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Lchf Diabetes Type 1

Type 1 Diabetes And Low Carb

Type 1 Diabetes And Low Carb

I met a guy called Ralph Norris a few months ago. He is one of New Zealand’s more successful businessmen and corporate CEOs. He’s had roles as CEO of Air New Zealand, ASBank, and Commonwealth Bank Australia (CBA). He’s on the board of New Zealand’s biggest company Fonterra, and the Treasury board, and is fit and healthy looking. He’s a peak performer in every aspect of his life; even in his mid-sixties he still looks good and is sharper than anyone I know. Oh yeah, it’s Sir Ralph Norris too! I was showing him around our labs at AUT’s Millennium Institute where my research centre is. I was explaining the work we do with both athletes and the general public to try to understand and encourage them to burn fat as a primary fuel source and how we often achieved that through low carbohydrate high fat (LCHF) diets. We talked about resetting the metabolism, lowering insulin, and dealing with Type 2 diabetes. He immediately became engaged and explained how he had been working on his own diabetes (Type 1) for 20 years with a LCHF diet. He described his glucose control as “the best his specialist had ever seen”. This leads me to a question I am often asked about – are Type 1 diabetics safe to use a LCHF diet? I think the first thing to remember is that Type 1 diabetics have no insulin. As such, they cannot move glucose into the cells. Before synthetic insulin was invented, the disease was untreatable and sufferers would literally starve to death because fuel couldn’t move into the cells. Either that or ketoacidosis would get them. This is a dangerous condition where the body produces so many ketone bodies that you end up with life endangering acid blood. Either way it was bad news. Enter insulin. Now diabetics had the missing substance and could live a health Continue reading >>

See More Of Low Carb Experiences With A Type 1 Kid On Facebook

See More Of Low Carb Experiences With A Type 1 Kid On Facebook

The findings showed that the ketogenic diet without exercise was much more effective than the other groups at achieving weight loss, lowering body fat percentage and decreasing HbA1c (a long-term measure of blood glucose control). It is significant that even without exercise, the ketogenic diet trumped a standard diet in which people were exercising. The treatment has so far shown success in treating mice engineered to develop a form of diabetes similar to type 1 diabetes. Whilst many treatments have been successful in treating mice, no treatment has yet been developed that tackles type 1 diabetes in humans. Prof. Thomas' team have been recruiting patients from the Lady Cilento Children's Hospital for human trials and hope to start those trials in around two years' time. Continue reading >>

Ironman Triathlon On Lchf With Type 1 Diabetes

Ironman Triathlon On Lchf With Type 1 Diabetes

Introducing Lewis Civin. Lewis is a 38 year old Type 1 diabetic. He has a great story of what is possible doing Ironman triathlons on a LCHF diet. His persistence and learning experiences leading into and from the recent Auckland Ironman 70.3 on a low carb high fat diet tells us loads about human physiology and fat burning. Lewis story has some great insights about how both carbsand proteinaffect his blood sugar and insulin requirements. Lewis race data from the 70.3 event in Auckland. If you are a Type 1, or know a Type 1, then this will be really interesting. If you are an endurance athlete its interesting for seeing what is possible on fat burning alone. Before we begin properly, heres Lewis coach Stephen Farrell. Steve is a good friend of mine weve known each other 25 years since he and I were professional triathletes he always used to beat me. Hes now a professional triathlon coach and has been the Director of Triathlon NZs Olympic medal wining program in Beijing. While Lewis story is about conquering diabetes, the lesson for all of us is that thereisa solution to any barrier that gets in the way of our life goals. All it takes is persistence and the right support team. I hope you find his race report inspiring. For me, it was one of those golden coaching moments where someone smashes through the glass ceiling and finds a whole new world of exciting challenges. Seriously, Ive seen people win Olympic gold medals and not be as excited as Lewis was on Sunday. I caught up with him immediately after the race and he didnt stop talking for about 10 minutes! It was awesome!!! Hes already entered next years race! I have had diabetes since age 9.I have always been reasonably well controlled, HBA1c between 7 and 8. Healthy weight. I would have typically taken 22 units of lan Continue reading >>

Lchf To T1dm Children. Risks For Life. Pediatric Diabetics.

Lchf To T1dm Children. Risks For Life. Pediatric Diabetics.

Low carbohydrate diets for the management of type 1 diabetes have been popularised by social media. The promotion of a low carbohydrate diet in lay media is in contrast to published pediatric diabetes guidelines that endorse a balanced diet from a variety of foods for optimal growth and development in children with type 1 diabetes. This can be a source of conflict in clinical practice. We describe a series of 6 cases where adoption of a low carbohydrate diet in children impacted growth and cardiovascular risk factors with potential long-term sequelae. These cases support current clinical guidelines for children with diabetes that promote a diet where total energy intake is derived from balanced macronutrient sources. CASE REPORT Endocrine and metabolic consequences due to restrictive carbohydrate diets in children with type 1 diabetes: An illustrative case series From Pediatric Diabetes. 2017;1–9. wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/pedi 1 Nyhetsinfo www red DiabetologNytt 1 | INTRODUCTION Nutritional management is a core aspect of diabetes care. Interna-tional clinical guidelines on the management of type 1 diabetes univer-sally describe the requirement for a healthy diet based on a variety of nutritious foods. The International Society for Paediatric and Adoles-cent Diabetes (ISPAD)1 and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)2 Paediatric guidelines recommend that ~50%-55%, <35%, and 15%-20% of energy should be derived from carbohydrate, fat, and protein, respectively.1 with an individualized assessment required. At the same time, alternative diets such as low carbohydrate 30%-40% energy from carbohydrate) and very low carbohydrate diets (21-70 g/d)3 are promoted for the management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in various media forums in order to optimis Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Type 1 Diabetes: What I Eat

The Ketogenic Diet And Type 1 Diabetes: What I Eat

I recently began writing about the ketogenic diet and type 1 diabetes in an attempt to optimize my blood sugar in relationship to athletic performance. This podcast episode can provide some additional perspective about how I arrived at the ketogenic diet for type 1 diabetes. It started with a low-fat plant-based diet and I have recently changed my approach (dramatically) to a Ketogenic diet (low-carb, high-fat). The results have been remarkable and I feel like this dietary approach is a worthwhile consideration for anyone who is in a position to optimize their diabetes management–or who just wants better energy with no “crashes” throughout the day. In case my standpoint isn’t obvious, let me clarify, there is no should or shouldn’t implied in my writing about this or any other diet. Some people eat pizza. Some people drink diet soda. Some never consume either–or do but always feel guilty. Still others know the drawbacks and act in moderation and feel great about it. My goal is to inform those who are interested in trying something new or just knowing what else is out there–not to persuade those who are happy with an already satisfactory approach. I wrote an eBook compiling my experiments with the ketogenic diet and type 1 diabetes which you can check out here: In my last blog I focused on the comparative results between the two diets, and this blog will hopefully answer the one major question I got–‘what do you eat on a daily basis?’ Not all low-carb diets are Ketogenic, but the Ketogenic diet is low-carb. In the coming weeks I will be sharing more about how my transition to this diet came together as well as mistakes I made along the way. I will also probably put up a post along the lines of “What is a Ketogenic diet?” although that is lower pri Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Type 1 Diabetes

The Ketogenic Diet And Type 1 Diabetes

What is type 1 diabetes? How is it different than type 2? Type 2 diabetes is a condition where the body becomes resistant to insulin, forcing the pancreas to produce ever more insulin, and leading to a downward spiral of metabolic illness. It’s also called “Adult Onset Diabetes”, because the vast majority of people who develop it do so in adulthood, after years of eating a high-carb diet. Type 1 diabetes, also known as “Juvenile Diabetes”, is a disorder where the body’s immune system attacks the cells of the pancreas responsible for producing insulin. Only the pancreas can produce insulin, and insulin is the hormone primarily responsible for shuttling molecules out of the blood and into cells for energy or storage. That means, if the pancreas isn’t producing insulin, a person will starve to death from the inside. Their cells, literally, cannot get any food. They can eat and eat and eat, but there’s no mechanism to transport that food energy into the cells. That’s why they need regular insulin shots. On a regular-carb diet, those insulin shots might be several times per day. On a high-carb diet, those shots will be even more frequent. Type 1 diabetics must keep injecting themselves with insulin in order to deal with all the glucose in their blood stream. They have to keep insulin levels high, if they eat high carbs, because they have a high level of glucose to deal with. Being ketogenic means insulin levels don’t have to be high, because there isn’t a high level of glucose that needs to be shuttled around. And, because there isn’t a big requirement for insulin, the type 1 diabetic can reduce the amount of insulin needed on a daily basis (many reduce this requirement by 80%). The important thing to remember is that someone suffering from type 1 dia Continue reading >>

Lchf Success Stories From Type 1's

Lchf Success Stories From Type 1's

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I created this thread as a place for fellow type 1 diabetics to share their success stories on the LCHF diet. I know there is a similar thread on the low carb forum but I found that most of the responses were from type 2's, so I thought it'd be nice to have a specific place for us to share experiences and hopefully inspire and learn from each other! Hi bellabella - I have been doing LCHF for a year and my BGs mostly meander in the rage between 4-8 mmol/l and I am using less insulin. Last HbA1c was 5.6 so I'm happy. I started low carbing proper last year, though my diet has never been high in carbs as carb control was the advice given to me at diagnosis. Plus from childhood I've been a veggie which limited the carbs anyway on a mainly vegetable diet. I did eat bread in small amounts, ditto potatoes but disregarded " hidden" carbs, and it's those I cracked down on. My current carb intake is 30 g per day, and never above 50g. No hardship whatsoever My insulin use is way down and my last A1c was 43 . Overall, my control is a lot better . Seriously_Sax1989 Type 1 Well-Known Member Thanks for putting this up! I posted recently about trying out the low carb to get better control over my BG and I've bought myself a low carb cookery book which I plan to put into effect next week! Will keep an eye on this thread to see what everyone had to say I've been low carbing almost since diagnosis. I was fortunate enough to be recommended the Diabetes solution by Dr. Bernstein within in days of my diagnosis and have followed it ever since. Low carbing certainly keeps my BS in check for the best results you also need a good exercise program. My last 1AC was 5 % , hoping t Continue reading >>

Lchf & Type 1 Diabetes

Lchf & Type 1 Diabetes

As we have discussed, a real food based, lower carbohydrate, higher fat (LCHF) approach should be the first line of treatment for Type II Diabetes (T2D) (catch up on the research here ), but what about Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)? We explore the facts and set the record straight on the management of T1D and LCHF. T1D is an auto-immune condition in which the immune system is activated to destroy the cells in the pancreas which produce insulin1. The onset begins when the pancreas stops producing insulin, which means that the bodys cells can no longer turn glucose (i.e. sugar) into energy. Without insulin, fat stores are turned to for fuel and a life-threatening state of ketoacidosis will occur. (It is important to distinguish ketoacidosis from controlled, nutritional ketosis and you can learn about the difference here 2). While we know T2D in largely a lifestyle disease with strong connections to poor dietary intake and obesity, the cause of type 1 is not yet known, but hereditary in nature. T1D more commonly affects children who are quite lean. It is lifelong condition with no known cure, although in Australia the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation in on a mission to find one (find out more here and here ). T1D needs to be managed with either insulin injections several times a day and/or the use of an insulin pump1. From the outset, T1D and T2D appear to be completely opposite diseases T1D is a disease of too little insulin and T2D is a disease of too much insulin. Due to the insulin lowering benefits of LCHF, the prescription of LCHF for T2D patients makes logical sense, but how does lowering insulin in the case of too little insulin (in the case of T1D) stand to reason? Type 1 diabetics must continuously calculate their insulin requirements, both in the form of a basal d Continue reading >>

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

I spend a great deal of time in my clinic dealing with the problems of type 2 diabetes. But occasionally, people ask about type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well. The reason why it is so rare for me is that I treat adult patients where T2D outnumbers T1D by at least 9:1. I was looking at a fascinating study that my friend, Ivor Cummins (The Fat Emperor) had alerted me to a few months ago. Dr. Richard Bernstein is a fascinating character. He had developed T1D as a child of twelve and began to have complications by his 30s. He eventually went to medical school in order to learn better how to treat his own disease. Eventually he decided that the proper treatment was a low carb diet. This was in direct contradiction to the prevailing wisdom of the time (1990s), which included treating patients with insulin and a diet high in carbs. Dr. Bernstein opened up a controversial clinic to treat T1D with a low carb diet and also wrote several best selling books discussing the same topic. Over the years, it has proven to be a safe treatment for T1D. While there are few long-term studies, Dr. Bernstein himself is living proof of the low carb T1D paradigm. In many ways, T1D and T2D are exact opposites of each other. T1D typically affects children who are usually quite skinny. T2D typically affects adults who are usually quite obese. This is not absolute, and we are seeing much more T2D in children as their weights have increased. There are also cases of normal or even underweight patients with T2D. But in general, that is the case. T1D is the severe deficiency of insulin where as T2D is the severe excess of insulin. Nevertheless, people often treat both types of diabetes in the same manner. Both are treated with medications or insulin to keep blood glucose in acceptable levels. Wait, you might Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Lchf – A Great Combination

Type 1 Diabetes And Lchf – A Great Combination

Is an LCHF diet really a great option for type 1 diabetes? What do people with a lot of experience say? We were just on the most spectacular trip of the year, the low-carb cruise in the Caribbean. We invited our participating moderators to write guest posts here on the blog. Here’s travel report number three, with important information on type 1 diabetes from our moderator Fredrik Söderlund: Guest post by Fredrik Söderlund Type 1 diabetes and LCHF – a great combination On the cruise I was inspired by both presenters and guests to write a few paragraphs about LCHF and type 1 diabetes. There’s still a fairly common misconception that type 1 diabetics won’t benefit from LCHF or that it may even be dangerous. One of the presenters was nephrologist Dr. Keith Runyan who himself has lived with type 1 diabetes for 17 years and switched to LCHF three years ago. Today he eats a ketogenic LCHF diet, or LCHFKD. Among the conference participants were several type 1 diabetics who advocate LCHF; one of them was Hanna Boëthius. She has had the disease for 30 years, since she was 2 years old, and switched to LCHF four years ago. Hanna was convinced of the benefits of the diet when she studied to become a nutrition counselor and now has her own business to help other diabetics worldwide (www.hannaboethius.com.) Hanna eats a ketogenic LCHF diet with 20–30 g carbohydrates daily and, like Dr. Runyan, she points out the many benefits of the diet that are beneficial for type 1 diabetics. I’m compiling some of the benefits that they both put forward on the cruise, but first some background knowledge. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that we don’t know how to prevent. The pancreas produces no, or very little, insulin. Insulin is needed to transport gluco Continue reading >>

Lchf And Diabetes

Lchf And Diabetes

Can a Low Carb, High Fat diet be used to manage Diabetes Type-1 or Type-2? Yes! We believe this is far and above the best way to manage diabetes and there is growing interest in returning to carbohydrate restricted diets as a tool in managing diabetes complications long term. If you have Type-1 or Type-2 Diabetes it is important to understand that decreasing your consumption of carbohydrates that raise your blood sugar will decrease your need for insulin and other medication used to lower blood sugars. Taking the same dose of insulin or medication as you did prior to adopting a Low Carb, High Fat diet may result in hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar). If you have Type-1 or Type-2 Diabetes get the approval and supervision of a medical professional before commencing a Low Carb, High Fat diet. A well-formulated Low Carb, High Fat diet can help Type-1 and Type-2 Diabetics achieve long term normalised blood sugar levels. For more resources on LCHF and Diabetes we recommend the works of Dr Richard Bernstein and Dr Jason Fung as well as the videos from Dr. Troy Stapleton, Lisa Scherger and Dr. Wendy Pogozelski below. My Story: Managing Type-1 Diabetes with LCHF “Hi, my name is Fiona and I’m a Type-1 diabetic. I have had diabetes for 23 years. I use an insulin pump to manage my diabetes and had always followed the standard Australian dietary guidelines. I ate whatever I wanted and just gave myself enough insulin to cover the amount of carbohydrates I was eating. After having my two children I had put on a significant amount of weight and it kept creeping up. I needed to change something in my life and it began with the discovery of David Gillespie’s book ‘Sweet Poison’. I read the book and it all just made sense. I quit sugar and found that my blood sugar levels began to Continue reading >>

Diabetic Type 1, Anyone Tried A Lchf Diet, Or Know Someone Who Has?

Diabetic Type 1, Anyone Tried A Lchf Diet, Or Know Someone Who Has?

Hi, this is maybe not the obvious place for this question, but you never know with STW. Ive been living with type 1 diabetes for over 20 years now, and have recently started using a pump and the free style libre patch. (all for free in france since june) however, the more I read around the subject it seems that the assembled/collected wisdom and treatment methods might be wrong. So to make this short Im just wondering if theres anyone out there who has tried a low carb high fat diet with type 1, and if so, how has it worked out? obviously there will be a period of adjustment, hopefully reducing insulin intake, but keeping a reasonable average glucose level. I plan to talk to my endocrinologue at the end of the month about this, but would welcome any real world experiences from the collected wisdom of STW. I have a mate who has T1, he had a Facebook group to discuss such issues. Think it was called cyclists with diabetes or something. I know he had trialled some stuff pump/patches etc. however, the more I read around the subject it seems that the assembled/collected wisdom and treatment methods might be wrong. Be aware that there is a LOT of Big Pharma knows the cure but wont give it to us bollocks in collected wisdom. Often from people who can sell you this secret all-natural cure for just $40 Is there a fundamental issue youre trying to address, e.g. lowering your HbA1c? My wife is T1, follows DAFNE and has been using Freestyle Libre recently. I attended part of the DAFNE course to learn the fundamentals. If youre doing DAFNE then you take an amount of insulin relative to carb intake. My thoughts are if youre eating really small amounts of carbs then setting the fast acting insulin dose might become trickier. Youll still need some insulin. We religiously weigh out car Continue reading >>

My Child’s Low-carb Diet For Type 1 Diabetes

My Child’s Low-carb Diet For Type 1 Diabetes

“We avoid grains, gluten, starches, sugar and fruit,” explains Mia Nickels, mom to 7 year-old Holden who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes almost a year ago. “I sweeten with Stevia or Swerve. He is non-celiac gluten intolerant. We can always tell when he has gotten into some hidden gluten, because he will have a huge unexplained spike, his stomach will hurt, and within 24 hours he will develop a rash around his mouth and on his cheeks.” For beverages, she says, “He usually drinks water with all meals — sometimes with Stur added (a zero-calorie flavor product). Occasionally he’ll have Zevia soda. I sneak protein powder into a lot of things, too. Shhh…don’t tell!” One major aspect of Holden’s success in his low-carb diet is his mom’s passionate effort in baking him gluten-free (GF) and low-carb (LC) treats based on various recipes, many of which she posts to her Facebook page (and his favorite donut recipe included below). You can find many of Mia’s recipes with each photo on her Facebook page. Holden’s Low-Carb Diet: Breakfast: 2 eggs fried in coconut oil, bacon with melted cheese, and half a LC bagel with Kerrygold butter or almond flour waffle sticks with butter and Waldon Farms syrup, and bacon with melted cheese. Snack: Cheese, LC/GF brownie, or LC chocolate meringues Lunch: Lunchmeat rolls (ham, turkey and chive cream cheese) or GF meatballs in LC tomato sauce, LC/GF bagel sandwich (piled up with lunchmeat, cheese and mustard), LC chicken wings, Mexican chicken soup accompanied with a celery, raw broccoli, and nuts. I usually send a LC baked treat or two pieces of Chocorite, too. Snack: A few of his daily snack options include nuts, cheese, HWC hot chocolate, TrueLemon Jello, Nori/Ham wraps, raw veggies with guacamole dip, or a baked tre Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And The Banting Diet

Type 1 Diabetes And The Banting Diet

Type 1 Diabetes and the Banting Diet On this episode of The Ask Prof Noakes Podcast we chat to Prof. Tim Noakes on the issue of whether or not the Banting Diet is suitable for someone who is a type 1 diabetic and find out about risks or precautions when following the Banting Diet. On this episode we look at whether or not the Banting Diet is suitable for someone who is a type 1 diabetic. Lucy got in touch and she wanted to know if following the LCHF or Banting Diet would be beneficial for a type 1 diabetic and would there be any risks involved or any precautions that a type 1 diabetic would need to take when following the Banting diet? Prof. Tim Noakes: Type 1 diabetics can be insulin resistant, or they can be insulin sensitive. That is the only difference. Therefore the insulin may work very well in them because their cells are insulin sensitive. But if they are insulin resistant as well as being type 1 diabetic, they are not secreting enough insulin – they obviously need to inject more insulin. The more insulin resistant they are, the fatter they will become with injecting insulin. We generally don’t want diabetics to inject too much insulin because it will cause obesity and other problems if you are insulin resistant. Cutting the carbohydrates is very healthy because it reduces the excess glucose production in the liver which all diabetics have, whether you’re type 1 or type 2. Following the a LCHF of Banting diet when you’re a type 1 diabetic is very effective. All the clinical trials show that diabetics should not have more than 25 grams of carbohydrate a day if they want to regulate their glucose effectively. There is one other really important point, that if you are injecting insulin – there is always a 10% error on the calculation. A diabetic will for Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Certainly a low carb approach doesn’t work with Type 1’s, right? What about the dangerous risks of hypoglycemia? Actually, this thinking is repeated over and over. Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, those using a low carbohydrate high healthy fat (LCHF) approach have much more stable blood sugars, some nearly eliminating hypoglycemic episodes altogether. It really makes perfect sense. Why this reasoning is shunned, defies logic. Think about it…less (fast acting, blood-sugar-spiking) carbs, less insulin, less hypos. Before we go further in this post, I’d like you to read this powerfully compelling account of Dr. Keith Runyan, MD, a Nephrologist, who is a Type 1, and who successfully uses a carb restricted approach to manage his diabetes. Please read his story (link below). There is no way I could do this story justice in fewer words. The entire article is needed to understand its full impact. Afterwards, I would recommend his accompanying video. Nutritional Ketosis vs Diabetic Ketoacidosis Much of the backlash from mainstream beliefs regarding the use of carb restriction with Type 1’s stems from the lack of understanding about the difference between nutritional ketosis and diabetic ketoacidosis. I’m going to quote directly from Diabetes Daily Website. Here is the content of their article entitled “Why DKA and Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same”…(read the full article HERE) “There’s a very common misconception and general misunderstanding around ketones. Specifically, the misunderstanding lie in the areas of: ketones that are produced in low-carb diets of generally less than 50g of carbs per day, which is low enough to put a person into a state of “nutritional ketosis.” ketones that are produced when a diabetic is in a state of Continue reading >>

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