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Lantus Solostar Side Effects Weight Loss

Counseling Patients On How To Avoid Weight Gain From Insulin

Counseling Patients On How To Avoid Weight Gain From Insulin

A lot of people with type 2 diabetes delay going on insulin for as long as possible because they’ve heard horror stories about how much weight it can make them gain (or maybe they just don’t like shots), but people with type 1 don’t have a choice. While it is true that insulin treatment is often associated with weight gain and more frequent bouts of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), the real question is, why? Some theories to explain insulin-induced weight gain are that when using insulin, your blood sugar is (usually) better controlled and you stop losing some of your calories (as glucose in your urine when your blood sugars exceed your urinary threshold) and that you may gain weight from having to eat extra to treat any low blood sugars caused by insulin. If you’re taking oral medications to lower your blood sugar and they are not working, however, insulin may be your main option for better control. A few research studies have looked at whether weight gain is simply a result of eating more when you’re on insulin. One such study found that weight gain was not due to an increase in food intake, but rather that your body may increase its efficiency in using glucose and other fuels when your glycemic control improves — making you store more available energy from the foods you eat as fat (even if you’re eating the same amount as before you went on insulin) (1). So, what can you do to avoid weight gain if you have to take insulin? First of all, you should try to keep your insulin doses as low as possible because the more insulin you take, the greater your potential for weight gain is. The best way to keep your insulin needs in check is to engage in regular physical activity. By way of example, some people with type 2 diabetes who were studied gained weight from Continue reading >>

What Is Long-acting Insulin?

What Is Long-acting Insulin?

Long-acting insulins are insulin analogs that are steadily released and can last in the body for up to 24 hours. It is often used in the morning or at bedtime as a basal insulin to help control your blood sugar throughout the day. Insulin is made inside the beta cells of the pancreas. It helps regulate the glucose (sugar) in the bloodstream by stimulating the cells to absorb the glucose, which is needed by the cells for energy. Insulin also keeps the liver from producing more glucose. In type 2 diabetes, the body can lose the ability to produce insulin and if insulin is produced, the body isn’t able to use it properly (insulin resistance). Different types of insulin therapies, such as long-acting insulin, enables the body to get the insulin that is needed for optimal glycemic control. Some of the long-acting insulins available in the US include: Levemir contains insulin detemir, which is a long-acting, basal insulin that is used to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes. It can help keep your blood sugar levels within a normal range by moving glucose from the bloodstream into the cells, and it prevents the liver from producing more glucose. Levemir is available in a vial and pre-filled pen called Levemir FlexTouch, each containing 100 units/ml (U-100) of insulin detemir. Once the pen is in use, it is good for 42 days and should not be refrigerated but stored at room temperature (below 86°F). The vial is also good for 42 days after first use, and can be stored in the refrigerator or at room temperature. Levemir is injected under the skin (subcutaneously) in the abdomen, thigh or upper arm once daily, or twice daily depending on your personal requirements. Injection sites should be rotated within the same region from one injection to the next to red Continue reading >>

The Lantus Solostar Side Effects

The Lantus Solostar Side Effects

Lantus Solostar side effectsmay cause serious health issues. Lantus is insulin glargine product made for people with diabetes. Insulin is a natural substance that allows the body to use sugar in your daily diet. This medicine replaces your bodys insulin that is no longer produced, so it can lower your blood sugar which certainly can prevent you from the possibility of kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, and loss of limbs. Controlling blood sugar levels can also help prevent sexual function problems. Proper diabetes control can also reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke. Lantus is a drug commonly used with proper dietary patterns and physical exercise programs to control blood sugar levels. This drug is intended for patients with type 1 diabetes (insulin dependence) and type 2 diabetes patients. This drug is a man made remedy that looks similar to human insulin. And this drug works faster and does not last as long as ordinary insulin. Do not inject this medicine cold because it will hurt. The place to put this medicine should be located or stored at room temperature (see the storage rules). Wash your hands before measuring and injecting this medicine. Before treatment, check your product to see if there is any foreign substance or discoloration. If any of these are present, do not use this medicine. This drug should be clear and colorless. To avoid drug damage, do not shake the storage bottle of this drug. The dose of this drug can be determined based on your health condition and the bodys response to treatment. Prevent the dose with caution as a slight dose change can affect your blood sugar levels. If you use a cartridge or other device in drug injection, place the screen pointer upwards so that you can see clearly, if you point the screen down, you may be m Continue reading >>

Taking Lantus®, Taking Action: Watch Real Success Stories

Taking Lantus®, Taking Action: Watch Real Success Stories

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Lantus: Side Effects, Ratings, And Patient Comments

Lantus: Side Effects, Ratings, And Patient Comments

occasional fits of excessive hunger - have been prepared for this by doctor and dieticians and have a course of action planned out; have used for about 5 years; have lost about 60 lbs and then have stayed at weight; Frustrated at times with quality control of pens - some jam; others appear not to be at the same solution level - and so make sure I have back up pens ready to warm up. I have worked with dieticians to remove everything from my house that I should not eat - I know when I've comforted myself with food during stress and when not to blame the Lantus. started at 12 units x 3 days went to 13units x3 days. Stopped taking on third 13 unit day(Supposed to increase to 14units) Blood sugar persistently went up. Before taking was in 2 to 300 range when I stopped it was over 600. Sr and team still insist that plants can't increase blood sugar because it is insulin. I will not take any more. Went back to Actos. Sill having spikes over 600. I have stage 4 kidney failure and am having great difficulty finding high protein food not full of salt. Any suggestions on a good drug to use? Easily go hypoglyemic if too active, severe joint pain all over body, itching, swollen stomach & weight gain, tingling in hands and crawling sensation on skin, regular nausea and headaches,bouts of severe shakes as if I'm hypoglycemic, but #'s are normal, Severe fatigue, occasional bouts of Vertigo so severe that cannot drive a car and must lean against walls to walk around at home. I've been on it for approx. 4 years and currently injecting 80 units @ bedtime -- Do not know what I am going to about all this, but now realize from this blog that it is all related to the Lantus LA. I have days when the joint pain is so sever I can barely walk or put on or take off my jacket. I have experienced e Continue reading >>

Lantus Solostar Side Effects

Lantus Solostar Side Effects

Depression of the skin at the injection site itching, pain, redness, or swelling at the injection site Applies to insulin glargine: subcutaneous solution Adverse reactions associated with insulin glargine (the active ingredient contained in Lantus Solostar) include hypoglycemia , allergic reactions , injection site reactions, lipodystrophy, pruritus , rash, edema , and weight gain.[ Ref ] The ORIGIN (Outcome Reduction with Initial Glargine Intervention) trial, an open-labeled, randomized study comparing insulin glargine (the active ingredient contained in Lantus Solostar) to standard care in persons 50 years or older with abnormal glucose levels ( impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance ) or early type 2 diabetes mellitus and established cardiovascular (CV) disease or CV risk factors, found over the course of the 6 year study, severe hypoglycemia occurred in 5.7% of patients receiving insulin glargine compared to 1.9% in the standard care group. The median HbA1c values in the insulin glargine group ranged from 5.9% to 6.4% while the HbA1c values in the standard care group ranged from 6.2% to 6.6%. The incidence for all hypoglycemia was 58% and 26% in the insulin glargine and standard groups, respectively. Weight gain has been reported with insulin therapy and has been attributed to the anabolic effects of insulin and the decrease in glucosuria. In the ORIGIN trial, the median change in body weight from baseline to the last treatment visit was 2.2 kg greater in the insulin glargine group (+1.4 kg vs -0.8 kg).[ Ref ] Frequency not reported: Weight gain[ Ref ] Injection site reactions include redness, pain, itching, hives, swelling, or inflammation. In some cases, these reactions may be caused by other factors, such as irritants in skin cleansing agents Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medications And Weight Gain

Diabetes Medications And Weight Gain

Both people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes usually gain weight when they begin therapy, either insulin or some type 2 diabetes medications. For many people with type 1, weight gain is advisable due to the loss of lean body mass often accompanying the disease prior to diagnosis and treatment. However, for people with type 2, and increasingly people with type 1 who were overweight or obese before their diagnosis, seeing the numbers on the scale rise is counterproductive. Increasing weight leads to more insulin resistance, which in addition to making diabetes harder to control, escalates cardiovascular risk. There are a variety of reasons weight gain occurs when people start insulin. Some people with type 2 were in poor glycemic control prior to beginning insulin. These folks were seeing the energy from the food they ate end up in their urine stream instead of being stored as fat. As their control improves with insulin, the lost energy finds its way into the fat cells. Treatment for hypoglycemia, if it happens frequently, can also be a source of added pounds when insulin is initiated. Additionally, since an exact replacement for physiological insulin secretion is almost impossible to duplicate, patients may often be taking slightly more insulin than needed over a 24-hour period. Normal circadian rhythm for insulin secretion surges from 4 am to about 7 am then drops, increases a bit around dinner time through 10 pm and declines to its lowest level until the early morning hours. Injected insulin is unable to mirror this profile. Finally, injected insulin follows a slightly different pathway to the cells from insulin that comes from our bodies. Insulin from our bodies is directed first to the liver but insulin that is injected travels first through the blood circulation wher Continue reading >>

Insulin And Weight Gain: Keep The Pounds Off

Insulin And Weight Gain: Keep The Pounds Off

Insulin and weight gain often go hand in hand, but weight control is possible. If you need insulin therapy, here's how to minimize — or avoid — weight gain. Weight gain is a common side effect for people who take insulin — a hormone that regulates the absorption of sugar (glucose) by cells. This can be frustrating because maintaining a healthy weight is an important part of your overall diabetes management plan. The good news is that it is possible to maintain your weight while taking insulin. The link between insulin and weight gain When you take insulin, glucose is able to enter your cells, and glucose levels in your blood drop. This is the desired treatment goal. But if you take in more calories than you need to maintain a healthy weight — given your level of activity — your cells will get more glucose than they need. Glucose that your cells don't use accumulates as fat. Avoid weight gain while taking insulin Eating healthy foods and being physically active most days of the week can help you prevent unwanted weight gain. The following tips can help you keep the pounds off: Count calories. Eating and drinking fewer calories helps you prevent weight gain. Stock the refrigerator and pantry with fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Plan for every meal to have the right mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins, and fats. Generally, experts recommend that meals consist of half non starchy vegetable, one-quarter protein and one quarter a starch such as rice or a starchy vegetable such as corn or peas. Trim your portion sizes, skip second helpings and drink water instead of high-calorie drinks. Talk to your doctor, nurse or a dietitian about meal-planning strategies and resources. Don't skip meals. Don't try to cut calories by skipping meals. When you skip Continue reading >>

Can Lantus Solostar Cause Weight Gain?

Can Lantus Solostar Cause Weight Gain?

Lamisil vs Lotrimin Mucinex vs Sudafed Lactogen 1 Side Effects Evekeo vs Adderall Dexilant and Alcohol Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

Toujeo (insulin Glargine) Solostar Pen Dosing, Side Effects, Cost, And Prescribing Information For Diabetes Treatment | Jessica Pourtaverdi, Pharmd | Rxeconsult

Toujeo (insulin Glargine) Solostar Pen Dosing, Side Effects, Cost, And Prescribing Information For Diabetes Treatment | Jessica Pourtaverdi, Pharmd | Rxeconsult

by Jessica Pourtaverdi, PharmD - April 6, 2016 | Views: 24772 | Likes: 0 | Comment: 0 Side effects of Toujeo are similar to side effects of other insulins and include: Severe hypoglycemia is the most common side effect observed in diabetes patients. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include blurry vision, rapid heartbeat, pale skin, headache, fatigue, tremor, and hunger. Allergic reactions such as redness, rash, itching, inflammation, pain, and urticaria. Lipodystrophy, which is an abnormal deposit of fat tissue that happens at the site of injection from long-term use of insulin. Taking Toujeo with thiazolidinediones (TZDs) may cause heart failure. What is the dosing of Toujeo and how is it administered? Toujeo is available as a SoloStar disposable prefilled pen. The solution in the 1.5 mL pen contains 300 units/mL of insulin glargine (450 units/1.5 mL). Toujeo should not be administered intravenously, intramuscularly, or via insulin pump due to severe hypoglycemia. It can only be administered subcutaneously into the abdomen, thigh, or deltoid.Patients should rotate injections sites to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy. Only use Toujeo if the solution is clear and colorless. Dosing is based on the patient's blood glucose control goals and the dose is adjusted according to response. Doses should be titrated every 3 to 4 days to minimize the risk of hypoglycemia. The maximum glucose effect of a dose of Toujeo may not occurfor five days. Therefore, the first Toujeo dose may not adequately cover metabolic needs in the first 24 hours of use. The recommended Toujeo dose for insulin naive patients is one-third to one-half of the total daily insulin dose once daily. The recommended starting Toujeo dose for insulin naive patients is0.2 units/kg of body weight once daily. The starting dos Continue reading >>

What You Can Expect From Lantus® Insulin

What You Can Expect From Lantus® Insulin

For starters, Lantus® may give you improved blood sugar management. When you add Lantus® to your diabetes treatment plan, which can include other diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise,* you may improve your blood sugar management, helping you move towards your target blood sugar and A1C goals. *Caffeine, alcohol, medication, medication interactions, stress, lack of sleep, jetlag, allergies, illness, smoking, menstruation, altitude, as well as injection site issues including scar tissue or lipodystrophy can all affect glucose levels. Why Lantus® (insulin glargine injection) 100 Units/mL May Be the Right Choice for You Improved blood sugar management. Lantus® has been shown to lower A1C as part of an overall diabetes treatment plan, which includes diet, exercise, and other diabetes medicines. Once-a-day. One dose of Lantus® at the same time each day works all day and all night. Dial-in Dosing. With the Lantus® SoloSTAR® pen, you get the dose you dial every time, plus push-button administration. Risks of Insulin The most common side effect of insulin, including Lantus®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life-threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include swelling, weight gain, injection site reactions, and allergic reactions. In rare cases, some allergic reactions may be life-threatening. Other people may not experience symptoms of hypoglycemia. It is, therefore, important to monitor your blood sugar levels regularly. See Prescribing Information for complete details. Discuss this with your doctor and find out more about the benefits and risks associated with Continue reading >>

Should I Switch Insulin To Lose Weight?

Should I Switch Insulin To Lose Weight?

Have any studies been done, other than by Novo Nordisk, to prove that taking Levemir causes little if no weight gain? I have gained a lot of weight taking Lantus, and I don't know if it would be better to switch to Levemir. Lee Safian, New Milford, New Jersey Roger P. Austin, MS, RPh, CDE, responds: Insulin detemir (Levemir) and insulin glargine (Lantus) are both basal insulins. There have been a number of published studies comparing insulin detemir with other diabetes treatments. These studies were primarily funded by Novo Nordisk, the manufacturer of insulin detemir. Studies in patients with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes have shown a slight weight loss or slightly less weight gain in patients on Levemir when compared to other treatment options. However, these differences were small, and whether or not some insulins are worse offenders in causing weight gain is unknown due to lack of quality data. You may find it useful to discuss a change of insulins with your physician to see what happens in your case; however, in most cases, a significant lowering of A1C will likely result in some weight gain. Weight gain with insulin use is not necessarily inevitable. The science of developing newer insulins over time has been directed at trying to better mimic the action of naturally produced insulin in the pancreas. The fewer insulin injections given per day, the less the insulin's performance will be similar to that of naturally produced insulin in the body. Understanding appropriate blood glucose targets before and after meals, as well as frequent and regular monitoring of blood glucose, is essential to successful individualization of insulin dosing and weight management. Minimizing weight gain also requires a good understanding of carb counting, practice of portion control, Continue reading >>

Important Safety Information For Soliqua® 100/33 (insulin Glargine & Lixisenatide Injection) 100 Units/ml & 33 Mcg/ml

Important Safety Information For Soliqua® 100/33 (insulin Glargine & Lixisenatide Injection) 100 Units/ml & 33 Mcg/ml

What is the most important information I should know about SOLIQUA 100/33? Do not share your SOLIQUA 100/33 pen with other people, even if the needle has been changed. SOLIQUA 100/33 can cause serious side effects, including inflammation of the pancreas, which may be life-threatening. Before using SOLIQUA 100/33, tell your doctor if you have had pancreatitis, stones in your gallbladder, or a history of alcoholism. These medical problems may make you more likely to get pancreatitis. Stop taking SOLIQUA 100/33 and call your healthcare provider right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe, and will not go away. The pain may be felt in the back area. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. Who should not use SOLIQUA 100/33? Do not use SOLIQUA 100/33 if you are having an episode of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin glargine, lixisenatide, or any of the ingredients in SOLIQUA 100/33. Tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you: have or have had problems with your pancreas, your kidneys, or your liver, stones in your gallbladder, or a history of alcoholism. have heart failure or other heart problems. If you have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs (thiazolidinediones). have severe problems with your stomach, such as slowed emptying of your stomach or problems digesting food. are pregnant or breastfeeding or plan to become pregnant or to breastfeed. It is not known if SOLIQUA 100/33 will harm your unborn baby or pass into your breast milk. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including all prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. SOLIQUA 100/33 may affect the way some medicines work. Before using SOLIQUA 100/33 Continue reading >>

Insuln & Weight Gain

Insuln & Weight Gain

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have been insulin dependant for 47 years and always overweight. Over the last 2 years have managed to lose 4 stone and still wanting to lose another 2 (sorry still in old weight measures) but have now started to gain weight even though I am eating the same as I did when loosing it. Exercise has increased and BMI levels down to lowest ever. In my opinion my weight loss slowed and I started to gain when Monotard & Actrapid stopped being available and I then had a short time withHumalog 25. Due to control going from 6 to 8.4 I was advised to go onto 4 a day and in February this year was put on Novorapid and Levemir. Pre meal dosage amounts of Novorapid vary from 10 - 16 depending on severity of early morning hypos but the Levemir stays at 50 units per evening. Are these insulins helping to prevent weight loss :?: Are there other insulins which can maintain my control and be more condusive to helping with weight loss. :?: don't know if this helps, but I have had problems losing weight over past few years-bit overweight too. I was on Lantus, a long-acting insulin analogue like Levemir, for nearly 4 years, and throughout this time was unable to lose weight. I felt constantly hungry and had really lousy, unpredictable BS control from one day to the next,felt like shxxx and suffered indescribable exhaustion and other horrible side effects. I moved onto Hypurin Pork Isophane in May this year,and continued with my Humalog. Since then my Humalog works really well, and doesnt do anything unexpected. I believe Lantus was the problem, and the change has proved that. I like the action of Humalog, and I only need bout 3 units to cover a meal, and I split my Isophan Continue reading >>

How To Manage Weight Gain While On Insulin

How To Manage Weight Gain While On Insulin

Weight gain is a normal side effect of taking insulin. Insulin helps you manage your body sugar by assisting your cells in absorbing glucose (sugar). Without insulin, the cells of your body are unable to use sugar for energy. You’ll eliminate the extra glucose in your bloodstream through your urine or have it stay in the blood, causing high blood sugar levels. You may experience weight loss before you start insulin therapy. The loss of sugar in your urine takes water with it, so some of this weight loss is due to water loss. Also, unmanaged diabetes can make you extra hungry. This can lead to eating an increased amount of food even when you start insulin therapy. And when you start insulin therapy and begin getting your blood sugar under control, the glucose in your body is absorbed and stored. This causes weight gain if the amount you eat is more than you need for the day. It’s important not to cut back on your insulin, even if you gain weight. You may lose weight again when you’re off insulin, but you’re then risking complications. Once you start treatment again, the weight will come back. This can lead to an unhealthy weight loss pattern and long-term complications such as heart diseases or kidney damage. Insulin is the best way to lower your blood glucose and manage your diabetes. The good news is that you can manage your weight while taking insulin. It may mean changing your eating habits and being more physically active, but this can help you avoid weight gain. Learn what steps you can take to manage your weight. Your healthcare team has a wealth of information, experience, and practical tips for navigating these waters. They can help you make a plan for weight loss and for maintaining a healthy weight. This important team may include one or more of the fo Continue reading >>

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