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Lantus And Weight Gain

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Interactive Dosing Calculator

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Weight Beneficial Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

Weight Beneficial Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

Weight Beneficial Treatments for Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes Research Institute (L.F.M.), University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida 33136 Address all correspondence and requests for reprints to: Luigi F. Meneghini, M.D., MBA, Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1450 N.W. 10th Avenue, Miami, Florida 33136. Search for other works by this author on: Cathedra of Family Medicine (D.O.-B.), Clinical Medicine Department, University Miguel Hernandez, 03550 San Juan de Alicante, Spain Search for other works by this author on: Department of Health Sciences (K.K.), University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, United Kingdom Search for other works by this author on: Servizio di Diabetologia (S.C.), Policlinico Gemelli, Universit Cattolica, 00168 Rome, Italy Search for other works by this author on: Istanbul University (T.D.), Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, 34378 Istanbul, Turkey Search for other works by this author on: Center for Diabetes and Metabolism (A.L.), 83670 Fachklinik Bad Heilbrunn, Germany Search for other works by this author on: University of Calgary (S.R.), Alberta, Canada AB T2N 1N4 Search for other works by this author on: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 96, Issue 11, 1 November 2011, Pages 33373353, L. F. Meneghini, D. Orozco-Beltran, K. Khunti, S. Caputo, T. Dami, A. Liebl, S. A. Ross; Weight Beneficial Treatments for Type 2 Diabetes, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 96, Issue 11, 1 November 2011, Pages 33373353, The close link between type 2 diabetes and excess body weight highlights the need to consider the weight effects of different treatment regimens. We examine the impact of weight-friendly type 2 d Continue reading >>

12 Myths About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

12 Myths About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin facts vs. fiction When you hear the word “insulin,” do you picture giant needles (ouch!) or pop culture portrayals of insulin users with low blood sugar (like Julia Roberts losing it in Steel Magnolias)? Either way, most people think of insulin as a difficult, painful, or potentially scary medical treatment. The problem is that if you have type 2 diabetes, you need to know the real deal before you can make an informed choice about whether or not this potentially lifesaving therapy is right for you. Here, we take a look at the facts and fiction about insulin when it comes to treating type 2 diabetes. Diabetics always need insulin Not necessarily. People with type 1 diabetes (about 5% to 10% of diabetics) do need insulin. If you have type 2, which includes 90% to 95% of all people with diabetes, you may not need insulin. Of adults with diabetes, only 14% use insulin, 13% use insulin and oral medication, 57% take oral medication only, and 16% control blood sugar with diet and exercise alone, according to the CDC. The point is to get blood sugar—which can be a highly toxic poison in the body—into the safe zone by any means necessary. Taking insulin means you’ve ‘failed’ “This is a big myth,” says Jill Crandall, MD, professor of clinical medicine and director of the diabetes clinical trial unit at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in the Bronx, N.Y. “Many people who try very hard to adhere to a diet, exercise, and lose weight will still need insulin.” The fact is that type 2 diabetes is a progressive illness, meaning that over time you may need to change what you do to make sure your blood sugar is in a healthy range. Eating right and exercise will always be important, but medication needs can vary. “A large percentage of people with ty Continue reading >>

Selected Important Safety Information

Selected Important Safety Information

Contraindications Levemir® is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to Levemir® or any of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Never Share a Levemir® FlexTouch® Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Dosage adjustment and monitoring: Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Insulin regimens should be modified cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment of concomitant anti-diabetic treatment. Administration: Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin or solution. Do not administer subcutaneously via an insulin pump, intramuscularly, or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Selected Important Safety Information Contraindications NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill®Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Levemir® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) Indications and Usage Levemir® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) is i Continue reading >>

High-alert Medications - Apidra (insulin Glulisine)

High-alert Medications - Apidra (insulin Glulisine)

The leaflets are FREELY available for download and can be reproduced for free distribution to consumers. Or, if you are a facility or organization, you can order professional pre-printed leaflets shipped directly to you. Extra care is needed because Apidra is a high-alert medicine. High-alert medicines have been proven to be safe and effective. But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake happens while taking them. This means that it is very important for you to know about this medicine and take it exactly as directed. Top 10 List of Safety Tips for Apidra When taking your medicine 1. Know your insulin. Apidra is a rapid-acting insulin that should be injected below the skin within 15 minutes before or 20 minutes after starting a meal. Have food ready before injection. After injecting the insulin, do not delay eating or skip a meal. 2. Prepare your insulin. Apidra can be mixed with insulin NPH (intermediate-acting insulin), but always draw Apidra into the syringe first and use immediately after preparing the mixture. Do not mix Apidra with other insulins if using an insulin pen or external pump. Do not vigorously shake insulin before use. 3. Don’t reuse or recycle. Dispose of used syringes/needles, pens, and lancets in a sealable hard plastic or metal container (e.g., empty detergent bottle or sharps container from your pharmacy). When the container is full, seal the lid before placing it in the trash. Do not reuse or recycle syringes/needles or lancets. 4. Don’t share. Even if you change the needle, sharing an insulin pen or syringe may spread diseases carried in the blood, including hepatitis and HIV. To avoid serious side effects 5. Avoid mix-ups. If you use more than one type of insulin, make sure each vial or pen looks different to avoid mix-ups. Fo Continue reading >>

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) or type 2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes. The most common side effects of Lantus is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Symptoms include: hunger, sweating, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Other common side effects of Lantus include pain, redness, swelling, itching, or thickening of the skin at the injection site. These side effects usually go away after a few days or weeks. Lantus should be administered subcutaneously (under the skin) once a day at the same time every day. Dose is determined by the individual and the desired blood glucose levels. Lantus may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, or beta-blockers. Many other medicines can increase or decrease the effects of insulin glargine on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Lantus. Discuss a plan to manage blood sugar with your doctor before becoming pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Insulin needs may change while breastfeeding. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding. Our Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Continue reading >>

Lann-study: Lantus, Amaryl, Novorapid, Novomix Study

Lann-study: Lantus, Amaryl, Novorapid, Novomix Study

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. LANN-study: Lantus, Amaryl, Novorapid, Novomix Study The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00151697 Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information Many diabetics gain weight while on insulin therapy. In this study, we evaluate the efficacy of the combination of glimepiride and short-acting insulin on weight control and glucose control. In this study, 150 diabetics whose diabetic control is inadequate while on maximal oral treatment will be randomized to either the new combination treatment or twice daily injections with a mixture of short- and longacting insulin or once-daily injection with a basal insulin analog. The study will compare glucose control and weight gain during a year after randomisation between the three treatments. Drug: Novomix 30 Drug: Novorapid and Amaryl Drug: Lantus Diabetic patients failing on maximal oral treatment usually switch to twice daily administration of a mixture of short- and longacting insulin. Although this improves glycemic control, it is generally accompanied by a substantial gain in body weight. This may lead to an increase in body fat resulting in a worsening of insulin resistance, leading to an increase in insulin dose needed to maintain glycemic control. The combination of glimepiride(amaryl) and short-acting insulin (novorapid) is thought to attain glycemic control with a smaller increase in body weight. In this Continue reading >>

Insulin Detemir Causes Lesser Weight Gain In Comparison To Insulin Glargine: Role On Hypothalamic Npy And Galanin

Insulin Detemir Causes Lesser Weight Gain In Comparison To Insulin Glargine: Role On Hypothalamic Npy And Galanin

Copyright © 2014 Mohammad Ishraq Zafar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Objective. Compared with other insulin analogues, insulin detemir induces less weight gain. This study investigated whether this effect was achieved by influencing the hypothalamic appetite regulators neuropeptide Y (NPY) and galanin (GAL). Methods. Type 2 diabetic rat models were established with a high-fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of STZ. All rats were divided into NC, DM, DM+DE and DM+GLA groups. Glycemic levels of all study groups were checked at study onset and after 4 weeks of insulin treatment. Food intake and body weight were monitored during treatment. After 4 weeks, the hypothalamus of rats was examined for NPY and GAL mRNA and protein expression. Results. After 4 weeks of treatment, compared with the DM+GLA group, the DM+DE group exhibited less food intake () and less weight gain (), but showed similar glycemic control. The expression of hypothalamic NPY and GAL at both mRNA and protein level were significantly lower () in the DM+DE group. Conclusion. Insulin detemir decreased food intake in type 2 diabetic rats, which led to reduced weight gain when compared to insulin glargine treatment. This effect is likely due to downregulation of hypothalamic NPY and GAL. 1. Introduction Diabetes is a common condition that affects a significant percentage of the global population. Unfortunately, its prevalence on a global scale is increasing with time. According to current statistics, 171 million diabetes patients were identified in the year 2000, and it is predicated that 366 million people will be aff Continue reading >>

Determinants Of Weight Change In Patients On Basal Insulin Treatment: An Analysis Of The Dive Registry

Determinants Of Weight Change In Patients On Basal Insulin Treatment: An Analysis Of The Dive Registry

Objective We aimed to describe patterns of weight change in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) starting basal insulin (BI) treatment. Research design and methods Diabetes Versorgungs-Evaluation (DIVE) is an observational, multicenter, prospective registry in patients with T2DM. Patients were divided into those initiating BI therapy for the first time (with optional oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs)) and those initiating OADs only (OADo). Results 521 patients were included in the analysis, 113 in the BI arm and 408 in the OADo arm. Relative to baseline, the BI group gained an average of 0.98±7.1 kg at 1 year, compared with a loss of 1.52±11.8 kg in the OADo group (p<0.001). This difference remained statistically significant when expressed as a proportional change from baseline (+0.014±0.08 vs −0.015±0.12, respectively (p<0.001)). Baseline weight (regression coefficient (RC) 0.89; 95% CI 0.81 to 0.97; p<0.001) and diabetes duration (RC 2.52; 95% CI 0.53 to 4.52; p=0.01) were the only factors identified as significant predictors of weight gain between baseline and 1 year follow-up in BI patients. Conclusions Though BI therapy leads to modest weight gain over the subsequent year, this may be limited by BI initiation at an early stage of the disease. As such, delaying the start of insulin therapy based on fears of weight gain appears counter-productive, and should be reconsidered. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: Continue reading >>

Tresiba (insulin Degludec) Vs. Lantus (insulin Glargine)

Tresiba (insulin Degludec) Vs. Lantus (insulin Glargine)

www.adverahealth.com © 2016 Advera Health Analytics 1 For more information contact us Drug Evidence Review: © Copyright. 2016 Advera Health Analytics, Inc. All rights reserved. This material MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED, DISPLAYED, MODIFIED, DISTRIBUTED or LINKED TO without the express prior written permission of the copyright holder. Advera Health Analytics Inc.’s research may be cited but not excerpted in its entirety. For permission, contact Sharon Miller Actionable Intelligence: Tresiba (insulin degludec), the FDA- approved long-acting injectable insulin analog, seems to have a similar safety profile to its comparator Lantus (insulin glargine), based on their matching labeled serious adverse events (AEs). In head-to-head clinical trials comparing these two insulin analogs, Tresiba (insulin degludec) was statistically non-inferior to Lantus (insulin glargine) in reducing glycosylated hemoglobin levels, fasting glucose levels & confirmed hypoglycemic episodes, but the rate of nocturnal hypoglycemic events were significantly reduced especially in type 2 diabetes patients treated with Tresiba (insulin degludec). Both the drugs had similar rates of serious AEs through the clinical trials. Based on real-world adverse events reported for Lantus (insulin glargine), our analytics have identified: non-labeled Active RxSignals for serious events such as liver transplant, cerebral thrombosis, and myelitis transverse; an RxScore of 43.88; and an RxCost per prescription of $1.62. Drugs Covered: Tresiba (insulin degludec), Lantus (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection) Indications Covered: Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 Drug Classes Covered: Insulins and analogues for injection, long- acting MoA Covered: Insulin Receptor Agonists Overview Novo Nordis Continue reading >>

Toujeo Launches In The Us – The Next Generation Lantus

Toujeo Launches In The Us – The Next Generation Lantus

Update (4/3/15): New basal insulin Toujeo (insulin glargine U300) has now launched in the US, around a month after its FDA approval. In what we think is fantastic news, Toujeo will be priced around the same as Lantus (insulin glargine U100) per unit. You can find a detailed injection guide for using the updated SoloStar pen for Toujeo on the website. We’re most excited for this product in terms of “next generation” combo products (more on that below). Based on clinical trial data, for some Toujeo may lead to nighttime hypoglycemia and/or weight loss benefits, although this is not technically on the label. The product also has an impressive COACH patient support program (available free to anyone with a Toujeo prescription) that provides live one-on-one phone calls with a COACH guide, online resources, tips via text message, and even diabetes educator-led in-person sessions. We can’t wait to see how this works in real life; if you’re using Toujeo’s COACH program, please let us know your impressions by e-mailing us. A savings card also allows patients with commercial insurance (but not Medicare/Medicaid/VA patients) to pay no more than $15 per prescription for the next year. Although many criticize the high price of insulin in the US, it’s good to see the availability of saving programs for Toujeo for people with insurance. Original Article (3/5/15): Twitter summary: [email protected]_FDA approves Toujeo, more concentrated version of basal insulin Lantus – our story on data, delivery, & a promising future In late February, Sanofi announced FDA approval of its once-daily, long-acting basal insulin Toujeo. Toujeo is the same type of basal insulin (glargine) as Sanofi’s blockbuster Lantus, but a stronger version. In Toujeo, each milliliter of liquid carries 300 units of Continue reading >>

Lantus Insulin & Weight Gain

Lantus Insulin & Weight Gain

Lantus, or insulin glargine, is a brand of injectable insulin prescribed to treat both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Injectable insulin is used to replace the insulin you no longer make or to overcome your body’s resistance to your own insulin. In addition to reducing your blood glucose level, insulin exerts a variety of metabolic effects and changes the way you process energy. One of insulin’s common side effects is weight gain. Video of the Day In healthy individuals, the pancreas produces insulin in response to rising blood glucose levels. Your pancreas secretes insulin whenever you consume a meal containing carbohydrates or proteins. Insulin stimulates the cells in your muscles, liver and fat tissue to absorb glucose, which is then converted to glycogen or fat and stored for future use. Diabetics no longer make their own insulin or, in the case of type 2 diabetics, their cells are “insulin resistant” and don’t readily respond to insulin’s signals. Injectable insulin, such as Lantus, reduces blood glucose levels in diabetic patients. Insulin is a “storage” hormone. It triggers the conversion of glucose and fatty acids to glycogen and fat, which are deposited in your tissues for future use. In addition, insulin inhibits the oxidation of glucose and fatty acids and the metabolism of proteins and amino acids for energy. Thus, insulin’s net effect is to decrease your daily energy expenditure. According to Drugs.com, insulin therapy – including Lantus – often leads to an increase in total body fat as the result of “more efficient use of calories.” The intensity of insulin therapy – the frequency of administration and total dosage – influences how much weight you might gain while using Lantus or any other form of insulin. In general, higher dose Continue reading >>

Indications And Usage For Apidra® (insulin Glulisine [rdna Origin] Injection)

Indications And Usage For Apidra® (insulin Glulisine [rdna Origin] Injection)

Prescription Apidra® is for adults with type 2 diabetes or adults and children (4 years and older) with type 1 diabetes to improve blood sugar control. Apidra® given by subcutaneous injection is usually used with a longer-acting insulin. When used as a mealtime insulin, Apidra® should be given within 15 minutes before or within 20 minutes after starting a meal. Apidra® may be infused subcutaneously by external insulin infusion pumps. Do not use Apidra® during a low blood sugar reaction (hypoglycemia) or if you are allergic to any of the ingredients in Apidra®. Do not share needles, insulin pens or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. You must test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Apidra®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Apidra® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Apidra®, when given by injection under the skin, should not be mixed with insulins other than NPH. Do not mix Apidra® with any insulin when used in the pump or for intravenous administration. The most common side effect of insulin, including Apidra®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include low blood potassium, injection site reactions, such as changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions, such as itching and rash. Less common, but potentially more serious or life-threatening, is generalized allergy to in Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine In The Treatment Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Glargine In The Treatment Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Glargine in the Treatment of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham, West Midlands, England, UK Correspondence: Anthony H Barnett, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Undergraduate Centre, Birmingham, B9 5SS, UK Tel + 44 121 424 3587 Fax + 44 121 424 0593 Email [email protected] Copyright 2006 Dove Medical Press Limited. All rights reserved This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Insulin glargine is an analogue of human insulin that is modified to provide a consistent level of plasma insulin over a long duration. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies show that a single injection of insulin glargine leads to a smooth 24-hour timeaction profile with no undesirable pronounced peaks of activity. In clinical trials, this profile has been associated with at least equivalent, if not better, glycemic control than other traditional basal insulins and a significantly lower rate of overall and nocturnal hypoglycemia. The convenience of a once-daily injection, a lack of need for resuspension (insulin glargine is a clear solution when injected), and lower rates of hypoglycemia should translate into improvements in patient treatment satisfaction. This review appraises the evidence for the view that insulin glargine represents an advance in basal insulin therapy for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients. Keywords: Insulin glargine, basal insulin therapy, diabetes, review While insulin remains the only antihyperglycemic therapy for type 1 diabetes, oral agents have been the mainstay of therapy for those with type 2 diabetes. Oral therapies are limited in their ability to maintain tight glycemic control in the long term ( UKPDS 1995a , 1995b ). There is increasing support for the earlier initiation of insulin Continue reading >>

Counseling Patients On How To Avoid Weight Gain From Insulin

Counseling Patients On How To Avoid Weight Gain From Insulin

A lot of people with type 2 diabetes delay going on insulin for as long as possible because they’ve heard horror stories about how much weight it can make them gain (or maybe they just don’t like shots), but people with type 1 don’t have a choice. While it is true that insulin treatment is often associated with weight gain and more frequent bouts of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), the real question is, why? Some theories to explain insulin-induced weight gain are that when using insulin, your blood sugar is (usually) better controlled and you stop losing some of your calories (as glucose in your urine when your blood sugars exceed your urinary threshold) and that you may gain weight from having to eat extra to treat any low blood sugars caused by insulin. If you’re taking oral medications to lower your blood sugar and they are not working, however, insulin may be your main option for better control. A few research studies have looked at whether weight gain is simply a result of eating more when you’re on insulin. One such study found that weight gain was not due to an increase in food intake, but rather that your body may increase its efficiency in using glucose and other fuels when your glycemic control improves — making you store more available energy from the foods you eat as fat (even if you’re eating the same amount as before you went on insulin) (1). So, what can you do to avoid weight gain if you have to take insulin? First of all, you should try to keep your insulin doses as low as possible because the more insulin you take, the greater your potential for weight gain is. The best way to keep your insulin needs in check is to engage in regular physical activity. By way of example, some people with type 2 diabetes who were studied gained weight from Continue reading >>

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