diabetestalk.net

Lantus And Weight Gain

Insulin And Weight Gain

Insulin And Weight Gain

Tweet In many people taking insulin, a common side effect is weight gain. Insulin can cause people to gain weight for several reasons. For example, insulin reduces the removal of glucose (sugar) from the body, and this excess glucose is stored as fat. However, taking insulin does not automatically mean you will gain weight. If you are taking insulin and notice that you are gaining weight, you may be able to control your weight with proper diet and exercise. Weight gain is one of the most frustrating and seemingly unfair side effects of insulin. While many people gain weight while taking insulin, there are ways to help prevent or reduce the weight gain that often comes with insulin use. Why Does Insulin Cause Weight Gain? There are a few different reasons why insulin causes weight gain. Probably, the most significant reason is that insulin reduces the removal of glucose (sugar) through the urine. With uncontrolled diabetes, the body cannot use (or store) glucose properly, and glucose is lost through the urine. This means that you can consume more calories than you need, and your body cannot use it or store it as fat as well as normal. As soon as you correct the situation with insulin, all of a sudden, your body can access the glucose in the blood. Any excess glucose is not lost through the urine; it is stored as fat. In this sense, insulin is not really causing the weight gain; it is simply correcting the problem (high diabetes) that once allowed you to eat more than you needed. Secondly, insulin can cause episodes of low blood sugar levels. These episodes are very frightening. People who have experienced low blood sugar episodes due to insulin may be more likely to overeat in order to avoid future episodes. This overeating can lead to weight gain. Thirdly, some people f Continue reading >>

Type 1: Does Lantus Cause Weight Gain?

Type 1: Does Lantus Cause Weight Gain?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Over the past couple of months my long honeymoon period seems to be slowly disappearing and I've been gradually increasing my Lantus dose to retain the same fasting levels. I am eating the same diet as always and exercising the same amount (if not more) than I did previously. My control remains tight. Nothing has changed except my Lantus dose. I am convinced the increased Lantus is causing weight gain: I have gained 5kg in the last couple of months and my waist has also gained a couple of inches. Are there any studies on Lantus causing weight gain? Insulin is known to cause weight gain but there could be other reasons for example - hypoactive thyroid. (I went on to Lantus over a year ago and I am lucky I haven't put on weight with it.) Insulin is known to cause weight gain but there could be other reasons for example - hypoactive thyroid. (I went on to Lantus over a year ago and I am lucky I haven't put on weight with it.) That's not wholly correct. The OP is a Type 1. Excessive food/carbs requiring more insulin may cause weight gain but it's wrong to say insulin per se makes you gain weight. I've been taking it for more than 20 years and my weight has stayed stable and I remain slim. @pinewood I think @mahola said something about Lantus and weight. Perhaps she can help? Continue reading >>

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) or type 2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes. The most common side effects of Lantus is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Symptoms include: hunger, sweating, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Other common side effects of Lantus include pain, redness, swelling, itching, or thickening of the skin at the injection site. These side effects usually go away after a few days or weeks. Lantus should be administered subcutaneously (under the skin) once a day at the same time every day. Dose is determined by the individual and the desired blood glucose levels. Lantus may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, or beta-blockers. Many other medicines can increase or decrease the effects of insulin glargine on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Lantus. Discuss a plan to manage blood sugar with your doctor before becoming pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Insulin needs may change while breastfeeding. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding. Our Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Continue reading >>

Determinants Of Weight Change In Patients On Basal Insulin Treatment: An Analysis Of The Dive Registry

Determinants Of Weight Change In Patients On Basal Insulin Treatment: An Analysis Of The Dive Registry

Objective We aimed to describe patterns of weight change in insulin-naive patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) starting basal insulin (BI) treatment. Research design and methods Diabetes Versorgungs-Evaluation (DIVE) is an observational, multicenter, prospective registry in patients with T2DM. Patients were divided into those initiating BI therapy for the first time (with optional oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs)) and those initiating OADs only (OADo). Results 521 patients were included in the analysis, 113 in the BI arm and 408 in the OADo arm. Relative to baseline, the BI group gained an average of 0.98±7.1 kg at 1 year, compared with a loss of 1.52±11.8 kg in the OADo group (p<0.001). This difference remained statistically significant when expressed as a proportional change from baseline (+0.014±0.08 vs −0.015±0.12, respectively (p<0.001)). Baseline weight (regression coefficient (RC) 0.89; 95% CI 0.81 to 0.97; p<0.001) and diabetes duration (RC 2.52; 95% CI 0.53 to 4.52; p=0.01) were the only factors identified as significant predictors of weight gain between baseline and 1 year follow-up in BI patients. Conclusions Though BI therapy leads to modest weight gain over the subsequent year, this may be limited by BI initiation at an early stage of the disease. As such, delaying the start of insulin therapy based on fears of weight gain appears counter-productive, and should be reconsidered. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: Continue reading >>

Insulin, Glp-1 Receptor Agonist Combinations Increase Glycemic Control Without Hypoglycemia, Weight Gain

Insulin, Glp-1 Receptor Agonist Combinations Increase Glycemic Control Without Hypoglycemia, Weight Gain

In two separate studies evaluating fixed-ratio combinations of a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist and a basal insulin, adults assigned the combinations were more likely to reach a target HbA1c without hypoglycemia or weight gain vs. those assigned insulin alone or insulin plus metformin. In May, an FDA advisory panel voted in favor of recommending approval of each of the combination drugs: iGlarLixi, a combination of insulin glargine (Lantus) and lixisenatide (Lyxumia) developed by Sanofi Aventis, and IDegLira, a combination of insulin degludec (Tresiba) and liraglutide (Victoza) developed by Novo Nordisk. In a randomized, open-label, parallel-group trial, researchers comparing the efficacy and safety of iGlarLixi vs. insulin glargine alone found the drug was well tolerated over 30 weeks, with a low rate of nausea and vomiting reported in patients. Vanita R. Aroda, MD, director of the MedStar Community Clinical Research Center at the MedStar Health Research Institute, and colleagues analyzed data from 736 patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes on either basal insulin alone or with up to two oral antidiabetes drugs (mean age, 60 years; 53% women; 92% white; mean diabetes duration, 12 years; average basal insulin therapy use, 3 years; mean BMI, 31 kg/m²). Within the cohort, the mean insulin dose prior to randomization was 35 units; 52% were taking metformin; 32% were taking metformin and sulfonylureas. Included patients remained in poor control (HbA1c greater than 7% despite a morning fasting plasma glucose of 140 mg/dL or less) following a 6-week run-in phase where insulin glargine was either introduced or optimized; any oral antidiabetes agents with the exception of metformin were discontinued prior to the start of the trial. Researchers randomly assig Continue reading >>

Control Of Type 2 Diabetes

Control Of Type 2 Diabetes

Embrace your diabetes Enlarge Haemoglobin, in your blood, joins up with glucose to form the chemical called HbA1c We are learning more about diabetes all the time, and it is becoming clear the harder you work to control your diabetes when it is diagnosed the more benefit you will get in the long term. Complications from diabetes will be prevented or delayed (NEJM 08) (UKPDS 08). Type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition. It is not a 'mild' form of diabetes. The exercise you take and the food you eat need to balance the remaining natural insulin your body makes. This page is designed to give readers an idea how decisions are made concerning their care, but remember every patient is different and advice can vary. Take control....learning how to control type 2 diabetes Your diabetes nurse can teach you the basics, and reading up is helpful. But there are structured diabetes education programs that your doctor must enable you to attend such a course. The programs teach you how to take control of type 2 diabetes, and patients who have attended the program have better diabetic control and fewer problems. Compliance Birmingham meeting 2012: Patients only take half their oral medication. Fixed dose combination tablets would help a little. 10% compliance with multiple drugs. What is happening in type 2 diabetes There are four particular problems. These factors work together to contribute to type 2 diabetes. The factors may be controlled by genes. So your children or brothers and sisters may be affected, and they should take precautions (exercise, healthy diet, not becoming overweight, and not smoking). First, there is a shortage of insulin You may have inherited this condition from your parents. Alternatively, a few people may have had pancreatitis or a bad attack of mumps that Continue reading >>

Selected Important Safety Information

Selected Important Safety Information

Contraindications Levemir® is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to Levemir® or any of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Never Share a Levemir® FlexTouch® Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Dosage adjustment and monitoring: Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Insulin regimens should be modified cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment of concomitant anti-diabetic treatment. Administration: Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin or solution. Do not administer subcutaneously via an insulin pump, intramuscularly, or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Selected Important Safety Information Contraindications NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill®Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Levemir® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) Indications and Usage Levemir® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) is i Continue reading >>

Lantus: Side Effects, Ratings, And Patient Comments

Lantus: Side Effects, Ratings, And Patient Comments

occasional fits of excessive hunger - have been prepared for this by doctor and dieticians and have a course of action planned out; have used for about 5 years; have lost about 60 lbs and then have stayed at weight; Frustrated at times with quality control of pens - some jam; others appear not to be at the same solution level - and so make sure I have back up pens ready to warm up. I have worked with dieticians to remove everything from my house that I should not eat - I know when I've comforted myself with food during stress and when not to blame the Lantus. started at 12 units x 3 days went to 13units x3 days. Stopped taking on third 13 unit day(Supposed to increase to 14units) Blood sugar persistently went up. Before taking was in 2 to 300 range when I stopped it was over 600. Sr and team still insist that plants can't increase blood sugar because it is insulin. I will not take any more. Went back to Actos. Sill having spikes over 600. I have stage 4 kidney failure and am having great difficulty finding high protein food not full of salt. Any suggestions on a good drug to use? Easily go hypoglyemic if too active, severe joint pain all over body, itching, swollen stomach & weight gain, tingling in hands and crawling sensation on skin, regular nausea and headaches,bouts of severe shakes as if I'm hypoglycemic, but #'s are normal, Severe fatigue, occasional bouts of Vertigo so severe that cannot drive a car and must lean against walls to walk around at home. I've been on it for approx. 4 years and currently injecting 80 units @ bedtime -- Do not know what I am going to about all this, but now realize from this blog that it is all related to the Lantus LA. I have days when the joint pain is so sever I can barely walk or put on or take off my jacket. I have experienced e Continue reading >>

Insulin And Weight Gain: Keep The Pounds Off

Insulin And Weight Gain: Keep The Pounds Off

Insulin and weight gain often go hand in hand, but weight control is possible. If you need insulin therapy, here's how to minimize — or avoid — weight gain. Weight gain is a common side effect for people who take insulin — a hormone that regulates the absorption of sugar (glucose) by cells. This can be frustrating because maintaining a healthy weight is an important part of your overall diabetes management plan. The good news is that it is possible to maintain your weight while taking insulin. The link between insulin and weight gain When you take insulin, glucose is able to enter your cells, and glucose levels in your blood drop. This is the desired treatment goal. But if you take in more calories than you need to maintain a healthy weight — given your level of activity — your cells will get more glucose than they need. Glucose that your cells don't use accumulates as fat. Avoid weight gain while taking insulin Eating healthy foods and being physically active most days of the week can help you prevent unwanted weight gain. The following tips can help you keep the pounds off: Count calories. Eating and drinking fewer calories helps you prevent weight gain. Stock the refrigerator and pantry with fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Plan for every meal to have the right mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins, and fats. Generally, experts recommend that meals consist of half non starchy vegetable, one-quarter protein and one quarter a starch such as rice or a starchy vegetable such as corn or peas. Trim your portion sizes, skip second helpings and drink water instead of high-calorie drinks. Talk to your doctor, nurse or a dietitian about meal-planning strategies and resources. Don't skip meals. Don't try to cut calories by skipping meals. When you skip Continue reading >>

Insulin Detemir Reduces Weight Gain As A Result Of Reduced Food Intake In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

Insulin Detemir Reduces Weight Gain As A Result Of Reduced Food Intake In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

OBJECTIVE Insulin detemir lacks the usual propensity for insulin to cause weight gain. We investigated whether this effect was a result of reduced energy intake and/or increased energy expenditure. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A 32-week, randomized crossover design trial was undertaken in 23 patients with type 1 diabetes. Patients on a basal-bolus regimen (with insulin aspart as the bolus insulin) were randomly assigned to insulin detemir or NPH insulin as a basal insulin for 16 weeks, followed by the other basal insulin for 16 weeks. At the end of each 16-week period, total energy expenditure, resting energy expenditure, diet-induced thermogenesis, activity energy expenditure, energy intake, weight change, glycemic control, hypoglycemic episodes, and hormones that affect satiety and fuel partitioning were measured. RESULTS After 16 weeks, weight change was −0.69 ± 1.85 kg with insulin detemir and +1.7 ± 2.46 kg with NPH insulin (P < 0.001). Total energy intake was significantly less with insulin detemir (2,016 ± 501 kcal/day) than with NPH insulin (2,181 ± 559 kcal/day) (P = 0.026). There was no significant difference in any measure of energy expenditure, HbA1c percentage, or number of hypoglycemic episodes. Leptin was lower and resistin was higher with insulin detemir compared with NPH insulin (P = 0.039, P = 0.047). After the meal, ghrelin and pancreatic polypeptide levels (P = 0.002, P = 0.001) were higher with insulin detemir. CONCLUSIONS The reduced weight gain with insulin detemir compared with NPH insulin is attributed to reduced energy intake rather than increased energy expenditure. This may be mediated by a direct or indirect effect of insulin detemir on the hormones that control satiety. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This study was registered with clinica Continue reading >>

Levemir Versus Lantus

Levemir Versus Lantus

For people who are struggling to control their diabetes and require regular insulin injections, two of the most common long-lasting options are Levemir and Lantus. In the Levemir vs Lantus debate, both are intended for daily use and neither one is intended to help with an immediate spike of blood sugar should it occur. Neither one won’t treat ketoacidosis should it occur either. When both insulin options are considered, the risks of side effects and the benefits they provide are also the same. With so little between these two injections, are there any differences that can help to decide which one is better to take? Here are some answers to some common comparison questions. 1. How Often Does An Injection Need To Occur? Levemir can be taken either once or twice per day. The doses must be spread out over the course of 12 hours to prevent low blood sugar levels from forming. For those who inject Levemir just once per day, it should be taken around bedtime or at dinner so that it can provide the best results possible. Lantus is only taken once per day. It doesn’t matter what time of day that it is taken, but a routine should be established so that one dose occurs every 24 hours or so. Taking it in the morning one day and then in the evening the next day is not recommended. 2. What About Weight Gain? Levemir has been shown to lessen the risks of gaining weight while taking insulin injections. This may be beneficial to those who are working to control their Type 2 diabetes especially. Lantus provides a higher overall risk of weight gain, but people can gain weight while using either product. Lantus, on the other hand, was developed to produce fewer injection site reactions when used regularly. There is less of a risk of developing a rash or other similar skin reaction when Continue reading >>

Metformin And Insulin In Type 2 Diabetes

Metformin And Insulin In Type 2 Diabetes

the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Group (UKPDS) has pointed out that majority of type 2 diabetes patients will experience progressive pancreatic beta cell dysfunction even when their diabetes control is excellent (1) so type 2 diabetics may eventually require treatment with insulin when oral hypoglycaemic medication is no longer effective a straight swap to insulin treatment is usual if the maximal therapy with non-insulin treatments have been reached according to estimations in UK general practice, only 50% of patients who require insulin due to failure of oral medication will receive it within 5 years o the average time taken from beginning treatment with the last oral agent to beginning insulin therapy is around 8 years (2) in the case of overweight patients taking metformin, then treatment with metformin may be continued - this is because metformin may attenuate weight gain resulting from the introduction of insulin therapy insulin therapy and a sulphonylurea may decrease the amount of insulin actually required and enhance the use of a single night-time dose but overall the clinical advantages of this combination are small (3) the average weight gain resulting from introduction of insulin therapy is 4 kg - however some patients may have a marked increase in weight after onset of insulin therapy in a comprehensive review of combination therapies with insulin in type 2 diabetes Yki-Jarvinen suggests an algorithm for starting insulin in an insulin naive type 2 diabetic patient who is on maximal oral hypoglycaemic therapy. In this algorithm she suggests stopping sulphonylurea treatment and continuation of metformin at a dose of 2g per day in combination with insulin treatment (4). If the patient is not on a dose of 2g per day when conversion to insulin occur Continue reading >>

Basaglar® (insulin Glargine Injection 100 Units/ml), A Long-acting Basal Insulin, Is Now Available In U.s.

Basaglar® (insulin Glargine Injection 100 Units/ml), A Long-acting Basal Insulin, Is Now Available In U.s.

INDIANAPOLIS and RIDGEFIELD, CT – Dec. 15, 2016 – Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) and Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that BASAGLAR® (insulin glargine injection 100 units/mL) is available by prescription in the U.S. BASAGLAR is a follow-on insulin to Lantus®. It is a long-acting insulin with an amino acid sequence identical to Lantus, another U-100 insulin glargine. In December 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved BASAGLAR as a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. BASAGLAR should not be used to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. BASAGLAR should not be used during episodes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) or in people with an allergy to insulin glargine or any of the ingredients in BASAGLAR. “Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim are proud to bring another proven effective diabetes treatment choice to people who may need a long-acting insulin to help control their blood sugar,” said David Kendall, M.D., vice president, Global Medical Affairs, Lilly Diabetes. “We know that starting insulin can be a challenging experience for some people with type 2 diabetes. As part of our continuing commitment to the diabetes community, we are expanding our educational resources.” With resources designed to be simple, BASAGLAR goes beyond just insulin by offering helpful support for people beginning insulin. These bilingual resources include an app for smartphones and tablets to provide an interactive experience that helps patients relax and guides them through injection using their BASAGLAR KwikPen®, injection demo kits (available through HCPs), and access to educational videos. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle h Continue reading >>

Lantus Insulin & Weight Gain

Lantus Insulin & Weight Gain

Lantus, or insulin glargine, is a brand of injectable insulin prescribed to treat both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Injectable insulin is used to replace the insulin you no longer make or to overcome your body’s resistance to your own insulin. In addition to reducing your blood glucose level, insulin exerts a variety of metabolic effects and changes the way you process energy. One of insulin’s common side effects is weight gain. Video of the Day In healthy individuals, the pancreas produces insulin in response to rising blood glucose levels. Your pancreas secretes insulin whenever you consume a meal containing carbohydrates or proteins. Insulin stimulates the cells in your muscles, liver and fat tissue to absorb glucose, which is then converted to glycogen or fat and stored for future use. Diabetics no longer make their own insulin or, in the case of type 2 diabetics, their cells are “insulin resistant” and don’t readily respond to insulin’s signals. Injectable insulin, such as Lantus, reduces blood glucose levels in diabetic patients. Insulin is a “storage” hormone. It triggers the conversion of glucose and fatty acids to glycogen and fat, which are deposited in your tissues for future use. In addition, insulin inhibits the oxidation of glucose and fatty acids and the metabolism of proteins and amino acids for energy. Thus, insulin’s net effect is to decrease your daily energy expenditure. According to Drugs.com, insulin therapy – including Lantus – often leads to an increase in total body fat as the result of “more efficient use of calories.” The intensity of insulin therapy – the frequency of administration and total dosage – influences how much weight you might gain while using Lantus or any other form of insulin. In general, higher dose Continue reading >>

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

(insulin Glargine Injection) 300 Units/ml

Toujeo® is a long-acting human insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with diabetes mellitus. Limitations of Use: Toujeo® is not recommended for treating diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Toujeo® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or any of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Toujeo® contains the same active ingredient, insulin glargine, as Lantus®. The concentration of insulin glargine in Toujeo® is 300 Units per mL. Insulin pens and needles must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimens cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Changes in insulin regimen may result in hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. Unit for unit, patients started on, or changed to, Toujeo® required a higher dose than patients controlled with Lantus®. When changing from another basal insulin to Toujeo®, patients experienced higher average fasting plasma glucose levels in the first few weeks of therapy until titrated to their individualized fasting plasma glucose targets. Higher doses were required in titrate-to-target studies to achieve glucose control similar to Lantus®. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Toujeo®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label bef Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet