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Ketosis Diet

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

What is the ketogenic diet? The "classic" ketogenic diet is a special high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that helps to control seizures in some people with epilepsy. It is prescribed by a physician and carefully monitored by a dietitian. It is usually used in children with seizures that do not respond to medications. It is stricter than the modified Atkins diet, requiring careful measurements of calories, fluids, and proteins. Foods are weighed and measured. The name ketogenic means that it produces ketones in the body. (keto = ketone; genic = producing) Ketones are formed when the body uses fat for its source of energy. Usually the body uses carbohydrates (such as sugar, bread, pasta) for its fuel. Because the ketogenic diet is very low in carbohydrates, fats become the primary fuel instead. The body can work very well on ketones (and fats). Ketones are not dangerous. They can be detected in the urine, blood, and breath. Ketones are one of the more likely mechanisms of action of the diet, with higher ketone levels often leading to improved seizure control. However, there are many other theories for why the diet will work. Who will it help? Doctors usually recommend the ketogenic diet for children whose seizures have not responded to several different seizure medicines. The classic diet is usually not recommended for adults, mostly because the restricted food choices make it hard to follow. However, the modified Atkins diet does work well. This also should be done with a good team of adult neurologists and dietitians. The ketogenic diet has been shown in many studies to be particularly helpful for some epilepsy conditions. These include infantile spasms, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex, Dravet syndrome, Doose syndrome, and GLUT-1 deficiency. Using a formula-only Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet 101: A Detailed Beginner's Guide

The Ketogenic Diet 101: A Detailed Beginner's Guide

The ketogenic diet is a low-carb, high-fat diet that offers many health benefits. Over 20 studies show that this type of diet can help you lose weight and improve health (1). Ketogenic diets may even have benefits against diabetes, cancer, epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease (2, 3, 4, 5). This article is a detailed beginner's guide to the ketogenic diet. It contains everything you need to know. The ketogenic diet (often termed keto) is a very low-carb, high-fat diet that shares many similarities with the Atkins and low-carb diets. It involves drastically reducing carbohydrate intake, and replacing it with fat. The reduction in carbs puts your body into a metabolic state called ketosis. When this happens, your body becomes incredibly efficient at burning fat for energy. It also turns fat into ketones in the liver, which can supply energy for the brain (6, 7). Ketogenic diets can cause massive reductions in blood sugar and insulin levels. This, along with the increased ketones, has numerous health benefits (6, 8, 9, 10, 11). The ketogenic diet (keto) is a low-carb, high-fat diet. It lowers blood sugar and insulin levels, and shifts the body’s metabolism away from carbs and towards fat and ketones. There are several versions of the ketogenic diet, including: Standard ketogenic diet (SKD): This is a very low-carb, moderate-protein and high-fat diet. It typically contains 75% fat, 20% protein and only 5% carbs (1). Cyclical ketogenic diet (CKD): This diet involves periods of higher-carb refeeds, such as 5 ketogenic days followed by 2 high-carb days. Targeted ketogenic diet (TKD): This diet allows you to add carbs around workouts. High-protein ketogenic diet: This is similar to a standard ketogenic diet, but includes more protein. The ratio is often 60% fat, 35% protein and 5% Continue reading >>

Understanding A High-fat Ketogenic Diet—and Is It Right For You?

Understanding A High-fat Ketogenic Diet—and Is It Right For You?

While food trends come and go, high-fat diets—lauded for their weight-loss potential and brain-function benefits—have proven to have some staying power. Functional medicine M.D. Sara Gottfried contributes frequently to goop on the topic of weight-loss resistance. She’s spent the past two years rigorously studying the ketogenic diet—high-fat, low-carb, moderate-protein. Named for ketones, which Gottfried explains are “the energy source made by the body when there’s not enough carbohydrates to be burned for energy demand,” the goal of the diet is to get the body to burn fat instead of sugar. Gottfried recommends the keto diet (as it’s commonly called) to help with a range of brain and focus issues—she finds ketones to be “very efficient fuel for the brain”; she also says it works well for some patients (not all) who want to lose weight but have trouble kicking sugar cravings. We talked to her about who the keto diet is right for (and whom, or when, it isn’t); the nutritional ins and outs of mastering it; and which keto-friendly meals are healthy for practically everyone, regardless of what diet we do (or don’t) practice. A Q&A with Sara Gottfried, M.D. Q What is ketosis? A In most circles, ketosis refers to nutritional ketosis, an optimized state in which you burn fat instead of sugar. Nutritional ketosis has been used to treat epilepsy since the 1920’s and its popularity for mental acuity and weight loss has surged recently. More technically, ketosis refers to a metabolic state in which most of your body’s energy comes from ketones in the blood, as opposed to glycolysis, in which energy supply comes from blood glucose. Ketones are the energy source made by the body (in the liver) when there’s not enough carbohydrates to be burned for energ Continue reading >>

30 Day Ketogenic Diet Plan

30 Day Ketogenic Diet Plan

Hey guys! So I know you’re all looking for something that’s easy to follow and I set out to make something that’s exactly that. A full one month meal plan of the ketogenic diet, the breakdown, the overview, and of course – the meals. Included are all recipes, all breakdowns of final macros, and the daily breakdown of what you should be eating. Tips Before Starting Some people don’t believe in counting calories on a ketogenic diet, but I am one of the few that does. For most normal people, the amounts of fats and protein will be enough to naturally keep you satiated and naturally keep you in a calorie deficit. Though, the average American is not always normal. There’s tons of hormone, endocrine, and deficiency problems that we need to take into account. That said, it doesn’t always allow you to lose weight when you are consuming more than your own body is expending. “Macros” is a shortened version of macronutrients. These are the “big 3” – fats, proteins, and carbs. You can use a calculator to find out how much or how little of each you need in order to attain your goals. You can find the calculator on the navigation bar of the site! A lot of people take their macros as a “set in stone” type of thing. You shouldn’t worry about hitting the mark every single day to the dot. If you’re a few calories over some days, a few calories under on others – it’s fine. Everything will even itself out in the end. It’s all about a long term plan that can work for you, and not the other way around. I wanted to put it out there that I made this meal plan specifically with women in mind. I took an average of about 150 women and what their macros were. The end result was 1600 calories – broken down into 136g of fat, 74g of protein, and 20g net carbs a Continue reading >>

The Truth Behind The World's Most Cutting-edge, Fat-burning Performance Meal Plan: The Keto Diet

The Truth Behind The World's Most Cutting-edge, Fat-burning Performance Meal Plan: The Keto Diet

Timothy Noakes, M.D., is an emeritus professor in the Division of Exercise Science and Sports Medicine at the University of Cape Town. While his name may not ring a bell here in the U.S., he’s a full-blown celebrity in his native South Africa and one of the most accomplished exercise physiologists on the planet. You can’t walk by a restaurant in Cape Town that doesn’t offer a “Noakes option”—say, an avocado stuffed with breakfast sausage and eggs, or a double cheeseburger with lettuce sans bun—and evidence of his teachings seems to be everywhere, mostly in the form of the nation’s best-known athletes, including ageless golfing legend Gary Player and eight-time Ironman World Champion Paula Newby-Fraser. In fact, Noakes’ celebrity these days is such that he’s even been pulled into South African presidential politics: To echo the country’s papers of record, “Is President Jacob Zuma’s and his wife’s dramatic weight loss a result of the Noakes Diet?” No one is sure about the president, but his wife, definitely: She’s lost 66 pounds following the Noakes plan. To high-performing athletes, Noakes preaches that the bedrock tenet of endurance athletic nutrition—that winning performance is best fueled by eating lots of carbohydrates—is simply wrong. Instead, he believes athletes can alter their bodies so that their metabolism burns fat as a primary fuel source, a physiological process known as ketosis, either from stored body fat or from the foods they eat every day. For non-athletes and anyone trying to lose weight or keep it off, Noakes’ advice is that eating a high-fat diet, with few if any refined carbs and as little sugar as possible, will switch on the same fat-burning system and keep your body lean and your weight stable without making Continue reading >>

What's A Keto Diet?

What's A Keto Diet?

What is a ketogenic diet and how does it work? The process was initially developed in 1924 by Dr. Russell Wilder as an effective, non-pharmacological treatment for intractable childhood epilepsy. The process works when the body is put into a metabolic state called Ketosis, where ketones become the main source of energy for the brain and body to function. The ketogenic diet plan is high in fat and low in carbohydrates while supplying adequate protein to the body. This specific combination changes the manner in which your body uses energy. Additionally, while reducing epileptic seizures, this process lowers glucose levels while improving the body’s resistance to insulin. So I know a lot of you are probably wondering "what is Ketosis?" am I right? By definition, it is when your body goes through a metabolic state in which the body transforms ketones created from fat into energy, instead of energy created from converting carbohydrates. What are they exactly did you ask? Biochemically speaking, ketones are organic, carbon-based compounds that contain a central carbon atom double-bonded to an oxygen atom and two carbon-containing substituents, denoted by “R.” Ketones are considered simple compounds because they do not contain chemical groups that are readily reactive. Fatty acids in the body are oxidized by the liver for energy production. There are 3 different ketone bodies produced in mitochondria of the liver: acetone, acetoacetic acid and beta-hydroxybutyric acid. Some of these fatty acids are oxidized by the liver for energy production while others can be partially oxidized to form the substrate acetoacetate, which is then converted to beta-hydroxybutyric acid; collective. These bodies produced in the liver are referred to as endogenous ketone bodies and are those Continue reading >>

Understanding The Ketogenic Diet

Understanding The Ketogenic Diet

Understanding the ketogenic diet The Ketogenic Diet is the dream diet of 2017: eat all the fat you want and lose weight. The Ketogenic Diet allows you to enjoy that extra strip of bacon. You can go to town on all the high fat foods and still lose weight. How? Eliminate carbs. "You will eliminate all carbs - that's the key. What's left is eating a moderate to high amount of fat-derived foods and protein-derived foods. A lot of eggs, meat, cheese, oils, and such," said America's Healthy Heart Doctor Joel Kahn. When your body is looking for energy from carbs and you're not eating those carbs, your body goes into ketosis, which turns your fat stores into energy. The compounds that are created are called ketones. "Eliminate processed junk foods. Get rid of added sugar, processed meats. It's a great way to get on the path to losing 100 puonds," Dr. Kahn said. Cutting out cookies and soda is always a good idea, but there's a downside. First, it's really hard to eliminate pasta, bread, many fruits, and starchy vegetables. Second, eating a high fat diet long term, might be questionable. "The concern in the medical community is doing this day after day, eating high protein eliminating carbs. There is scienc that this might not be safe long term," Dr. Kahn said. Instead, Dr. Kahn recommends a plant-based version of the keto diet and try it for just five days a month. There are a lot of vegan ketogenic diets if you look on line. Here's one resource - but you can also search online by looking for vegetarian ketogenic diet. Continue reading >>

A Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet: An Effective Way Of Optimizing Your Health

A Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet: An Effective Way Of Optimizing Your Health

Many Americans suffer from various chronic diseases such as diabetes and obesity, and the main culprit is usually the food they eat. The standard American diet contains excessive amounts of protein and carbohydrates, neither of which is good for your health because it eventually causes you to develop insulin and leptin resistance. As a result, you gain excess weight, develop inflammation and become prone to cellular damage. To avoid this problem, significant changes in your diet are necessary, and the best way is inducing your body into a state of nutritional ketosis, a condition where your body burns fat as its primary fuel instead of sugar. In order to reach nutritional ketosis, you must follow a ketogenic diet. But what exactly is a ketogenic diet? This guide will tell you everything you need to know about a ketogenic diet – how you can apply it to your lifestyle and what positives you can reap from it. The Various Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet A ketogenic diet is a dietary approach that focuses on minimal carbohydrates, moderate amounts of protein and high healthy fat consumption — the three keys to achieving nutritional ketosis. In fact, it’s what I recommend for most people who would like to optimize their health. There are many reasons why you should try a ketogenic diet. It can be very beneficial for people suffering from chronic conditions, or for people who would simply like to be healthier than their current state. You’ll be excited to know that a ketogenic diet can help with the following: • Weight loss If you’re trying to lose weight, then a ketogenic diet is one of the best ways to do it, because it helps access your body fat so that it can be shed. Obese people in particular can benefit from this method. In one study, obese test subjects were Continue reading >>

What You Should Know Before Trying A Ketogenic Diet

What You Should Know Before Trying A Ketogenic Diet

Five people have recently told me they were going to “try keto”—the most recent after gushing about a mutual friend who has been doing keto, aka the popular ketogenic diet, and getting awesome-looking results. You’ve probably heard rumblings about keto, but what the heck is it? And is it too good to be true? Let’s first get you caught up on all the hubbub around the ketogenic diet. Keto is an extremely low-carb, moderate-protein, and high-fat diet. You’ll find those on keto gobbling up stuff like fat slabs of bacon, mountains of avocados, and cartons of heavy whipping cream. There’s a lot of enthusiastic fanfare around it, like this comment on Reddit: Awesome. And then there’s this one: Low-carb diets are nothing new for weight loss. And keto is kind of a low-carb diet with a twist in that you emphasize tons of fat. I spoke to Leigh Peele, NASM certified personal trainer who fields questions on all matters of weight loss, metabolism, and nutrition, and is author of Starve Mode; and she told me that the original definition of keto is a 4:1 ratio of fats to carbohydrates or protein. That is, for every gram of protein or carb you eat, you would also eat four grams of fat (hence, the avocados and heavy whipping cream). But you don’t have to stick to that exactly as long as your carbs are low and protein moderate enough to properly be “ketogenic.” Let me explain. Differences Between Keto and a Low-Carb Diet Keto’s trump card against the average low-carb diet is that, after consistently depriving yourself of bread, pasta, donuts, and any carb source, your body goes into ketosis (between a couple of days and a week). Ketosis means your body is breaking down fat and releasing large quantities of molecules called ketones into your bloodstream. Your body t Continue reading >>

Why The Ketogenic Diet May Help Fight Diabetes, Cancer

Why The Ketogenic Diet May Help Fight Diabetes, Cancer

A diet extremely high in fat may not seem like the best way to lose fat. But there’s a growing body of research showing that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet is not only good for weight loss, but also may help in preventing disease. The ketogenic diet, or keto, relies on using your fat as fuel, instead of glucose from carbohydrates or protein. Simply put, the daily ketogenic diet consists of 75 percent fat, 20 percent of protein, and a teeny allotment of carbohydrates, about 5 percent. This balance of macronutrients is intended to put your body in a state of ketosis, which suppresses the release of insulin and blood glucose levels. The benefits of ketosis to your health are improvements in biomarkers like blood glucose, reduction of blood pressure and decreased appetite due to fullness linked to consumption of fats. You might think this sounds a lot like the Atkins diet — it’s not. The main difference lies in the protein content of the diet. Atkins tends to be very high in protein, while ketogenic is moderate. Getty Images stock It's not the easiest plan to follow, but the theory of ketosis as a possible prevention against disease is gaining attention from cancer specialists. Tumor immunologist Dr. Patrick Hwu, one of the leading cancer specialists in the U.S., has followed the keto diet for four years, although he prefers to call it the fat-burning metabolism diet, or fat-burning diet. More research is needed to prove its benefits, but Hwu, the head of cancer medicine at MD Anderson in Houston, believes in it after seeing improvements in his own health. Why keto works The body’s first and preferred fuel of choice is glucose — stored as glycogen. Anytime you eat a carbohydrate, be it lentils or licorice, the body turns it into glucose, or sugar. B Continue reading >>

Can You Lose Weight On The Ketogenic Diet?

Can You Lose Weight On The Ketogenic Diet?

Update | In the past few years, if any of your friends are particularly health conscious (re: into experimental diets), you may have heard of the ketogenic diet. But if you yourself are outside of the Soylent set, a primer might be useful: The ketogenic diet began life as a treatment for epilepsy and seizures in children. It’s come into vogue in recent years among adults without seizure conditions to lose weight. The body mostly burns carbohydrates as its fuel. When your body is deprived of sugar, it will look for whatever other fuel it can find. Much like a person with poor meal planning habits reaching for a can of black beans on the back of the shelf and hoping to God for the best, the body burns reserves of fat in place of sugar when it has nothing else to turn to. After the liver breaks down that fat, it’s left with ketone bodies and fatty acids. The result of that metabolic foraging-in-the-back-of-the-cabinet is called ketosis: the state of being when a person has higher-than-normal levels of ketone bodies in their bloodstream (some of which are used as an alternative fuel source in the brain). People on the ketogenic diet hope to suspend their body in that state, burning up reserves of fat instead of carbohydrates. Then, using urinalysis strips (read: peeing on small, chemically sensitive pieces of paper), people on the diet can monitor the level of ketone bodies in their system based on the resulting color of the strips. The diet itself consists of eating few carbohydrates, a moderate amount of protein, and a high amount of fat. And since it’s not necessarily the most pleasant relationship to have with food, as The Atlantic reports, one company is working on a beverage that introduces ketone bodies into the bloodstream apparently without the need for fasti Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis And The Ketogenic Diet?

What Is Ketosis And The Ketogenic Diet?

Eating Keto 101 Ketosis is a metabolic state where your liver produces raised levels of "ketones" through healthy fats. Typically, glucose is the primary fuel source of the body and brain, but it can be replaced by these ketones. In this state of ketosis, your body optimizes fat as fuel and can lead to many health benefits. Because the fat is coming from high quality sources, it also leads to improved lipid labs (triglycerides, LDL, HDL, and more). Although fasting is the quickest way to get to ketosis - it's certainly not sustainable. Instead, followers of the keto diet find a balance of what to eat (and when) to keep their body constantly producing ketones. This lifestyle - the ketogenic diet - is a balance of losing weight and performing efficiently. A strict ketogenic diet is not for everyone. We recommend consulting with a doctor to make sure this restriction is for you. The Keto Plan Though there are various definitions of a Keto diet, the general guidelines are as follows: Very low carb intake Medium level of protein High levels of high quality fat as a major fuel source At Factor 75, we have our own Nutritional Philosophy, based on cutting edge research and feedback from our advisory board. Though we aren't strictly Keto, we do provide some excellent Keto meals options. Though we aren't strictly Keto, we do provide some excellent Keto meal options. At Factor 75, the definition of Keto that guides us in creating our Keto meals is: High Quality Fats 60 - 80% Carbs at or under 20g of carbs Protein 20 - 35% Low Glycemic Carbs 5 - 15% Less than 20 grams of net carbs per meal This ratio - and no added sugars - burns fat. Keto Benefits Research has shown that adherence to a Ketogenic diet can: A few of Factor 75's favorite Ketogenic foods: Explore Other Healthy Eating Continue reading >>

Celebs Over 40 Are Obsessed With The Keto Diet. Here’s Everything You Need To Know Before Trying It.

Celebs Over 40 Are Obsessed With The Keto Diet. Here’s Everything You Need To Know Before Trying It.

There was once a time when low-fat cookies, chips, and peanut butter were considered “healthy choices.” Oh, how times have changed! Ever since studies began surfacing showing that low-carb, high-fat diets can be more effective for weight loss than low-fat plans, more and more health-conscious folks have fully embraced fat. Sales of whole-fat milk and yogurt have soared in recent years, and most nutritionists now tell their clients to incorporate fatty foods like fish, avocado, and olive oil into their diets. The reemergence of all this creamy goodness has led to a century-old diet making a major comeback: the ketogenic diet. Celebrities including Gwyneth Paltrow and Mick Jagger are both rumored to have taken the plan for a test drive. (Got 10 minutes? Then you've got time to lose the weight for good with Prevention's new 10-minute workouts and 10-minute meals. Get Fit in 10: Slim and Strong for Life now!) Those following the keto diet plan eat a lot of fat and just a few carbohydrates. More specifically, 80% of the diet is comprised of fat, 15% is protein, and a mere 5% of calories come from carbohydrates. For someone on a 1,500-calorie diet, that translates to 19 grams of carbohydrates per day, which is less than what you find in a cup of green peas. (For some context, most people’s diets contain 55% carbohydrates, 30% fat, and 15% protein.) The idea is that if you deplete yourself of carbohydrates, the brain’s preferred fuel source, your body will start breaking down fat for energy. When this occurs, the body goes into a state of ketosis. But does this really fuel weight loss or make us healthier? According to one Spanish study of 20 obese adults, the answer is yes. For the study, participants were put on a low-calorie keto diet and lost an average of 40 pound Continue reading >>

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

The Fat-fueled Brain: Unnatural Or Advantageous?

Disclaimer: First things first. Please note that I am in no way endorsing nutritional ketosis as a supplement to, or a replacement for medication. As you’ll see below, data exploring the potential neuroprotective effects of ketosis are still scarce, and we don’t yet know the side effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. This post talks about the SCIENCE behind ketosis, and is not meant in any way as medical advice. The ketogenic diet is a nutritionist’s nightmare. High in saturated fat and VERY low in carbohydrates, “keto” is adopted by a growing population to paradoxically promote weight loss and mental well-being. Drinking coffee with butter? Eating a block of cream cheese? Little to no fruit? To the uninitiated, keto defies all common sense, inviting skeptics to wave it off as an unnatural “bacon-and-steak” fad diet. Yet versions of the ketogenic diet have been used to successfully treat drug-resistant epilepsy in children since the 1920s – potentially even back in the biblical ages. Emerging evidence from animal models and clinical trials suggest keto may be therapeutically used in many other neurological disorders, including head ache, neurodegenerative diseases, sleep disorders, bipolar disorder, autism and brain cancer. With no apparent side effects. Sound too good to be true? I feel ya! Where are these neuroprotective effects coming from? What’s going on in the brain on a ketogenic diet? Ketosis in a nutshell In essence, a ketogenic diet mimics starvation, allowing the body to go into a metabolic state called ketosis (key-tow-sis). Normally, human bodies are sugar-driven machines: ingested carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, which is mainly transported and used as energy or stored as glycogen in liver and muscle tissue. When deprived of d Continue reading >>

A Ketogenic Diet For Breakfast

A Ketogenic Diet For Breakfast

Mike Samuels started writing for his own fitness website and local publications in 2008. He graduated from Peter Symonds College in the UK with A Levels in law, business and sports science, and is a fully qualified personal trainer, sports massage therapist and corrective exercise specialist with accreditations from Premier Global International. Eggs are a good base for a keto breakfast.Photo Credit: TeodoraDjordjevic/iStock/Getty Images A ketogenic diet is one which is high in fat, contains a moderate amount of protein and is very low in carbohydrates. When on a ketogenic diet, your body goes into ketosis and switches to burning fat for fuel, rather than carbohydrate. This diet was originally designed as a treatment for the symptoms of childhood epilepsy, but has also made its way into the world of weight loss dieting. Whether you're following a full ketogenic plan, or just looking for low-carbohydrate meals, you have plenty of options at breakfast time. Eggs can be a staple breakfast item in any ketogenic dieter's breakfast, according to the Atkins website. They can be served any way -- boiled, poached, fried or scrambled -- or make an omelet using low-carb vegetables like asparagus and mushrooms. For eggs you can make in advance, try making a low-carb quiche using a basic recipe of eggs, heavy cream, onion, a little butter and cheese, plus seasoning. You can then vary the flavor by adding more vegetables, different cheeses or meat. If you can't eat eggs, don't enjoy them, or simply fancy a change, you do have alternative options. The Diabetes Life website recommends two sausage patties with two thick slices of tomato and two tablespoons of cottage cheese, which comes in at just 3 grams of carbs. Alternatively, try a steak melt, made with five thin strips of leftover Continue reading >>

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