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Ketogenic Diet Diabetes Type 2

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The ketogenic diet was originally developed almost 100 years ago to treat epilepsy. Nowadays, it is used as a nutrition plan by health-conscious men and women to optimize body composition and athletic performance. Recent research suggests that high fat, very-low carb diets have another benefit: They may help control glucose, triglycerides, insulin, and body weight in people with diabetes. The research below shows the ketogenic diet may be an effective tool you can use to manage symptoms of Diabetes, alongside exercise and medication. Cutting through the Fat: What is Diabetes? Before we get to research, we need to review some basic medical terminology. Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases in which the body has elevated blood levels its main energy source: a sugar called glucose. There are two reasons why this occurs. In some people, there is insufficient production of a chemical called insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that lower levels of glucose in the blood. People who suffer from low insulin levels have type I diabetes and they comprise approximately 5 to 10% of all diabetics. [1] Type I diabetes is usually inherited and type I diabetics usually have to inject insulin to maintain proper levels of blood glucose. The other 90% to 95% of people with diabetes are type II diabetics. [1] In this version, the body doesn’t produce enough insulin for proper function or cells in the body do not react to insulin and take in sugar from the blood. Type 2 diabetes is not inherited. However, lifestyle factors such as high body weight, poor exercise and eating habits all increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. [2] It can be managed by improving dietary and lifestyle habits and also using proper medication. [2] Diabetes results in a higher concentration of s Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Better For Type 2 Diabetes

Ketogenic Diet Better For Type 2 Diabetes

A recent study (link is external) adds to the growing body of research evaluating low carbohydrate and very low carbohydrate diets. Working with a group of overweight and obese adults, all of whom qualified as either pre-diabetic or type 2 diabetics, researchers employed two different dietary strategies. Randomly assigned to either a standard American Diabetic Association diet (ADA: count your calories, keep fat low and carbohydrates moderate) or a low-carb diet designed to induce ketosis (LCK: very low in carbs, high in fat, and calories unrestricted), the participants were instructed and followed for three months. Assessment at three months found a significant difference, with the LCK group enjoying a significant drop in their hemoglobin A1C, or overall blood sugar, reading. A far greater portion of the LCK group (44% vs 11%) were able to discontinue one or more of their diabetes medications, and lost 5.5 kg compared to 2.6 kg. Overall a markedly superior outcome, in just 3 months, working with high risk patients. The LCK diet can present certain challenges that might require supervision by an experienced clinician but overall is taking home a lot of blue ribbons when compared to standard dietary interventions for fat loss, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Cure? This High-fat Diet Could Help Control It

Type 2 Diabetes Cure? This High-fat Diet Could Help Control It

Type 2 diabetes is a life-long condition which causes a person’s blood sugar level to rise too high. It affects 90 per cent of adults with diabetes, and is where the body is unable to produce enough insulin, or its cells do not react to insulin. If the body does not know how to deal with insulin efficiently, then the sugar in the blood does not reach the body’s cells and levels can become too high. However there’s much evidence to support that the condition can be managed by maintaining a healthy weight by following a healthy diet and exercising. Eating a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet - known as the ketogenic diet - has been found by research to naturally control diabetes. According to a study, people who lose five to ten per cent of their body weight can lower their risk of diabetes by 58 per cent. If those with diabetes or pre-diabetes - slightly elevated blood sugar levels - do the same, they can experience a significant improvement in blood sugar levels. However, eating a particular high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet has been found by research to naturally control diabetes. A 2005 study found a third of type 2 diabetes sufferers were able to stop all diabetes medications after following the ketogenic diet for 16 weeks, and another study published in the same year discovered patients could improve insulin sensitivity by 75 per after just two weeks on the diet. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. The ketogenic diet involves eating five per cent carbohydrates, 20 per cent protein and 75 per cent fats per day. Foods high in fat include nuts, cheese, fish, meat and avocado. It was created in 1924 as Continue reading >>

Experts Weigh In On Ketogenic Diet For Diabetes Type 2

Experts Weigh In On Ketogenic Diet For Diabetes Type 2

Ketogenic diet has taken us by the wind in the recent years. There are numerous resources available online for people who are considering going on one. A ketogenic diet, in very simple terms, is a very low-carb diet. It has been claimed that going on a ketogenic diet is beneficial for people seeking to lose weight and to improve their health. This probably sounds very charming to a person with diabetes who is looking to lose excess weight and to improve their overall general health to avoid or prevent any diabetes related complications. But, is it really worth all the hype it has generated? For someone who has diabetes, a healthy and nutritional lifestyle is extremely important. Though lowering the consumption of carbs from your diet can aid you, is it actually recommended to restrict yourself to a very low carb diet if you have diabetes? We can’t claim to know but we reached out to respected experts who have shared their thoughts on the diet and whether they recommend it to their patients. Read on to find out whether or not you could benefit from going on a Ketogenic diet. 1. Gina Keatley, CDN I would not recommend the ketogenic diet to any patients other than those suffering with epilepsy. The proper ratio of fat to protein to carbohydrate calories (80-15-5) is extremely difficult to maintain over any period of time. In many research studies over half of the participants drop out of studies before they have completed due to this difficulty and in other studies the researchers do not get institutional approval for such a strict limit of carbohydrates and use one with far more protein and carbohydrate (usually a 60-30-10 ratio). That being said what has been shown to lower blood sugar levels over the long term is losing weight–a diet that is calorie controlled and f Continue reading >>

Study Shows Ketogenic Diet May Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Study Shows Ketogenic Diet May Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

If you’ve ever read about health on the internet, you’ve probably seen stories and ads claiming to reverse diabetes. Maybe you saw the article about juicing bitter gourds, or the one that suggests boiling cinnamon powder in water. And isn’t there one out there that suggests rubbing your pancreas with aloe vera twice a day? Maybe you’ve tried one of the above, but hopefully every time you’ve seen the words reverse diabetes, you quickly closed your browser’s tab. However, while there is definitely no way to reverse type 1 diabetes yet, a new study suggests type 2 diabetes really can be reversed (but not by pancreatic massage). Recently, a trial conducted by Stephen Phinney and Jeff Volek, of The Art and Science of Low Carb, showed the positive effects of a low-carbohydrate diet. Phinney and Volek have been low-carb advocates for some time, and you can see their other research here. This particular trial provides evidence that a low-carb diet can improve blood sugar levels and facilitate weight loss in adults with type 2 diabetes. In almost 60% of participants, medication was decreased or stopped altogether. The study, conducted in Indiana in partnership with Indiana University Health, and published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research publications, looked at 262 people with type 2 diabetes who were also overweight. Each participant restricted their carbohydrate intake to 30 grams or less per day, and they increased fat and protein intake. This practice induces what is known as “nutritional ketosis” and is considered a ketogenic diet, forcing the body to burn fat for energy rather than carbohydrates. According to Diabetes.co.uk, “Previous studies have shown that such ketogenic diets can improve insulin sensitivity and bring many other benefits. How Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Type 1 Diabetes

Ketogenic Diet And Type 1 Diabetes

What is Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system is a defence that guards the body against bacteria, fungi or parasites. A combination of genetics and an environmental (viral infection, vaccines, low levels of vitamin D, cow’s milk or increased insulin demand) trigger engages the immune system to attack and destroy the beta cells in the pancreas. After these beta cells are destroyed, the body is unable to produce insulin. Type 1 diabetes is the result of the inability of the pancreas to produce insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the pancreas produces insulin. Who Gets Type 1 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes can affect all age groups. Although the thought has been that type 1 diabetes appears during childhood, current research has found that adults are just as likely to be diagnosed with type 1 diabetes; half of type 1 diabetics are diagnosed after age 30. (1) Yet, the rate of Type 1 diabetes in children, in the US, has increased by almost 60% in 11 years (2) and approximately 1 in 300 children in the US will be affected by type 1 diabetes by 18 years of age. (3) There are too many children who are effected globally. The highest rates are in northern Europe and in individuals of European decent. Men are more commonly affected in early adult life. (2) Data suggests the incidence of T1D has been increasing by 2–5% worldwide. (5) What Happens When Your Body Does Not Make Enough Insulin? Beta cells in the pancreas are destroyed by your own immune system resulting in too little or no insulin (a hormone released by the pancreas) produced. Without insulin, energy (sugar) from food cannot enter the cells. Instead of fueling the cells, this excess sugar circulates in the blood causing high blood sugar levels (also known as hyperglycemia). If there is Continue reading >>

The Effect Of A Low-carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet Versus A Low-glycemic Index Diet On Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

The Effect Of A Low-carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet Versus A Low-glycemic Index Diet On Glycemic Control In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: Abstract Dietary carbohydrate is the major determinant of postprandial glucose levels, and several clinical studies have shown that low-carbohydrate diets improve glycemic control. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a diet lower in carbohydrate would lead to greater improvement in glycemic control over a 24-week period in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Eighty-four community volunteers with obesity and type 2 diabetes were randomized to either a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (<20 g of carbohydrate daily; LCKD) or a low-glycemic, reduced-calorie diet (500 kcal/day deficit from weight maintenance diet; LGID). Both groups received group meetings, nutritional supplementation, and an exercise recommendation. The main outcome was glycemic control, measured by hemoglobin A1c. Forty-nine (58.3%) participants completed the study. Both interventions led to improvements in hemoglobin A1c, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and weight loss. The LCKD group had greater improvements in hemoglobin A1c (-1.5% vs. -0.5%, p = 0.03), body weight (-11.1 kg vs. -6.9 kg, p = 0.008), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (+5.6 mg/dL vs. 0 mg/dL, p < 0.001) compared to the LGID group. Diabetes medications were reduced or eliminated in 95.2% of LCKD vs. 62% of LGID participants (p < 0.01). Dietary modification led to improvements in glycemic control and medication reduction/elimination in motivated volunteers with type 2 diabetes. The diet lower in carbohydrate led to greater improvements in glycemic control, and more frequent medication reduction/elimination than the low glycemic index diet. Lifestyle modification using low carbohydrate interventions is effective for improving and reversing type 2 diabetes. Effect of diet programs on indices of glycemic Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes With Nutritional Ketosis

Reversing Type 2 Diabetes With Nutritional Ketosis

Virta is a science-based online specialty medical clinic using continuous remote monitoring and intensive coaching to help our patients reverse type 2 diabetes and prediabetes. A unique contributor to our success in this is harnessing and sustaining the metabolic benefits of nutritional ketosis. Admittedly, reversing diabetes is a rather bold goal. By way of contrast, the American Diabetes Association defines type 2 diabetes as a progressive disease whose course at best can be slowed by lifestyle change and medication. Based upon solid science—some old and some new—we beg to differ. Perhaps it’s time for a paradigm change. There are few times in the lives of medical scientists where we have the opportunity to change the course of a major medical disease; and even fewer cases where we actually succeed in doing so. In 1920, Banting’s discovery that injected insulin could control type 1 diabetes (T1D) was such an event. As a result, over the last century, millions of people with T1D have achieved long and productive lives; whereas before 1920 most of them would have succumbed to this insulin-deficiency disease within less than a year. Type 2 diabetes (T2D), on the other hand, is a very different disease that affects hundreds of millions of people. It responds very poorly to injected insulin. Whereas T1D patients cannot make insulin, people with T2D typically make lots of insulin but are resistant to insulin’s effects across a variety of cellular functions. Despite these facts having been known for 5 decades, we are taught that the core components of T2D management are to force the body to make even more insulin or to inject more insulin to overcome the insulin resistance that characterizes this disease. But in study after study, intensive management of type 2 dia Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And My Type 2 Diabetes

The Ketogenic Diet And My Type 2 Diabetes

I was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes in October 2008. This morning and yesterday morning my fasting blood sugar was 86. That is a non-diabetic fasting blood sugar. If you have Type 2 Diabetes, the likely answer to curing/controlling it is a high fat, low carb, ketogenic diet and lifestyle. I consider myself cured, but I know there are people out there who don’t like me saying that. To them I say, “Too bad.” My doctor told me that in my current state there is no way, no how that I would be diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes, so therefore I consider that cured. I began this way of life on March 3, 2014 and by early May 2014 I was off the diabetes medication I was taking, which was 1000 mg of Metformin per day. Initially, upon going off the meds, my blood sugars went up a little for about a week, but then gradually came back down when my body realized it could do the job it needed to do. I have been off the meds for 13 months. I do not poison my body or feed that disease with the food I eat. I eat real food. I eat food that has ingredients I can pronounce. I don’t eat processed food (the packaged high carb sugar laden “food”). I don’t eat artificial sweeteners anymore (although there may be an exception from time to time in a low carb baked good). I don’t eat Atkins bars/Quest bars or shakes anymore. I stick with eggs, bacon, meat, veggies, cheese (I have cut back on that too), nuts and berries very sparingly. I put butter and good oils on my food. I use salt. Let’s take a look at what the ADA says I should eat: Whole grain breads, such as whole wheat or rye whole grain Cereal Oatmeal Grits, hominy or cream of wheat Rice Pasta Tortillas Cooked beans and peas Potatoes Corn Sweet potatoes Winter squash Low-fat crackers Low-fat snack chips Low-fat pretzels Light Continue reading >>

Very Low-carbohydrate Ketogenic Diet May Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Very Low-carbohydrate Ketogenic Diet May Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Vice President, Primary Care, Eisenhower Medical Center; Clinical Professor, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California Dr. Scherger reports no financial relationships relevant to this field of study. SYNOPSIS: A very low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet demonstrated superiority to the plate method diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association for controlling and even reversing type 2 diabetes. SOURCE: Saslow LR, Mason AE, Kim S, et al. An online intervention comparing a very low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet and lifestyle recommendations versus a plate method diet in overweight individuals with type 2 diabetes: A randomized controlled trial. J Med Internet Res 2017;19(2):e36. doi: 10.2196/jmir.5806. This randomized, controlled trial conducted at the University of California, San Francisco compared a very low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet with the “create your plate” diet recommended by the American Diabetes Association for managing type 2 diabetes. Saslow et al previously conducted an in-person randomized, controlled trial;1 the most recent study was conducted online. Both studies were small (25 patients) and showed the same results. HbA1c dropped more than twice as much with the very low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet compared to the plate method (average 0.8% vs. 0.3%). With an average HbA1c of 7.1% or 7.2% at baseline, more than half the very low carbohydrate subjects dropped their HbA1c to below 6.5%. A very low-carbohydrate diet consisted of only 20-50 grams of nonfiber carbohydrates for ketones to appear in urine, reflecting fat metabolism. Patients in both groups were mailed diet plans. Patients in the very low-carbohydrate group were mailed urine test kits for ketones. The only diabetes medication allowed by the study subjects was metformin, bot Continue reading >>

How To Cure Type 2 Diabetes

How To Cure Type 2 Diabetes

Jay Wortman, MD, tells the spectacular story of how he got rid of his rampant type 2 diabetes using a simple dietary change. Eight years later he is still free from the disease and needs no medication. Basically he stopped eating the foods that turn to sugar in the gut. During the last few years several well designed scientific studies has proven that this common sense approach works very well. You can read more about it on Dr. Wortman’s website or use the detailed guidelines here at DietDoctor.com (completely free). In the video above (filmed during the Baltimore conference this month) dr Wortman also talks about his experience using a very low carb (ketogenic) diet for kids and how his wife used it during pregnancy, very interesting subjects. Continue reading >>

A Low-carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

A Low-carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet To Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Abstract The low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (LCKD) may be effective for improving glycemia and reducing medications in patients with type 2 diabetes. From an outpatient clinic, we recruited 28 overweight participants with type 2 diabetes for a 16-week single-arm pilot diet intervention trial. We provided LCKD counseling, with an initial goal of <20 g carbohydrate/day, while reducing diabetes medication dosages at diet initiation. Participants returned every other week for measurements, counseling, and further medication adjustment. The primary outcome was hemoglobin A1c. Results Twenty-one of the 28 participants who were enrolled completed the study. Twenty participants were men; 13 were White, 8 were African-American. The mean [± SD] age was 56.0 ± 7.9 years and BMI was 42.2 ± 5.8 kg/m2. Hemoglobin A1c decreased by 16% from 7.5 ± 1.4% to 6.3 ± 1.0% (p < 0.001) from baseline to week 16. Diabetes medications were discontinued in 7 participants, reduced in 10 participants, and unchanged in 4 participants. The mean body weight decreased by 6.6% from 131.4 ± 18.3 kg to 122.7 ± 18.9 kg (p < 0.001). In linear regression analyses, weight change at 16 weeks did not predict change in hemoglobin A1c. Fasting serum triglyceride decreased 42% from 2.69 ± 2.87 mmol/L to 1.57 ± 1.38 mmol/L (p = 0.001) while other serum lipid measurements did not change significantly. Conclusion The LCKD improved glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes such that diabetes medications were discontinued or reduced in most participants. Because the LCKD can be very effective at lowering blood glucose, patients on diabetes medication who use this diet should be under close medical supervision or capable of adjusting their medication. Go to: Background Prior to the advent of exog Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Type 2 Diabetes?

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Type 2 Diabetes?

You’ve probably seen dozens of headlines about the ketogenic diet by now, which has made its way into popular culture largely by celebrities and supermodels giving the long-standing fad diet a repeated stamp of approval. Is this the diet to follow if you have diabetes? Studies suggest the answer isn’t so simple. Some science shows its meal plan may be helpful, while other research, like one study published in September 2016 in Nutrients, highlights the importance of whole grains in the diets of people with diabetes — a restricted food category in the ketogenic diet. While the keto diet can offer many potential benefits for diabetes management, following it requires pretty serious commitment. So take a beat before you take the plunge — and consider these questions that can help you and your medical team determine if it’s right for you: How Does the Ketogenic Diet Work Exactly? There’s a good reason the ketogenic diet is also referred to as a low-carb, high-fat diet. Indeed, following the ketogenic diet means reducing carbohydrate intake to typically less than 50 grams (g) of carbohydrates per day, while increasing fat and protein intake, according to a review published in August 2013 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. To put that into perspective, an individual on an average, non-restricted diet can easily eat more carbohydrates than that in one typical meal — for instance, a turkey, cheese, and veggie sandwich on whole-grain bread with a small, 1 ounce (oz) bag of classic potato chips would come in at around 51 g of carbs. These dietary changes drive down insulin levels, eventually leading your body into a state of ketosis, during which it is burning fat rather than carbohydrates. What Are Some of the Potential Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet for Continue reading >>

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