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Januvia Weight Loss Reviews

A Review Of Three Weight Loss Medications

A Review Of Three Weight Loss Medications

A Review of Three Weight Loss Medications Medications for Weight Loss When You Have Type 2 Diabetes Millions of overweight Americans struggle with their weight every day. Diabetics, especially type 2 diabetics, are often told, when diagnosed, that they must lose weight. The most common strategies for weight loss are diet and exercise; however, when obese people are unable to lose weight using these techniques, medications may be prescribed to achieve a healthier weight. Here we look at three of these medications in order to educate our readers so that you can ask informed questions of medical teams. Phentermine was first approved for the treatment of obesity in 1959, and it became very popular when articles were written about its efficacy in 1992. It was used in combination with both fenfluramine (Pondimin) and dexfenfluramine (Redux) until studies showed a possible link between fenfluramines and heart-valve problems. Today, phentermine alone is used as an appetite suppressant. It activates the adrenergic system (ie, the "fight or flight" response), causing it to release norepinepherine. For reasons not completely understood, this suppresses appetite. The effectiveness of phentermine has been studied in a number of trials. If we exclude those trials where it was taken with other drugs, all clinical trials have been 20 weeks or less in length. These studies show that use of this medication results in an average weight loss of 6.6 pounds. It is approved for short-term use only (just for a few weeks). Although phentermine is no longer prescribed with fenfluramines, it is used in combination with other medications. Some clinicians combine it with fluoxetine (Prozac), however; controlled studies are needed to show that this combination is safe and effective in the treatment Continue reading >>

Lose Weight With Januvia

Lose Weight With Januvia

Hi I am new to this site. I have type 2 diabetes. Has anyone lost any weight with januvia? D.D. Family Getting much harder to control I was on it but it didnt work for me, one thing is were all different so good luck with it. Also lowering your carb level and getting exercise is a must to help the meds. Moderator T2 since Oct 08, from insulin to no meds =) well it might or might not make you lose weight on it... but combining it with proper diet and exercise would definitely help the weight go off HbA1c: Oct 08 - 9.2% | Dec 08 - 5.5% | Feb 09 - 4.4% | June,Sep,Dec 09,Mar 10 - 5.2% | June, Aug 10 - 5% | Nov 10 - 5.3% | Dec 10 - 5.1% | Feb 11 - 5.2% | May 11 - 5.3% | Aug 11 - 4.6% | Dec 11 - 5% | March 12 - 5.1% | June 12 - 5.0% | Sept 12 - 4.9% | Dec 12 - 5.2% | March 13 - 4.8% | May 13 - 5.0% | Oct, Dec 13 - 5.2% | Mar 14 - 5.0% For the weight loss exercise is the best way. It helps in burning the calories don't go for any type o0f pills without consulting with your doctor. Januvia, I took that with metformin in the beginning. metformin helped me lose weight and the januvia helped me keep my BG numbers in check without lows. I loved it but my insurance quit paying for it so I had to stop taking it. Januvia, I took that with metformin in the beginning. metformin helped me lose weight and the januvia helped me keep my BG numbers in check without lows. I loved it but my insurance quit paying for it so I had to stop taking it. Is Januvia insulin? I need to go look it up and read about it. Is it very expensive without insurance. I have insurance and it covered all but $50.00 of Byetta when I was on it but it made me so sick even after taking it for a year. All I take now is Metformin, just wondering how Januvia works. Without insurance Byetta was $200.00 a month and sorry I Continue reading >>

Januvia & Weight Loss

Januvia & Weight Loss

Januvia is the brand name for sitagliptin, a medication prescribed to improve blood sugar regulation in adults with type 2 diabetes. Produced by Merck and Co., Januvia is intended to be used along with diet and exercise. Evidence on whether Januvia is beneficial for weight loss is conflicting, but the medication does have some effects that might lead to weight loss. Video of the Day Januvia helps to regulate blood sugar by increasing the amount of two hormones that the body produces in response to food intake. This increase in hormones has several effects, and two effects may help with weight loss. The hormones decrease the transit time for food to move from the stomach into the intestines, slowing the absorption of glucose into the bloodstream, explains NetDoctor. They also cause a feeling of fullness that helps the person to eat less. In pre-approval research evaluating the effectiveness of Januvia for treating type 2 diabetes, the medication generally did not cause weight gain or weight loss, reports eMedTV. In addition, people taking Januvia along with metformin for treating type 2 diabetes did not lose more weight than those taking only metformin. In 2008, Merck and Co. presented an analysis of research on Januvia at the American Diabetes Association 68th Annual Scientific Sessions, as reported by "Medical News Today." In comparison with the type 2 diabetes medication glipizide, Januvia was much better at preventing hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, in type 2 diabetes patients needing medicine to control blood sugar. In addition, participants taking Januvia experienced significant weight loss, although the actual amounts were small on average. Some people experience side effects when taking Januvia that could cause weight loss. These effects include excess gas, dia Continue reading >>

What Is Januvia

What Is Januvia

JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right Continue reading >>

Januvia

Januvia

I'm maxed out on metformin (850 mg 3x/day) and glyburide (5mg 4x/day). Januvia, even without the other 2 meds, had my readings in the desired ranges in a day. It's only been 5 days, but so far VERY GOOD! Thanks! Started Januvia 100 mg once a day with in days I had joint pain so bad I did not want to get out of bed and the join pain has not went away its not as bad but still there. Chronic heart pain my heart beat so hard and fast I worried I was having a heart attack. My chest was/is sore I have congestion, I still have a fast heart beat off and on "This worries me". Shortness of breath. I was dizzy, chest colds, Very bad headache, Both hands were numb this was worse at night I would wake with my hands hurting I still have some numbness it is off and on and and mostly in my fingers now. I was so hoping Januvia would work for me. I do not think this drug was not tested well enough before the public was allowed to use it. I hope my side effects are not long term and no damage was caused and with time will go away. I was on another medication for type 2 diabetes and it didnot work for me. My doctor didn't want to take me off of it because he said it work for most people. Well, I change Doctors and the new Doctor stated me on Januvia 50 mg in the AM and 50 in the PM and it started to work at the end of the week, no side effects, my number was very close to normal and I feel GREAT . I even lost weight while on this medication. My husband is on 50 mg a day and doing great with no side effects. Family member had a rash with this medicine, and a friend said there was a new warning posted about a deadly disease called Stevens-Johnson syndrome associated with Januvia. I didn't find it in WebMd though. Is it true? Januvia (with metformin) has worked very well for me so far (3 mont Continue reading >>

New Concerns Over Byetta And Januvia Underscore The Value Of Older And Cheaper Diabetes Drugs

New Concerns Over Byetta And Januvia Underscore The Value Of Older And Cheaper Diabetes Drugs

New concerns over Byetta and Januvia underscore the value of older and cheaper diabetes drugs Consumer Reports News: March 05, 2013 09:13 AM If you take Byetta or Januvia to control your blood sugar levels, you might have a small, but increased risk for a condition marked by stomach pain and nausea. Not only are the drugs more expensive and no more effective than our Best Buy Drug picks for diabetes , they're associated with an increased risk for pancreatitis, or an inflamed pancreas, according to a new study in JAMA Internal Medicine. We recommend asking your doctor if you shouldn't be taking another drug in the first place. Researchers at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore analyzed the medical records of 1,269 people with type 2 diabetes who filled at least one prescription for any diabetes drug over a three-year period. The researchers found 87 of the patients who developed pancreatitis were taking Byetta or Januvia, while 58 of the people who developed pancreatitis were taking some other diabetes drug. Tens of millions of people take these drugs, though our experts say other drugs--metformin (Glucophage and generic) and a sulfonylurea (glipizide or glimepride)--are better first choices for most people. "In my opinion, Byetta and Januvia are third-line medications for type 2 diabetes, behind metformin and sulfonylureas" says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., an endocrinologist and Consumer Reports' chief medical adviser. "And patients who take them should be warned about the early signs of pancreatitis." Also talk with your doctor about lifestyle changes, such as weight loss and dietary changes, that can help you control the disease. Those measures can be as effective medication, especially in the early stages of diabetes. Continue reading >>

Liraglutide And Sitagliptin Both Have Role To Play In Diabetes

Liraglutide And Sitagliptin Both Have Role To Play In Diabetes

September 28, 2010 (Stockholm, Sweden) Two relatively new agents for type 2 diabetes have a role to play in the treatment of this disorder because they have been shown to improve glycemia and induce weight loss and could one day even replace the use of insulin in insulin-dependent type 2 diabetics, attendees at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 2010 Meeting heard this week. During a late-breaking clinical-trials session, Dr Richard Pratley (University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington) discussed more data from the Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes (LEAD) series of trials with liraglutide (Victoza, Novo Nordisk), a glucagonlike peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist and one of a number of new drugs for type 2 diabetes known as incretins. Pratley discussed the latest results from LEAD , which compares liraglutide with another incretin, the oral agent sitagliptin (Januvia, Merck)--a dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor; these show that liraglutide is generally well tolerated and reduces glycated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c) and body weight to a greater extent than sitagliptin when added to metformin treatment; also those on the higher dose of liraglutide reported greater overall patient satisfaction, he noted. Discussant of the session, Dr Jonathan Bodansky (St James University Hospital, Leeds, UK), said both agents were useful additions to the diabetologists' armamentarium, with the decision about therapy coming down to physician and patient choice. "Gratifying" to See Weight Loss With Sitagliptin Bodansky agreed the data so far do indicate that liraglutide results in more weight loss than sitagliptin, but "they both go in the right direction," and it is "gratifying" to see weight loss with sitagliptin, he said, which has previously been cons Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Drug Januvia Approved By Fda

New Diabetes Drug Januvia Approved By Fda

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new oral diabetes drug on Tuesday, October 17. The drug, sitagliptin (brand name Januvia), is manufactured by the pharmaceutical company Merck & Co., Inc., and is meant for use in people with Type 2 diabetes. Januvia is the first drug in a new class called dipeptidyl peptidase IV (or DPP-4) inhibitors to be approved. DPP-4 inhibitors work by enhancing the body’s levels of a protein called GLP-1. This protein, in turn, stimulates the pancreas to produce more insulin and prevents the liver from producing glucose—but only when blood glucose levels are already elevated. This selectivity makes DPP-4 inhibitors much less likely to cause hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) than some older diabetes drugs. Januvia is meant to be taken once a day and can be taken on its own or in addition to certain other diabetes medicines, namely metformin (Glucophage and other brand names), pioglitazone (Actos), and rosiglitazone (Avandia). One of its chief selling points will likely be that, according to clinical trials, it does not cause weight gain or severe side effects like hypoglycemia. In a study of over 2,000 people, the most common side effects were sore throat, diarrhea, and colds. This study also showed that Januvia lowered HbA1c (a measure of blood glucose control) by an average of 0.67%, the same amount as the older diabetes drug glipizide (Glucotrol and other brand names), which does tend to cause weight gain and hypoglycemia. Januvia’s chief drawback for many people will likely be its price, which is $4.86 per day, or about $145 per month. Merck is planning to ship Januvia to pharmacies and send free samples to doctors quickly, meaning that the drug should be available to people with diabetes very soon. A survey of 60 doc Continue reading >>

Can Januvia Cause Weight Loss?

Can Januvia Cause Weight Loss?

Lamisil vs Lotrimin Mucinex vs Sudafed Lactogen 1 Side Effects Evekeo vs Adderall Dexilant and Alcohol Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

Januvia Oral Reviews And User Ratings: Effectiveness, Ease Of Use, And Satisfaction

Januvia Oral Reviews And User Ratings: Effectiveness, Ease Of Use, And Satisfaction

This drug almost killed me! My entire body was numb and tingling for 3 months. I was in ER twice, admitted once ,had thousands of dollars in test and I am happy they were all normal.Once I stopped the drug it took 3 months for the symptom's to stop and co away!I did report this to the drug company. This drug almost killed me! My entire body was numb and tingling for 3 months. I was in ER twice, admitted once ,had thousands of dollars in test and I am happy they were all normal.Once I stopped the drug it took 3 months for the symptom's to stop and co away!I did report this to the drug company. I started out on metaformin once a day, then went to twice a day, levels and A1C started going up again, then add Januvia seemed to help at first then I stared gaining weight and sugar levels and A1C started going up again, added trilicity shots once a week seemed to be doing ok, now the levels and A1C are climbing again. I stopped the Januvia because of the joint pain I was having and the sugar c ... Show Full Comment I started out on metaformin once a day, then went to twice a day, levels and A1C started going up again, then add Januvia seemed to help at first then I stared gaining weight and sugar levels and A1C started going up again, added trilicity shots once a week seemed to be doing ok, now the levels and A1C are climbing again. I stopped the Januvia because of the joint pain I was having and the sugar cravings. Been off it about a month and my levels are not any better so heading to the DR again to see what to try next. I think diabetes drugs are a joke the are not made to help for a long time before you have to add another pill or shot to keep things working. Big pharm making some money off from these for sure. I started Januvia 100 mg twice a day with Metformin 1000mg. Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia is the brand name of the drug sitagliptin, which is used to treat type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which the body doesn't make or use the hormone insulin normally, so it can't properly control your blood sugar levels. Januvia belongs to a class of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. It works by increasing levels of substances in the body that help lower blood sugar. Januvia may be taken alone or with other diabetes medications. It's often prescribed as a combination medicine called Janumet (which contains the drugs sitagliptin and metformin). Taking Januvia, along with adopting a healthy lifestyle, can reduce your risk of developing serious or life-threatening complications from diabetes, which may include heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, kidney problems, or eye problems. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Januvia in 2006. It's manufactured by Merck & Co. Januvia Warnings Januvia shouldn't be taken by people with type 1 diabetes (a disease in which the body doesn't produce any insulin) or diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous condition that can occur if high blood sugar is untreated). Before taking Januvia, tell your doctor if you have, or have ever had: Kidney disease Angioedema (swelling of the face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, or legs) Januvia may increase the risk of developing pancreatitis (swelling and inflammation of the pancreas). Be sure to tell your doctor if you've ever had any problems with your pancreas, or if you experience any of the following symptoms while taking Januvia: Severe pain in your upper stomach that spreads to your back Loss of appetite Fast heartbeat Severe nausea and vomiting Also, tell your doctor you're taking this medicine before having any type of surgery, including a dental Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia Side Effects Center

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral diabetes medicine for people with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes. Januvia is sometimes used in combination with other diabetes medications, but is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Many people using Januvia do not have serious side effects. Side effects that may occur with Januvia include: headache, joint or muscle pain, nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, or constipation. Although Januvia by itself usually does not cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), low blood sugar may occur if Januvia is prescribed with other anti-diabetic medications. Symptoms of low blood sugar include sudden sweating, shaking, fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, or tingling hands/feet. Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Januvia including pancreatitis (severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, fast heart rate), urinating less than usual or not at all, swelling, weight gain, shortness of breath, or severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads [especially in the face or upper body] and causes blistering and peeling). The recommended dose of Januvia is 100 mg once daily. Januvia may interact with digoxin, probenecid, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin or other salicylates, sulfa drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), or beta-blockers. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. During pregnancy Januvia should be used only when prescribed. Pregnancy may cause or worsen diabetes. Your doctor may change your diabetes treatment during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Cons Continue reading >>

Yet Another Problem With Januvia

Yet Another Problem With Januvia

UPDATE (April 2, 2013): Before you take Byetta, Victoza, Onglyza, or Januvia please read about the new research that shows that they, and probably all incretin drugs, cause severely abnormal cell growth in the pancreas and precancerous tumors. You'll find that information HERE. Update (January, 2009) : A much more important problem with Januvia--that it promotes cancer by inhibiting a tumor suppressor gene researchers have called "the trigger for prostate cancer"--is discussed in this more recent blog post: More Research Shows Januvia and Glinides Inhibit Tumor Suppressor Gene DPP-4. Posted Dec 8, 2008. Original Post: If you have had or might get melanoma, ovarian cancer, lung cancer or prostate cancer, please read the above post before making your decision about whether Januvia is for you. Here is the original post that was posted 9/12/08: I have been hearing from people about a new, and, to me, very troubling problem with Januvia. The problem is this: now that doctors have decided that all people recently diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes should be put on Januvia, prescriptions for the combination drug Janumet, which is made up of both Januvia and Metformin, are becoming much more frequent as a first prescription for diabetes. Metformin is a very safe drug that has been used safely for decades. The most recent follow up to the UKPDS study, the 20 year follow-up, which was just presented at the annual EASD conference found that at 20 years after the start of the study, "Patients treated with metformin had a 21% reduction in risk of any diabetes endpoint (P=0.01), a 30% reduction in risk of diabetes-related death (P=0.01), a 33% reduction in risk of MI (P=0.005), and a 27% reduction in risk of all cause mortality (P=0.002)." Metformin is a very good drug for people with Ty Continue reading >>

Januvia Smackdown

Januvia Smackdown

Get your ringside seats, Folks! A while back I posted about the Merck's new Type 2 oral drug Januvia (What It Doesn't Do), explaining how it apparently trumps competitors in terms of patient "tolerability." No other post has ever generated such ongoing reader energy, both positive and negative. Nearly every day, several new commentors weigh in, duking it out over the relative merits of Januvia. Most everyone seems to agree that Januvia reduces appetite, which is a good thing. But then again, Byetta is known for that effect as well. The key is question whether Januvia fulfills its core function of lowering blood glucose (BG) levels, and lives up to its no-side-effects promise. As of today, the score stands pretty much tied, as such: Total comments = 50 Positive = 10 Negative = 13 Mixed = 16 (liked some aspects of the drug but not others) Neutral = 11 (those asking or responding to questions only) Among the most vocal of the Pro Team: "I take Januvia and have for 6 months. I have no side effects. I have experienced a decrease in appetite. I have had no headaches or respiratory problems. My BG has gone down. It is a great drug." -- Mike "Januvia has been a positive thing for me. My sugar levels dropped from 240+ to 110 +/- 10 after fasting. I have taken 100 mg once per day for a month... I am not as hungry as before usage." -- Jim K. L. "I've been on Januvia for a little over three months and have lost over 15 pounds which I had put on with Actos. I've experienced no side effects, other than I am not hungry all of the time. For me it has been very effective..." -- Bill "I am substantially less hungry then I have felt in years ... and my BG hovers around 100 - 120 between meals/fasting, and 120 - 160 for a few hours after a heavy carb meal. The usual BG spikes of 180 - 200+ Continue reading >>

What’s Invokana? 10 Things You Need To Know

What’s Invokana? 10 Things You Need To Know

Invokana (canagliflozin) is one of the new oral medications for adult onset diabetes. It’s expensive but has many upsides. Taken usually in combination with metformin it is a rising star in the treatment of diabetes. Here is what you need to know to help you decide: worth it or not? Invokana is taken as a 100 mg tablet once daily before breakfast, increasing to a 300 mg tablet once a day if you have normal kidney function. Invokana can be taken with or without food. Invokana is not yet recommended for use alone in the treatment of diabetes; it should be given as a second agent in addition to metformin or as a third-line treatment. Invokana works on the kidneys and tells the proximal tubule to resorb approximately 90 percent of the filtered glucose load. So, Invokana promotes dumping of glucose from the kidneys to the urine. Invokana used alone doesn’t lower blood sugars (measured by the A1C blood test) enough to make it effective as a single agent for diabetes. In studies it lowers A1C by 0.5 to 0.7 percentage points, making it a relatively weak glucose lowering agent. When should Invokana be added? It has been shown to be effective in lowering A1C when metformin alone is not achieving the goal A1C of < 7.0. Invokana 300 mg compared to Januvia 100 mg mixed with metformin was better at lowering blood sugar and helped with weight loss. Will I lose weight on Invokana? Yes, in most studies Invokana (used with metformin) resulted in a 6.5 pound weight loss at 12 weeks and an almost 10 pound weight loss at the end of a year. That’s quite a plus. The huge downside of Invokana is the frequency of genital fungal infections, which are almost sixfold higher. This means there is an increased risk of genital yeast infections: vulvovaginal candidiasis (vaginal yeast infections) Continue reading >>

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