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Januvia Patient Reviews

Januvia

Januvia

I'm maxed out on metformin (850 mg 3x/day) and glyburide (5mg 4x/day). Januvia, even without the other 2 meds, had my readings in the desired ranges in a day. It's only been 5 days, but so far VERY GOOD! Thanks! Started Januvia 100 mg once a day with in days I had joint pain so bad I did not want to get out of bed and the join pain has not went away its not as bad but still there. Chronic heart pain my heart beat so hard and fast I worried I was having a heart attack. My chest was/is sore I have congestion, I still have a fast heart beat off and on "This worries me". Shortness of breath. I was dizzy, chest colds, Very bad headache, Both hands were numb this was worse at night I would wake with my hands hurting I still have some numbness it is off and on and and mostly in my fingers now. I was so hoping Januvia would work for me. I do not think this drug was not tested well enough before the public was allowed to use it. I hope my side effects are not long term and no damage was caused and with time will go away. I was on another medication for type 2 diabetes and it didnot work for me. My doctor didn't want to take me off of it because he said it work for most people. Well, I change Doctors and the new Doctor stated me on Januvia 50 mg in the AM and 50 in the PM and it started to work at the end of the week, no side effects, my number was very close to normal and I feel GREAT . I even lost weight while on this medication. My husband is on 50 mg a day and doing great with no side effects. Family member had a rash with this medicine, and a friend said there was a new warning posted about a deadly disease called Stevens-Johnson syndrome associated with Januvia. I didn't find it in WebMd though. Is it true? Januvia (with metformin) has worked very well for me so far (3 mont Continue reading >>

Confab Reviews Safety Of Diabetes Drugs Like Merck's Januvia, Novo's Victoza

Confab Reviews Safety Of Diabetes Drugs Like Merck's Januvia, Novo's Victoza

Confab reviews safety of diabetes drugs like Merck's Januvia, Novo's Victoza Pressure is building to take a deeper dive into the cancer risks of incretin mimetics, a group of drugs for Type 2 diabetes that includes blockbusters like Merck's ($MRK) Januvia and Novo Nordisk's ($NVO) Victoza. A study of insurance records in March raised the specter of higher pancreatic cancer risks, and the FDA has been taking a closer look at the data. Drugmakers are meeting this week with officials of the FDA and the National Institutes of Health to present safety data for their drugs and to discuss what further study may be needed. FDA spokeswoman Morgan Liscinsky told Bloomberg that one possibility is a large clinical trial designed to show patterns of adverse events. Robert Ratner, chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association, said: "We need some calm heads and to look at the data and try and make some reasonable judgments out of this." Potential risks for incretin mimetics, which help regulate blood sugar by stimulating insulin production, were identified years ago, not long after Byetta from Bristol-Myers Squibb ($BMY) hit the market. Their labels already carry warnings for risks of pancreatitis, added after Byetta was tied to 6 patient deaths. But in February a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that patients hospitalized with pancreatitis were twice as likely to be using Januvia or Byetta compared to diabetics who didn't have pancreatitis. And pancreatitis is linked to pancreatic cancer. That prompted the FDA to look again. Liscinsky told Bloomberg in an email that FDA researchers have not found a direct link between the use of incretin mimetics and pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer or thyroid cancer. "There have been several hypothesis gen Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin | Nature Reviews Drug Discovery

Sitagliptin | Nature Reviews Drug Discovery

Sitagliptin phosphate (Januvia; Merck) was approved by the US FDA for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in October 2006. It is the first in a new class of drugs that inhibit the proteolytic activity of dipeptidyl peptidase-4, thereby potentiating the action of endogenous glucoregulatory peptides, known as incretins. Subscribe to Nature Reviews Drug Discovery for full access: Therapeutic strategies based on glucagon-like peptide-1 Enhanced insulin secretion and improved glucose tolerance in mice lacking CD26 . Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 97, 68746879 (2000). Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase IV improves metabolic control over a 4-week study period in type 2 diabetes (2R)-4-oxo-4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-5,6-dihydro[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyrazin-7(8H)-yl]-1-(2,4,5-trifluorophenyl)butan-2-amine: a potent, orally active dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor for the treatment of type 2 diabetes Efficacy and safety of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor sitagliptin as monotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus Effect of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor sitagliptin as monotherapy on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes Efficacy and safety of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor sitagliptin added to ongoing metformin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with metformin alone Efficacy and safety of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor sitagliptin added to ongoing pioglitazone therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes: a 24-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study Exenatide versus insulin glargine in patients with suboptimally controlled type 2 diabetes: a randomized trial Daniel Drucker is at the Banting and Best Diabetes Centre, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hos Continue reading >>

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia Side Effects

Januvia is the brand name of the drug sitagliptin, which is used to treat type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which the body doesn't make or use the hormone insulin normally, so it can't properly control your blood sugar levels. Januvia belongs to a class of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. It works by increasing levels of substances in the body that help lower blood sugar. Januvia may be taken alone or with other diabetes medications. It's often prescribed as a combination medicine called Janumet (which contains the drugs sitagliptin and metformin). Taking Januvia, along with adopting a healthy lifestyle, can reduce your risk of developing serious or life-threatening complications from diabetes, which may include heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, kidney problems, or eye problems. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Januvia in 2006. It's manufactured by Merck & Co. Januvia Warnings Januvia shouldn't be taken by people with type 1 diabetes (a disease in which the body doesn't produce any insulin) or diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous condition that can occur if high blood sugar is untreated). Before taking Januvia, tell your doctor if you have, or have ever had: Kidney disease Angioedema (swelling of the face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, or legs) Januvia may increase the risk of developing pancreatitis (swelling and inflammation of the pancreas). Be sure to tell your doctor if you've ever had any problems with your pancreas, or if you experience any of the following symptoms while taking Januvia: Severe pain in your upper stomach that spreads to your back Loss of appetite Fast heartbeat Severe nausea and vomiting Also, tell your doctor you're taking this medicine before having any type of surgery, including a dental Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin For Diabetes Januvia

Sitagliptin For Diabetes Januvia

Take sitagliptin tablets once a day. Remember to follow any advice you have been given about your diet. The most common side-effects are feeling sick (nausea), headache, and nose or throat infections. About sitagliptin Type of medicine An antidiabetic medicine Used for Adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus Also called Januvia®; Janumet® (a combination tablet containing sitagliptin with metformin) Available as Tablets Insulin is a hormone which is made naturally in your body, in the pancreas. It helps to control the levels of sugar in your blood. If your body does not make enough insulin, or if it does not use the insulin it makes effectively, this results in the condition called sugar diabetes (diabetes mellitus). People with diabetes need treatment to control the amount of sugar (glucose) in their blood. This is because good control of blood glucose levels reduces the risk of complications later on. Some people can control the sugar in their blood by making changes to the food they eat but, for other people, medicines like sitagliptin are given alongside the changes in diet. Sitagliptin works in part by increasing the amount of insulin produced by your body. It also reduces the amount of a substance called glucagon being produced by your pancreas. Glucagon causes your liver to produce more sugar, so by reducing the amount of glucagon in your body, this also helps to reduce the levels of glucose in your blood. Before taking sitagliptin Some medicines are not suitable for people with certain conditions, and sometimes a medicine may only be used if extra care is taken. For these reasons, before you start taking sitagliptin it is important that your doctor knows: If you are pregnant, trying for a baby or breast-feeding. If you have any problems with the way your kidneys w Continue reading >>

Januvia And Janumet

Januvia And Janumet

Januvia (sitagliptin) is an oral Type 2 diabetes medication manufactured by Merck & Co. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the drug in 2006, and it is one of the most popular Type 2 diabetes drugs on the market. In 2007, the FDA approved a variation of Januvia called Janumet, which is a combination of sitagliptin and metformin. Janumet also comes in an extended-release formula called Janumet XR. Januvia and Janumet are known as dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors that work by helping the body produce more insulin. Both Januvia and Janumet belong to a class of drugs called dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors that work by helping the body produce more insulin. Januvia was the first DPP-4 approved by the FDA and is the top-selling brand in its class. Two million prescriptions were written for Januvia in 2011. Januvia brought in about $6 billion in 2014. Merck stands to benefit from the patent on the drug until 2022. In clinical trials, Januvia proved effective in controlling blood-sugar levels. However, some studies reported rare and serious side effects, including acute pancreatitis, severe joint pain, pancreatic cancer and thyroid cancer. How Do Januvia and Janumet Work? Januvia is designed to work with other Type 2 diabetes medications, like Byetta, to increase their effectiveness. It helps lower blood sugar in two ways. It helps the body increase insulin to stabilize blood sugar and decrease sugars that are made in the liver. It is a part of the class of diabetes medications called DPP-4 inhibitors. DPP-4 is a protein made by the body that plays a role in glucose metabolism. The process works like this: After a person eats and blood sugar rises, intestinal cells release hormones called incretin hormones. Incretin stimulates pancreatic cell Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin (januvia) For The Treatment Of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Sitagliptin (januvia) For The Treatment Of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

SAFETY Two large trials have assessed the effectiveness and safety of sitagliptin alone or in combination with metformin in adult patients with type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemia rates in patients receiving sitagliptin were similar to those in patients receiving placebo or metformin alone, with no incidents of severe hypoglycemia1–3; however, it is unknown whether sitagliptin will increase hypoglycemic events when combined with sulfonyl-ureas or insulin. Hepatic insufficiency appears to have minimal effect on sitagliptin concentrations and requires no dosage adjustment. Patients with moderate renal insufficiency (creatinine clearance of 30 to 50 mL per minute [0.50 to 0.83 mL per second]) should reduce daily dosages to 50 mg, and patients with severe kidney dysfunction (creatinine clearance of less than 30 mL per minute [0.50 mL per second]) should take 25 mg daily.4,5 Sitagliptin is U.S. Food and Drug Administration pregnancy category B.5 TOLERABILITY Overall, reports of side effects with sitagliptin are similar to those reported with placebo. Respiratory symptoms (e.g., nasopharyngitis, respiratory tract infection, cough) occur more often with sitagliptin than with placebo or other oral hypoglycemics; however, those rates are still low. Gastrointestinal side effects are uncommon, and weight gain does not occur.1–3,5 None of these side effects resulted in discontinuation of treatment.1,2 EFFECTIVENESS Only three clinical trials evaluating the effectiveness of sitagliptin have been published, with a total enrollment of fewer than 2,000 patients.1–3 The trials showed that after six months of monotherapy with sitagliptin, A1C levels decreased by an average of 0.8 percent in patients with a baseline A1C of 8.1 percent.1,4 In patients with moderately uncontrolled diabetes Continue reading >>

New Concerns Over Byetta And Januvia Underscore The Value Of Older And Cheaper Diabetes Drugs

New Concerns Over Byetta And Januvia Underscore The Value Of Older And Cheaper Diabetes Drugs

New concerns over Byetta and Januvia underscore the value of older and cheaper diabetes drugs Consumer Reports News: March 05, 2013 09:13 AM If you take Byetta or Januvia to control your blood sugar levels, you might have a small, but increased risk for a condition marked by stomach pain and nausea. Not only are the drugs more expensive and no more effective than our Best Buy Drug picks for diabetes , they're associated with an increased risk for pancreatitis, or an inflamed pancreas, according to a new study in JAMA Internal Medicine. We recommend asking your doctor if you shouldn't be taking another drug in the first place. Researchers at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore analyzed the medical records of 1,269 people with type 2 diabetes who filled at least one prescription for any diabetes drug over a three-year period. The researchers found 87 of the patients who developed pancreatitis were taking Byetta or Januvia, while 58 of the people who developed pancreatitis were taking some other diabetes drug. Tens of millions of people take these drugs, though our experts say other drugs--metformin (Glucophage and generic) and a sulfonylurea (glipizide or glimepride)--are better first choices for most people. "In my opinion, Byetta and Januvia are third-line medications for type 2 diabetes, behind metformin and sulfonylureas" says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., an endocrinologist and Consumer Reports' chief medical adviser. "And patients who take them should be warned about the early signs of pancreatitis." Also talk with your doctor about lifestyle changes, such as weight loss and dietary changes, that can help you control the disease. Those measures can be as effective medication, especially in the early stages of diabetes. Continue reading >>

Januvia Study Shows What's Wrong With U.s. Health Care

Januvia Study Shows What's Wrong With U.s. Health Care

Does the story adequately discuss the costs of the intervention? There was no discussion of costs in this story. Cost information is available. It costs about $350 for 30 tablets of 100 mg each. Does the story adequately quantify the benefits of the treatment/test/product/procedure? The focus of the story is on the drugs risk profile, but we think the story should have provided at least some information about whether this drug has been shown to be more efficacious than other therapies. The story missed what was in our view one of the most important points of the study: the practically nonexistent benefit in reducing blood sugar compared with existing therapy. And, while the drug did not increase rates of cardiovascular disease, it also did not reduce them. Also, the study followup was relatively short; median follow up of 3 years. That could have been mentioned somewhere. Does the story adequately explain/quantify the harms of the intervention? The story is focused on the potential harms of the drug and it does a fairly good job explaining the differences between the risks for different bad outcomes from the drug and from a placebo. We give very high marks to the story for providing both comparisons using percentages but also using absolute numbers throughout. So, for example, the story said,There were 228 such hospitalizations for Januvia and 229 in the placebo group, according to data also published in the New England Journal of Medicine. It also does a nice job of explaining, at least in one instance, that some of the comparisons between the drug and placebo are not statistically significant. For example, the story said that, There was also no significant difference between Januvia and placebo in infections, cancer, kidney failure or severe hypoglycemia, which is da Continue reading >>

New Fda Warning About Januvia Joint Pain Side Effect

New Fda Warning About Januvia Joint Pain Side Effect

On August 28, 2015, the FDA issued the following caution: “The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning that the type 2 diabetes medicines sitagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin, and alogliptin may cause joint pain that can be severe and disabling. We have added a new Warning and Precaution about this risk to the labels of all medicines in this drug class, called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors.” The agency specifies that patients should not stop their medication but should contact the prescriber immediately if “they experience severe and persistent joint pain.” The FDA wants health care professionals to understand that drugs in this class can cause serious joint pain and if that occurs they should recognize that it is not necessarily because a patient is “getting older” or developing sudden arthritis. The alert points out that symptoms can start within a day of beginning one of these drugs or come on gradually, after years of use without symptoms. The FDA states: “After the patients discontinued the DPP-4 inhibitor medicine, their symptoms were relieved, usually in less than a month. Some patients developed severe joint pain again when they restarted the same medicine or another DPP-4 inhibitor.” Januvia Joint Pain Side Effect: Over the last several years the FDA has approved a number of new medications to treat type 2 diabetes. They include Januvia (sitagliptin) and Janumet (sitagliptin + metformin), Nesina (alogliptin), Onglyza (saxagliptin), and Tradjenta (linagliptin). Januvia has been widely advertised and is one of the best-selling diabetes drugs, earning billions annually for its manufacturer. Januvia Television Commercials: Perhaps you have seen the Januvia TV commercials and didn’t even realize it. They promote the idea tha Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin: A Review Of Its Use In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Sitagliptin: A Review Of Its Use In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Sitagliptin: a review of its use in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Adis, 41 Centorian Drive, Private Bag 65901, Mairangi Bay, North Shore, 0754, Auckland, New Zealand, [email protected] Drugs. 2014 Feb;74(2):223-42. doi: 10.1007/s40265-013-0169-1. Sitagliptin (Januvia(), Xelevia, Glactiv(), Tesavel()) is an orally administered, potent and highly selective inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) and was the first agent of its class to be approved for use in the management of adults with type 2 diabetes. Numerous randomized placebo- or active comparator-controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy of sitagliptin in terms of improving glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes, including its use as monotherapy, initial combination therapy (usually with fixed-dose combinations of sitagliptin/metformin), or add-on therapy to metformin or to other antihyperglycaemic drugs, with or without metformin. The primary endpoint of the clinical trials was the reduction from baseline in glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), although sitagliptin also showed beneficial effects for other endpoints, such as the proportion of patients who achieved target HbA1c, and reductions from baseline in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels and 2-h postprandial glucose (PPG) levels. Sitagliptin was generally well tolerated in clinical trials, had a low risk of hypoglycaemia (although this depends on background therapy) and had a neutral effect on body weight. Despite concerns regarding a possible increased risk of rare pancreatic adverse events (e.g. pancreatitis) with glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapies, such as GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors, no causal association has been found; regulators in Europe recently conducted a review of available data, conc Continue reading >>

Review Of Sitagliptin Phosphate: A Novel Treatment For Type 2 Diabetes

Review Of Sitagliptin Phosphate: A Novel Treatment For Type 2 Diabetes

Review of sitagliptin phosphate: a novel treatment for type 2 diabetes Dept. Medicine IV, Eberhard Karls University, Tuebingen, Germany Correspondence: Baptist Gallwitz Dept. Medicine IV, Eberhard Karls University, Otfried Mueller Str. 10, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany Tel + 49 7071 298 2093 Fax + 49 7071 29 5004 Email [email protected] Copyright 2007 Dove Medical Press Limited. All rights reserved This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Sitagliptin (Januvia, Merck Pharmaceuticals) is a dipeptidyl-peptidase inhibitor (DPP-4 inhibitor) that has recently been approved for the therapy of type 2 diabetes. Like other DPP-4 inhibitors its action is mediated by increasing levels of the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP). Sitagliptin is effective in lowering HbA1c, and fasting as well as postprandial glucose in monotherapy and in combination with other oral antidiabetic agents. It stimulates insulin secretion when hyperglycemia is present and inhibits glucagon secretion. In clinical studies it is weight neutral. This article gives an overview of the mechanism of action, the pharmacology, and the clinical efficacy and safety of sitagliptin in type 2 diabetes therapy. Keywords: incretins, type 2 diabetes, diabetes therapy, DPP-4 inhibitors, sitagliptin Utilizing the therapeutic potential of GLP-1 in type 2 diabetes Since glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) itself is not feasible for type 2 diabetes therapy due to its very short biological half-life, two major strategies have been developed to utilize the beneficial effects of GLP-1 ( Drucker 2006 ). On the one hand, long-acting, dipeptidyl-peptidase ihibitor (DPP-4 inhibitor)-resistant peptides with a high similarity to the native GLP-1 can be used Continue reading >>

Januvia Smackdown

Januvia Smackdown

Get your ringside seats, Folks! A while back I posted about the Merck's new Type 2 oral drug Januvia (What It Doesn't Do), explaining how it apparently trumps competitors in terms of patient "tolerability." No other post has ever generated such ongoing reader energy, both positive and negative. Nearly every day, several new commentors weigh in, duking it out over the relative merits of Januvia. Most everyone seems to agree that Januvia reduces appetite, which is a good thing. But then again, Byetta is known for that effect as well. The key is question whether Januvia fulfills its core function of lowering blood glucose (BG) levels, and lives up to its no-side-effects promise. As of today, the score stands pretty much tied, as such: Total comments = 50 Positive = 10 Negative = 13 Mixed = 16 (liked some aspects of the drug but not others) Neutral = 11 (those asking or responding to questions only) Among the most vocal of the Pro Team: "I take Januvia and have for 6 months. I have no side effects. I have experienced a decrease in appetite. I have had no headaches or respiratory problems. My BG has gone down. It is a great drug." -- Mike "Januvia has been a positive thing for me. My sugar levels dropped from 240+ to 110 +/- 10 after fasting. I have taken 100 mg once per day for a month... I am not as hungry as before usage." -- Jim K. L. "I've been on Januvia for a little over three months and have lost over 15 pounds which I had put on with Actos. I've experienced no side effects, other than I am not hungry all of the time. For me it has been very effective..." -- Bill "I am substantially less hungry then I have felt in years ... and my BG hovers around 100 - 120 between meals/fasting, and 120 - 160 for a few hours after a heavy carb meal. The usual BG spikes of 180 - 200+ Continue reading >>

Januvia Patient-centered Health, Reviews And Testimonials

Januvia Patient-centered Health, Reviews And Testimonials

Acid Reflux & Heartburn Acne Addison's des Alcoholism Allergic Reaction Allergies Alopecia Areata Altitude Sickness / Mountain Sickness Alzheimer's Amblyopia Anemia Anesthetic Reversal Anesthetics Angina (Chest Pain) Angioedema Ankylosing Spondylitis Anti-Aging & Cell Health Anti-Inflammatory Antioxidant Anxiety Apotic Dermatitis Arrhythmia (Irregular Heartbeat) Arteriosclerosis Arthritis Asthma & Breathing Difficulty Astigmatism Atherosclerosis & Arterial Disease Attention Deficit Disorder (ADHD) Autism Autoimmune Urticaria Bacterial Infection Bacterial Infections Barratt osophergous Benign Tumors / Cysts Bipolar Disorder / Manic-Depression Birth Control Bladder Disorder Bleeding disorder Brain Trauma Breast Cancer Bronchitis Burn Injury Cancer Celiac Disease Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Chronic Kidney Disease Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Circulation Cirrhosis of the liver Cold Cold Constipation Crohn's Disease Cushing's Syndrome Cystic Fibrosis Depression Dermatomyositis Detoxification Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diarrhea & Bowel Disorder Digestive Aids Displasia Drug Addiction Ear Infection Eating Disorder Eczema Edema Enlarged Prostate (BHP) Epilepsy Epilepsy, Seizure & Spasm Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Eye & Vision Problem Fever Fibromyalgia Flu Fungal Infection Gastrius Gastrointestinal & Stomach Problem Gastroparesis Gingivitis Glaucoma Gliomas Gout Hair Loss / Thinning Harth pain Hashimoto's Hypothyroidism Hay Fever Headache Heart Attack Heart Disease Hemorrhage (Blood Loss) Hemorrhoids Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Herpes High blood pressure High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) High Cholesterol HIV / AIDS Hormone Imbalance Hperkemia Hughes syndrome Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Huntington's Disease Hyperparathyroid hypercalcemia Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidi Continue reading >>

Lowers Your Blood Sugar.

Lowers Your Blood Sugar.

Our bottom line Januvia (sitagliptin) is a good add-on treatment if your blood sugars are not controlled and you don't want to use an injectable medicine. Oral blood sugar-lowering medicine. Januvia (sitagliptin) is not linked to worsening heart failure like other medicines in its class. It is less likely to cause weight gain and low blood sugar compared to other diabetes medicines. Lowers A1c (average blood sugar over time) by less than 1%. Rare but serious side effects include pancreatitis and severe joint pain. Januvia (sitagliptin) is an anti-diabetic drug that enhances your body's release of insulin. Sign up and get Pill Talk, the latest in health & medicine news from Iodine What to expect when you take Januvia (sitagliptin) for Type 2 diabetes Possible side effects Source: FDA product label and Iodine pharmacists Side effect rates for Januvia (sitagliptin) Where we got our data » Risks and Warnings for Januvia (sitagliptin) Higher risk if: › History of pancreatitis › High blood triglyceride levels › Gallstones (stones in gallbladder) › History of alchoholism › Kidney problems Januvia (sitagliptin) can cause a sudden inflammation of the pancreas. This can be life-threatening if not treated. Let your doctor know about any stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, or loss of appetite that doesn't go away. Frequently Asked Questions This medication treats type 2 diabetes in adults. Common concerns from people taking Januvia (sitagliptin) Take once a day in the morning with or without food. Januvia (sitagliptin) can worsen kidney problems. Your doctor may check your kidney function before and during treatment. Your doctor may have to adjust the dose or stop this medicine based on changes in kidney function. Tell your doctor right away if you have severe stomach pain, Continue reading >>

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