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Is Yogurt Good For Lowering Blood Sugar?

20 Foods That Are Good For High Blood Pressure

20 Foods That Are Good For High Blood Pressure

With many factors influencing heart health and blood pressure, is there a diet for those with high blood pressure? Health experts suggest that consuming a nutritious, balanced diet may be the best bet to lower blood pressure and achieve good health. Try adding these 20 foods into your diet to help reduce blood pressure. Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is when the heart forcefully pumps blood into the arteries, consequently increasing the pressure against the blood vessels. Uncontrolled hypertension may lead to atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), kidney disease, stroke and heart failure. But with numerous causes, many factors contributing to high blood pressure are modifiable and include smoking, being overweight and obese, staying sedentary, drinking too much alcohol and eating too much salt. With a healthy lifestyle encompassing most of the influences, is there a high blood pressure diet? Health experts suggest that consuming a nutritious, balanced diet may be your ticket to lower blood pressure and achieving good health. 20 Foods That Are Good for High Blood Pressure When it comes to food that lowers blood pressure, one single nutrient or food cannot do the entire job. Instead, the DASH (dietary approaches to stop hypertension) diet focuses on a lifelong approach. The DASH diet further emphasizes portion sizes and encourages a variety of nutritious foods by incorporating fresh produce and low-fat dairy with moderating intake of whole grains, fish, poultry and nuts. Additionally, nutrients such as fiber, potassium, magnesium and calcium have been shown to have a healthy effect on blood pressure. Fresh Produce: 8 to 10 servings of fruits and vegetables a day 1. All Green, Leafy Vegetables Romaine lettuce, spinach and kale are all prime examples and provid Continue reading >>

What’s The Effect Of Yogurt On Blood Glucose?

What’s The Effect Of Yogurt On Blood Glucose?

Yogurt has a much lower impact on glucose levels than people think. Therefore, it gets the green light to be included in a diabetes-friendly diet. In fact, research has shown that diets including yogurt may even help to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). One explanation is associated to glycemic index of yogurt, which was the aim of the presentation of Thomas Wolever (University of Toronto, Canada) at the Fourth Global Summit on the Health Effects of Yogurt. Most yogurts have a minimal effect on blood sugar The differences between carbohydrate foods can be described in relation to their glycemic index. Simply put this index, which goes from 100 to 0, indicates how quickly a food raises blood glucose levels. Glucose is rated at 100, and the closer to 100 a food is rated, the more it increases blood sugar levels. Generally, GI values of foods are classified as low GI(GI≤55), medium GI (55Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Yogurt: The Do’s And Don’ts

Diabetes And Yogurt: The Do’s And Don’ts

Yogurt can be a great nutrient-dense breakfast option or an easy snack. It is low in carbohydrates, meaning it won’t cause blood sugar spikes in people with diabetes. There may even be additional benefits for people with diabetes. What Research Shows Fermented foods, such as yogurt, contain good bacteria called probiotics. Probiotics have been shown to improve gut health. Research on gut health is ongoing, but gut bacteria and overall health could play a factor in a number of health conditions, including obesity and diabetes. What Do I Need to Know About Probiotics? Recent research shows that yogurt consumption might be associated with lower levels of glucose and insulin resistance, and lower systolic blood pressure. Another study found a potential link between regular yogurt consumption and a reduced risk for type 2 diabetes. These studies are encouraging, but more research is needed to determine what link, if any, exists between yogurt and type 2 diabetes. What Makes Yogurt Great Most dairy products are low on the glycemic index. This makes them ideal for people with diabetes. To get the most out of your yogurt, check the labels before you purchase. If you want the gut benefits from the probiotics, choose a yogurt that contains live and active cultures. Also pay attention to the nutrition facts. Many yogurts have added sugars. Look for yogurts with high protein content and low carbohydrates, such as unflavored Greek yogurt. Sugar content among brands, and even among flavors within the same brand, can vary drastically, so check labels closely. Carbohydrates By Yogurt Type Yogurt Type (6 ounces) Carbohydrates Sugar plain Greek yogurt 6-8 grams 4-8 grams flavored Greek yogurt 16-22 grams 12-18 grams plain yogurt 11-15 grams 10-12 grams vanilla yogurt 22-33 grams 21-28 Continue reading >>

Exactly What I Ate To Get My Blood Sugar Under Control For Good

Exactly What I Ate To Get My Blood Sugar Under Control For Good

When Thomas Rupp was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, he was stunned. Despite having a challenging career (he was working in corporate finance and for FEMA), he managed to exercise regularly, and he rarely ate fast food or sweets. Sure, he weighed 245 pounds, but at 6 feet tall that didn't seem so terrible. He didn't consider that his weight pushed his BMI into the obese category—and he didn't realize that many of the "healthy" foods he was eating were actually loaded with tons of sugar and calories. Rupp's doctor started him on four different medications. The side effects were bothersome, but what really kicked him into gear was learning that he'd need to start injecting himself with insulin nightly. Instead, he turned to the Diabetes Reversal Program at Tufts Medical Center, where he met with the founding director, Michael Dansinger, MD. They worked together to closely examine Rupp's diet and uncover pitfalls that Rupp had trouble spotting on his own. (You can control your blood sugar with food and without insulin by making healthy lifestyle changes. Try the easy plan in The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes.) For instance, while adding some cream and sugar to a cup of coffee might not be a big deal for some people, Rupp often downed 10 cups of coffee a day to power himself through long days in the office. (Here are 8 physical signs you drink way too much coffee.) And he was putting cream and sugar in each cup. "That's 10 containers of cream and 10 teaspoons of sugar a day I was adding to my diet," he says. And even though he worked out, "I was drinking green juices at the gym, or protein smoothies with mango, once again without realizing the sugar content." Other seemingly healthy choices—like salads—also concealed stealth sugar bombs. "I would add vinaigrette dressi Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Prevent dangerous blood sugar spikes with the help of these foods. Yogurt Low-fat yogurt naturally contains both high-quality carbohydrates and protein, making it an excellent food for slowing or preventing an unhealthy rise in blood sugar. Studies also show that a diet high in calcium from yogurt and other calcium-rich foods is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Be sure to stick to low-fat or nonfat brands; fat-free Greek yogurt is my top pick because it has twice as much protein as regular nonfat yogurt. Previous Next More Photos Almonds Fish Continue reading >>

Two Thumbs Up For Yogurt

Two Thumbs Up For Yogurt

Yogurt is one of those foods that you just can’t say enough about. Yes, I’ve written about it in the past (several different times), but it seems like there’s always something to share about its health benefits — hence, the focus of my posting this week is, once again, yogurt. In case you’re interested, yogurt is a fermented food made from milk and/or cream. Bacteria are added to heated, pasteurized milk, which is then incubated at a specific temperature to encourage the growth of the bacteria. The bacteria break down the lactose (milk sugar) to lactic acid, which thickens the milk and gives it a tangy flavor. Once that’s done, the yogurt is cooled and at this point, sweeteners, fruit, or other ingredients may be added. It’s a pretty simple process and many people make their own yogurt at home. Two benefits Yogurt actually has many health benefits, but I wanted to focus on two in particular this week. Diabetes prevention. The CDC recently released their diabetes statistics report, and the results aren’t looking too good: Roughly 29 million people in the U.S. now have diabetes, and another 86 million have prediabetes. While diabetes prevention involves a number of lifestyle changes, including weight loss, you might be interested to know that yogurt may play a role. Researchers at the University of Cambridge in England looked at data from more than 25,000 people, comparing the diets of 753 of those people who developed Type 2 diabetes with 3,502 people who did not get diabetes. Their findings? The folks who ate yogurt at least four-and-a-half times a week were significantly less likely to get diabetes than those who didn’t eat yogurt that often. What’s in yogurt that might be protective? There are a number of possible ingredients, including calcium, ma Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Foods That Have Little Impact On Blood Sugar

5 Surprising Foods That Have Little Impact On Blood Sugar

What is the most important information I should know about TREMFYA®? TREMFYA® may cause serious side effects, including infections. TREMFYA® is a prescription medicine that may lower the ability of your immune system to fight infections and may increase your risk of infections. Your healthcare provider should check you for infections and tuberculosis (TB) before starting treatment with TREMFYA® and may treat you for TB before you begin treatment with TREMFYA® if you have a history of TB or have active TB. Your healthcare provider should watch you closely for signs and symptoms of TB during and after treatment with TREMFYA®. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have an infection or have symptoms of an infection, including: warm, red, or painful skin or sores on your body different from your psoriasis diarrhea or stomach pain shortness of breath have any of the conditions or symptoms listed in the section “What is the most important information I should know about TREMFYA®?” have recently received or are scheduled to receive an immunization (vaccine). You should avoid receiving live vaccines during treatment with TREMFYA®. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. What are the possible side effects of TREMFYA®? TREMFYA® may cause serious side effects. See “What is the most important information I should know about TREMFYA®?” The most common side effects of TREMFYA® include: upper respiratory infections, headache, injection site reactions, joint pain (arthralgia), diarrhea, stomach flu (gastroenteritis), fungal skin infections, and herpes simplex infections. These are not all the possible side effects of TREMFYA®. Call your doctor f Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Effect Of Skim Milk And Dahi (yogurt) On Blood Glucose, Insulin, And Lipid Profile In Rats Fed With High Fructose Diet.

Effect Of Skim Milk And Dahi (yogurt) On Blood Glucose, Insulin, And Lipid Profile In Rats Fed With High Fructose Diet.

Abstract In the present study, the effect of skim milk and the fermented milk product named dahi (yogurt) on plasma glucose, insulin, and lipid levels as well as on liver glycogen and lipid contents in rats fed with high fructose diet has been investigated. Rats were fed with high fructose diet (21%) supplemented with skim milk, dahi (10 g/day each), or no milk product (control group) for 6 weeks. After 6 weeks of high fructose diet administration, the plasma glucose became significantly higher in control animals (246 mg/dL), whereas it was lower in skim milk (178 mg/dL)- and dahi (143 mg/dL)-fed rats. The glucose tolerance became impaired at the third week of feeding of high fructose diet in control animals, whereas in skim milk- and dahi-fed animals achievement of glucose intolerance was delayed until the fourth and fifth week, respectively. Blood glycosylated hemoglobin and plasma insulin were significantly lower in skim milk (10% and 34%, respectively)- and dahi (17%, and 48%, respectively)-fed animals than those of the control group. Plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and very-low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and blood free fatty acids were significantly lower in skim milk (13%, 14%, 14%, 19%, and 14%, respectively)- and dahi (22%, 33%, 30%, 33%, and 29%, respectively)-fed animals as compared with control animals. Moreover, the total cholesterol, triglyceride, and glycogen contents in liver tissues were also lower in skim milk (55%, 50%, and 36%, respectively)- and dahi (64%, 27%, and 4%, respectively)-fed animals as compared with control animals. In contrast, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in plasma was higher in skim milk (14%)- and dahi (29%)-fed animals as compared with control animals. These results indicate Continue reading >>

Yogurt's Glucose Effect

Yogurt's Glucose Effect

Jill Corleone is a registered dietitian and health coach who has been writing and lecturing on diet and health for more than 15 years. Her work has been featured on the Huffington Post, Diabetes Self-Management and in the book "Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation," edited by John R. Bach, M.D. Corleone holds a Bachelor of Science in nutrition. Eat low-fat or nonfat yogurt and add your own fruit to improve nutrition.Photo Credit: Howard Shooter/Dorling Kindersley RF/Getty Images Rich in calcium, protein and friendly bacteria, yogurt makes a healthy addition to your diet. But because it's a source of carbs and sugar, you may be worried about how it affects your blood glucose levels if you have diabetes or concerns about fluctuations in blood sugar. Most yogurts have a minimal effect on blood sugar and may actually help blood sugar control. The glycemic index, or GI, is a system that ranks how carb-containing foods affect blood sugar. Foods with a low GI of 55 or less take longer to digest and absorb, causing a small, gradual rise in blood sugar. Foods with a high GI of 70 or more digest quickly, causing a spike in blood sugar. While the GI in yogurt varies depending on what is added to it, most yogurts have a low GI, averaging around 33. Eating yogurt may improve blood sugar, according to a 2006 study published in the "Journal of Medicinal Food." This was an animal study that tested the effects of yogurt on rats fed a high-sugar diet. The study found that glucose levels were lower in rats supplemented with yogurt on their high-sugar diet compared to the control group of rats fed only a high-sugar diet. The researchers suggested that yogurt may be helpful in managing blood sugar for those with diabetes. However, while yogurt is a healthy addition to your diet, more researc Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

14 Foods That Could Change A Diabetic's Life

Print Font: When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the 4 healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up Prevention's Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taki Continue reading >>

Probiotics May Help Reduce Blood Sugar Levels

Probiotics May Help Reduce Blood Sugar Levels

MORE NEW ORLEANS — The microbes that live in your gut may play a surprising role in your blood sugar levels, a small new study from Canada finds. The study involved people who were following the DASH diet, which is recommended for people with high blood pressure. The people on this diet who also consumed probiotics, which are considered "good" bacteria, had a decrease in several measures of blood sugar levels over a three-month period, according to the findings. People with consistently high blood sugar levels may or may not go on to be diagnosed with diabetes; a diagnosis can depend on the results of several tests. Although more research is needed, the findings suggest that adding probiotics to the DASH diet could be used in the future to help protect against diabetes, said Arjun Pandey, a researcher at the Cambridge Cardiac Care Centre in Ontario and the author of the study. [8 Tips to Be a Probiotic Pro] Pandey presented his findings here on Sunday (Nov. 13) at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions annual meeting. The findings have not been published in a peer-reviewed journal. In the study, 80 people with high blood pressure were placed on either the DASH diet or the DASH diet plus probiotic-rich foods. About 15 percent of the participants had prediabetes, Pandey noted, which means their blood sugar levels were elevated but were not considered high enough to warrant a diagnosis of diabetes. The DASH diet, which stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, is one of the most effective non-drug-related methods for improving certain aspects of heart health, including lowering blood pressure, Pandey told Live Science. The people in the study who added the probiotics to their diet did so by replacing certain components of the DASH diet with probio Continue reading >>

Yogurt Every Day May Help Keep Diabetes Away

Yogurt Every Day May Help Keep Diabetes Away

HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a serving a day of yogurt may lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. "The data we have gathered show that yogurt consumption can have significant benefit in reducing the risk of diabetes," said senior study author Dr. Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health, in Boston. "It's not a huge effect, about an 18 percent reduction [in risk]." "Yogurt is not magic for curing or preventing diabetes," Hu said. "That's the bottom line and the message we want to convey to our consumers, that we have to pay attention to our diet pattern. There is no replacement for an overall healthy diet and maintaining [a healthy] body weight." The study is published online Nov. 24 in the journal BMC Medicine. It was funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. In type 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells develop a resistance to insulin, and blood sugar levels then get too high. For the study, Hu and his team pooled the result of three large studies that tracked the medical histories and lifestyle habits of health professionals: the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study of more than 51,000 male health professionals; the Nurses' Health Study, which included more than 121,000 women nurses; and the Nurses' Health Study II, which followed nearly 117,000 women nurses. During the study follow-up, there were about 15,000 cases of type 2 diabetes. When they looked at total dairy intake, they saw no effect on the risk of diabetes. However, when they zeroed in on yogurt, they found one serving a day was linked with about a 17 percent reduced risk. The researchers next pooled their result with other published studies that lo Continue reading >>

Is Yogurt Good For Diabetes Or Not?

Is Yogurt Good For Diabetes Or Not?

Yogurt is a a common breakfast or snack food and known for its benefits on gut health. Is yogurt good for those who have been diagnosed with diabetes? How Yogurt Can Help Diabetes Yogurt is low in carbohydrates and therefore, it will not cause blood sugar spikes. But other than this, there are several other benefits that diabetics can get out of eating yoghurt. Several studies and researches were done in order to find out the health benefits of yogurt. Research shows that fermented foods like yogurt contains probiotics, which are good bacteria that helps to improve gut health. Probiotics is good for ones overall health condition, including people with diabetes. Further research shows that regular consumption of yogurt can be associated with lowering insulin resistance and blood glucose levels. Another study also found a possible link between regular consumption of yogurt and a reduced risk on Type 2 Diabetes. Such studies are really great news for those with diabetes, although more studies are needed in order to determine if there are any other links between yogurt and diabetes. How to Choose a Yogurt for Diabetes Most of the dairy products, including yogurt are known to have low glycemic index. As such, they are great for those who have been diagnosed with diabetes. In order to get the most out of your yogurt consumption, it is important to choose the type of product that you buy. Read labels and select the type of yoghurt that has live and active cultures. It is also important that you pay close attention to its nutrient facts. Go for yogurts that have high protein but low carbohydrates. Many of yogurt products have added sugars so be careful with that. Natural yogurt is sour so if your yogurt taste sweet, it most likely has added sugar. Avoid flavored yogurt. What to Continue reading >>

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