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Is The Paleo Diet A Ketogenic Diet?

Paleo Vs Keto Diet: Which One Is Right For You?

Paleo Vs Keto Diet: Which One Is Right For You?

When it comes to burning fat more efficiently, accelerating weight loss, and living an all-around healthier lifestyle, two diets have been on the radar of health enthusiasts: the Paleo diet and the Ketogenic diet. While both diets include many of the same foods and have overlapping similarities and benefits, each has a different purpose. Let’s take a look at how the Paleo vs Keto diets measure up against one another, which one is right for you, and why. Paleo vs Keto: Here’s What You Need to Know Before we compare the similarities and differences of the Paleo vs Keto diets, it’s helpful to know why a person may choose to follow each one. What is the Paleo Diet? When it comes to the Paleo diet — which is based on eliminating grains and legumes due to their phytic acid content — it’s more of a lifestyle choice to focus on eating quality foods that support digestive health (1). Most dairy products are also off limits on the Paleo diet because they contain lactose, which is hard for most people to digest (although some people do include ghee or grass-fed butter). By removing the most difficult foods to digest, the Paleo diet can be therapeutic for gut health, autoimmune conditions, blood sugar balance, and weight loss (2)(3). What is the Keto Diet? On the other hand, the Keto diet is targeted primarily towards those who want to experience dramatic weight loss. However, the Keto diet can also help improve medical conditions such as type 2 diabetes and cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (4). In fact, the initial purpose of the Keto diet was to prevent and treat seizures, when it was first discovered in the 1920s (5). But today, the Keto diet is best known as a rapid weight loss and fat burning strategy. The reason the Keto diet promotes accelerated Continue reading >>

Is Paleo Ketogenic And Is That A Good Idea?

Is Paleo Ketogenic And Is That A Good Idea?

With the popularity of high protein diets such as the paleo diet in recent days it’s important to delineate advantages and disadvantages to eating this way. From a health perspective it’s hard to beat a common sense approach like eating organic vegetables and lean, organic meats along with water for each meal of the day. In fact, any nutritionist or non-nutritionist alike can benefit from taking that approach. It’s not rocket science. Unless you have special diet needs, I’ll say it again: lean meats and veggies. You can’t go wrong if that makes up most of your diet. But what does it mean to be ketogenic? A diet is “ketogenic” when it is very low or absent in carbohydrates. There is a lot of chemistry behind the term, but the bottom line is that when you’re burning fat as a source of fuel all day long, you will go into a state called “ketosis.” Basically this means you aren’t using sugar for fuel, and that your breath is bad. The latter is a tip for those losing a lot of weight. Ketosis makes your breath rancid. You have been warned. In a study published last month in Nutrition & Metabolism, researchers looked at just over 19,000 people on a protein and micronutrient (vitamins and minerals) only diet – an extreme ketogenic diet. Weight loss was the major result. In fact, after 25 days on this diet, those studied lost an average of 22 lbs., mostly fat and water. In this study, no detrimental effects were noted. Now let’s be honest, most of us will never drink one protein shake, take a multivitamin, and call it a day. But by the above definition, a paleo diet is often also ketogenic. From their macronutrient profile, those on a paleo protocol might not be far off from those in the study. If you’re new to the diet, you might notice some significa Continue reading >>

Different Types Of Diets & How To Choose The One For You

Different Types Of Diets & How To Choose The One For You

Diets! There are so many of them to choose from! How do you decide which one is right for you? There is no single, without-a-doubt best diet for every person to follow, always and forever. While you may feel like a particular nutrition idea – such as paleo or ketogenic – works for you, it doesn’t mean everyone else should follow the same program. The human body can survive and thrive on a host of different nutritional conditions, which is clearly demonstrated by the traditional diets of various ethnic groups throughout the world. While there are huge differences in the common diets out there, they can all raise nutritional awareness and attention, they focus on food quality, they help eliminate nutrient deficiencies and they help control appetite and food intake. The best diet is the one that works for you and takes into account your physical and biochemical differences, as well as your lifestyle such as family, life demands, work situation, income level, cooking experience and food availability. Before jumping onto the next fad diet train, take the time to research what the diet entails, what the pros and cons of the diet are and really think about why you want to consider following a restrictive diet in the first place. Let’s take a look at some of the more common diets: THE KETOGENIC DIET In the early 1920s, the Ketogenic diet was used in experiments on children with epilepsy. By the 1940s the Ketogenic diet made its way into medical textbooks as a treatment for childhood epilepsy. The Ketogenic diet is a high fat, extremely low carbohydrate diet. A typical balanced meal is about 30 percent protein, 40 percent carbohydrates and 30 percent fat. A Paleo meal would have about 40 percent protein, 20 percent carbohydrates and 40 percent fat. Ketogenic, on the othe Continue reading >>

Most People Shouldn't Attempt Low-carb Diets Like Keto Or Paleo

Most People Shouldn't Attempt Low-carb Diets Like Keto Or Paleo

Sustainable health change occurs not by finding a "perfect" diet — finding is fairly passive — but rather through creating an individualized health "mix." Creating is active, and health is an active process. To create an individualized health mix, you have to learn about the various nutrition options available and parse out the nutritional guidelines that will work for YOU. My personal mix is built upon being aware of what I put in my body, as well as pillars "stolen" from a variety of sources. I limit snacking and aim for a substantial gap between dinner and breakfast — thanks, intermittent fasting. I eat almost exclusively from the "outside of the grocery store" — meaning fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins, and good-quality fats — thanks, Paleo, and habits formed while being vegetarian. Plus, I eat what I love in moderation. I call this my "love it rule" — thanks, Weight Watchers for the balanced approach. I use what works for me and ignore what doesn't. Curious what your "mix" is? Earlier, I covered the pros and cons of high-protein diets. Then, I examined the vegetarian versus vegan versus high-protein debate. I've also tackled "low-fat" diets, the Mediterranean diet, and Weight Watchers. Today a smorgasbord of smaller analyses (I only have so much space and the material for analysis is endless): the ketogenic diet, Paleo, intermittent fasting, and meal delivery services. Ketogenic diet The ketogenic diet advocates extremely low-carbohydrate (10-15 grams daily) and high-fat (75 per cent of diet) consumption. The goal is to put your body into ketosis so that it uses ketones as energy. The rationale is that the diet gives you the benefits of fasting — such as fat loss — without actually having to fast. I know I am supposed to be "Switzerland," Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating Tips For People With Lupus The Magic Of A Ketogenic And Paleo Diets

Healthy Eating Tips For People With Lupus The Magic Of A Ketogenic And Paleo Diets

What is Lupus? The Mayo Clinic has defined Lupus as “a chronic inflammatory disease that occurs when your body’s immune system attacks its own tissues and organs.” Marked by a rash and multiple types of inflammation, lupus is hard to diagnose because it attacks so many different areas of the body. Lupus can affect the skin, joints, kidneys, brain, heart, and lungs. Doctors have noted that the cause for lupus is still unknown and that symptoms appear differently in each person. While the root cause is unknown, experts point to genetics and the environment as factors. The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases lists the most common symptoms as joint inflammation, muscle pain, fever, facial rash, chest pains, hair loss, swelling in legs and eyes and glands, mouth ulcers, and fatigue. They also list less common symptoms as anemia, headaches, dizziness, and seizures. Along with no known cause, there is also no known cure. The disease appears in episodes and can be aggravated by common environmental things like medication or even sunlight. If left untreated, lupus can cause serious complications like kidney failure, inflammation of the chest, heart and blood vessels, stroke or seizure. Managing Lupus with Diet Inflammation is the kind of symptom that can strike anywhere at any time. A study from Johns Hopkins University noted that “no overarching diet exists for people with lupus. [It] is a systemic disease, so maintaining good nutritional habits will help your body remain as healthy as possible”. The doctors at Johns Hopkins recommend a diet similar to the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines. To date, there are is no prescribed “lupus diet”. And unfortunately, there are few studies that actually test the effects of diet on this disease. H Continue reading >>

Paleo Vs Atkins Vs Ketogenic Diet

Paleo Vs Atkins Vs Ketogenic Diet

Paleo, Atkins, Ketogenic… what the heck is the difference!? The Paleo diet, Atkins diet and ketogenic diet have a lot of overlap - in fact, you can actually be on all three of these diets at once. This overlap makes the three diets very easy to confuse and, it can make your decision on which diet is best for your goals a little bit tough. But, as always, you’ve got a scientist on your side and, today, I’m going to clear up the main difference. Let’s get started! Paleo vs Atkins vs Ketogenic Diet: a Comparison Ketogenic Diet To start off, I’d like to explain to you guys a bit about a biological state called nutritional ketosis. Pay attention, because this is a pretty important concept that may be a major factor in your dietary decision. Nutritional ketosis is a biological state in which your body being using fats, rather than glucose, as it’s main fuel source. In order for fats to be used as fuel, they are converted into ketone bodies, which is the basic goal of the ketogenic diet. Although more complex, cyclical ketogenic diets exist, in which you are cycling in and out of ketosis, with the basic ketogenic diet your body is in a constant state of nutritional ketosis. In order to enter into nutritional ketosis, you must drastically restrict your glucose supply, while concurrently increasing fat consumption so that your body is essentially forced into burning fat as fuel. Your macro breakdown should look something like 60-80% fat, 5% carbohydrates and the remainder as protein. As 1g carbohydrate is equivalent to approximately 4 calories, a 5% carbohydrate intake would equate to approximately 25g carbs daily for someone on a 2000 calorie per day diet. Keep in mind, these numbers are approximations and each person will enter ketosis at slightly different values, Continue reading >>

What’s The Difference Between Paleo And Keto Diets?

What’s The Difference Between Paleo And Keto Diets?

We live in a remarkable time. Anyone with an internet connection or smartphone can access a staggering amount of information in just moments. Although much of the time spent on the internet is devoted to watching cat videos on YouTube (my personal favorite), many people are using this wealth of knowledge to take their health education into their own hands. They’re investigating a host of nutrition and lifestyle options, including the paleo diet and one of the most searched diets in 2016, the keto (ketogenic) diet. Over the past 20 years, I’ve explored variations of these two dietary approaches. I’ve found them to be remarkably effective for a variety of needs—ranging from fat loss to reducing inflammation to improving athletic performance. Paleo Diet vs. Keto Diet Based on questions I’ve gotten, there’s clearly a lot of confusion on what constitutes a paleo vs keto diet. This article should help put both approaches in proper context and help you decide which might be a good option for you. The Paleo Diet Unlike most dietary approaches the Paleo diet was not “thought up” by any given person (although there certainly have been researchers who have championed the approach). The Paleo diet concept was born through the observations of dozens, if not hundreds, of anthropologists and medical explorers. They realized that hunter-gatherer groups were largely free of modern degenerative diseases. Yes, these people were remarkably healthy even despite an almost complete lack of modern medical interventions. While these groups suffered from high rates of infectious disease, injury, and childbirth complications (all areas where modern medicine excels), even those who lived into advanced age were largely free of obesity, type 2 diabetes, autoimmunity, heart disease an Continue reading >>

Paleo Vs Keto Diet: What’s The Difference?

Paleo Vs Keto Diet: What’s The Difference?

Paleo vs Keto: What’s the difference between the diets? Everyone is always looking for the quickest way to lose weight. Whether it be low-fat, low-carb, high-fat or high protein, there can be something valuable in whichever diet you choose. I’d just like to quickly say, I don’t believe that there is one diet that’s right for everyone. Those who are trying to sell you one diet as the be-all-end-all are a little too one sided in my opinion. That said, there are some very effective ways to drop weight fast using the Paleo Diet or the Ketogenic Diet. “Paleo vs Keto” …often, these diets get lumped together in the same category. While they have a lot of similarities, they also have a lot of differences. If you’re stumbling upon this blog via a google search marathon on how to lose weight fast, I completely understand why you might be confused right now. Let me help you understand the difference between the Paleo Diet and the Ketogenic Diet. The Paleo Diet (Quick Background) When thinking whether to go Paleo vs Keto, you’ll need to know a little history of both. The Paleo Diet was originally introduced into mainstream culture back in 2002 by Dr. Loren Cordain. Dr. Cordain did decades of extensive research around the diets of our Paleolithic Ancestors after reading an article in the New England Journal of Medicine, back in1987. This article struck a nerve with Dr. Cordain. This triggered an obsession around knowing more about the Paleolithic people and how they ate. His book, The Paleo Diet was the first of it’s kind, failing miserably for the first seven years in book stores. However, in 2009, the book started to take on a cult like following. This caused the book to skyrocket in sales and quickly become a trending diet in mainstream media. You might have a Continue reading >>

Why Ketosis Diets Will Fail: The Paleo And Keto Manifesto

Why Ketosis Diets Will Fail: The Paleo And Keto Manifesto

The most disturbing trend in Wellness these days is that most people have no idea what to eat. When choices were fewer, 100 years ago, how to eat for good health was so much clearer. Americans have been so steeped in the diet fads, that they’re now thoroughly confused about food. Recently, I mentioned to a Millennial that when I was a kid, we didn’t have bottled water, and she said, with a shocked look on her face, “Then how did you get any water to drink?!” Similarly, modern people think that in order to eat, you have to follow one of the diet fads. A strange feature of life in 2018 is the need to align with a programmed “food cult,” as I call them. Thanks to some strange cultural and market forces I do not believe to be particularly helpful to our overall health, food has become much like religion: Many don’t know how to eat outside of what their food tribe, congregation, or pastor tells them, and every few years, many people convert to the new cult. “I’m Paleo,” people say–as if identifying with a coat of arms. I’ve been asked countless times: “What diet do you eat?” Ketosis Diet Fads Several years ago, I wrote a detailed blog post on why the Paleo Diet was a fad, wouldn’t last, and why it would eventually be supplanted by a new fad aggrandizing fat rather than protein. Paleo followers wrote murderous emails and comments. Now those same people, it seems, are rabidly promoting the Ketogenic Diet. I felt I was fair to the Paleo Diet. We were friends, to a point. At least the Paleo cult banned processed food, even while glorifying animal flesh foods and strangely vilifying entire classes of foods that hominids and humans have eaten for 3.4 million years: Now, it seems, we’ve gone from the proverbial frying pan to the fire. As I predicted Continue reading >>

What’s The Difference Between A Ketogenic Diet And A Paleo Diet?

What’s The Difference Between A Ketogenic Diet And A Paleo Diet?

If you’re health conscious, you’ve probably heard of the paleo diet. The diet has its roots in the Paleolithic era, which stretched from about 2.5 million to 12,000 years ago. The paleo diet exploded into the mainstream in 2011, and it’s been the fastest growing diet trend since, with strong ties in the CrossFit community. Paleo should not be confused with the ketogenic diet, a very low-carbohydrate diet developed in the 1920s to curb childhood epilepsy. Recently keto, as the ketogenic diet is often called, has gained more widespread popularity as a way to lose weight quickly, reverse serious health problems, and boost energy levels. The keto diet has a number of celebrity followers including Kim Kardashian and LeBron James, while Tim McGraw and Jessica Biel are advocates of Paleo. Paleo and keto have some key similarities, but they’re also different. Keep reading to learn what makes paleo and keto unique, and to discover the pros and cons of trying either. The Paleolithic Diet Modern people eat radically differently than our hunting-and-gathering ancestors did 12,000 years ago when all calories likely came from wild game, nuts, berries, and vegetation. Processed foods—such as bread, snacks, cereal, and soda—make up 67% of the average American’s calories. On average, 15% of modern Americans’ daily calories come from refined sugar, which contains no nutrients. While most Paleolithic hunters and gatherers probably ate a large shopping bag full of highly nutritious wild greens every day, modern Americans eat few fruits and vegetables and almost no wild foods. Our meat is much higher in saturated fat than wild game because farmers fatten livestock with grain and corn. Today, most Americans eat large amounts of highly processed soybean and corn oils, which ar Continue reading >>

Keto Diet

Keto Diet

The Keto Diet, or Ketogenic Diet is a high-fat diet that is moderate in protein and low in carbohydrates. This macro-nutrient ratio allows the body to switch from using carbohydrates (converted into glycogen in the liver) for energy, to using fat (converted into fatty acids and ketone bodies in the liver). The human body is like a hybrid vehicle, relying on either carbohydrates or fat for fuel. For the most part, it cannot use both fuels simultaneously. Consuming fat allows the body to access hundreds of thousands of calories of stored fats that have been locked away during carbohydrate metabolism. In addition to burning fat reserves and super charging weight loss, ketosis produces a clean burning metabolic fuel that has many benefits. Ketones lower production of reactive oxygen species (ROS),1 enhance mitochondrial biogenesis,2 3 and induce positive epigenetic expression.4 Because of its neurological benefits, I went on a Keto Diet in 2014, and it has been helpful in moderating my MS symptoms. To help you get started on a Ketogenic Diet, I have compiled this page of my high-fat, low-carb Keto Diet recipes! Keto Diet Recipes Continue reading >>

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

Ketosis is a word that gets tossed around a lot within the Paleo community – to some, it’s a magical weight-loss formula, to others, it’s a way of life, and to others it’s just asking for adrenal fatigue. But understanding what ketosis really is (not just what it does), and the physical causes and consequences of a fat-fueled metabolism can help you make an informed decision about the best diet for your particular lifestyle, ketogenic or not. Ketosis is essentially a metabolic state in which the body primarily relies on fat for energy. Biologically, the human body is a very adaptable machine that can run on a variety of different fuels, but on a carb-heavy Western diet, the primary source of energy is glucose. If glucose is available, the body will use it first, since it’s the quickest to metabolize. So on the standard American diet, your metabolism will be primarily geared towards burning carbohydrates (glucose) for fuel. In ketosis, it’s just the opposite: the body primarily relies on ketones, rather than glucose. To understand how this works, it’s important to understand that some organs in the body (especially the brain) require a base amount of glucose to keep functioning. If your brain doesn’t get any glucose, you’ll die. But this doesn’t necessarily mean that you need glucose in the diet – your body is perfectly capable of meeting its glucose needs during an extended fast, a period of famine, or a long stretch of very minimal carbohydrate intake. There are two different ways to make this happen. First, you could break down the protein in your muscles and use that as fuel for your brain and liver. This isn’t ideal from an evolutionary standpoint though – when you’re experiencing a period of food shortage, you need to be strong and fast, Continue reading >>

4 Popular Diets: The Pros And Cons Of Gluten-free, Paleo, Detox And Ketogenic

4 Popular Diets: The Pros And Cons Of Gluten-free, Paleo, Detox And Ketogenic

A high-school reunion, New Year’s Eve, the start of summer. Certain times of the year prompt a renewed commitment to getting your health, fitness and nutrition in order. We may want the nutrition part of the solution to lie in a perfect “new” diet, such as the gluten-free, paleo, detox and ketogenic programs that may be on your radar right now. You may be asking yourself what these words even mean—and if you should be following one of these diet plans. Below is an overview of some of the pros and cons of each, along with a list of foods you are allowed and not allowed to eat. One note before you dig in: Remember that nutrition is not one-size-fits-all. I fully believe that there is not one right way for all of us to eat. What works for your best friend or brother may not be the best choice for you. If you choose to start a new nutrition plan, I recommend (in addition to consulting with a registered dietician ) you find one that works for your schedule, health (physical and mental), budget, cooking ability and, well, your whole life. Whatever diet plan you choose, you won’t continue with it if it’s not a good fit overall. Gluten-Free Diet This diet excludes foods containing the protein gluten, which is found in some plant foods. It is primarily used to treat celiac disease, gluten intolerance and often general irritable bowel syndrome symptoms. What foods are included? Foods that do not contain gluten, such as: Fruits and vegetables Most dairy products Meat, fish and poultry Beans Nuts and seeds (including flaxseed) Grains that don’t contain gluten protein, such as amaranth, cornmeal and rice What foods are avoided? Any grain-based product containing gluten protein, including: Wheat Barley Rye Triticale Any foods made in a factory with these grains What are Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet. Is It Paleo?

The Ketogenic Diet. Is It Paleo?

Part One in Our Ketogenic Diet Series. The Paleo and ketogenic diets are not the same, but does that mean there isn’t a place for the ketogenic diet within the Paleo template? They do have considerable overlap. Additionally, there is strong evidence that ketogenic diets are highly beneficial for a wide range of chronic health conditions. During the past decade, low-carb diets, such as the Paleo diet, have become increasingly popular, while a cloud of suspicion has formed over government-advocated, low-fat, grain-centric diets. The reasons for this are simple. Reducing carb intake promotes both improved blood glucose levels and reduced circulating insulin. It also improves metabolic syndrome markers, like obesity, which increase one’s risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease.1 The nutritional perspective on dietary fat has also changed. Dr. Cordain, Dr. Atkins, and other nutrition pioneers have helped bring two very important nutrition science concepts to the mainstream: 1) fat is an important energy source, and 2) fat doesn’t necessarily make you fat. While most people are aware that fat as well as carbs are the body’s primary energy sources, researchers and advocates of ketogenic diets have been calling attention to an important third fuel source (albeit a source derived from fat.) This “third fuel” is something called ketones, or ketone bodies (KBs). This third fuel is the basis of the ketogenic diet (as the name implies.) To understand KBs, we need to recap some biochemistry basics – specifically, the basics regarding a molecule called ATP. What is ATP? In 1929, a German chemist named Karl Lohmann discovered adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the molecule that became known as “the molecular unit of currency.”2 ATP is to biochemistry what gold is to t Continue reading >>

Keto, Paleo, And Yoli Diets: Do They Really Work?

Keto, Paleo, And Yoli Diets: Do They Really Work?

In the past, there was Atkins, After-6, South Beach, Mediterranean, Zone, and Raw Food. These days, there's Paleo (or Caveman) Diet, the Ketogenic Diet, and the fairly new Yoli Better Body System. What are these and do they really bring that much coveted weight loss? Simply put, the Paleo Diet restricts food choices to stuff a caveman would have eaten centuries ago: vegetables, meats, fruits, seafood, and nuts. That means no processed food, no fast food, no dairy, no grains, no added salt, no legumes, no whole grains, no alcohol, and no honey. Call it a going-back-to-basics kind of diet, where grass-fed and organic choices are given the thumbs up. The Ketogenic Diet, on the other hand, is a low-carb, high-fat diet which aims to bring the body to ketosis, the state when the body starts to produce ketones, which the body can use as alternative fuel. The usual fuel used by the body is blood sugar or glucose. When the body is in ketosis, it will access fat stored in the body and burn them. This diet has in fact been used for epileptics since the 1920s since it decreases seizures. Meanwhile, the Yoli Better Body System is not strictly a diet but more of a wellness system that incorporates a high-protein meal plan, protein supplements, and other supplements to improve metabolism, pH balance, and the gastrointestinal system. So the million-dollar question is: Do they work? Do they bring about weight loss? A number of people say they do. Paleo for a year Former TV network executive Sheila Paras said she went on the paleo diet in 2014 to lose excess weight gained when she was pregnant. “I couldn't just go on any diet at the time, because I was breastfeeding and had to be well-nourished. I needed to eat healthy fats, aside from vegetables, fruit, nuts and seeds, and also had to Continue reading >>

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