diabetestalk.net

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Diabetics?

Vegan Vs Keto For Diabetes… Which Is One Optimal?

Vegan Vs Keto For Diabetes… Which Is One Optimal?

I recently watched the Mastering Diabetes teleseminar on ketogenic diets with high hopes of picking up some gems of wisdom from the rising stars of the plant-based diabetes community. I shared my frustration on Facebook. Robb Wolf suggested I put together a response to some of the misinformation in the teleseminar. Hence this post. [Robb did an excellent breakdown on the claims in the What the Health Netflix doco, What the Health: A Wolf’s Eye View, which I highly recommend checking out if you haven’t already.] Cyrus Khambatta (aka Mangoman) and Robby Barbaro (The Mindful Diabetic) should be uniquely qualified, both academically and experientially having themselves lived with type 1 diabetes for decades. If I were was going to attack keto for diabetes management, then there would have been a couple of ‘free kicks’ I think they could have taken. So, in fairness to both sides, I’ll touch on a few of what I see as legitimate issues with ‘popular keto’ before I dissect the Mastering Diabetes presentation. Giving fat a free pass Humans like things to be straightforward and binary. Yes or No. Black or white. High fat or low fat. Low carb or high fat. High protein or low protein. Plants only or animals only. For the last four decades, we have been told that fat, particularly saturated fat, is bad because it causes heart diseases and should be avoided. The tide is now turning. However, there will always be people who take things to the extreme. Now fat is healthy. But is more is better? Ketones are good. So more is better? For many people, a higher fat diet will be more satiating, particularly compared to processed grains and sugars. However, not everyone can ‘eat fat to satiety’ without some level of restraint and self-discipline. We can’t all trust our app Continue reading >>

Maria Mind Body Health

Maria Mind Body Health

Another Maria Momentthis one was with DIABETES. I myself have had my own success story with Marias eating styleso I decided to introduce her recipes to my very picky, very diabetic father in-law. I spend the summers at the lake with my in-law and decided that this year I was going to cook out of Marias cookbook exclusively. I made some of my favorite banana walnut muffins and almond waffles and asked my father in-law if he would please try some. He is not fond of trying new foods maybe due to being picky but also because he has had terrible diabetes for over 30 years. My father in-law has large blood sugar swings even with his insulin pump. He tried the waffles and muffins and loved them. Keep in mind he had butter on both and sugar free syrup on the waffle. As we stood in the kitchen discussing how many units of insulin he should calculate for the food he ate, we come to the conclusion that he should take 5 units. normally for the food he had just consumed he would have needed to take 8 but since Marias food is different we shot it on the lower side my father in-law left for about 1 hr and came back out of sorts. My mother in-law said Tom are you okgo check your blood. He went and checked his blood and it had taken a huge nose divehe had a blood sugar level of 45! Now at this time only 2 units had gone into his bodynot 5 and he had to stop the rest of the insulin from entering his system. We couldnt believe it! Here he had taken almost 4 times less than he normally would have and his levels were too low. Ok, fast forwardabout a week later his blood sugar was too low so my mother in-law said tom why dont you have 2 almond waffles with butter and syrup to bring your blood sugars up a bit. He decided he would do this but they had to decide how much insulin he should take Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Successfully Managed With The Paleolithic Ketogenic Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Successfully Managed With The Paleolithic Ketogenic Diet

Abstract Introduction: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients are usually instructed to follow a low fat/high carbohydrate diet. A few studies in literature, however, reported metabolic benefits and sustainability of carbohydrate restricted diets. Case Report: Herein, we present a case of a 19-year-old male with newly diagnosed T1DM. The patient was first put on an insulin regime. Twenty days later, he shifted towards the paleolithic ketogenic diet and was able to discontinue insulin. Strict adherence to the diet resulted in normal glucose levels and a more than three-fold elevation of C-peptide level indicating restored insulin production. Currently, the patient is on the paleolithic ketogenic diet for 6.5 months. He is free of complaints, and no side effects emerged. Conclusion: We conclude that the paleolithic ketogenic diet was effective and safe in the management of this case of newly diagnosed T1DM. Marked increase in C peptide level within two months indicates that the paleolithic ketogenic diet may halt or reverse autoimmune processes destructing pancreatic beta cell function in T1DM. of chronic medical illnesses including diabetes, cancer, autoimmune diseases and epilepsy for ve Continue reading >>

Interest In The Ketogenic Diet Grows For Weight Loss And Type 2 Diabetes

Interest In The Ketogenic Diet Grows For Weight Loss And Type 2 Diabetes

Interest in the Ketogenic Diet Grows for Weight Loss and Type 2 Diabetes Control of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors 5 Years After Gastric Bypass for Type 2 Diabetes SayeedIkramuddin,MD, MHA; JudithKorner,MD, PhD; Wei-JeiLee,MD, PhD; Avis J.Thomas,MS; John E.Connett,PhD; John P.Bantle,MD; Daniel B.Leslie,MD; QiWang,MS; William B.InabnetIII,MD; Robert W.Jeffery,PhD; KeongChong,MD; Lee-MingChuang,MD, PhD; Michael D.Jensen,MD; AdrianVella,MD; LeaqueAhmed,MD; KumarBelani,MD; Charles J.Billington,MD This summer, 25 overweight and obese adults participating in a tightly controlled feeding study will take up full-time residence for 3 months at a wooded lakefront center in Ashland, Massachusetts. However, before checking in at Framingham State Universitys Warren Conference Center and Inn, they will have to lose 15% of their body weight on a calorie-restricted diet with home-delivered meals. Those who pass this hurdle will be invited to the inn, where theyll be randomly assigned to 1 of 3 equal-calorie diets: a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet thats either high or low in added sugar or a very low-carbohydrate, high-fat ketogenic diet that causes the body to switch from burning carbohydrates to burning fat. Continue reading >>

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Ketosis Vs. Ketoacidosis (dka): What Is The Difference?

Let’s break it down so that you can understand exactly what ketosis is and how it differs from ketoacidosis. But the states they refer to are nothing alike. In this case, maybe mistakes are understandable. Many people who believe that ketosis is dangerous are mixing it up with another state called "ketoacidosis." The two words do sound very similar. And some people simply make mistakes. Profit motives tend to muddy up the works when it comes to getting clear, factual information about your health. Well, there are a lot of individuals and companies which all have their own goals and motivations. Where do these misperceptions come from? Here’s the thing though … that is all misinformation. You then Googled something like, "low carb dangerous" and found a list of link-bait articles informing you that low-carb is a ketogenic diet, and ketosis is a dangerous metabolic state which can be fatal. And then maybe someone said something to you like, "What are you thinking? Low-carb is a dangerous diet." If you are thinking about starting a low-carb diet, maybe you have mentioned it to some of your family or friends. By the time you finish reading this article, you will understand why low-carb is a safe diet. Continue reading >>

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

I spend a great deal of time in my clinic dealing with the problems of type 2 diabetes. But occasionally, people ask about type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well. The reason why it is so rare for me is that I treat adult patients where T2D outnumbers T1D by at least 9:1. I was looking at a fascinating study that my friend, Ivor Cummins (The Fat Emperor) had alerted me to a few months ago. Dr. Richard Bernstein is a fascinating character. He had developed T1D as a child of twelve and began to have complications by his 30s. He eventually went to medical school in order to learn better how to treat his own disease. Eventually he decided that the proper treatment was a low carb diet. This was in direct contradiction to the prevailing wisdom of the time (1990s), which included treating patients with insulin and a diet high in carbs. Dr. Bernstein opened up a controversial clinic to treat T1D with a low carb diet and also wrote several best selling books discussing the same topic. Over the years, it has proven to be a safe treatment for T1D. While there are few long-term studies, Dr. Bernstein himself is living proof of the low carb T1D paradigm. In many ways, T1D and T2D are exact opposites of each other. T1D typically affects children who are usually quite skinny. T2D typically affects adults who are usually quite obese. This is not absolute, and we are seeing much more T2D in children as their weights have increased. There are also cases of normal or even underweight patients with T2D. But in general, that is the case. T1D is the severe deficiency of insulin where as T2D is the severe excess of insulin. Nevertheless, people often treat both types of diabetes in the same manner. Both are treated with medications or insulin to keep blood glucose in acceptable levels. Wait, you might Continue reading >>

Atkins For Diabetics

Atkins For Diabetics

Over the past few years, a significant amount of research- much of it reported in this newsletter- has shown that low-carb diets are effective not only for weight loss, but for improving many measures of risk for heart disease and diabetes. Now a new study from the prestigious Albert Einstein College of Medicine shows that a low-fat diet has no advantage over a low-carb diet modeled on the Atkins Advantage program in the treatment of diabetes. In fact- as we’ve said before- the low-carb diet actually has some significant advantages. This is important news since many conventional doctors have continued to believe- despite considerable evidence to the contrary- that low-carb diets are “dangerous”. In the current study, researchers studied 105 adults with type ll diabetes. The participants had a body mass index of 25 or more (overweight to obese) and Hemoglobin A1C levels between 6-11%. Hemoglobin A1c is a measure of blood sugar control over time, and a reading of over 6% is generally considered problematic and a good indication of diabetes. Half the subjects were put on a low-fat diet modeled after the standard diet outlined in the Diabetes Prevention Program, while the other half were put on a diet modeled after the Atkins program. Both groups lost weight and reduced their A1c levels. The low-fat diet- long considered the ‘gold standard’ in the treatment of diabetes- had absolutely no advantage over the Atkins program. Both groups of patients lost a similar amount of weight, but the Atkins dieters had an additional benefit- their HDL (“good”) cholesterol went up. Both groups saw the most weight loss- and the most reduction in their hemoglobin A1c levels- in the first three months. There was no significant reduction in A1c levels after a year, but this doesn Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: When Doctors’ Good Advice Turns Bad

Type 1 Diabetes: When Doctors’ Good Advice Turns Bad

Here’s a fascinating blog that throws up an ethical dilemma for doctors, nurses and dietitians who dish out orthodox advice for type 1 diabetes. The writer is Lemming Test-Pilot, the alter ego of a British GP who has type 1 diabetes. Last year, Lemming ditched “the almost impossible dark art of carbohydrate counting”, went on a low-carb, high-fat, ketogenic diet and survived. Actually, Lemming hasn’t just survived but has thrived in body and mind. And has been running half marathons faster ever since, even after fasting. Doctors and nurses told Lemming to go on the wrong diet for type 1 diabetes for 20 years. Lemming is understandably miffed about that but says with admirable restraint: “Any other condition managed with the wrong treatment for 20 years would rightly merit a lawsuit. The guideline advisers are getting knighthoods.” Here is Lemming’s remarkable, poignant, real-life story: By Lemming Test-Pilot* I have had type 1 diabetes for 20 years. I got it relatively late, in my 30’s. I’ve managed it the conventional way: 55% carbs, 30% fat mostly unsaturated, basal (long-acting) insulin, and DAFNE (Dose Adjustment For Normal Eating) with carbohydrate counting and injection of rapid acting insulin to balance the glucose. I look after my weight and exercise regularly. I tried three types of statins at various doses but had to stop due to muscle pains and fatigue. My blood pressure is OK and cholesterol reasonable in the 5’s. I have tried hard to manage my condition to the best of my ability and have followed the NICE guidelines and regularly attend for check-ups. My GP or Diabetes Nurse takes my measurements every year, makes some suggestions for improvement (there is always room for improvement) then leaves me to it for another year. My GP team the Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet For Remission In Type 1 Diabetes

Ketogenic Diet For Remission In Type 1 Diabetes

Share Share Share Health-e-Solutions comment: Just so we are clear, the title of this article is not mine. It is the authors. I like it, but this is not a study that proves it can be done, but rather it discusses the viability of such a concept. The diabetic-alkaline lifestyle produces better blood sugar control in nearly all diabetics who implement it (without the excessive meat in a paleo diet). The authors summary about the prospects of the ketogenic diet for people with type 1 diabetes bears repeating right here at the outset: In some cases of type 1 diabetes, the immune system only partially destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. These people may regain their ability to produce insulin and later go into remission. The ketogenic diet looks particularly promising as a way to control blood sugar levels, hence also the condition itself, in these cases. We have no way to prove it scientifically, but this sure sounds like what happened with our boys. Since healthy food is the primary activator, it sure did not hurt to try it (with doctor supervision of course). We could not be more thrilled with the results. The diabetic-alkaline diet is not quite the same as any of the ketogenic diets pictured. Diabetes has some unique considerations, such as “right-carbs” instead of that which we usually eat in the standard American diet. That is why we created recipes that taste great, but also keep blood sugars from spiking or going to low by encouraging the body to burn an alternate fuel source (fat) instead of glucose. Ketogenic Diet for Remission in Type 1 Diabetes The ketogenic diet was designed as an intervention for seizures in children. Its composition of high amounts of fat, adequate amounts of protein and minimal amounts of carbohydrates forces the brai Continue reading >>

Effective Diabetes Treatment

Effective Diabetes Treatment

The most effective diabetes treatment is one which helps people with diabetes lower carbohydrate intake. Eating a large amount of sugar and starch at one time causes blood sugars to spike after the meal. That large blood sugar surge then requires a large insulin response from the pancreas (or in an injection). Too much insulin then crashes blood sugar down. The image below is from a study which looks at blood sugar reactions to high carb meals. This blood sugar "roller coaster" is rooted in a belief in the mainstream medical community and diabetes organizations that carbohydrates should make up between 45-65% of daily calories. They try to hide this with vague language, but the 2017 medical recommendations from the American Diabetes Association specifically says 15-20% of calories should come from protein, and 20-35% of calories should come from fats. That means the balance of calories (45-65%) come from carbohydrates. See page S36 of this document. On a daily calorie intake of 2000 calories, that works out to between 225 and 325 grams of carbohydrate. Advising people with diabetes to eat 45-65% of their calories from carbohydrates causes high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) which sticks to or glycates body cells and tissues and guarantees the development of long term complications such as peripheral nerve pain (neuropathy), kidney damage (nephropathy), a loss of eyesight (retinopathy) and other common diabetic complications. Worse, for those who take insulin injections, the large doses of insulin that have to be given to match high blood sugar spikes can result in low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) episodes which are incredibly dangerous, since hypoglycemia can cause a loss of consciousness or death if the brain runs out of glucose. I think one reason for this advice is a beli Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is it safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss. What is a ketogenic diet? In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones. Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The ketogenic diet was originally developed almost 100 years ago to treat epilepsy. Nowadays, it is used as a nutrition plan by health-conscious men and women to optimize body composition and athletic performance. Recent research suggests that high fat, very-low carb diets have another benefit: They may help control glucose, triglycerides, insulin, and body weight in people with diabetes. The research below shows the ketogenic diet may be an effective tool you can use to manage symptoms of Diabetes, alongside exercise and medication. Cutting through the Fat: What is Diabetes? Before we get to research, we need to review some basic medical terminology. Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases in which the body has elevated blood levels its main energy source: a sugar called glucose. There are two reasons why this occurs. In some people, there is insufficient production of a chemical called insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that lower levels of glucose in the blood. People who suffer from low insulin levels have type I diabetes and they comprise approximately 5 to 10% of all diabetics. [1] Type I diabetes is usually inherited and type I diabetics usually have to inject insulin to maintain proper levels of blood glucose. The other 90% to 95% of people with diabetes are type II diabetics. [1] In this version, the body doesn’t produce enough insulin for proper function or cells in the body do not react to insulin and take in sugar from the blood. Type 2 diabetes is not inherited. However, lifestyle factors such as high body weight, poor exercise and eating habits all increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. [2] It can be managed by improving dietary and lifestyle habits and also using proper medication. [2] Diabetes results in a higher concentration of s Continue reading >>

Very-low-carbohydrate Diet Vs. Oral Diabetes Medication

Very-low-carbohydrate Diet Vs. Oral Diabetes Medication

Very-Low-Carbohydrate Diet vs. Oral Diabetes Medication A recent study by Kaiser Permanente and Yale Medical Center found that severe hypoglycemia is quite common in people with Type 2 diabetes who take insulin-stimulating medications. This was true regardless of level of control, meaning those with elevated blood sugar and A1c levels experienced low blood sugar as well as those who were within or below their A1c goal. Severe hypoglycemia is defined as a blood glucose level less than 50 mg/dL and is associated with increased risk for heart attack, stroke, loss of consciousness, and death, particularly when it occurs during sleep. Its symptoms can be frightening and include sweating, shaking, dizziness, unsteadiness, and heart palpitations. Although having tight control (A1c <6%) is considered dangerous by many diabetes specialists because it suggests frequent low blood glucose levels, it's evident that anyone taking medications which cause the pancreas to secrete insulin is at risk for hypoglycemia as well. (For the record, I think having a lower A1c is good, provided it's not due to frequent lows). According to Dr. Kasia Lipska, an endocrinologist at Yale Medical Center, "It's important to note that it's not the HbA1c that directly causes hypoglycemia; it's the therapies we use to lower it." Exactly. Insulin-stimulating medications cause unpredictable blood glucose response in several ways. Typically prescribed to be taken twice a day at meals in fixed dosages, they are unable to make the pancreas produce the precise amount of insulin needed to cover the carbohydrate ingested at a meal, nor do they start working at exactly the right time to match the digestion of carbohydrate. In the poorly controlled overweight person with diabetes, taking this type of medication pra Continue reading >>

Successful Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes And Seizures With Combined Ketogenic Diet And Insulin

Successful Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes And Seizures With Combined Ketogenic Diet And Insulin

Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The deficiency of insulin leads to metabolic decompensation, causing hyperglycemia and ketosis that resolves with the administration of insulin and fluids. However, an induced state of ketosis is the basis for the success of the ketogenic diet (KD), which is an effective therapy for children with intractable epilepsy. We report the case of a 2-year-old girl who presented to the emergency department with 1-week history of decreased activity, polyuria, and decreased oral intake. Her past medical history was remarkable for epilepsy, for which she was started on the KD with a significant improvement. Her laboratory evaluation was compatible with DKA, and fluids and insulin were given until correction. Because of concerns regarding recurrence of her seizures, the KD was resumed along with the simultaneous use of insulin glargine and insulin aspart. Urine ketones were kept in the moderate range to keep the effect of ketosis on seizure control. Under this combined therapy, the patient remained seizure-free with no new episodes of DKA. Abstract Protein-losing enteropathy in children is caused by intestinal metabolic, inflammatory, or infectious processes, or by lymphatic obstruction (intestinal lymphangiectasia). In this report, a 17-month-old child is presented with protein-losing enteropathy due to intestinal malrotation and chronic midgut volvulus causing lymphatic obstruction and spillage of lymph in the intestine and the peritoneum. This report should alert the pediatrician that intestinal malrotation should be added to the wide list of possible causes of protein-losing enteropathy in children. Abstract Cytokine dermat Continue reading >>

Is The Keto Diet Safe For Diabetics?

Is The Keto Diet Safe For Diabetics?

Diabetes can be a brutal disease to live with, afflicting almost 26 million Americans with a constant stream of health scares and a challenging quality of life. But many are asking if a new diet could be part of the solution that we have been waiting for. The ketogenic diet (also referred to as the keto diet) furnishes the body with a high fat content while restricting carbohydrates and proteins to minimal amounts. Its not an easy diet to live with. While the ADA recommends an average carb intake of 135 carbs per day, the keto diet cuts the amount down to a mere 20 grams per day. When following the ketogenic diet, your calorie intake should be 80% fat and 20% proteins/carbs. According to the Ketogenic Diet Community , The diet mimics aspects of starvation by forcing the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. It essentially brings individuals to a state of ketosis, where your body processes fat rather than carbs for energy. When the liver converts fats into ketone bodies, they replace glucose as the bodys primary source of energy. The keto diet has been used by many patients suffering from diabetes and epilepsy. A recent study at Kuwait University found that LCKD [low-calorie ketogenic diet] has a significant beneficial effect in ameliorating [improving] the diabetic state and helping to stabilize hyperglycemia. Their results displayed that the diet enabled patients to bring their glucose levels down to near-normal levels. To give you an idea of what the ketogenic diet looks like on your plate, TheKetogenicDiet.org offers the following sample meal plan: Breakfast: Ham and cheese omelet or two fried eggs with two strips of bacon Lunch: Two hamburger patties with cheese and bacon or salad with ham and cheese Dinner: Roast pork belly with cauliflower cheese or pork c Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet