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Is Salmon Bad For Diabetics?

Diabetes Risk Soars By A Quarter If You Eat Oily Fish Like Salmon Or Mackerel Every Day

Diabetes Risk Soars By A Quarter If You Eat Oily Fish Like Salmon Or Mackerel Every Day

Diabetes risk soars by a quarter if you eat oily fish like salmon or mackerel every day Eating fish such as salmon, mackerel and sardines can heighten chances of developing the condition, a study has found Study of 70,000 women found a link between regular consumption of oily fish and diabetes (Image: Getty) Could not subscribe, try again laterInvalid Email Eating a portion of salmon, mackerel or sardines a day increases the risk of developing diabetes by a quarter, according to new research. Oily fish , rich in omega 3s, have become a keystone in recommendations for a healthy diet, warding off a range of conditions from heart disease to dementia, according to nuritionists. But a study of more than 70,000 women found those who ate the most increased their risk of developing diabetes by more than a quarter, compared to those who ate the least. Oily fish is rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) which are said to boost brain power, keep hearts healthy and strengthen bones. But evidence on their association with the risk of type 2 diabetes, the form of the disease linked to diet and exercise, is controversial and lacking. Daily insulin injections for diabetics could be a thing of the past thanks to pig cell transplants So French scientists followed 71,334 women for 14 years and found the top third consuming the most omega-3 (1.6g a day) - roughly a portion of sardines or salmon - had a 26 percent increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared to the lowest third (less than 1.3g per day). This was after taking into account other factors such as other fatty acid groups and BMI (body mass index). Dr Guy Fagherazzi, of University Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France, said: Despite evidence suggesting high intake of PUFAs, especially omega-3 PUFAs, as beneficial Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Eat Peanut Butter?

Can People With Diabetes Eat Peanut Butter?

Peanut butter may help people to manage diabetes, a condition that affects blood sugar levels. How exactly does this popular snack help to control the condition? A diet high in magnesium is thought to offer protective benefits against the development of diabetes. Peanuts are a good source of magnesium. Natural peanut butter and peanuts are also low glycemic index (GI) foods. This means that they have a lower effect on blood sugar levels. This article explores research into the impact of peanut butter on diabetes, to help people with diabetes decide whether eating it could improve their condition. It also considers any risks involved and looks at other healthful snacks for people with diabetes. How GI affects blood sugar GI is a 100-point scale applied to foods. This scale measures how blood sugar and insulin spike after eating specific food types. Foods that are digested slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. Peanuts have a GI score of just 14, making them one of the lowest GI foods. Foods high in GI cause blood sugar and insulin to spike severely after eating them. This is followed by a crash in blood sugar that can result in hunger, cravings, and tiredness. These cycles of spiking and crashing blood sugar and insulin levels are not good for the body. They can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. Research into peanut butter and blood sugar By contrast, low-GI foods can help people to better control their blood sugar levels. For example, a 2012 study looked into eating peanut butter or peanuts at breakfast. This helped obese women who were at risk of developing type 2 diabetes to control their blood sugar throughout the day. In the study, the beneficial effects of the peanuts were observed. They were looked at hours later, Continue reading >>

The Best Diet For Managing Your Diabetes

The Best Diet For Managing Your Diabetes

Many older Americans have type 2 diabetes or prediabetes. In fact, even though many have not been diagnosed, one in four adults aged 65 or older have diabetes and nearly 50 percent have prediabetes. And what they eat matters. Though healthcare providers use blood sugar levels to diagnose diabetes, problems associated with type 2 diabetes extend well beyond blood sugar. Thus dietary treatment must address these other concerns as well. Blood sugar levels rise because muscle, fat, and liver cells become resistant to insulin (the hormone that ushers blood sugar into body cells) and ignore insulins signals. Its this insulin resistance thats at the heart of other problems too. Blood pressure: Insulin resistance affects the nervous system, kidneys, and blood vessels in ways that increase blood pressure levels. Cholesterol and triglycerides: Changes in fat metabolism often lead to high triglyceride and low HDL (good) cholesterol levels. Heart disease and stroke: People with diabetes and prediabetes have increased risks for heart disease and stroke. Cancer: Insulin resistance is likely one of the reasons that people with type 2 diabetes have increased risks for several types of cancer, including colon, post-menopausal breast, liver, pancreatic, endometrial and bladder cancers, as well as non-Hodgkins lymphoma. Your best diet for diabetes in eight steps Helping your body become more sensitive to insulin can help you with blood sugar management and reduce your risks for other problems associated with insulin resistance and diabetes. 1. Balance your diet. A health-boosting diet includes a variety of food groups and accounts for protein, carbohydrates and fats, says registered dietitian nutritionist and certified diabetes educator Jessica Crandall, R.D.N., C.D.E., national spokespe Continue reading >>

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks that need to become part of everyday life – injections, testing, treating a hypo, monitoring and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. Plus, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. I've just been diagnosed with Type 1 – what can I eat? In one word... anything. It may come as a surprise, but all kinds of food are fine for people with Type 1 diabetes to eat. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a very restrictive diet plan. This was because the availability of insulin was limited and the type of insulin treatment was very restrictive. As insulin treatments have been developed to be much more flexible, the days of “do's and don'ts” are long gone. The way to go nowadays is to try and fit the diabetes and insulin around the same healthy, balanced diet that is recommended for everyone, with lots of fruit and veg and some food from all the food groups. Is there anything I should avoid? Before your diagnosis of diabetes, it is likely that you experienced an unquenchable thirst. It is a good idea to avoid sugary drinks and fruit juices as a way of quenching thirst. They usually put blood glucose levels up very high and very quickly – which is why they can be a useful treatment for a hypo (low blood glucose levels). Instead, drink water, Continue reading >>

Canned Salmon Is A Good Choice

Canned Salmon Is A Good Choice

Research keeps offering more reasons for eating fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, particularly salmon. So far, studies indicate these anti-inflammatory, antioxidant substances are good for the heart, may inhibit cancer and appear to benefit blood pressure, the brain, rheumatoid arthritis and other health problems. On a practical level, the debate about eating farmed versus wild salmon continues. It centers around questions of the benefits, safety and cost of one versus the other. Safety issues relate to excessive levels of PCB, which is sometimes found in the meal-fed, farmed salmon and occasionally in ocean waters. The amount of omega-3s found in salmon depends on what they eat. For farmed fish, omega-3s must be added to the meal, while these substances occur naturally in what wild salmon eat. Some food sources available only to wild salmon, such as deep-sea algae, provide powerful phytochemicals that help protect against many health problems, including cancer. (They also give salmon their distinctive color.) For many consumers, price is a key factor in how much as well as what kind of salmon is purchased. Canned salmon is a great choice because most of it is wild fish and costs perhaps one-tenth of what fresh wild salmon does. It is even a good buy compared to fresh farmed fish. All canned salmon from Alaska is wild fish, and most brands specify origin on the label, so you can be sure. Today, the big question is whether to use canned salmon with bones or without. Boneless canned salmon, which is being widely introduced now, is neater but lacks the calcium bones provide. Its usually more expensive, and may also be farmed Atlantic, not Alaskan, fish. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Now some of the diabetes diet information presented below may be slightly different to what you are used to seeing. That’s because there are quite a few flaws in the common diet prescription for type 2 diabetes. In our work with clients we’ve discovered that a ‘real food’ approach to eating has helped control type 2 diabetes the most. That’s because there is more to managing diabetes than just counting cabrs! So we’ve put together this type 2 diabetes diet food list that will give you a great place to start. FREE DOWNLOAD Like a Take Home Copy Of This List? Includes Snack Ideas and Food Tips! Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List PROTEINS Every meal should contain a source of protein for energy production and to fuel the creation of new cells. Below is a list of good protein sources to choose from. Protein also helps to satisfy the appetite, keeping you fuller longer. Lean Meats Lean beef; veal, flank steak, extra lean mince, sirloin steak, chuck steak, lamb. Pork Lean cuts of pork; pork chops or loin. Poultry Chicken, turkey, duck, quail, goose. Fish Tuna, salmon, cod, trout, bass, flatfish, whitehead, mackerel, herring, eel, haddock, red snapper, trout, drum, walleye, sardines and so forth. Seafood Crab, lobster, prawns, shrimp, oysters, mussels, clams, scallops, abalone, crayfish. Game Meats Venison, wild boar, kangaroo, deer, pheasant, moose, wild turkey, alligator, emu, ostrich, elk, bison, turtle. Many people don’t eat these types of meats but you can eat them if you like them. Organ Meats Beef, pork, lamb, chicken livers. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken tongues, hearts, brains. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken marrow, kidneys. Many people don’t eat these types of meats either but you can eat them if you like them, and they are very good sources of vitamins and minera Continue reading >>

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taking in less of both Continue reading >>

Six Fish Facts To Know Now

Six Fish Facts To Know Now

We’ve been hearing for a long time now that fish and other types of seafood are good for us. Current recommendations tell us to aim to eat “two fish meals a week.” But fish has some fishy aspects to it, like mercury. And what about all that cholesterol in shellfish? Do fish sticks count towards your two weekly fish meals? Let’s find out the facts about fish. Fish fact #1: Frozen fish can be just as good as fresh fish. Frozen fish has often been frozen on the boat right after being caught. The flash-freezing process that’s used keeps the fish at temperatures lower than your home freezer. Some “fresh” fish, on the other hand, is fish that was previously frozen or fish that’s been sitting around for a few days. When choosing frozen fish, look for either vacuum-sealed fish or fish with a thick coating of ice on it. Fish fact #2: Freshwater fish is just as good for you as saltwater fish. When we think of fish, what often comes to mind are omega-3 fatty acids, which are present in fish oils. Fish that are high in omega-3s include salmon, herring, and tuna, which are saltwater fish. But freshwater fish from cold water contain these healthful fats, too. Fish like trout contain decent amounts. Omega-3 fatty acids are thought to help lower blood pressure, lower blood triglyceride levels, reduce inflammation in the body, and possibly even help alleviate depression. Fish fact #3: Shellfish is higher in cholesterol than fish, but it’s low in saturated fat. If you live on the east coast, you know how popular clams (“steamers,” “littlenecks”) are in the summertime. But, if your blood cholesterol is on the high side, you might be worried that clams (along with shrimp, lobster, and other shellfish) are too high in cholesterol for you to eat. Relax. OK, shellfis Continue reading >>

7 Best Fish Varieties For Diabetics - Myvita Wellness

7 Best Fish Varieties For Diabetics - Myvita Wellness

Choose your fish wisely to ward off diabetes Good nutrition is essential for everyone, but it is particularly important if you are living with diabetes. The deadliest complication of diabetes is heart disease. Diabetes experts recommend eating fish for cardiovascular health.Eating fish just once a week can reduce your risk by 40 per cent, according to a Harvard School of Public Health study. The fatty acids in fish reduce insulin resistance and inflammation in the body a major contributor to coronary disease. But remember to choose your fish wisely, as some varieties are much better for managing or warding off diabetes than others. Here are 7 of the best fish varieties for diabetics. Salmon is at the top of our list because it is high in omega-3, the healthy fats that can reduce the inflammation in your blood cells as well as help your cholesterol. The Omega-3 fatty acids in salmon are connected with a whole slew of other health benefits as well. These benefits include heart, brain, and eye health. Salmon is also great for managing blood glucose levels and improving your bodys ability to respond to insulin. As with most fish, you have a number of healthy options for cooking salmon, including poaching, broiling, and baking. Herring is an excellent choice for diabetics for many reasons. First and foremost, it is one of the best food sources of vitamin D. There seems to be more to vitamin D than strong teeth and bones. Its now thought that vitamin D deficiency might be a factor in many diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and diabetes. Additionally, Herring is loaded with EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). These fatty acids help prevent heart disease and keep the brain functioning properly. They are also effective in reducing inflammation in the b Continue reading >>

Why Would Eating Fish Increase Diabetes Risk?

Why Would Eating Fish Increase Diabetes Risk?

In the past two years, six separate meta-analyses have been published on the relationship between fish consumption and type 2 diabetes. The whole point of a meta-analysis is to compile the best studies done to date and see what the overall balance of evidence shows. The fact that there are six different ones published recently highlights how open the question remains. One thread of consistency, though, was that fish consumers in the United States tended to be at greater risk for diabetes. If we include Europe, then fish eaters appeared to have a 38% increased risk of diabetes. On a per serving basis, that comes out to be about a 5% increase in risk for every serving of fish one has per week. To put that into perspective, a serving of red meat per day is associated with 19% increase in risk. Just one serving per day of fish would be equivalent to a 35% increase in risk. But why might fish be worse than red meat? Fish intake may increase type 2 diabetes risk by increasing blood sugar levels, as a review of the evidence commissioned by the U.S. government found. The review found that blood sugars increase in diabetics given fish oil. Another possible cause is that omega 3’s appear to cause oxidative stress. A recent study, highlighted in my video, Fish and Diabetes, found that the insulin producing cells in the pancreas don’t appear to work as well in people who eat two or more servings of fish a week. Or it may not be related to omega 3’s at all but rather the environmental contaminants that build up in fish. It all started with Agent Orange. We sprayed 20 million gallons of the stuff on Vietnam, and some of it was contaminated with trace amounts of dioxins. Though the Red Cross estimates that a million Vietnamese were adversely affected, what about all the servicem Continue reading >>

8 Foods To Eat To Beat Diabetes (and 5 To Avoid!)

8 Foods To Eat To Beat Diabetes (and 5 To Avoid!)

Carnivores, rejoice: These foods (poultry without the skin) are fair game in a diabetes-friendly diet. Why? Because they're high in protein (result: full stomach) but typically low in fat (result: better weight management). Fatty fish also contains omega-3 fatty acids, which cut down on cardiovascular problems that can accompany diabetes. Continue reading >>

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Figuring out the best foods to eat when you have diabetes can be tough. The main goal is to keep blood sugar levels well-controlled. However, it's also important to eat foods that help prevent diabetes complications like heart disease. Here are the 16 best foods for diabetics, both type 1 and type 2. Fatty fish is one of the healthiest foods on the planet. Salmon, sardines, herring, anchovies and mackerel are great sources of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, which have major benefits for heart health. Getting enough of these fats on a regular basis is especially important for diabetics, who have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke (1). DHA and EPA protect the cells that line your blood vessels, reduce markers of inflammation and improve the way your arteries function after eating (2, 3, 4, 5). A number of observational studies suggest that people who eat fatty fish regularly have a lower risk of heart failure and are less likely to die from heart disease (6, 7). In studies, older men and women who consumed fatty fish 5–7 days per week for 8 weeks had significant reductions in triglycerides and inflammatory markers (8, 9). Fish is also a great source of high-quality protein, which helps you feel full and increases your metabolic rate (10). Fatty fish contain omega-3 fats that reduce inflammation and other risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Leafy green vegetables are extremely nutritious and low in calories. They're also very low in digestible carbs, which raise your blood sugar levels. Spinach, kale and other leafy greens are good sources of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C. In one study, increasing vitamin C intake reduced inflammatory markers and fasting blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat If You Have Diabetes

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat If You Have Diabetes

Most of us take it for granted that we can eat whatever we like, although it may have an unwanted effect on our waistline. But diabetics have to be much more careful with what they consume, as their inability to produce any, or enough, insulin, means their blood sugar levels can become dangerously high if they eat whatever they fancy. [Read more: 6 surprising cholesterol-busting foods] [Revealed: Why am I always hungry? 6 reasons you’re feeling starving] However, as World Diabetes Day is marked on November 14, Diabetes UK points out that no foods are totally off-limits for diabetics – they just need to eat carefully. Libby Dowling, senior clinical advisor at Diabetes UK, explains: “If you have diabetes – whatever the type – no food is out of bounds, but you should aim for a healthy, balanced diet, just as everyone should. This is a diet which is low in sugar, salt and saturated fats and includes plenty of fruit and vegetables. “It’s fine to have a treat now and again, but maintaining a healthy diet most of the time can help you to manage your diabetes, and is good for your general health too.” Here are some suggestions for the best and worst foods to eat when you're diabetic: Frozen grapes Instead of sweets, try these fruity little gems, which turn into a creamy sorbet-style healthy snack when frozen. Although there are fruit sugars in them, there's less sugar than there is in sweets, and fruit's packed with vitamins, minerals and fibre. Sweet potatoes Sweet potatoes have been shown to stabilise blood sugar levels in diabetics by lowering insulin resistance. They also contain high amounts of fibre, which helps reduce levels of 'bad' LDL cholesterol, which is linked to cardiovascular disease. Almonds Eating almonds can help people with type 2 diabetes to Continue reading >>

The Best Fish For Diabetics

The Best Fish For Diabetics

Diabetes is a disease that affects your body's ability to properly use and store sugars from the foods you eat. Your body either does not make or does not respond to insulin, which is the chemical that causes glucose to be removed from your blood after a meal. While most diabetics can enjoy all foods in moderation, your diet should consist mainly of healthy foods full of vitamins and minerals. Fish is an excellent food for diabetics because it provides many of the nutrients found in meat without unnecessary saturated fat and calories. The American Heart Association indicates that you should have two 3.5-ounce servings of fish per week for the greatest health benefits. Video of the Day Salmon is a fatty fish full of protein and omega-3 fatty acids, but low in saturated fat. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetics are at increased risk for developing heart disease, and omega-3 fats are important for your cardiovascular health. The American Heart Association indicates that omega-3s decrease triglyceride levels, lower blood pressure, slow the rate of plaques forming in your arteries and decrease the risk of developing an abnormal heart rhythm. Salmon provides you with lean protein that will lead to weight loss, and protein has been shown to help regulate your blood sugar. Salmon is also low in mercury, and you can safely consume up to twelve ounces per week. It is available in wild and farmed varieties. Prepare your salmon meals by baking, grilling or broiling. Avoid frying salmon to keep from taking in unnecessary saturated fat. Sardines are also a good source of omega-3 fats, and they are low in saturated fat. They contain as much calcium as a glass of milk, the B vitamin niacin, protein and iron. They are a convenient fish choice, since you can buy them Continue reading >>

5 Surprising Foods That Help Fight Diabetes

5 Surprising Foods That Help Fight Diabetes

Are you bored with sugar-free candy, low carbohydrate pasta, and endless chicken dinners? Having diabetes does not mean that your diet should be boring. In fact, it should be the opposite. Variety keeps your palate interested and ensures that you get a healthy balance of vitamins, nutrients, and antioxidants. The following 5 foods may or may not be a regular part of your diet, but each has a positive effect on diabetes management and prevention. Experiment with some of the “try this” options below for an easy way to incorporate these foods into your meals. Sunflower Seeds Sunflower seeds are a humble snack. They often sit on the shelf overlooked because of the hoards of positive press that almonds and walnuts get. Almonds and walnuts are very healthful nuts, but sunflower seeds are also full of important vitamins and minerals. Some of the nutrients in sunflower seeds that make them unique are copper, vitamin E, selenium, magnesium, and zinc. The presence and combination of so many of these nutrients can be hard to come by in common foods. Sunflower seeds have about 3 grams of fiber and 5 grams of protein in an ounce of kernels. The best part is that sunflower seeds, while high in total fat (about 14 grams), contain mostly polyunsaturated fat, which researchers believe is the best type of fat to combat diabetes. Try this: Swap out your peanuts for sunflower seeds. Or hunt down a jar of sunflower seed butter instead of peanut butter for an easy way to get your fix. Salmon Salmon boasts numerous health benefits. It’s a great source of protein that is low in saturated fat and has important omega-3 fatty acid for excellent heart health. The combination of omega-3 and polyunsaturated fats in salmon keeps blood pressure down and protects the heart from disease. Research Continue reading >>

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