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Is Metformin Fda Approved For Weight Loss?

Effects Of Metformin On Body Weight And Body Composition In Obese Insulin-resistant Children

Effects Of Metformin On Body Weight And Body Composition In Obese Insulin-resistant Children

Effects of Metformin on Body Weight and Body Composition in Obese Insulin-Resistant Children Jack A. Yanovski ,1 Jonathan Krakoff ,2 Christine G. Salaita ,3 Jennifer R. McDuffie ,1 Merel Kozlosky ,3 Nancy G. Sebring ,3 James C. Reynolds ,4 Sheila M. Brady ,1 and Karim A. Calis 1,5 1Unit on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Bethesda, Maryland 2Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), Bethesda, Maryland 1Unit on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Bethesda, Maryland 4Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Hatfield Clinical Research Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 1Unit on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Bethesda, Maryland 1Unit on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Bethesda, Maryland 5Department of Pharmacy, Hatfield Clinical Research Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 1Unit on Growth and Obesity, Program in Developmental Endocrinology and Genetics, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Bethesda, Maryland 2Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), Bethesda, Maryland 3Department of Nutrition Continue reading >>

Dr. Timothy Garvey On Qsymia And Other New Therapies For Weight Loss

Dr. Timothy Garvey On Qsymia And Other New Therapies For Weight Loss

Home / Conditions / Prediabetes / Dr. Timothy Garvey on Qsymia and Other New Therapies for Weight Loss Dr. Timothy Garvey on Qsymia and Other New Therapies for Weight Loss Steve Freed: Lets start out with a little background about Qsymia and Belviq. What is the FDA allowing you to treat with the drugs? Dr. Timothy Garvey: In 2012, the FDA approved two new weight loss medications. In 2014, another medication was approved. That is three new medications. We hope to be hearing any day now from the FDA on a fourth weight loss medication. In aggregate, these approvals give us new options for managing obesity and overweight in patients, tools that we just havent had previously. In fact, I think this is opening up a whole new field, Obesity Medicine, where we really manage obesity as the chronic disease that it is, and bring the full force of our medical model to help these patients. These medications are approved to treat obesity including diabetes patients with obesity. With respect to diabetes, there are existing clinical trial data in patients with type 2 diabetes for all of these medications. The pattern is very consistent. These medications when used in patients with type 2 diabetes lead to weight loss, over and above any weight loss that is achieved through lifestyle intervention program, while at the same time lowering hemoglobin A1c and decreasing the need for conventional diabetes medications; also lowering blood pressure and improving lipids. Of course, this is an outstanding profile of results in patients with type 2 diabetes. SF: Do you have the names of the three drugs that have been approved, and the one that is coming up? TG: The two approved in 2012 are phentermine-topiramate extended-release, which is a combination medication, brand name is Qsymia. The second Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Medications Aade Practice Advisory

Weight Loss Medications Aade Practice Advisory

Obesity continues to be an epidemic in the United States with over one third (approximately 78.6 million) of the adult population considered to be obese.1 A recently released report states that adult women have a higher prevalence of obesity at 40% than adult men with 35% in 2013-2014.2 Annual medical costs for obesity management were $147 billion in 2008, an expense that is higher than in the normal weight population. Obesity-related conditions, which include type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke and certain cancer types,1 are the leading cause of death among adults in the United States. The decision by the American Medical Association to recognize obesity as a disease in June 2013 created discussion and dialogue on the importance of managing diabetes and supporting provider reimbursement for oversight.3 According to the 2013 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association Guidelines for the Management of Overweight and Obesity, the management of obesity is Body Mass Index (BMI)-centric and includes lifestyle modifications, medications, and bariatric surgery.4 Specifically, medications are recommended for patients with a BMI of 30 or above; and patients with a BMI of 27 or above (Asian Americans will have lower BMI cut points) with obesity-related comorbidities including diabetes and hypertension.4-5 It is recommended as a first step that prescribed diabetes medicines be reviewed to see if any adjustments can be made to ensure they are weight sparing or weight neutral (see Table 1). If medications are elected as part of the treatment strategy, which already includes lifestyle changes such as increased physical activity and healthy eating patterns, experts recommend a weight loss of 5-10% is needed within the first six months of maximal medication dose to Continue reading >>

Anti-obesity Medication

Anti-obesity Medication

Orlistat (Xenical) the most commonly used medication to treat obesity and sibutramine (Meridia) a medication that was recently withdrawn due to cardiovascular side effects Anti-obesity medication or weight loss drugs are pharmacological agents that reduce or control weight. These drugs alter one of the fundamental processes of the human body, weight regulation, by altering either appetite, or absorption of calories.[1] The main treatment modalities for overweight and obese individuals remain dieting and physical exercise. In the United States orlistat (Xenical) is currently approved by the FDA for long-term use.[2][3] It reduces intestinal fat absorption by inhibiting pancreatic lipase. Rimonabant (Acomplia), a second drug, works via a specific blockade of the endocannabinoid system. It has been developed from the knowledge that cannabis smokers often experience hunger, which is often referred to as "the munchies". It had been approved in Europe for the treatment of obesity but has not received approval in the United States or Canada due to safety concerns.[4][5] The European Medicines Agency in October 2008 recommended the suspension of the sale of rimonabant as the risks seem to be greater than the benefits.[6] Sibutramine (Meridia), which acts in the brain to inhibit deactivation of the neurotransmitters, thereby decreasing appetite was withdrawn from the United States and Canadian markets in October 2010 due to cardiovascular concerns.[3][7] Because of potential side effects, and limited evidence of small benefits in weight reduction especially in obese children and adolescents,[8] it is recommended that anti-obesity drugs only be prescribed for obesity where it is hoped that the benefits of the treatment outweigh its risks.[9][10] Mechanisms of action[edit] Current Continue reading >>

New Weight Loss Formula: Popular Diabetes Drug Melts Pounds, Studies Show

New Weight Loss Formula: Popular Diabetes Drug Melts Pounds, Studies Show

If the FDA says yes, a major new weight loss drug may hit the market this year. A high-dose formulation of liraglutide, the popular diabetes drug from Novo Nordisk melts up to 10 percent of body mass, studies show. Liraglutide, available in 1.2 mg and 1.8 mg doses as Victoza, is already a huge success for Novo Nordisk. The company has now filed with the FDA seeking approval for a 3.0 mg dose after studies found major weight loss benefits (in conjunction with diet and exercise.) In clinical trials, liraglutide helped those taking it lose 5 to 10 percent of their body mass, according to research published in the International Journal of Obesity. And while this study looked at people with diabetes, a previous study published in the Lancet tested the drug in non-diabetics and found similarly impressive weight loss. In late December, Novo Nordisk filed two submissions for liraglutide, a new drug application (NDA) with the FDA, and a Marketing Authorization Application (MAA) with the European Medicines Agency, according to Drug Discovery & Development. But some folks may not have to wait even that long. In February, Novo Nordisk made the unusual move of targeting Mexico for an initial approval of high-dose liraglutide. And others may not wait at all; while the studies warn against using liraglutide "off-label" for weight loss, it seems certain that patients will seek to use Victoza for that purpose. Liraglutide works by mimicking a hormone known as GLP-1, which slows digestion and stimulates the body's natural production of insulin. Victoza has been very successful for Novo Nordisk, with sales jumping 58 percent in 2012, and climbing an additional 14 percent in the third quarter of 2013. Experts are projecting that liraglutide would have blockbuster potential as a weight loss Continue reading >>

Two New Weight-loss Drugs Available For Patients With Diabetes

Two New Weight-loss Drugs Available For Patients With Diabetes

With the FDA approval and coverage of new prescription weight-loss drugs last year, healthcare professionals have two more options to consider when treating obesity. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009–2010 saw this major public health challenge affect more than one-third of adults and almost 17% of children and adolescents. Obesity places individuals at increased risk for several chronic diseases, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Weight loss in patients with diabetes has been associated with improved glycemic control and improved lipid profiles. Although healthcare professionals have counseled patients about diet and exercise as the main approach for weight reduction, some patients continue to struggle and may seek alternative methods beyond caloric restriction and the treadmill. Lorcaserin approval In June 2012, FDA approved lorcaserin (Belviq, Arena Pharmaceuticals/ Eisai), a serotonin 2C receptor agonist, indicated as an adjunct to diet and increased physical activity for chronic weight management in adult patients who are obese or overweight and have at least one weight-related comorbidity (e.g., hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes). This was the first weight-loss prescription approved in 13 years, since FDA approved orlistat, a reversible inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases. Lorcaserin was approved on the basis of data from three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials lasting from 52 to 104 weeks. At one year, approximately 47% of patients without diabetes in studies 1 and 2 lost ≥5% body weight, and approximately 22% achieved a loss of 10% body weight or more. In the third study, 37.5% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus lost ≥5% body weight and about 16% achieved Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

If you’re managing type 2 diabetes with metformin (Glucophage), you might be well acquainted with unwanted side effects of this drug — namely, upset stomach, diarrhea, muscle aches, and sleepiness. These can be a figurative and literal pain, but you might welcome one side effect of metformin with open arms, particularly if you’ve struggled to lose weight. Metformin isn’t a weight loss drug, but researchers have found a link between the drug and weight loss. In fact, a long-term study published in April 2012 in the journal Diabetes Care that was conducted by the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) concluded that the drug could serve as a treatment for excess body weight, although more studies are needed. What Is Metformin and How Does It Work? “[Metformin] has been considered a first-line medication in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and it mainly acts by lowering the amount of glucose released by the liver,” says Minisha Sood, MD, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “It also helps a hormone called insulin to work better by helping muscles use glucose in a more efficient manner. When insulin works better (and insulin sensitivity improves), a person’s insulin levels are lower than they would be otherwise.” There’s no cure for type 2 diabetes, but the right combination of medication and healthy lifestyle can stabilize blood sugar levels, which, of course, is the end goal of any diabetes treatment. As the medication helps your body properly metabolize food and restores your ability to respond to insulin, you’ll not only feel better, you can potentially avoid complications of high blood sugar, such as heart disease, kidney damage, nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), and eye damage (retinopathy). Why Does Metformin Cause Weight Lo Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Metformin is a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. You may have heard that metformin can also help you lose weight. But is it true? The answer is a resounding maybe. Here’s what you should know about what metformin can do for weight loss, as well as why your doctor may prescribe it for you. According to research, metformin can help some people lose weight. However, it’s not clear why metformin may cause weight loss. One theory is that it may prompt you to eat less by reducing your appetite. It may also change the way your body uses and stores fat. Although studies have shown that metformin may help with weight loss, the drug is not a quick-fix solution. According to one long-term study, the weight loss from metformin tends to occur gradually over one to two years. The amount of weight lost also varies from person to person. In the study, the average amount of weight lost after two or more years was four to seven pounds. Taking the drug without following other healthy habits may not lead to weight loss. Individuals who follow a healthy diet and exercise while taking metformin tend to lose the most weight. This may be because metformin is thought to boost how many calories you burn during exercise. If you don’t exercise, you likely won’t have this benefit. In addition, any weight loss you have may only last as long as you take the medication. That means if you stop taking metformin, there’s a good chance you will return to your original weight. And even while you’re still taking the drug, you may slowly gain back any weight you’ve lost. In other words, metformin may not be the magic diet pill some people have been waiting for. It has been shown to reduce weight in some, but not others. One of the benefits of metformin Continue reading >>

Off-label Drugs For Weight Management

Off-label Drugs For Weight Management

Center for Weight Management, Roseville and Sacramento, CA, USA Correspondence: Ed J Hendricks, Center for Weight Management, 2510 Douglas Blvd, Suite 200, Roseville, CA 95661, USA, Tel +1 916 202 5759, Email [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2017 Hendricks. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited The full terms of this license are available at and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( ). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. The global pandemic of obesity and overweight now affects between 2.8 and 3.5 billion of the world population and shows no signs of abatement. Treatment for what is now recognized as a chronic disease includes pharmacotherapy, considered an essential component of comprehensive therapy. New drug discovery is robust, but the pace of the US Food and Drug Administration approval for obesity drugs has been glacial, and only a handful of approved drugs are available for treating obesity. In the last 20 years, the US Food and Drug Administration has approved 208 drugs for cancer, 118 for cardiovascular diseases, 168 for neurological diseases, and 223 endocrinologic drugs, but only 6 for obesity, 2 of which have been taken off market. Currently, there are only 9 drugs approved by the FDA for obesity treatment. US physicians have turned to off-label drug use in their effort to care for increasing numbers of patients with excess adiposity. Phentermine is the most commonly used drug for treating obesity. Although approved only for short-term use, US physician Continue reading >>

Metformin For Weight Loss And Metabolic Control In Overweight Outpatients With Schizophrenia And Schizoaffective Disorder

Metformin For Weight Loss And Metabolic Control In Overweight Outpatients With Schizophrenia And Schizoaffective Disorder

Metformin for Weight Loss and Metabolic Control in Overweight Outpatients With Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder L. Fredrik Jarskog , M.D., Robert M. Hamer , Ph.D., Diane J. Catellier , Dr.P.H., Dawn D. Stewart , M.S., Lisa LaVange , Ph.D., Neepa Ray , M.S., Lauren H. Golden , M.D., Jeffrey A. Lieberman , M.D., and T. Scott Stroup , M.D., M.P.H., for the METS Investigators Departments of Psychiatry and Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill; North Carolina Psychiatric Research Center, Raleigh; Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York; and New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York Address correspondence to: Dr. Jarskog ( [email protected] ) The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Am J Psychiatry See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. The purpose of this study was to determine whether metformin promotes weight loss in overweight out-patients with chronic schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. In a double-blind study, 148 clinically stable, overweight (body mass index [BMI] 27) outpatients with chronic schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were randomly assigned to receive 16 weeks of metformin or placebo. Metformin was titrated up to 1,000 mg twice daily, as tolerated. All patients continued to receive their prestudy medications, and all received weekly diet and exercise counseling. The primary outcome measure was change in body weight from baseline to week 16. Fifty-eight (77.3%) patients who received metformin and 58 (81.7%) who received placebo completed 16 weeks of treatment. Mean change in body weight was 3.0 kg (95% CI=4.0 to 2.0) for the metformin group and 1.0 kg (95% CI= 2.0 to 0.0) for the pla Continue reading >>

Anti-aging Human Study On Metformin Wins Fda Approval

Anti-aging Human Study On Metformin Wins Fda Approval

News Reports around World Describe Multiple Benefits The media has caught up to the potential health benefits of metformin, something our long-term supporters discovered long ago. What caught the media’s attention was the FDA’s approval of the first human study to see if metformin can protect against the multiple diseases of aging. Prominent headlines around the world proclaimed: “New Anti-Aging Drug Could Extend Human Life Span to 120 Years” Metformin of course is not a new drug. It was approved in England in 1957 and made available to type II diabetics around the world shortly thereafter. It took the FDA a staggering 37 years to approve it in the United States. Here are some accurate quotes from worldwide news sources: “Although it might seem like science fiction, researchers have already proven that the diabetes drug metformin extends the life of animals, and the Food and Drug Administration in the US has now given the go-ahead for a trial to see if the same effects can be replicated in humans.” “I have been doing research into aging for 25 years and the idea that we would be talking about a clinical trial in humans for an anti-aging drug would have been thought inconceivable…20 years ago aging was a biological mystery. Now we are starting to understand what is going on.” “Scientists think the best candidate for an anti-aging drug is metformin, the world’s most widely used diabetes drug, which costs just 10p [15 cents] a day. Metformin increases the number of oxygen molecules released into a cell, which appears to boost robustness and longevity.” “If we can slow aging in humans, even by just a little bit, it would be monumental. People could be older, and feel young.” “This would be the most important medical intervention in the modern e Continue reading >>

Metformin As Treatment For Overweight And Obese Adults: A Systematic Review

Metformin As Treatment For Overweight And Obese Adults: A Systematic Review

Metformin as Treatment for Overweight and Obese Adults: A Systematic Review We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Metformin as Treatment for Overweight and Obese Adults: A Systematic Review Kara M. Levri, MD, MPH, Elizabeth Slaymaker, MD, [...], and Stephen A. Wilson, MD PURPOSE We wanted to determine whether metformin is an effective medication for treatment of overweight or obese adults who do not have diabetes mellitus or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). METHODS We searched MEDLINE (19662003), EMBASE (19862003), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (19852003), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (19702003), the Cochrane Library, American College of Physicians Journal Club, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, reference lists of retrieved articles, and articles by selected authors and pharmaceutical manufacturers. Inclusion criteria were being obese or overweight determined by a BMI of 25 kg/m2 or greater or waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) of more than 0.8, metformin use, and aged 18 years or older. Exclusion criteria were a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovarian syndrome or descriptors of polycystic ovarian syndrome, human immunodeficiency virus infection, and concomitant antipsychotic medications. Trials were graded on an 11-point Jadad scale. Only randomized controlled and blinded trials were accepted. Two Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Interventions That Work: Medications

Weight Loss Interventions That Work: Medications

Weight loss interventions that work: Medications Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. Photos: Hidden medical causes of weight gain Are you sure those extra pounds are caused by a lack of willpower, or could there be an underlying medical issue? Photos: Hidden medical causes of weight gain The stress hormone cortisol regulates appetite, body composition and metabolism. Studies show that prolonged exposure to stress is related to high body mass and obesity. It's hard to beat a stress habit, but experts suggest trying to choose better coping habits than comfort food. Look to yoga, medication, deep breathing and mindfulness exercises. Photos: Hidden medical causes of weight gain The culprit for your recent weight gain could be hiding in your medication cabinet. A variety of medications are frequently associated with weight gain, most notoriously antidepressants. Be sure to read up on side effects and discuss options with your psychiatrist. Photos: Hidden medical causes of weight gain Ovarian cancer is a rare but deadly reason for a bloated belly. It usually goes along with other telltale signs such as abdominal pain, urinary frequency, postmenopausal and anal bleeding, and a loss of appetite. So if you've suddenly developed abdominal distension in the past few months and have any of these other symptoms, see a doctor immediately. And don't rely on the results of your Pap test; that's effective only in the early detection of cervical cancer. Photos: Hidden medical causes of weight gain Some diabetes medications, such as insulin, are notorious for adding on pounds. That's especially vexing when being overweight has contributed to the development of the disease. Experts suggest working closely with your doctor to see whethe Continue reading >>

Is Metformin Effective For Weight Loss?

Is Metformin Effective For Weight Loss?

Losing weight can be hard. At times you may question whether the changes to your diet and what seems like endless hours of exercise are worth it. For that reason many people choose to go down the route of prescription medicine for weight loss – and metformin is one option that pops up from time to time. But is prescription medicine the best way forward and will it boost your progress more than knuckling down and changing your lifestyle and diet for the better? In this article we’ll give you the lowdown on whether or not this drug can help you. What is Metformin? Metformin hydrochloride is an anti-diabetic drug taken orally and sold under a number of different brand names. Its main action is to reduce the levels of glucose in the blood and is used commonly in non-insulin-dependent, type 2 diabetics [1]. The mechanism of action with this drug is complex, but all you need to know is that it doesn’t increase blood insulin levels like other medications. Instead it decreases liver production of glucose as well as how sensitive you are to the existing insulin in your body. Impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes are big risk factors for cardiovascular disease so it’s important that these are properly managed. Metformin has largely been seen to reduce these associated risks, particularly in combination with exercise [2]. Currently the American Diabete Association (ADA) [3] recommend the drug as a first-line medication for type 2 diabetes. It is however being used more and more for other illnesses such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) as well. On an occasional basis it is also prescribed to those who want to lose weight but have no associated medical conditions. In general it is apparent that patients using metformin do not gain weight. But does that mean you’ll los Continue reading >>

Weight Loss Drugs

Weight Loss Drugs

By the dLife Editors Americans are learning to downsize everything—except food portions. Despite efforts by the medical community and governmental and private organizations, the obesity epidemic seems to be a runaway train. And what’s keeping up with that train? The type 2 diabetes prevalence. Weight Loss Drugs Approved by the FDA Just as there’s no magic bullet for any big health problem, there’s no magic weight loss capsule. However, over the past four years, the FDA has approved four new drugs for weight loss. A recent meta-analysis of twenty-eight clinical trials involving over 28,000 participants found that each of the five FDA-approved weight loss drugs was associated with achieving at least five percent weight loss in one year, compared with participants who were given a placebo. Let’s take a look at these drugs. Orlistat Brand names: Alli (Orlistat 60 mg) and Xenical (Orlistat 120 mg) A lipase inhibitor (fat blocker), Orlistat causes less fat (30 percent of fat and calories) to be absorbed into the gut. Side effects include diarrhea from eating fatty foods when taking the medication. Xenical (Orlistat 120 mg) was approved as a prescription product by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1999 for obesity management, in addition to an over-the-counter version at a smaller dose: Alli (Orlistat 60 mg) was approved in 2007. In the spring of 2010, the the FDA issued a safety warning about this drug. Some people who take Orlistat are potentially at risk for liver failure. The drug label has been revised to include new safety information about the rare occurrence of severe liver injury. Cost: Ranges between $120 and $500 per month—contact your local pharmacy to price out the option that is prescribed or suggested to you by your doctor.* Phentermin Continue reading >>

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