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Is Gluten Free Diet Good For A Diabetic?

Low-gluten Or Gluten-free Diets Linked To Type 2 Diabetes

Low-gluten Or Gluten-free Diets Linked To Type 2 Diabetes

Does reduction in gluten consumption provide long-term health benefits? Gluten is a protein that is commonly found in wheat, rye and barley, which gives bread and other baked goods elasticity and a chewy texture. It is avoided in a small percentage of the population that cannot tolerate gluten due to Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. Gluten-free foods often contain less dietary fiber and other micronutrients, such as, vitamins and minerals, thus making them less nutritious and they also tend to cost more. However, recent popularity of gluten-free diets has been trending even among people without any health problems. A ‘Gluten-free’ diet has been interchangeably used to represent a ‘healthy diet.’ On the contrary, researchers have shown concern that it may actually lead to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) over a period of few decades. Although there is no scientific evidence that low-gluten will contribute to diabetes, the scientists are concerned about the long-term health benefits with the reduction in gluten consumption. An analysis of a large study of U.S. health professionals observed the effects of food on health in nearly 200,000 subjects. The study suggested that gluten intake might not exert significant adverse effects on the incidence of T2D or excess weight gain. Thus, limiting gluten from the diet is unlikely to facilitate T2D prevention and may lead to reduced consumption of cereal fiber or whole grains that help reduce diabetes risk. The purpose of the study was to determine if gluten consumption would affect health in people with no apparent medical reasons to avoid gluten. A long-term observational study looked at the data from three big previously held studies that started 40 years ago with the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and continu Continue reading >>

Eating Right With Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Eating Right With Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Managing diabetes means monitoring your carbohydrate intake to help prevent spikes in your blood sugar levels. An additional diagnosis of celiac disease adds another layer of complexity to eating. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which people cannot tolerate gluten.1 Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye—it helps dough rise and keep its shape and texture. Treatment of celiac includes eating a gluten-free diet. Common foods that are made with gluten include:2 pasta; bread; cereal; beverages such as beer; couscous; tortillas; crackers; cookies, cakes, muffins, and pastries; dressings, sauces, and gravies; and wheat-based flours such as white flour, wheat flour, kamut, semolina, spelt, and wheat bran. This list might seem overwhelming, but there are a variety of gluten-free versions of popular foods such as bread, pasta, and crackers that can be found in your local grocery store. For people with celiac and diabetes, however, it is important to consider the carb count—especially because many gluten-free foods are made with flours that contain less fiber and have a higher glycemic index. The golden rule? Get in the habit of checking the labels of anything you put in your mouth or on your skin (for both gluten and carbs). Hide-and-Seek with Gluten Labels can sometimes be deceiving. Just because something is labeled as “wheat-free” does not mean it is gluten-free. Always examine labels for buzz words such as wheat, barley, or rye, and if you have any questions, contact the manufacturer directly before eating. Certain additives in packaged foods contain traces of gluten—ask your healthcare provider or a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) who specializes in celiac disease for a complete list of unsafe ingredients and foods. It is also impo Continue reading >>

Gluten And Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Gluten And Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Although many people continue to buy gluten-free foods at grocery stores and restaurants, it appears the gluten-free trend is waning for those looking to lose weight or gain energy, according to Packaged Facts, a market research company. For those who have to restrict gluten for medical reasons, such as managing celiac disease, gluten-free foods are necessary. A key treatment for those with celiac disease, a recognized and diagnosable medical disorder, is to avoid gluten. But some celebrities and popular diet books have demonized gluten, elevating gluten-free diets to the mainstream. This exposure has led people with no medical reasons to attempt to eliminate gluten from their diets. “It’s caused a bit of hysteria,” says Pam Cureton, a registered dietitian at the Center for Celiac Research in Baltimore. Some people incorrectly associate a gluten-free diet as synonymous with choosing to restrict the amount of carbohydrate they eat. Consumers see the gluten-free label on packaging and assume it must be better. Often, however, the gluten-free food is lower in nutrients and higher in added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium, making it a less healthy choice for most people—especially for those with diabetes. Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance: What’s the Difference? Celiac disease, a chronic autoimmune intestinal disorder, affects about 1 percent of the general population. It’s about 8 percent more common among people with type 1 diabetes, according to the Celiac Disease Foundation. Celiac disease is characterized by intestinal damage, nutrient deficiencies, joint pain, severe fatigue, weakness, and infertility. Some people, however, have no obvious symptoms when they are diagnosed. Gluten sensitivity is more common than celiac disease. “It affects about 6 pe Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diet Could Be Linked To Type 2 Diabetes Risk, Study Suggests

Gluten-free Diet Could Be Linked To Type 2 Diabetes Risk, Study Suggests

A gluten-free diet has been on the rise as a purportedly healthier way to eat — but research out of Harvard University in the United States suggests it could instead be linked to increased risk of type 2 diabetes. While people with coeliac disease or gluten intolerance avoid gluten as a matter of medical necessity, people without those disorders have also turned to a gluten-free diet as a lifestyle choice. But research presented to an American Heart Association conference overnight suggests those people could be doing harm to their health by entirely cutting out foods like bread, cereals and pasta. The study saw researchers estimate the daily gluten intake of over 200,000 participants in different long-term health studies which spanned more than 30 years. Over time, the 20 per cent of participants who ate the highest daily amount of gluten were found to have a 13 per cent lower chance of developing type 2 diabetes compared to those who ate the least amount of gluten. Geng Zong from Harvard University's Department of Nutrition said the results suggested eating foods with gluten could lower people's risk of type 2 diabetes. "Gluten-free foods often have less dietary fibre and other micronutrients ... making them less nutritious," he said. "People without coeliac disease may reconsider limiting their gluten intake for chronic disease prevention, especially for diabetes." University of Canberra Associate Professor of nutritional science Duane Mellor said decreased diabetes risk may be linked to foods commonly found alongside gluten, rather than the protein itself. "It's unclear whether the gluten is actually the thing that's protecting them from getting type 2 diabetes," he said. "It could be that other things that you tend to find gluten with, we tend to find things like Continue reading >>

Is Going Gluten-free Giving You Diabetes? New Study Links Diet With The Disease

Is Going Gluten-free Giving You Diabetes? New Study Links Diet With The Disease

Is going gluten-free giving you diabetes? New study links diet with the disease Jasmine and Melissa Hemsley have championed gluten-free foodCredit:Ken McKay/ITV/REX/Shutterstock Gluten-free diets adopted by growing numbers of health-conscious consumersenhance the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, scientists have warned. A majorstudy by Harvard University suggests that ingesting only small amounts of the protein, or avoiding it altogether, increases the danger of diabetes by as much as 13 per cent. The findings are likely to horrify the rising number of people who are banishing gluten from their daily diet, encouraged by fashionable clean eating gurus such as Jasmine and Melissa Hemsley. People without Celiac disease may reconsider limiting their gluten intake for chronic disease prevention, especially for diabetes Gluten is found in wheat, rye and barley and gives food a chewy texture and elasticity during the baking process. Only around 1 per cent of people are genuinely gluten-intolerant, a condition called coeliac disease, however some estimates put the proportion of adults adhering to gluten-free diets in the UK at more than 12 per cent. The researchers behind thestudy havesuggestedthat people who are limiting their gluten intake who are not coeliacs should think again, and pointed out that there is no evidence that going gluten-free has any health benefits. The Harvard team examined 30 yearsof medical data from nearly 200,000 patients. They found that most participants had a gluten intake of below 12g a day, which is roughly the equivalent to two or three slices of wholemeal bread. Within this range, those eating the highest 20 per cent of gluten had a 13 per cent lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes compared withthose eating up to 4g a day. 12 per cent of n Continue reading >>

Going Gluten Free May Raise Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk: Study

Going Gluten Free May Raise Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk: Study

If you don't have celiac disease or a gluten sensitivity, here's one reason you might not want to give up bread entirely. Good news, bread lovers: Eating gluten may be one way to reduce your type 2 diabetes risk, according to preliminary research presented yesterday at an American Heart Association meeting in Portland, Oregon. The study authors say more research is needed to draw firm conclusions, but that their findings might be one reason to reconsider going gluten free. For people with celiac disease or a diagnosed gluten sensitivity, of course, going gluten free isn't optional. But this type of diet has become more popular in recent years in people without those conditions, even though there’s not much evidence that cutting out gluten—a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley—does much for long-term health. So Harvard researchers decided to investigate the link between gluten consumption and health outcomes, gathering data from three long-running studies involving nearly 200,000 people total. People in these studies filled out food-frequency questionnaires every two years, and also had their health monitored regularly. Over roughly three decades, more than 15,000 participants were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The researchers found that most participants had gluten intakes below 12 grams a day, and that within this range, those on the higher end were less likely to develop diabetes. One reason that low gluten intake might be associated with higher diabetes risk was that people who ate less gluten also tended to eat less fiber, the researchers noticed. Controlling for this measure explained part of the disparity, but not all of it. Those in the highest percentile for gluten consumption still had a 13% lower diabetes risk than those in the lowest, who ate less Continue reading >>

Ask The Experts: Eat Gluten-free For Type 2 Diabetes?

Ask The Experts: Eat Gluten-free For Type 2 Diabetes?

Q: “I was wondering if gluten-free products would be a healthier option for my husband, who has type 2 diabetes?” Narelle, via email A: HFG dietitian Zoe Wilson says: “Being diagnosed with diabetes may mean that you need to change the type of carbohydrate foods you are eating, particularly when it comes to grain-based foods. Unless you are diagnosed with coeliac disease at the same time, however, there is no need to choose gluten-free bread, cereal, pasta or other products. The most important thing is to choose whole grain foods that are low-GI, such as multigrain bread, pasta, muesli or high-fibre cereal. Low-GI carbohydrates are more slowly absorbed into the blood, making it easier to control blood sugar levels and also keep you more satisfied with a smaller amount of food if you need to lose some weight. Unfortunately, gluten-free products can actually be lower in fibre and higher-GI than regular products, so they may make controlling blood sugar levels more difficult.“ Continue reading >>

Gluten And Diabetes: The Headlines Get It Wrong Again

Gluten And Diabetes: The Headlines Get It Wrong Again

Another study was released recently that purports to “prove” that gluten-free diets are associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes. As with many studies of this type, the findings were misinterpreted but fed into the media’s continual need for titillating headlines. I thought this hubbub would pass by now, but reports about this study (such as this piece of tripe from The Washington Post) seem to be gaining more traction than usual, fueling the misunderstanding and misinformation that plagues nutritional thinking. While I thought this would just pass, it looks like it will not and I’m therefore posting my comments. First, a few words about epidemiological studies of the sort this group used, the Physicians’ Health Study population of health professionals. The participants were asked diet questions, then health status was tracked over several years. Putting aside the imprecision of such dietary recall questionnaires, we know that such studies simply cannot—no matter how large the study, no matter how meticulous the questions—establish cause-effect relationships; they can only suggest a potential association. The purported 13% difference in type 2 diabetes incidence is minor, given the dramatic imprecision of epidemiological studies; confident associations are typically much larger than this: 40% or 50%, for instance. This does not stop, of course, media people, who are journalists at best, paid marketing people for the grain industry at worst, to propagate their misinterpretations. To further illustrate the problems inherent in epidemiological studies, let’s pretend that we want to establish whether a Toyota Prius is a safer car to drive than a Corvette. We therefore identify 1000 Prius drivers and 1000 Corvette drivers. We then ask the drivers ev Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diets Are Not Actually Linked To Diabetes

Gluten-free Diets Are Not Actually Linked To Diabetes

In the pantheon of fad diets, there is perhaps none more hated on than gluten-free. And despite how annoying fad dieters are (if I hear one more person order a salad because they’re ‘gluten-free’ and then ask for croutons…), it’s not unreasonable to want to avoid foods that might possibly be bad for you. But is gluten actually bad for people who don’t have a problem with it? There’s no real evidence that avoiding gluten leads to tangible health benefits, assuming that you don’t have celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. But there also haven’t been many studies that actually asked that question—there’s just not much information out there. On Thursday we got some preliminary answers...kind of. Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done People who eat low gluten diets are at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes, according to results presented on Thursday at the American Heart Association Meeting. It’s crucial to point out here that these researchers weren’t looking at people on gluten-free diets. The researchers were only studying associations between eating less gluten and getting diabetes. Their study size was massive—199,794 people—because they looked at data f Continue reading >>

Should I Start Following A Gluten-free Diet?

Should I Start Following A Gluten-free Diet?

I have had type 1 diabetes for 20 years. In the past, none of my doctors have suggested that I follow a gluten-free diet. My new doctor and pharmacist have both proclaimed the advantages of this kind of diet. Is there any merit to going gluten free when you have diabetes? Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diets: American Diabetes Association

Gluten-free Diets: American Diabetes Association

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, barley and all foods that are made with these grains. Celiac disease is a digestivedisorder. When someone with celiac disease eats foodcontaining gluten, their body reacts by damaging the small intestine.Uncomfortable symptoms such as abdominal pain often occur. The damage tothe small intestinealso interferes with the body's ability to make use of the nutrients in food. About 1% of the total population has celiac disease. It is more common in people with type 1 diabetes. An estimated 10% of people with type 1 also have celiac. The only way to manage celiac disease is to completely avoid all foods that have gluten. Following a gluten-free diet will prevent permanent damage to your body and will help you feel better. There are also many people who are said to have a gluten intolerance. When these people eat foods that contain gluten, they also experience uncomfortable symptoms. However, they test negative for celiac disease and actual damage to their small intestine does not occur. More research about gluten intolerance is needed, but avoiding foods with gluten should help to relieve these symptoms. Taking gluten out of your diet can be a difficult and frustrating change to make in your life, especially if you already feel limited by your diabetes. But there are many people who do it, and so can you! Gluten-Free Recipes for People with Diabetes Are you going gluten-free? If so, then this book is your guide to living a gluten-free (and taste-filled) lifestyle. Complete with recipes, meal plans, strategies, and tips, you wont need anything else to start feeling better and eating healthy. You can find resources and organizations that deal specifically with gluten-free issues by searching for "gluten-free" or "celiac disease" in your Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

You’ve probably noticed a lot of food packages on grocery store shelves with gluten-free labels. If you have diabetes, you may be wondering if gluten is something you should avoid. Gluten is a type of protein found in certain grains. These include wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten can cause inflammation of the small intestine in people with celiac disease. This can result in symptoms that include: It’s necessary to follow a gluten-free diet for the rest of your life if you have celiac disease. Some symptoms of celiac disease are experienced by people with a condition known as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). These people don’t experience the same kind of injury and irritation to the small intestine as those with celiac disease, but gluten intolerance can still cause physical and mental problems. Intolerance to other components of gluten-containing foods — such as FODMAPs, a group of fermentable carbohydrates — may cause physical or mental problems. NCGS can sometimes lead to fuzzy thinking and depression. About 1 in 100 people have celiac disease, but about 10 percent of people with type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Research suggests that there may be a genetic link between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. Certain biomarkers in your blood that make you more likely to have celiac disease may increase your risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Both conditions have an inflammatory component, which causes the immune system to attack the body’s tissues or organs, such as the intestines or pancreas. There doesn’t appear to be a connection between celiac disease and type 2 diabetes. Gluten is found in many high-carb foods because they are often grain-based. High-carb foods can raise your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Downside To Gluten-free Diets: Diabetes Risk?

Downside To Gluten-free Diets: Diabetes Risk?

HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, March 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- "Gluten-free" may be the latest diet fad, but new research casts some doubt on its presumed health benefits. In a large study of U.S. health professionals, scientists found that those with the least gluten in their diets actually had a slightly higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes over a few decades. The findings do not prove that a low-gluten diet somehow contributes to diabetes. But the study raises questions about the long-term benefits of avoiding gluten, which many people assume to be a healthy move. Some people -- namely, those with the digestive disorder celiac disease -- do have to shun gluten, said lead researcher Geng Zong. But there is little research on whether other people stand to gain from going gluten-free, said Zong. He is a research fellow in nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in Boston. That's a big evidence gap, according to Zong -- given the popularity and expense of gluten-free foods. Gluten is a protein found in grains such as wheat, rye and barley. Gluten-free diets are a must for people with celiac disease -- an autoimmune disorder in which gluten-containing foods cause the immune system to attack the small intestine. But gluten-free, or at least gluten-light, diets have caught on as a way for anyone to lose weight and improve their health. One recent study found that the number of Americans who say they've gone gluten-free tripled between 2009 and 2014. The new findings are based on nearly 200,000 U.S. health professionals whose health and lifestyle habits were followed over three decades. The low-gluten fad did not exist when the study period began, in the 1980s, Zong pointed out. But participants' gluten intake naturally varied, based on how often they at Continue reading >>

Is A Gluten-free Diet Necessary For Type I Diabetics And Those Without Celiac Disease?

Is A Gluten-free Diet Necessary For Type I Diabetics And Those Without Celiac Disease?

A study published this past month from Denmark stated that a gluten-free diet may successfully treat type I diabetes. (1) It is common to see both celiac disease and type I diabetes in the same person. The study, led by Dr. Sildorf at Copenhagen University Hospital, followed a five-year-old boy who was diagnosed with type I diabetes. While type I diabetes and celiac disease often occur together, the boy’s blood work showed that he did not have celiac disease. When looking for celiac disease, physicians will screen for certain antibodies or immune system signals in the blood. These antibodies can tell the immune system to attack the body’s own cells. Unfortunately, we can develop antibodies to just about anything, including hormones and enzymes that are essential to our wellbeing. After his diagnosis, the boy began a gluten-free and low-sugar diet. It turns out that after five weeks of insulin treatment, the boy’s physicians determined that he no longer needed the insulin treatments. Nearly two years after his diagnosis of type I diabetes, the young boy still requires no insulin therapy. What Does Gluten Have to Do with Insulin-Dependent Diabetes? Type I diabetes mellitus is also known as juvenile onset or insulin-dependent diabetes. A serious health condition like type I diabetes, also known as juvenile onset diabetes, could be successfully treated with a gluten-free diet, according to new research. Avoiding gluten can prevent autoimmune flare-ups that will make a chronic illness even worse. It typically develops during childhood. Little or no insulin is produced in the body. Insulin is a hormone that is made by specific cells in the pancreas. Insulin regulates blood sugar. If we do not have enough insulin, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood. When it comes to Continue reading >>

Could A Gluten-free Diet Reduce Your Risk Of Diabetes?

Could A Gluten-free Diet Reduce Your Risk Of Diabetes?

As the prevalence of diabetes continues to rise, prevention becomes increasingly important. In recent years, several studies have assessed the effects of gluten on diabetes risk. Read on to learn what the researchers found and if a gluten-free diet could help you prevent diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes has skyrocketed in recent decades. Consider the following: An estimated 9.4 percent of the U.S. population has diabetes, and 33.9 percent has prediabetes. Together, this adds up to 100 million affected Americans (1). Five million people in the United States are expected to have type 1 diabetes by 2050, including roughly 600,000 children and adolescents (2). Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions and is a familiar topic on my blog. You may have seen my 2015 article on reversing type 2 diabetes and more recently, how a fasting mimicking diet might soon be a viable treatment option for type 1 diabetes. But what if we could prevent diabetes in the first place? Wouldn’t that be the best solution? In this article, I’ll review how gluten consumption or avoidance might affect your risk for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We’ll start with type 1 diabetes. The gluten–leaky gut–diabetes connection The immune system has the important job of distinguishing foreign invaders from the body’s own tissues. When this process is disrupted, the body can start to attack some of its own cells, a condition called autoimmunity. In type 1 diabetes (T1D), the immune system attacks the beta cells of the pancreas. These beta cells are responsible for the secretion of the hormone insulin, and a loss of these cells results in unregulated blood sugar levels. Individuals with T1D must rely on insulin injections or an insulin pump to maintain blood glucose. Pioneering researcher Dr. Alessi Continue reading >>

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