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Is Cla Safflower Oil Safe For Diabetics

Cla Safflower Oil Could Help To Lose Fats & Gain Attractive Muscles

Cla Safflower Oil Could Help To Lose Fats & Gain Attractive Muscles

CLA Safflower Oil Could Help to Lose Fats & Gain attractive Muscles CLA Safflower Oil Reviews This Product Improving Your Health Because CLA Safflower Oil Reduce Fats. Supplement ingredients really helping weight loss. Read completely About CLA Safflower Oil Before Buy. Folks are getting fat daily. Fats are the primary reason behind your bad wellness. They are disturbing your lifestyle by affecting the many parts of the body. Youre getting less attractive along with less healthy. Being fat does not mean you are healthy. Call yourself healthy when you start taking good foods. Also, become able to do basic tasks of your life with ease and distinction. But for this purpose fats should get burned and stubborn fats are not easy to lose. Once a fat gains its place in your body then it becomes unable to get rid of. Now I am going to discuss a phenomenal product to get rid of all the stubborn fats in your body. Mostly Oils are not beneficial when it is the decision of good health. How? Many oil manufacturers claim that they do provide health maintenance in their complement. But, they do not owe it. So, now your tension about natural extracts in your intakessolved by CLA Safflower Oil. It is available in US, CA, UK, as well. CLA stands for CONJUGATEDLENOIRACID and itused to burn the fats in your body. Your body fatsstored in because of excessive use of oily foods. Oily means the oil whichisresponsible for generating the fats. So, the poor immune system to keep it stored in your body. But CLA Safflower Oil is not like other oils. It is going to keep yousafefrom many kinds of disease or inner weakness. also useful for diabetes too, which is plus point for Safflower Oil. you will read many facts and benefits of this product some of the listed below. CLA Safflower Oilused for many Continue reading >>

Cla And Diabetes | Livestrong.com

Cla And Diabetes | Livestrong.com

Milk, cheese and other diary items.Photo Credit: olegkalina/iStock/Getty Images William Gamonski is a graduate of St. Francis College, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in health promotion and sciences. He was a dietetic intern at Rivington House and has been a personal trainer for the past two years. He is currently pursuing a Master of Science degree in nutrition. Dairy foods and meat contain conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). It is also available as a dietary supplement. CLA contains a mixture of different chemical forms -- or isomers -- of linoleic acid, a type of fat your body needs to function properly. Preliminary findings, based largely on animal studies, suggest that CLA may have both beneficial and harmful effects with respect to diabetes, as well as other diseases. Because of the inconsistent data, anyone with diabetes should consult their doctor before using this supplement. CLA is found naturally in milk fat and the meat of ruminants -- animals that chew their cud, like cows and sheep. The amount of CLA in these foods depends on what the animal has eaten. For example, according to an October 1999 article in the "Journal of Dairy Science," the CLA content of milk from grass-fed cows is five times higher than that from grain-fed cows. CLA is also sold as a dietary supplement. The supplements are not derived from ruminants, but are instead made by chemically altering vegetable oils. Because of this, the two sources have slightly different chemical structures. The effect of CLA on diabetes is mixed. For example, studies of rats with diabetes published in the July 2003 issue of the "American Journal of Physiology -- Endocrinology and Metabolism" and the May 2001 issue of "Diabetes" have demonstrated that CLA makes cells more responsive to insulin -- the Continue reading >>

Safflower Oil Each Day May Keep The Doctor Away

Safflower Oil Each Day May Keep The Doctor Away

Safflower Oil Each Day May Keep the Doctor Away According to a recent study from Ohio State University, daily consumption of safflower oil over the course of 16 weeks can improve health markers such as blood glucose level, insulin sensitivity, cholesterol level, and inflammation in certain people with Type 2 diabetes. As reported by DiabetesSelfManagement.com in 2009 , previous research by the same team showed that daily supplementation with safflower oil reduced abdominal fat, increased muscle tissue, and lowered fasting blood glucose levels. Safflower oil, commonly used in cooking, contains linoleic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA). Decades of research suggest that PUFAs from plant sources can help protect against heart disease. In their previous study with this oil, the researchers had 35 obese, postmenopausal women with Type 2 diabetes take 8 grams per day (slightly less than 2 teaspoons) of either safflower oil or conjugated linoleic acid (CLA, naturally found in some meats and dairy products), then the same amount of the other type of oil, for 16 weeks each. The subjects were instructed not to change their diet or exercise regimens so that the effects of only the supplements could be measured. At the end of the study period, the researchers were surprised to find that daily consumption of safflower oil had reduced abdominal obesity in the participants. Performing further research on the data from this original trial, the researchers discovered that CLA reduced total body fat, but did not affect blood glucose or cholesterol control in the women. Safflower oil, on the other hand, increased insulin sensitivity by about 2.7% ( insulin resistance is a hallmark of Type 2 diabetes) and decreased A1C by 0.64%. Levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammati Continue reading >>

Safflower Oil Could Help Combat Diabetes

Safflower Oil Could Help Combat Diabetes

A new study in the United States has found that daily intake of safflower oil over a 16-week period could be an effective way to lower the risk of heart problems , and also help prevent type 2 diabetes . The research, published in the journal Clinical Nutrition , suggested that common cooking safflower oil can help to improve cholesterol and blood sugar levels, as well as insulin sensitivity in obese post-menopausal women that suffer from type 2 diabetes . With a greater amount of research now exploring the health benefits of omega-3 fish oils , less attention is being paid to these fats , this timely study comes after another recent report that found safflower oil could lower abdominal fat and increase muscle tissue for this group of women after a period of 16 weeks, as it contains a polyunsaturated fatty acid called linoleic acid. Martha Belury, study leader, commented "The women in the study didn't replace what was in their diet with safflower oil. They added it to what they were already doing." She added "I believe these findings suggest that people consciously make sure they get a serving of healthy oil in their diets each day - maybe an oil and vinegar dressing on a salad, or some oil for cooking." Continue reading >>

Popular Weight-loss Supplement May Have Nasty Side Effects

Popular Weight-loss Supplement May Have Nasty Side Effects

Popular Weight-Loss Supplement May Have Nasty Side Effects The diet supplement conjugated linoleic acid, better known as CLA, has created some excitement in the weight-loss world for its advertised ability to help overweight people shed unwanted pounds. But two new studies suggest that CLA may have some previously unknown, unsavory side effects. Researchers studied how mice and rats responded to CLA, an essential amino acid found in trace amounts primarily in beef, lamb and milk. Synthetic forms of CLA are marketed under a variety of brand names, including Tonalin and GNC, as supplements that help reduce body fat, and some manufacturers also tout CLA for reducing the risk of diabetes and certain types of cancer. The mice and rats responded in very different ways to CLA, according to Martha Belury, the lead author of both studies and an associate professor of human nutrition at Ohio State University. Mice fed a CLA-supplemented diet lost weight very fast, but also accumulated excessive amounts of fat in their livers -- a common side effect of rapid weight loss. Excessive fat accumulation in the liver is linked to insulin resistance, a hallmark of Type 2 diabetes. Yet CLA didn't help rats lose weight they had gained prior to taking the supplement. But it effectively decreased the amount of fat that had accumulated in the animals' livers due to the weight gain. In turn, the rats were less resistant to insulin. "Many people take CLA as a supplement in hopes of trimming body fat, and it seems to work," Belury said. "But we're not sure what else it does to the body. Studying CLA's effects in two different animal models may help us to better understand any additional effects in humans. "It seems that these mice and rats represent a continuum of possible side effects induced b Continue reading >>

Cla Impact On Diabetes Control

Cla Impact On Diabetes Control

Supplementing the diet with the fatty acid conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) may lead to better weight control and disease management in diabetics, a new study suggests. Diabetics who added CLA to their diets had lower body mass as well as lower blood sugar levels by the end of the eight-week study, report researchers from Ohio State University in the US. Hyperglycaemia, or high blood sugar, is a hallmark of diabetes. Researchers also found that higher levels of this fatty acid in the bloodstream led to lower levels of leptin, a hormone thought to regulate fat levels. Many scientists believe that high leptin levels may play a role in obesity, one of the biggest risk factors for adult-onset diabetes. The research appears in the January issue of the Journal of Nutrition​. "In previous work, we found that CLA delayed the onset of diabetes in rats,"​ said Martha Belury, the senior author of the study and an associate professor of human nutrition at Ohio State University. "In this study, we found that it also helped improve the management of adult-onset diabetes in humans."​ CLA is made up of various fatty acid isomers - compounds that share the same chemical formula but differ in chemical structure. Related isomers can have very different effects. In the current study, the researchers found that one particular CLA isomer, t10c12-CLA ( the '10-12 isomer') helped control both body weight and leptin levels. The researchers asked 21 people with adult-onset diabetes to take either a daily supplement containing a mix of rumenic acid and 10-12 isomer or a safflower oil supplement as a control, for the eight-week period. The group was divided roughly in half. Rumenic acid is the predominant isomer in foods that contain CLA, while the 10-12 isomer is less abundant. CLA can be fou Continue reading >>

Conjugated Linoleic Acid (cla)

Conjugated Linoleic Acid (cla)

CLA is an essential fatty acid that's important for good health. We get small amounts of it from the food we eat. It's also an antioxidant that may have other health benefits. Studies show that CLA supplements may help people who are obese . But it's complicated. CLA may decrease body fat. It may help people feel fuller after eating. However, it doesn't seem to lower a person's weight or BMI. For now, if you're looking to lose weight, there's not enough evidence to show that taking CLA will help. As an antioxidant, CLA may have cancer -fighting properties. Studies have shown that women who get a lot of CLA from their diets have a lower risk of colorectal cancer ; they may also have a lower risk of breast cancer . However, we don't know if taking CLA supplements would have these benefits, too. More research is needed. CLA does seem to lower bad LDL cholesterol . But since it also lowers good HDL cholesterol , it's not a standard treatment. People take CLA supplements for other reasons, ranging from dry skin to multiple sclerosis (MS). We don't know if CLA will help with these conditions. There's no standard dose for CLA. For obesity , dosages may range from 1 gram to 3.4 grams daily, much higher than the amount of CLA in a typical diet. Ask your doctor for advice. CLA is in many animal products, like milk, beef, and other meat. Grass-fed beef may have higher levels of CLA than grain-fed beef. It's also in sunflower and safflower oil. Cooking food may increase levels of CLA. Tell your doctor about any supplements youre taking, even if theyre natural. That way, your doctor can check on any potential side effects or interactions with medications . Side effects. CLA supplements may cause upset stomach , nausea , diarrhea , and fatigue . Risks. CLA supplements may worsen ins Continue reading >>

Can Cla Safflower Oil Help With Diabetes | Safflower Oil - Academia.edu

Can Cla Safflower Oil Help With Diabetes | Safflower Oil - Academia.edu

Can CLA Safflower Oil Help with Diabetes?Diabetes is a serious health condition that can cause serious side effects like the loss of hearing, eyesight or severe infection in the extremities that will stop wounds from healing. But there are a lot ofnatural remedies that people can take to help with improving their Diabetes Type2 condition. One of thenewest natural remedies is CLA Safflower Oil. Although it has been known and used for so long, thereare recent claims that CLA Safflower Oil can actually help with Diabetes.How can CLA Safflower Oil affect Diabetes?CLA is conjugated linoleic acid which is an essential fatty acid that can reduce both the body mass andthe blood sugar. High blood sugar is the main symptom of diabetes. Moreover, research studies haveproved that the higher the level of this fatty acid, the lower the level of leptin. When you have highlevels of leptin, the higher your chances are of becoming obese, which could be the main reason for theonset of diabetes. The Safflower oil itself improves inflammation and blood lipids, both are 2 majorsymptoms of diabetes. These reasons made people more interested in trying CLA Safflower Oil as atreatment to help with diabetes.What is the best way to consume CLA Safflower Oil?In order to achieve the best benefits from CLA Safflower Oil, you need to consume it cold, like on yoursalad or in a cold drink. This will ensure that the composition of the oil doesnt change and it will retainall its health nutrients. There are claims that CLA Safflower Oil can reduce body weight and blood sugarlevels without having to change anything about your diet.Is CLA Safflower Oil safe to treat Diabetes?CLA Safflower is not dangerous. It is a natural healthy oil that will enrich your body with healthy fattyacids that help it retain its Continue reading >>

A Dose Of Safflower Oil Each Day Might Help Keep Heart Disease At Bay

A Dose Of Safflower Oil Each Day Might Help Keep Heart Disease At Bay

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! A dose of safflower oil each day might help keep heart disease at bay A daily dose of safflower oil, a common cooking oil, for 16 weeks can improve such health measures as good cholesterol, blood sugar, insulin sensitivity and inflammation in obese postmenopausal women who have Type 2 diabetes, according to new research. This finding comes about 18 months after the same researchers discovered that safflower oil reduced abdominal fat and increased muscle tissue in this group of women after 16 weeks of daily supplementation. A daily dose of safflower oil, a common cooking oil, for 16 weeks can improve such health measures as good cholesterol, blood sugar, insulin sensitivity and inflammation in obese postmenopausal women who have Type 2 diabetes, according to new research. This finding comes about 18 months after the same researchers discovered that safflower oil reduced abdominal fat and increased muscle tissue in this group of women after 16 weeks of daily supplementation. This combination of health measures that are improved by the safflower oil is associated with metabolic syndrome, a cluster of symptoms that can increase risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. These new findings have led the chief researcher to suggest that a daily dose of safflower oil in the diet -- about 1 2/3 teaspoons -- is a safe way to help reduce cardiovascular disease risk. "The women in the study didn't replace what was in their diet with safflower oil. They added it to what they were already doing. And that says to me that certain people need a little more of this type of good fat -- particularly when they're obese women who already have diabetes," said Martha Belury, professor of human nutrition at Ohio S Continue reading >>

What Are The Benefits (and Side Effects) Of Safflower Oil?

What Are The Benefits (and Side Effects) Of Safflower Oil?

Safflower oil has lots of benefits and helps in weight loss, skin care or respiratory problems. This article provides a detailed look at benefits and side effects of safflower oil with scientific explanation of why it helps and/or does harm. Hope it helps. Safflower is actually thistle-like (a group of flowering plants having sharp leaves) and herbaceous plant. The oil from this plant is generally obtained for making vegetable oil. The general length of the plant is 35 to 155 cm. The color of these flowers can either be red, orange or yellow. There are approximately two to five flower heads on a branch, and each flower head has in turn about 20 seeds. Safflower is widely cultivated in areas where it rains less. Also, it can be cultivated in areas with seasonal rains. A deeper taproot is grown on safflower, due to which it can survive in harsh climates. According to the scientists, safflower is one of the oldest crops. A detailed analysis of safflower oil showed that it was used by people for making dyes, during the twelfth dynasty. Also, on the tomb of the Pharaoh Tutankhamun, garlands were present, which were made from safflower oil. The Greek name for safflower is karthamos. There are further two divisions of safflower oil. One of them is the weighed safflower, also known as the red safflower; the other one is the measured safflower, also known as the white safflower. In general, the red florets and the pale seeds are the two parts of the plant, which can be utilized. In the nineteen century, safflower was also popular by another name, carthamine. In todays world, safflower can be classified as a minor crop, meaning that, although it is expensive in cost, it isnt cultivated widely. In more than 60 countries around the world, approximately 600,000 tons of the crop are Continue reading >>

Safflower Oil: Use A Fat To Lose Fat?

Safflower Oil: Use A Fat To Lose Fat?

By Russell H. Greenfield, MD Clinical Assistant Professor of MedicineUNC Chapel Hill School of Medicine Posted on 1/02/2012 | By Russell H. Greenfield, MD we have a real health problem in this country generally speaking, were overweight, many of us are obese, and appropriate weight loss is simply not easy. weight gain is often accompanied by the accumulation of abdominal fat. this becomes extremely problematic when that fat surrounds our organs (so called visceral fat) because it drives the vicious cycle of inflammation, insulin resistance, and further fat deposition. all this places us at great risk for heart disease, stroke and certain forms of cancer. Montel Williams' Favorite Belly Fat-Blasting Supplements considering this backdrop, its no wonder that many people got excited when news hit of research suggesting a possible magic bullet for losing abdominal fat in the form of readily available safflower oil. so, should you go out and start taking safflower oil products for weight loss? the answer, for now, is no. and why not? because the approach is based primarily on the results of a single small study, a study whose weaknesses are significant. keep in mind that good research is very hard to do. the researchers behind these data are applauded and honored for their efforts they have generated a hypothesis that can (and should) be tested. that is not the same, however, as saying the results imply that anyone interested in losing abdominal fat should begin taking a safflower oil supplement. in the study, the effects of taking conjugated linoleic acid (cla, an agent promoted for weight loss) and safflower oil over two 16-week periods were compared. by trials end, the researchers found that subjects taking safflower oil experienced a significant loss of abdominal fat com Continue reading >>

Safflower Oil May Reduce Risk For Diabetes Complications

Safflower Oil May Reduce Risk For Diabetes Complications

Safflower Oil May Reduce Risk for Diabetes Complications March 29, 2011 Supplementation with 8 g safflower (SAF) oil daily improved glycemia, inflammation, and blood lipids in obese, postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes, according to the results of a randomized, double-masked, crossover study reported online March 21 in Clinical Nutrition. "The women in the study didn't replace what was in their diet with [SAF] oil. They added it to what they were already doing," senior author Martha A. Belury, PhD, RD, professor of human nutrition at Ohio State University in Columbus, said in a news release. "And that says to me that certain people need a little more of this type of good fat particularly when they're obese women who already have diabetes. "I believe these findings suggest that people consciously make sure they get a serving of healthy oil in their diets each day maybe an oil and vinegar dressing on a salad, or some oil for cooking. And this recommendation can be extended to everyone." Because the metabolic effects of dietary fat quality in people with type 2 diabetes are incompletely understood, the investigators aimed to assess the effects of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and SAF oils on glycemia, blood lipids, and inflammation. Their hypothesis was that dietary oils would improve glycemia, lipids, and inflammatory markers in a time-dependent way that follows the accumulation of LA and CLA isomers in the serum of participants using dietary oil supplementation. "The message from this study could be misinterpreted by the general population," Anoop Misra, MD, director and head of the Department of Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolic Diseases at Fortis Hospital, New Delhi, India, told Medscape Medical News when asked for independent comment. "It is suggested that pati Continue reading >>

Cla Safflower Oil Reviews | The Truth On Cla Safflower Oil Dietary Supplements

Cla Safflower Oil Reviews | The Truth On Cla Safflower Oil Dietary Supplements

CLA Safflower Oil Reviews | The Truth on CLA Safflower Oil Dietary Supplements Last updated Feb 22, 2018 by Jessica Lewis First of all, the designation can be slightly misleading. CLA and safflower oil are related yet different substances and, although they are presented as being a unitary extract, further inquiry and analysis of the compounds are needed. Secondly, we should delve a bit deeper into the effects of the ingredients that make up these supplements in order to find out if they work towards achieving the goal of weight loss. Then there are technicalities dosage, side effects and the like. We will provide you with the necessary information, starting with a separate discussion of CLA and then safflower oil (with arguments for and against the consumption of each), followed by an assessment of the existing body of reviews and rounding the article up with our verdict on the probability that CLA Safflower oil supplements could help anyone in their quest for a healthier and more appealing silhouette. 7 Don't Miss the CLA Safflower Oil Special Offer Some time ago, The American Heart Association released a suggestion concerning the benefits that Omega-6 fatty acids have on the overall heart health, urging their steady but moderate consumption. In the wake of this announcement, the number of studies undertaken on omega-6 acids, and polyunsaturated fats in general, have increased markedly. One such study , conducted at Ohio State University, was concerned with the effects of supplementation with safflower oil and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in menopausal, obese, diabetic women who did not require daily insulin injections. It was long speculated that this kind of supplementation would have a positive effect on weight loss efforts. Safflower oil (or rather a linoleic a Continue reading >>

Are There Any Bad Side Effects To Taking Safflower Oil?

Are There Any Bad Side Effects To Taking Safflower Oil?

Are There Any Bad Side Effects to Taking Safflower Oil? Alex Burgess has been a professional writer since 1990, specializing in travel, herpetology, lifestyle, fashion, health and fitness. Her work has appeared in various British newspapers, magazines and international online publications. Burgess studied design before working as a journalist in England. A spoonful of safflower petals on wood.Photo Credit: bdspn/iStock/Getty Images Bad side effects to taking safflower oil do exist, but they are rare. According to Wellness, bleeding, stomach problems and intestinal disturbance have been reported as adverse reactions after taking safflower oil. Safflower is used to treat symptoms of high blood pressure, diabetes, cystic fibrosis or fatty acid deficiency and as an anti-coagulant. The medical efficacy and side effects of safflower oil are open to speculation because results and opinions vary greatly between different clinical trials and studies. Safflower oil may trigger an allergic reaction in those with a sensitivity to daisies because it is part of the same family of flowers. An existing ragweed allergy could also mean you will have a sensitivity to safflower oil. Diarrhea, stomach cramps and vomiting may occur in patients using safflower every day. Nausea and an unpleasant aftertaste in the mouth are also associated with regularly taking safflower oil as a supplement. High daily doses of safflower can lead to a drop in blood pressure, and as a result, patients with hypotension should be cautious and speak to a doctor before taking safflower oil. Low blood pressure may fall to dangerous levels when taking the supplement, leading to a worsening of the condition. Changes in heart rate, chest pain and rapid breathing were reported in some patients taking a safflower oil su Continue reading >>

Safflower: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

Safflower: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Dosage, And Warning

Safflower is a plant. The flower and oil from the seeds are used as medicine. Safflower seed oil is used for preventing heart disease , including hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ) and stroke . It is also used to treat fever, tumors, coughs , breathing problems , clotting conditions, pain, heart disease , chest pain , and traumatic injuries. Some people use it for inducing sweating ; and as a laxative , stimulant, antiperspirant, and expectorant to help loosen phlegm. Women sometimes use safflower oil for absent or painful menstrual periods; they use safflower flower to cause an abortion . In foods, safflower seed oil is used as a cooking oil. In manufacturing, safflower flower is used to color cosmetics and dye fabrics. Safflower seed oil is used as a paint solvent. The linolenic and linoleic acids in safflower seed oil might help prevent hardening of the arteries, lower cholesterol , and reduce the risk of heart disease. Safflower contains chemicals that may thin the blood to prevent clots, widen blood vessels, lower blood pressure , and stimulate the heart. High cholesterol . Some research suggests that taking safflower oil as a dietary supplement or substituting it for other oils in the diet helps lower total and low-density lipoprotein ( LDL or bad) cholesterol . However, it does not seem to lower other blood fats called triglycerides or raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL or good) cholesterol. Low birth weight. Some research suggests that adding a specific safflower oil product (Safola by Marico Industries Ltd.) to infant formula or breast milk does not improve weight gain or skin thickness in low birth weight infants. Cystic fibrosis . Early research shows that taking safflower oil by mouth for one year does not improve test markers or severity of cys Continue reading >>

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