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Is Chinese Food Bad For Diabetics

Tips For Dining Out With Diabetes

Tips For Dining Out With Diabetes

CONTRAVE® (naltrexone HCI/bupropion HCl) is a prescription weight-loss medicine that may help adults with obesity (BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2), or who are overweight (BMI greater than or equal to 27 kg/m2) with at least one weight-related medical condition, lose weight and keep the weight off. CONTRAVE should be used along with diet and exercise. One of the ingredients in CONTRAVE, bupropion, may increase the risk of suicidal thinking in children, adolescents, and young adults. CONTRAVE patients should be monitored for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. In patients taking bupropion for smoking cessation, serious neuropsychiatric adverse events have been reported. CONTRAVE is not approved for use in children under the age of 18. Stop taking CONTRAVE and call a healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms, especially if they are new, worse, or worry you: thoughts about suicide or dying; attempts to commit suicide; depression; anxiety; feeling agitated or restless; panic attacks; trouble sleeping (insomnia); irritability; aggression, anger, or violence; acting on dangerous impulses; an extreme increase in activity and talking (mania); other unusual changes in behavior or mood. Do not take CONTRAVE if you have uncontrolled high blood pressure; have or have had seizures; use other medicines that contain bupropion such as WELLBUTRIN, APLENZIN or ZYBAN; have or have had an eating disorder; are dependent on opioid pain medicines or use medicines to help stop taking opioids such as methadone or buprenorphine, or are in opiate withdrawal; drink a lot of alcohol and abruptly stop drinking; are allergic to any of the ingredients in CONTRAVE; or are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Before taking CONTRAVE, tell your healthcare provider ab Continue reading >>

Asian-inspired Recipes

Asian-inspired Recipes

Enjoy your favorite Asian dishes, from Thai to Chinese to Vietnamese to Japanese, without needing a passport. Enjoy your favorite Asian dishes, from Thai to Chinese to Vietnamese to Japanese, without needing a passport. Enjoy your favorite Asian dishes, from Thai to Chinese to Vietnamese to Japanese, without needing a passport. Enjoy your favorite Asian dishes, from Thai to Chinese to Vietnamese to Japanese, without needing a passport. Continue reading >>

Living With Diabetes

Living With Diabetes

News you can use about diabetes Living with diabetes is about so much more than well, diabetes. It's about the ups, like small daily accomplishments and achieving your goals, and the downs. It can be complicated, but it may help to keep in mind that you can find inspiration, information, and motivation here. In these featured articles, you'll discover ideas to take the pressure off and help you deal with everything from making travel easier to making dining out more enjoyable. Since stress can really take its toll on your blood sugar, you can read how to tackle that, too. More articles are added each month. So browse them all, get inspired, and check back in with us often. If you'd like, you can sign up for more TeamingUp to get regular updates. Continue reading >>

Chinese Food... - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Chinese Food... - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I LOVE chinese food and have not ate any since I was dx'd last week, does anyone here have a problem with there BG after eating Chinese food? I love the eggrolls, fried rice, beef and broccoli and all kinds of chinese food actually I have heard it's not that bad for you as a diabetic but I don't really know the truth to that...any stories would help! Those eggrolls and fried rice are loaded with starchy carbs (and fat). And many of the sauces used in Chinese restaurants include cornstarch as a thickening agent, rendering innocent veggies like broccoli more carb-laden than your system might like. That said, just as with Mexican food you can find items that are tasty and satisfying; You just need to be selective, test to see what works for you, and really be aware of portion control. Perhaps you should pick up a book or two about low glycemic index carbohydrates. Also, get the Calorie King guide (available in most book stores and on the web) and use it to determine the carb content of the foods you eat. It will be an eye opener for sure! As you are newly diagnosed, I would recommend that you spend a few weeks eating at home where you can control your portions and macronutrients. Get used to carb counting and portion control. Once you've done this, and tested to see what foods work for you, restaurant eating will be much easier. This is probably not what you want to hear, but it might make the whole thing more managable. Knowledge is power! I avoid rice, but find that a small portion of egg noodles work. I tend to steer clear of sauces such as "Sweet Chilli, Sweet and Sour, and BBQ". Salt and ch Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Foods From Around The World

Diabetes-friendly Foods From Around The World

Thinkstock Global cuisines offer a new way to prepare diabetes-friendly meals if you know what to eat and what to avoid. For example, some of the spices in ethnic foods, such as turmeric, might help improve the health of people with type 2 diabetes. Turmeric appears to have anti-inflammatory properties via a substance called curcumin that may counter metabolic diseases, including diabetes, according to research in the September 2015 issue of the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology. Whether eating a favorite family dish or trying a new cuisine, you can apply the same nutrition strategies you learn from a diabetes educator or dietitian to all your meals — and doing so could lead to a 1 to 2 point drop in HbA1c, according to a review of data published in February 2014 in the Journal of Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, and Obesity. “Make half of your plate vegetables, one-quarter of your plate lean meat, and one-quarter a whole-grain or high-fiber carbohydrate,” says Shannon Weston, MPH, RD, a certified diabetes educator at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in Houston. Here’s how to find diabetes-friendly choices for some popular cuisines: Italian Food Italian options include salads, lean meats, and a variety of vegetables, Weston says. Watch out for heavy cream-based sauces, cheeses, oils, deep-dish or thick-crust pizza, breaded meats, and pasta dishes “stuffed with high-fat meats and cheeses,” she says. If you’re cooking at home or asking for changes to a restaurant meal, try these strategies: Use grated cauliflower as a crust instead of a flour crust to make a pizza and layer on the vegetables and lean meats. Use spaghetti squash or zucchini “noodles” cut with a spiralizer or a peeler in place of pasta. Choose homemade marinara instead of Alf Continue reading >>

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

How to keep your blood sugar in check when dining out. By the dLife Editors Going out to eat is fraught with challenges for people who need to watch their blood sugar. There’s the giant portion size issue, the unknown ingredients, and the “special-occasion effect.” That’s the way we tell ourselves it’s ok to make unhealthy choices on special occasions. Our idea of what constitutes a special occasion is pretty subjective. Here are some tips on making d-friendly choices in restaurants, by type of cuisine. What to Order at Italian Restaurants Italian restaurants can be full of high-carbohydrate foods like bread, pasta, pizza, risotto, and gnocci. Many of these combine refined carbs with processed meats like sausage and pepperoni, and batters or breading (think eggplant Parmesan or fried mozzarella). Things you can do: Ask your server to skip the bread basket for your table. If you’re going to splurge and have pasta, ask for it as a side dish and don’t eat more than the size of your fist. That’s one cup of pasta, or about 45 grams of carbohydrate. Order unbreaded chicken or veal baked with sauces like piccata, marsala, puttanesca, francese, or cacciatore. Other good choices include: Caesar salad with grilled or baked fish, escarole and beans, and minestrone soup. What to Order at Mexican Restaurants Mexican food can be full of carbohydrates with large portions of rice, beans, and tortillas. Things you can do: At the very least, limit portion sizes. Ask to have half your plate wrapped to go before you even start eating. Skip the rice; ask for black beans or salad in its place. If you love chips and salsa, take a handful and then ask for the basket to be removed from the table. Order soft chicken or fish tacos and eat the fillings with a fork, skipping the tor Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Lo Mein?

Can Diabetics Eat Lo Mein?

Lo mein is a Chinese noodle dish that often contains sauce, vegetables and a source of protein, such as chicken or tofu. If you have diabetes, the high carbohydrate content of this dish may make you hesitate to order it from Chinese restaurants, but it can occasionally fit into a healthy diet. Eat it in moderation and with healthy modifications to minimize the impact on your blood sugar levels. Diabetes is a condition of high blood sugar levels that can result when your body doesn't metabolize carbohydrates properly. Consuming a moderate amount, such as 45 to 60 grams, of carbohydrates at each meal can help you control your blood sugar levels, according to the American Diabetes Association. One cup of vegetable lo mein contains 27 grams of carbohydrates, so assuming they eat no more than 2 cups in one sitting, diabetics can eat lo mein. But restaurant portions are often much larger than this. Diabetics should refrain from having large portions of steamed or fried rice at the same meal, since a cup of rice contains 44 grams of carbohydrates. Calories in Lo Mein Achieving and maintaining a healthy weight aids in blood sugar control. Consuming more calories than you expend causes weight gain, and a typical restaurant serving of lo mein contains 897 calories. Lo mein can fit more easily into a diet for controlling your weight and lowering blood sugar if you serve yourself a smaller portion. A cup of lo mein contains 165 calories. If eating a single serving of lo mein leaves you feeling hungry, order an extra serving of steamed nonstarchy vegetables, which are low in carbs and calories. Fiber and Protein Dietary fiber can help lower blood sugar levels, and lo mein is healthier if you make it with whole-grain noodles or thin whole-wheat spaghetti instead of refined chow mein Continue reading >>

Dining Out With Diabetes: Chinese Restaurants

Dining Out With Diabetes: Chinese Restaurants

Chinese food is one of the most popular dining options in North America – many people will admit to having at least one Chinese take out menu stashed in a kitchen drawer. However, as is the case with most ethnic cuisine, America’s version of Chinese food tends to differ from traditional preparations in ways that make it challenging to incorporate into a healthy diet. People with diabetes need to be especially careful, because certain entrees are high not only high in carbs, but also in fat and sodium. More than Just Oodles of Noodles The great thing about Chinese food is the tremendous variety that it offers. You can eat healthy foods if you look closely at the menu and know what to pick. Steamed rice, veggie dishes, and soups are just a few examples of lighter options for people with diabetes who are trying to watch their calories and carbs. Even certain beef entrees can be part of your meal plan. For example, a 3 oz serving of broccoli with beef and 1/2 a cup of steamed rice from Panda Express has about 300 calories and 20 grams of carbs, an acceptable amount for most diabetes meal plans. Veggies are a staple in Chinese dishes and are much lower in carbs than starchy sides like fried noodles. Be creative and try bok choy, sprouts, shitake mushrooms, or eggplant as side dishes with 3-4 ounces of meat or tofu. Diabetes Diners: Keep it fun If you really want to order a favorite dish, be smart: focus on the flavor and keep your portions small. Many of the most popular entrees, like sweet & sour pork and lemon chicken, are deep-fried and therefore have higher fat and calories. Other favorites, like fried rice and chow mein, are often high in carbs and fat. One way to eat healthy is to ask for the sauce on the side and enjoy a lighter version of your favorite dish. For Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: Chinese New Year And Kanji Carbs

Ask D'mine: Chinese New Year And Kanji Carbs

Happy Chinese New Year, one and all! To mark the holiday, our diabetes advice guru Wil Dubois takes on a question about Chinese food. {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Hank, type 1 from Kansas, writes: I love Chinese food, but it sure doesn’t love me! It seems no matter how much insulin I take, I end up crazy-high hours later. What’s up with that? It’s just meat and veggies, for crying out loud, it should be the perfect diabetes food! Wil, what’s the secret to Chinese food? [email protected] D’Mine answers: I’ve long suspected that the Chinese people are on a secret mission to sabotage us D-folk. And what a delightfully wicked tool to carry out such a program: tasty, healthy-appearing food that delivers a sugar wallop that can send the most careful D-peep into a coma. While you are right that veggies and meats dominate typical Chinese food—at least as it’s made here in the United States—the secret is in the sauce. And not in a good way. Of course the infamous pink sweet and sour dipping sauce is an obvious trap. It even looks like the diabetes equivalent of a tar pit. But how much sugar does it really have? Calorie Count lists fully 75 varieties, with most in the range of 10 carbs per tablespoon. That means, realistically, you need to bolus for 5 carbs per dip, even before you figure out how many carbs are in the wanton or egg roll you are submerging in the pink morass. But I wasn’t really talking about the pink sauce. I was talking about the hidden sugar in the sauces that coat nearly all the Chinese entrees with sugary tentacles. Many of the common sauces used in Chinese recipes, even the ones that aren’t “sweet,” are packed with white and brown sugar, pineapple juice, ketchup, and honey—plus they use flour or cornstarch Continue reading >>

Foods’ Strange Tricks

Foods’ Strange Tricks

You sit down to eat. How will your meal affect your blood glucose? If you’re on insulin, how much should you take? Turns out that counting carbohydrate will not always give you the answer. Food can affect you in strange ways. Do you know about the pizza effect? In a blog on glycemic index, I mentioned how plain pizza had a much higher glycemic index than a deluxe pizza with all the toppings. Plain dough and sauce raises your blood glucose way faster. What I didn’t mention was that all that carbohydrate in the deluxe pizza will get into your bloodstream eventually. You just don’t know when, unless you check your blood glucose every hour for four hours or even more. That’s because the fats and protein in the toppings slow down the absorption of carbohydrate. As a result, your blood glucose might spike two to five hours after the meal. Other meals that combine lots of carbohydrate with fats and/or proteins could have the same effect. Jan Chait posted here five years ago about a big spaghetti fest she had with her husband. The pasta was covered with a fatty sauce, with a side of garlic bread and lots of butter. Because of the fats (the pizza effect,) her blood glucose levels were up for two days, instead of just spiking high for an hour or two. One commenter posted on HealingWell.com that he injected enough insulin to cover the carbohydrate in a big Chinese meal, including lots of fried food. Two hours after eating, his glucose was 171, the same as it had been before the meal. But three hours later his sugar was over 500! It took him days to get back in control. Sometimes the pizza effect is helpful, like at bedtime. A bedtime snack that includes a small amount of fat and protein can help keep overnight levels from going too low. That way you don’t get a rebound e Continue reading >>

Type 1: Is It Ok To Eat Chinese

Type 1: Is It Ok To Eat Chinese

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Julia McCoulough Type 1 Well-Known Member Is it ok to have Chinese food please and also Indian because I was told I could I am not a Chinese food eater but I would say no to the rice and noodles I love Indian curries but will not now eat the rice or naan bread Julia McCoulough Type 1 Well-Known Member I am not a Chinese food eater but I would say no to the rice and noodles I love Indian curries but will not now eat the rice or naan bread I don't like a lot of rice but I do like my noodles it all depends on the food choices you make. personally I avoid the rice, noodles, gloopy MSG sauces, sweet sauces and deep fried batters. It doesn't leave much, but it does mean I won't go hungry if my friends insist on Chinese. I don't like a lot of rice but I do like my noodles Yes, you can eat Chinese and Indian. I personally don't eat the full portion of rice or noodles as they can have a lot of carbs in. You'll need to carb count and adjust your insulin. Test lots afterwards. Julia McCoulough Type 1 Well-Known Member Yes, you can eat Chinese and Indian. I personally don't eat the full portion of rice or noodles as they can have a lot of carbs in. You'll need to carb count and adjust your insulin. Test lots afterwards. Problem with those types of take-aways are they are full or carbs, sugars and fats. You can eat them if your on insulin, those on pumps most likely use an extended bolus, those on injections may need to work at it to work out how much and when to inject to help avoid the spikes and pro-longed highs normally associated with this kind of meal. Trial and error and lots of testing is the only way to go I'm afraid. As an example if I'm having a curry ( Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

How Do You Dine Out At Chinese Restaurants?

How Do You Dine Out At Chinese Restaurants?

How do you dine out at Chinese Restaurants? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. How do you dine out at Chinese Restaurants? I am newly diagnosed and I probably eat Chinese food at least four times a week (plus leftovers). What sort of modifications can I ask for? Thanks in advance. I love chinese food but I haven't had it in a couple of years and few and far between before that bc its near impossible (probably actually impossible) to have the dishes that I really like without my blood sugar being crazy. If you happen to like steamed veggies with no rice you're in luck, but otherwise it is slim pickins. I do make myself some chinese-ish and vietnamese-ish food at home with no cornstarch or sugar or rice. I think this might be an area that you should consider changing. Haven't eaten in a chinese restaurant since diagnosis, but would ask if there are plain steamed veggies with no cornstarch or sugars, seems like a lost cause to me, even fish sauce has more carbs than I could handle:( As Jayne mentioned, I also make asian type foods at home substituting cauli rice and/or miracle noodles. Lucky for me I just do not care for Chinese food. However, I think the rice alone would be a deal breaker, also all the sweet sauces. I used to love Italian food, pizza, lasagna. Not anymore! I can live with that. The operative word being "live." I am newly diagnosed and I probably eat Chinese food at least four times a week (plus leftovers). What sort of modifications can I ask for? Thanks in advance. Chinese is one of my favorites. After my diagnosis, I pretty well gave it up for over a year, but now that I'm on insulin and have learned what happ Continue reading >>

Eating Out With Diabetes: 7 Tips For Chinese Restaurants

Eating Out With Diabetes: 7 Tips For Chinese Restaurants

We asked a dietitian what to order to keep blood sugar levels steady and carbs in check. Fried rice, lo mein, sweet and sour chicken, wonton soup: These beloved dishes at Chinese restaurants (at least those in America) are totally delicious, but they all scream “carb bomb,” which is far from good news for anyone diagnosed with diabetes. But you can still eat well at Chinese restaurants if you have diabetes or are watching your carb or sugar intake, and not just by eating only steamed versions of everything. New York City-based nutritionist Sharon Richter, RD, reveals her favorite tips for making healthy choices at Chinese restaurants so you can enjoy these dishes while keeping blood sugar levels steady. Avoid sweet or fried dishes. Many dishes at Chinese restaurants come with fried meats covered in a sweet sauce. This is a double-whammy of saturated fat (from frying) and sugar (from the sauce), equaling one dish that’s very high in calories, low in nutrients, and a nightmare for blood sugar levels. Use chopsticks. If they’re awkward for you to use, that’s actually a good thing, says Richter. Here’s why: Chopsticks can help you eat more slowly than you would with a fork, even if you’re a pro at using them. They hold a smaller volume of food per bite, and it takes a little more concentration to pick up each morsel of food. The more slowly you eat, the more time you give your brain to register that your stomach is full. Choose your carbs wisely. Think about what you want your source of carbohydrates to come from and make everything else a protein or vegetable. It’s way too easy to end up with an all-carb meal (and this is true at almost any restaurant, not just Chinese). Pick a light appetizer. Look for clear broth soups, such as the classic egg drop soup o Continue reading >>

Diabetic Food Choices At Chinese Restaurants

Diabetic Food Choices At Chinese Restaurants

The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse reports that about 23.6 million Americans have diabetes. If you have diabetes, your body has difficulty processing carbohydrates from your diet, and your blood sugar levels are high. Many typical menu items at Chinese restaurants are unhealthy for individuals with diabetes, but some choices can be part of a healthy diet to control blood sugar levels. Study the menu and order nutritious items that can fit into your carbohydrate-controlled, healthy diet. Video of the Day Limit your consumption of high-carbohydrate Chinese restaurant foods such as fried rice, steamed rice, chow mein, lo mein and other noodle dishes. The American Diabetes Association suggests that most individuals with diabetes should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal to help prevent surges in blood sugar levels. A cup of rice or noodles has 44 to 50 grams of carbohydrates. Vegetables, chicken, fish and tofu are low-carbohydrate options. Increase Fiber Consumption Order high-fiber menu items to help control your blood sugar levels. Individuals with diabetes who consume more high-fiber foods, such as whole grains, fruits, legumes and vegetables tend to have better blood sugar control, according to a study published in the January-February 2011 edition of the journal “Endocrine Practice." Ask for extra vegetables in each dish, order brown instead of white rice and eat orange slices instead of sweets to increase your fiber intake. You are at risk for developing heart disease if you have diabetes, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. A healthy diet can help you lower your cholesterol levels and reduce your heart disease risk. Fried foods, such as egg rolls, fried rice, General Tsao’s chicken and fried noodle dishes, are Continue reading >>

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