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Is Chicken Soup Good For Diabetics

How To Make Your Own Soup

How To Make Your Own Soup

Save for later You can create soups like thisMulligatawnyin a flash Soup can be a simple snack, a filling mid-week meal or a great dish to serve to friends – the variations are endless. Although convenient, canned, powdered or ready-made chilled soups can be high in salt. So why not try making your own? You don’t need any special equipment and it’s easy, cheap and nutritious. Soup can be stored in the fridge for three days or frozen for up to three months. You can defrost it straight from the freezer to give you a meal in minutes. Soup can be made with almost any ingredient and is perfect for using up leftovers and odds and ends of meat, fish or vegetables. It can be thick and creamy or a warming hearty broth. It can even be served chilled on a summer’s day, such as thisgazpacho, which doesn’t even need cooking. History It’s thought that soup has been enjoyed for around 20,000 years. Every country and culture eats soup. With almost mythical status as a healing food and used in times of both feast and famine, it’s no wonder soup is often regarded as the ultimate comfort food. Download yourHow to make your own soup guide (PDF 274,KB) Fill yourself up Soup is one of the most filling foods you can eat. Research has shown that soup can keep you fuller for longer than eating the same ingredients separately. This makes soup a particularly good food if you have diabetes and trying to avoid snacking between meals. Try this easypotato, leek and cheese soup. Soup and weight loss As long as it’s not full of fat or cream, soup can be useful if you’re trying to lose weight or maintain ahealthy weight.A major ingredient is water, which means soup can be less ‘energy-dense’ food. Energy density is the amount of energy or calories per gram of food. So you can eat a Continue reading >>

Chicken Soup: Low Carb

Chicken Soup: Low Carb

I went to my aunts house today and she had some chicken soup that tasted really good and I noticed it didn't have any veggies. I asked her how she made it she said something along these lines: I'm no cook but I think even I could make this. That does sound easy. I usually put celery and carrots in mine. Managing diabetes is like trying to figure out how much air you need to breath every day. Chicken soup, stock or broth is usually very low in carbs. Even if you cook the chicken with some aeromatic veges like celery, carrots and garlic it doesn't really add to the carbs of the stock. I always dispose of the ones I cook for the stock. The dog loves to munch on them! I add back more when I am going to serve it, cooking the veges in the already finished soup base. So, it all depends on how much you add back as far as carbs. The real trick for me was to make a low carb matzo ball, which I have done. They only have about 5 grams of carbs each and are not a bad size. Enjoy the soup you make. The recipe from the OP sounds wonderful! I would add back shredded chicken to it as well as a few vegetables like tomatoes, onions and bell peppers and serve it with homemade low carb tortilla chips. I just love to make and eat soup! Ok Chef -- while it is still a ways off - please tell us how you make low carb Matzah balls -- would love that recipe Ok Chef -- while it is still a ways off - please tell us how you make low carb Matzah balls -- would love that recipe No problem. Give me time to find it and I'll post it here in the recipe forum. It's really pretty simple. I'll dig it up for you. 1) I added 3 sliced garlic clovers to it. 3) I boiled the chicken in a separate pot and transferred the chicken to the boiled veggies. It's lower in fat that way. Even though the chicken was skinless Continue reading >>

Diabetics & Chicken Noodle Soup

Diabetics & Chicken Noodle Soup

Persons with diabetes face a very high risk of developing heart disease. A diet low in saturated fat, about 16 mg a day, and sodium, no more than 1,500 mg daily, and rich in whole grains and non-starchy vegetables will help protect you against cardiovascular disease. Properly prepared, chicken noodle soup makes a healthy choice on a diabetes diet. Video of the Day Choose whole-grain noodles for your soup, instead of noodles made of refined grains. Whole-grain food items make healthy diabetes choices because whole grains are rich in soluble fiber, a nutrient that may help stabilize your blood glucose levels, lower your blood pressure and reduce your low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In addition, whole grains contain essential fatty acids, vitamin E and most of the B vitamins. Look for ingredient lists topped by 100 percent whole-wheat flour when shopping for noodles. Avoid noodles made from processed and refined grains, like those containing white or enriched wheat flour. Lean Chicken and Broth The healthiest protein sources are low in calories and saturated fat. For your soup, choose lean, skinless chicken breast over fatty cuts. Instead of chicken stock, try preparing your soup broth with low-sodium vegetable stock. Vegetable-based broths tend to contain fewer calories and less saturated fat than canned chicken broths. If you do choose a prepared chicken broth, look for a variety low in fat and sodium. Or make your own stock and skim all visible fat. Non-starchy vegetables make healthy choices on a diabetes diet because they are particularly low in calories and carbohydrates. In fact, according to the American Diabetes Association, non-starchy vegetables should comprise half of all of your lunch and dinner meals. Many store-bought or restaurant-ordered chicken noodl Continue reading >>

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Lunches For Type 2 Diabetes

If breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day, lunch can often be the most hurried. A recent survey found that 62 percent of Americans rush through lunch at their desks, and even when we manage to leave the office, fast-food restaurants and food courts often prevail over more healthy options. But they don't have to be your only option — and, in fact, they shouldn't be your first choice if you have type 2 diabetes. In general, try to pack your own lunch whenever possible — the health benefits, not to mention the cost-savings, can be enormous. Short on prep time? Put these quick and nutritious lunch ideas on your menu to fill you up and keep your blood sugar in check. 1. Salads Salad should be in regular rotation for lunch. You can create a different salad every day of the week by varying your toppings. Try grilled chicken, shrimp, or fish, but avoid heaping on a lot of fattening ingredients, such as bacon bits and heavy cheeses. Salads with lots of raw vegetables are best, including carrots, cucumbers, radishes, celery, and spinach. Sprinkle nuts or seeds on top, add a few dried cranberries, and garnish with some avocado chunks to give it zip. Choose a salad dressing made with vinegar and olive oil to avoid added sugars found in fat-free and low-fat versions, and limit the serving to one tablespoon for a side salad and two tablespoons for an entrée-sized salad. 2. Sandwiches As with salads, there are many ways to spice up a sandwich. Start with whole-grain bread or a whole-wheat tortilla. Pick a lean meat, such as turkey, ham, or grilled chicken; layer on your choice of veggies; add mustard, low-fat mayonnaise, or hummus to the mix — and you have a filling and tasty lunch. Stay away from greasy chips, French fries, and other fattening sides. Instead choose fr Continue reading >>

Barley-vegetable Chicken Soup

Barley-vegetable Chicken Soup

4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves (1 to 1 1/4 pounds total), cut into 3/4-inch cubes 1/4 cup snipped fresh parsley or 2 tablespoons dried parsley flakes 1 tablespoon snipped fresh sage or rosemary or 1 teaspoon dried sage or rosemary, crushed 1 cup chopped green, yellow, and/or red sweet pepper In a 4-quart Dutch oven, bring broth to boiling; add barley. Return to boiling; reduce heat. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes. Add chicken, celery, carrots, onion, dried parsley (if using), sage, and black pepper. Return to boiling; reduce heat. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes. Add sweet pepper; cover and simmer about 5 minutes more or until chicken is no longer pink and vegetables are tender. Stir in fresh parsley (if using). Makes 8 (1 1/2-cup) main-dish servings.) Make-Ahead Directions: Prepare as directed. Let cool for 30 minutes. Transfer to airtight freezer containers. Seal, label, and freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw in the refrigerator overnight (soup may still be a little icy). Place soup in a saucepan; heat through over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally. PER SERVING: 137 cal., 1 g total fat 33 mg chol., 631 mg sodium, 14 g carb. (3 g fiber), 18 g pro. Continue reading >>

5 Diabetes-friendly Vegetable Soup Recipes

5 Diabetes-friendly Vegetable Soup Recipes

Soup is an easy make-ahead meal and a great way to add some nutritious and fiber-packed vegetables to your diet. For people with diabetes, the more vegetables you can eat, the better. Vegetables are full of lots of the good stuff your body needs, such as antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and even fiber. Many vegetables are also low in calories and carbs, which is a must-have for people with diabetes. “The focus for diabetics should be on nonstarchy vegetables instead of the starchy varieties, since starchy vegetables contain more grams of carbohydrate per serving,” says Sarah Hallenberger, lead dietitian at bistroMD. That means adding choices like leafy greens, greens beans, eggplant, mushrooms, or peppers to your diet when you can instead of relying on foods like corn, peas, and potatoes. Here are five soups packed with enough veggies and flavor to share. Lentil Chili Chili made from red meat is often high in fat, but this lentil-based version is not just low in fat, it’s also high in fiber and protein. Lentils are also a good source of folate, iron, phosphorus, potassium, and fiber. View the recipe. Curried Butternut Squash Soup One big win for this soup is its main ingredient, butternut squash, which is loaded with vitamin A. Butternut squash is higher in carbs than some other vegetables, though, so be mindful of what else you consume alongside this soup. Consider pairing it with a grilled chicken breast or a lower-carb salad loaded with protein. View the recipe. Easy Salsa Verde White Chicken Chili Coming in at 200 calories and 15 grams of carbs per serving, this diabetes-friendly soup is loaded with flavor. Just watch the high-calorie toppings, like cheese. To lower the sodium content, look for low-sodium or no-sodium canned beans. View the recipe. Chunky Whi Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Soups & Stews

Diabetes-friendly Soups & Stews

Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan. Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan. Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan. Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan. Continue reading >>

Preparation And Benefits Of Chicken For Type 1 And 2 Diabetics

Preparation And Benefits Of Chicken For Type 1 And 2 Diabetics

Healthy Diet Plans >> Diabetic Diet >> Chicken Diabetes is a common disease that is on the increase worldwide. It is a common cause of death in the United States and has no known cure. There are two types of diabetes known as type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. It is a condition where the body cannot manufacture its own insulin (type 1 diabetes) or cannot make use of the insulin (type 2 diabetes). Insulin is a hormone that is required by the body to convert glucose into energy. With diabetics, the inability of the body to convert glucose to energy, results in elevated levels of sugar in the blood. Type 2 diabetes is by far the more common variety, affecting about 90% to 95% of all diabetics. Many diabetics develop secondary illnesses like coronary heart disease and kidney disorders. Diet plays a very important role in managing blood sugar levels. A healthy well balanced diet along with regular exercise can help diabetics lead a healthy normal life and can even prevent its development. Studies have shown that a diabetic diet should contain a high proportion of fruits and green leafy vegetables along with lean white meats like chicken and fish. Chicken is good for diabetic patients because of its low fat content. The high fat content in red meats causes elevated levels of cholesterol which can lead to blockages in the arteries resulting in coronary heart disease. Diabetics are at a higher risk of developing coronary heart disease and should replace red meat in their diets with lean white meats like chicken. This has a beneficial effect on both the heart and the kidneys, two organs that are at greater risk in diabetics. Fried, Baked & Grilled Chicken For Diabetics The method of preparing the chicken is also important. Fried chicken is not good for diabetics, especially t Continue reading >>

Slow Cooker Chicken Noodle Soup, Diabetic

Slow Cooker Chicken Noodle Soup, Diabetic

Rinse and pat dry chicken. Place in a 5-quart or larger crockery slow cooker. Place the peeled and quarterd onion, peeled and quartered carrot, and parsley around chicken pieces. Sprinkle with thyme, marjoram, and pepper. Add chicken broth, cover, and cook on low for 7 to 8 hours or on high for 2 1/2 to 3 hours. When done cooking, remove the chicken and discard the onion, carrot, and parsley. Skim off and discard all surface fat from the broth. Cool chicken from broth for about 10 minutes, until cool enough to handle and remove and discard the chicken skin and bones. Shred chicken. Add shredded chicken back to the slow cooker and bring to a simmer. Lightly saute the diced onion, diced carrots, diced celery, mushroom, in a little broth or water until softened and place in the crock along with the spinach. Simmer for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, cook noodles according to package directions. Just before serving, add cooked noodles to soup and season with salt and pepper (to taste). Continue reading >>

Stock Your Kitchen For Diabetes Health

Stock Your Kitchen For Diabetes Health

Eating healthy, balanced meals is the key to managing your diabetes. Good nutrition not only helps you control your blood sugar levels, but it also lowers your blood pressure and cholesterol and keeps cravings at bay. When you have the right foods on hand, it’s much easier to stick to a healthy meal plan. Not sure what to stock? Add these must-haves to your shopping list. Beans “Kidney beans, pinto beans, black beans, and garbanzo beans are all great for blood glucose control,” says Jessica Bennett, a dietitian at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. “They’re high in fiber and take a long time to digest.” Beans offer a lot of options. They make a tasty side dish, or you can add them to salads, soups, casseroles, and chili. They’re also a great stand-in for meat because they’re high in protein but low in fat. Dried beans are a better choice than canned. They contain less sodium. Soak them overnight and they’ll be ready to cook in the morning. If you go for the ones in a can, rinse them first. That’ll keep the salt down. Salt-Free Seasonings Spices are a great way to jazz up your meals without adding calories or carbs. Just be sure to avoid ones with salt. “Red pepper flakes, oregano, curry, cinnamon, turmeric, and garlic powder [not salt] are all great options,” Bennett says. Whole Grains They’re packed with fiber, but finding them isn’t as easy as it may seem. Some foods only contain a small amount, even though it says “contains whole grain” on the package. Read the ingredients label and look for the following sources to be listed first: Bulgur (cracked wheat) Whole wheat flour Whole oats/oatmeal Whole-grain corn or cornmeal Popcorn Brown rice Whole rye Whole-grain barley Whole farro Wild rice Buckwheat Buckwheat flour Quinoa Bennett sug Continue reading >>

Enhanced Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup

Enhanced Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup

One of my favorite lunches is a can of Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup. The whole can is roughly 20G of carbohydrates. But I take it for two diversions - having eaten it so often - there are two favorite ways I like to prepare it for myself. Using a can of condensed soup - start off by adding only a 1/2 can of water - not a whole can as suggested. This makes the soup flavor stronger. Then, the two most popular ways I take it: * While cooking, squeeze 1/2 of a lime into the soup - bonus points if you get a little pump in there as well. Done! It's a taste similar to the Lime soups in Mexico! (sopa de lima!) * While cooking, shake a little McCormick Chipotle Chile Pepper into the soup. * Add a little ground red pepper for spice. Enjoy - the Chipotle flavor and the red pepper blend so well with the chicken broth. ps. There is no HFCS in Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup (Condensed) - but there is a little MSG. D.D. Family T1 for 54 years - on Pump since 03/2008 I am so jealous Drew. I remember having Campbells chicken noodle soup when I was little - living in Canada. You can't buy it here in the UK ! Arggggg I am so jealous Drew. I remember having Campbells chicken noodle soup when I was little - living in Canada. You can't buy it here in the UK ! Arggggg Can't you order some and have it shipped to you? D.D. Family Adult-onset Type 1 since 11/2008 * While cooking, squeeze 1/2 of a lime into the soup - bonus points if you get a little pump in there as well. Does it matter what kind of pump you use? Minimed, Animus, Omnipod....? D.D. Family T1 for 54 years - on Pump since 03/2008 No - they don't ship to the UK - well - if I owned one of the lrg supermarkets here - then maybe. It's the same with REAL BEEF hot dogs. I have to take a 3 hr drive ( one way) to get hot dogs & skippy p Continue reading >>

Diabetic Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe

Diabetic Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe

Ingredients 2 (8 ounces each) boneless, skinless chicken breasts 6 cups water 1 can (14 1/2 ounces) fat-free, 1/3-less-sodium chicken broth 1/3 cup finely diced carrot 1 cup diced onion (approximately 1/2 large onion) 1/2 cup finely diced celery 1 teaspoon dried parsley 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon black pepper 4 ounces dry angel hair pasta (break noodles in half) Directions Place chicken, water, broth, carrot, onion, and celery in a one-gallon pot and bring to a boil. Cook until chicken is no longer pink (about 15 minutes). Remove chicken and skim any fat from broth (or refrigerate broth for 2 to 3 hours and then skim fat). Dice chicken into bite-size pieces. Return chicken to the skimmed broth along with all remaining ingredients. Place over high heat and return to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-high and boil gently until pasta is cooked (3 to 5 minutes). Serve right away; the pasta will continue to absorb liquid if the soup is left simmering. Yield: 8 cups. Serving size: 1 cup. Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories: 151 calories, Carbohydrates: 10 g, Protein: 21 g, Fat: 3 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Sodium: 276 mg, Fiber: <1 g Exchanges per serving: 1/2 starch, 3 very lean meat. Carbohydrate choices: 1. This recipe was developed by Tami Ross, a Diabetes Nutrition Specialist and Certified Diabetes Educator in Lexington, Kentucky. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

7 Delicious Diabetes-friendly Soups

7 Delicious Diabetes-friendly Soups

It is almost officially fall. This year went by fast! I didn’t want to quite believe it, but the temperatures have been dropping and I have had to put my summer clothes away in favor of warmer, fall ones. With the drop in temperatures I have been craving warm, comforting food. As someone who has noticed a spike in my blood sugar levels with the change of seasons from summer to fall (I still have no idea what this is) the best thing for me to do is make sure my diet is as healthy as possible. Soup is a fantastic way to get a healthy, lower carbohydrate, lower calorie meal in that should keep your blood sugar levels on track. There are plenty of recipes out there for some fantastic soups that are filled with hidden calories and carbohydrates. Here, I have found seven of my favorite soup recipes for those chilly fall nights. Please feel free to share your favorite and diabetes friendly recipes for soup in the comments below! The Best Vegetable Soup. This is one of my mom’s standby recipes that I grew up with. It is filling, delicious, and oh so healthy. One of the best parts about this recipe is that you can use what you already have in your fridge. My mom usually makes it when she is cleaning out her vegetable drawer, so the recipe varies each time based on what is in her fridge. Easy peasy. Soup au Pistou. I have a strong affinity for French cuisine, as it was a staple in my diet when I was a child. This is a lovely soup to make and as a bonus you can use up the basil in your garden in the pistou recipe. Chicken and White Bean Soup. This is a recipe that is in constant rotation in my house. Just the smell of it simmering on the stove says home to me. The fresh sage, thyme and rosemary give it so much flavor and depth. I promise you will love this recipe as much as I Continue reading >>

Chicken And Vegetable Soup

Chicken And Vegetable Soup

Soup is a healthy meal that you can load with lots of veggies. If desired, you can add some brown or wild rice to this dish, but add some extra water. This soup would go well with our Orange and Walnut Salad . 1 pound skinless, boneless, chicken breasts 32 ounces fat-free, reduced-sodium chicken broth Add the oil to a large soup pot or dutch oven and heat over medium-high heat. Add the chicken and sear for 4 minutes on each side. Remove the chicken from the pan and set aside. Add the carrots, celery, and mushrooms to the same pot and saut over medium-high heat for 5 minutes. Add the remaining ingredients and add the chicken back to the pot. Bring to a boil; reduce the heat and simmer for 45 minutes. Remove the chicken from the pot and shred or cut up. Add the chicken back to the pot; stir. MAKE IT GLUTEN-FREE: You can purchase gluten-free chicken broth and verify the spices are gluten-free and this dish can be gluten-free. Photo: Chicken and Vegetable Soup. PNC Photography, Photographer: Peter Papoulakos. The beginning of a new year is a great time to start working toward a healthier you! One easy way to improve your diet is to start bringing a healthy lunch from home. Calculate the number of calories you should eat each day to maintain your present body weight: Please select an option before you continue. I don't do any physical activity other than what I need to do for my usual activities, such as going to work or school, grocery shopping, or doing chores around the house. I do some moderate exercise every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk about 1.5 to 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's moderately active. I am very active every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk mor Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: 20 Soup Ideas For Diabetics

Diabetic Diet: 20 Soup Ideas For Diabetics

Treating diabetes involves eating a recommended amount of nutritional requirements in the daily diet with regular exercise. Fortunately, there is no such thing as a diet meant only for diabetics strictly, so one need not abstain from their favorite foods all the time. Nor do you need special foods since locally available foods can provide you great diabetes friendly recipes. All you dear diabetics, we give you 20 diabetic friendly soup recipes that will pep up your meals and satiate your palate too! DON'T MISS Continue reading >>

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