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Is Casein Protein Good For Diabetics

Whey Powder For Diabetics

Whey Powder For Diabetics

Whey protein on a spoon.Photo Credit: marekuliasz/iStock/Getty Images Markee Marchini is a Registered Dietitian who has been writing freelance articles since 2009. Her work has been published on eHow and LIVESTRONG.COM, where she writes about vegetarianism, media, longevity and genetics. She holds a Master of Health Science in nutrition communication from Ryerson University. Whey powder is a protein supplement that is eligible for use as part of a diabetic diet. Diabetics can use whey powder in place of other protein sources in instances of poor appetite, unintentional weight loss or personal preference. Using whey powder in place of real foods when there is no sensible indication causes loss of the benefits achieved from eating whole food sources. Whey powder is a complete form of whey protein that comes from cheese and casein production. It is often sold in health food stores claiming that is helps build muscle. Many whey powder products dangerously recommend consuming two to three times the daily allowance of protein. The Recommended dietary allowance for most healthy diabetics is 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram body weight or roughly 40 to 50 grams of protein per day. The diabetic exchange lists includes the five food groups, carbohydrates, vegetables, fruit, protein, dairy and meat & beans. The diet plan works by recommending a certain number of servings for each food group for each day based on calorie needs. Needs and exchange list plans are different for every individual. A dietitian can outline your personal diet plan. Whey powder is a part of the protein exchange. One protein exchange equals 7g of protein. Supplementing with whey powder is most useful when your appetite does not allow you to consume adequate protein exchanges. Whey powder can be mixed into Continue reading >>

Casein Protein Vs. Whey Protein: The Benefits Of The Other Protein Powder

Casein Protein Vs. Whey Protein: The Benefits Of The Other Protein Powder

Dr. Axe on Facebook22 Dr. Axe on Twitter5 Dr. Axe on Instagram Dr. Axe on Google Plus Dr. Axe on Youtube Dr. Axe on Pintrest465 Share on Email Print Article Jillian BabcockDecember 4, 2015June 13, 2017 Currently the most popular protein powder in the world is whey protein , loved by athletes and those both looking to lose or gain weight. Whey protein has been the go-to muscle enhancer for decades, but theres another protein supplement out there: casein protein. One of the top sources of long-lasting amino acids, casein protein sometimes called the other protein powder provides easy-to-digest protein in a similar fashion to whey. What makes casein protein different from whey protein, pea protein powder, or even whole foods like eggs and chicken breast? One of caseins greatest advantages is the timing of how its absorbed, plus how long it lingers in the body. Both factors make it beneficial for building muscle fast and preserving the bodys lean muscle tissue. When it comes to nutrient timing, the type of protein matters. Casein protein hits your bloodstream very quickly plus its amino acids stay where they need to be in order to help build muscle tissue for many hours, as opposed to being flushed from the body relatively quickly. So, looking to build lean muscle mass, curb hunger and see even more benefits from your exercise(and who isnt)? Thenperhapsyou might want to start using casein protein or is it better to have this protein in pure food formand stayaway from this controversial protein powder. Answers ahead. Derived from milk, just like whey protein, casein protein is actually a naturally more abundant source of branched-chain amino acids . Thats why its sometimes simply called milk protein, since around 80 percent of the protein found in cows milk is casein and it Continue reading >>

Protein Supplements: Casein And Soy

Protein Supplements: Casein And Soy

One of the myths about protein supplements is that they can magically help you build muscleor lose weight. What many people dont realize about protein powders and shakes is that unless you substitute them for other foods in the diet, you can very well end up gaining weight. I recall that some of my patients would ask about using supplements or meal replacements (Glucerna, Boost, Ensure, etc.) to supplement their meal plan. They often didnt understand that drinking those supplements on top of whatever they were eating for meals or snacks was contributing additional calories and carbohydrate. The same holds true for protein supplements. Always read the Nutrition Facts label to determine whats in the product and decide how youll fit it into your eating plan. Last week we looked at whey protein , a popular type of protein supplement. This week well look at casein and soy supplements. What it is: Like whey, casein is a dairy product. Casein makes up roughly 80% of the protein in cows milk (the remaining 20% comes from whey). Its also used as a binder in food, medicines, and even in nonedible products such as paint and nail polish. Benefits: Theres probably no major benefit to choosing casein protein over whey protein. In terms of bodybuilding, both proteins can help build muscle. However, casein is a more slowly absorbed protein compared to whey (and you thought only carbs were quickly or slowly absorbed!). When casein is ingested, it forms a gel-like substance in the stomach, taking several hours to break down into amino acids. In contrast, whey protein breaks down in about 40 minutes. Casein is also rich in glutamine, an amino acid needed to keep the immune system, the digestive system, and the brain in good working order. There is some evidence that casein may be helpful Continue reading >>

Finding The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics: Reviews & Buyer’s Guide

Finding The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics: Reviews & Buyer’s Guide

Protein supplements are far and wide the most popular and best-selling supplements on the market. After all, if you’re not getting enough protein, your muscles won’t be growing anytime soon. However, when dealing with diabetes, you need to be attentive to what you eat. Carbohydrates, including sugars, are the largest factor in your diet. The best way to control your diabetes, but still make some great progress in terms of body composition and muscle gain, is to supplement with a protein powder with as few carbohydrates as possible. With low-carb protein supplements, you can double scoop without worrying too much about insulin levels. For those who don’t know me, I am an absolute nut when it comes to strict nutrition, and I recently studied the relationship between protein supplements and diabetes in order to find the best protein powder for diabetics. After researching and comparing over 100 different protein powders, I found the following five supplements to be the all-around best options for diabetic-friendly proteins. Protein 26g 25g 18g 30g 24g Carbs 0g 2.5g 1.5g 2g 1g Fat 0g 0.5g 1g 1g 2g Sugar 0g 2g 1g 0.5g 0g Taste Rating 9.4/10 9.0/10 8.9/10 9.4/10 8.1/10 Other Unflavored so can be mixed with anything Several flavors available Contains good amount of L-glutamine Contains 4 good sources of protein Non-GMO peas used to create this protein Cost Per Serving $0.86 $0.76 $0.72 $1.55 $0.62 8 Choosing The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics Not only is Isopure the top pick for the best protein powder for diabetics, it’s one of the best protein supplements on the market PERIOD. With 0g fat, 0g carbohydrates and 26g of protein per serving, Nature’s Best Isopure Whey Protein Isolate is definitely the cleanest protein out there. In addition to being squeaky clean, t Continue reading >>

Protein And Blood Sugar

Protein And Blood Sugar

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community When I consume a protein shake first thing in the morning (1 scoop protein with water only) I always get a fast and radical spike in my sugar level. I use pea protein powder that purports to contain only 3.2g CHO per scoop, so it's hardly the carb content that's responsible. I can have a fasting glucose of 4mmol and see it shoot up to 14 or 15 after the shake unless I have a bolus of about 3 units. I've read quite a bit about the body being able to convert protein to glucose and though my dietitian's opinion is that it's unlikely that this is what's happening, I'm inclined to think otherwise. My diabetic specialist reckons it's down to the surge of morning stress hormones and that the protein shake is a red herring. I've tested his theory by omitting the shake altogether (no breakfast either) and have not seen any significant change in my glucose levels during the morning. Anybody else have any experience with this phenomenon? Shooting up to 14/15 isn't good news so I would be ditching the shake, why don't you just have some scrambled eggs or an omelette instead? I find if I eat protein based meals that I need nearly as much insulin as I do for one that is carb based, typical example is eggs as above where I would need 4 units of QA insulin compared to 5 units for a bowl of porridge. Sorry Noblehead, I should have pointed out that I'm vegan, so eggs are out for me. As for your suggestion, Frankie, that the protein powder has some hidden extras, I really don't think that is the case as it a UK-made product and the manufacturer's own website provides comprehensive nutritional data about it. As I mentioned, I can avoid the spike with a small bolus, so I Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Use Whey Protein Shakes?

Can Diabetics Use Whey Protein Shakes?

Whey protein will help you curb hunger, recover quickly from exercise and lose fat while maintaining muscle, according to the National Dairy Council. Whey is the liquid fraction of protein that is left when removing the curds, or the solids, from dairy. You can use whey protein if you have diabetes. In fact, it may help you gain better control over your blood sugar levels. Talk to your doctor before taking whey protein shakes, though, especially if you have diabetes, and don't stop taking medication that has been prescribed. Video of the Day Whey With Your Meal Test subjects with Type 2 diabetes showed a higher insulin response after eating a carbohydrate-containing meal that included whey protein powder than a similar meal without whey. Researchers mixed the powder into mashed potatoes. The increased insulin response was accompanied by lower post-meal blood sugar levels. This effect has the potential to delay the need for diabetes medications and has not been shown to cause hypoglycemia, reported the researchers in a 2005 issue of the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition." Researchers who published a study in 2014 in "Diabetologia" found similar results. Participants had 28 percent lower blood sugar levels and 96 percent higher insulin levels after a high-carbohydrate meal when they drank a whey protein shake beforehand. Look for a whey protein concentrate powder that contains no added sugars. Continue reading >>

How Whey Protein Helps Weight Loss & Type 2 Diabetes

How Whey Protein Helps Weight Loss & Type 2 Diabetes

Whey protein offers tremendous metabolic advantages for healthy people as well as those who are struggling to improve their metabolism. This article reviews the latest findings on how whey protein assists weight loss and type 2 diabetes, based on a recent scientific article. Whey is far more than simply “grams of protein.” The protein itself is composed of bioactive peptides: β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, proteose peptone, immunoglobulins, bovine serum albumin, lactoferrin and lactoperoxidase. The whey protein used for food supplementation is a byproduct of the cheese making industry, thus it also contains glycomacropeptides (GMPs), which are produced by enzymatic reactions. Whey protein is an excellent source of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). As whey protein is digested it produces additional bioactive peptides, many of which help circulation or immunity. Many mechanisms are in play and contribute to the wide range of benefits from whey protein consumption. Whey Protein Boosts Metabolic Rate Dietary protein is well known to exert a higher level of metabolic activity compared to fats or carbohydrates. This food based thermogenic is important to overall metabolism. Whey protein has been shown to be a superior metabolic activator, much better than the other dairy protein (casein) or soy. Because whey protein contains 50 percent - 75 percent more leucine than other proteins it has a much more dynamic ability to stimulate muscle metabolism. In higher amounts whey protein stimulates an important gene signaling system called the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). mTOR is central to your body building up its structure via protein synthesis, including muscles, joints, and bone. Because whey protein is so easy to absorb compared to other proteins, its higher surg Continue reading >>

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease where the body cannot maintain normal levels of blood sugar, and blood sugar levels go too high. Blood sugars that are too high can cause symptoms such as dry mouth, increased thirst, frequent urination, tiredness, and increased urination at night. High blood sugar levels over time can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels. What people eat has a huge impact on their blood sugars. Carbohydrates found in foods cause blood sugar to go up. Foods that digest slower cause a slower rise in blood sugar, which is helpful for those with diabetes. But what about protein shakes? What is protein? The three essential macronutrients found in food are protein, carbohydrates, and fat. Protein helps to maintain, rebuild, and repair muscle. Protein is also a building block for the skin, nails, bones, and even blood. It makes up hormones, enzymes, and antibodies. Protein in foods has staying power because it digests slower than carbohydrate. Proteins do not raise blood sugar. Periods of growth, such as during infancy and pregnancy, need more protein. Protein needs are also raised for people with injuries, those who have had surgery, or active people. Most people, including those with diabetes, are looking for healthy options to grab on the go like protein shakes or bars. While it is important to rely on packaged food products as little as possible, it is smart to have some healthier options in mind when needed. The problem with protein shakes is that they often have lots of artificial ingredients and can have as much sugar as soda. Protein requirements The total amount of protein consumed in a day is important, but so is how that intake is spread out over the day. Many people will consume a small amount at breakfast, a moderate amount at lunch, and a lar Continue reading >>

Best Whey Protein Powder For Diabetics

Best Whey Protein Powder For Diabetics

Whey protein has a ton of health benefits, even though most people immediately associate it with the health and fitness realm. And, within that application, there’s a good reason for its popularity: Whey protein has been shown to encourage an overall healthy body composition – meaning it helps to builds lean muscle and reduce fat. The popular powder, though, has plenty of other uses. For one thing, whey can be extremely useful to diabetics. How? Is there a particular type of whey protein they should look for? The Benefits of Whey Protein for Diabetics The first thing to consider when discussing whey protein and diabetes is the fact that whey is a high protein food. This also means that it is naturally low in carbohydrates. Considered together, these nutritional facts mean that whey has a very low glycemic index (meaning that it will have little effect on insulin levels) and will still be a filling food. In general, this places whey within the bounds of the type of foods usually recommended for diabetics. But, recent research has found yet another reason for diabetics to use whey: the powder can actually reduce the severity of an insulin response even after a meal that would normal cause a massive spike. In the study, 15 subjects with type 2 diabetes took 50 grams of whey 30 minutes before eating a high glycemic index meal and had their blood tested periodically before and after the meal. The team of researchers found that, after drinking whey, the insulin response was reduced by 28 percent. Clearly, whey could (and should) have a place in a healthy eating plan to control diabetes. Other Considerations for Whey Protein Powders & Diabetes Unfortunately, not all whey protein powders are the same. Many have been loaded with other ingredients – including sweeteners. As Continue reading >>

The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics

The Best Protein Powder For Diabetics

Whether you are looking to kick start your current weight loss plan or gain muscle in the gym, protein powders can very helpful. However, if you are diabetic you need to take extra care when choosing a protein powder. Ensuring that the supplement you choose fits with your current lifestyle and dietary needs is very important. Read on to find out exactly what the best protein powder for diabetics is. Who Are Protein Powders Designed For? There are a number of protein powders available, all of which are usually marketed for specific uses. For example, you can find protein for weight loss, powders for bulking up and gaining muscle and meal replacements. Traditionally though, most people tend to use protein powder as a post workout shake in order to aid their fitness goals. The Benefits Of Protein Powder Protein Powder Aids Weight Loss While Preserving Muscle If you are starting a serious weight loss program, especially if you’re attempting to improve or reverse the effects of type 2 diabetes, following a very low calorie diet (VLCD) is a good plan. Programs such as the blood sugar diet can be a great way to lose weight fast. One thing to be careful of is that restricting calories to this level can cause your body to break down muscle as you workout while it attempts to hold onto your fat stores. Drinking a protein shake post workout can help preserve muscle and burn more calories. Protein Powder Controls Hunger If you are trying your best to complete a weight loss program, constantly feeling hungry can be a huge obstacle. However, research has shown that drinking shakes with 50 grams of whey protein can reduce the hormones which tell the brain you’re hungry for up to four hours (source). Protein Powder Can Help You Beat Stress If you are feeling stressed, run down and Continue reading >>

Whey Protein: The “whey” Forward For Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Whey Protein: The “whey” Forward For Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Go to: Abstract A cost-effective nutritional approach to improve postprandial glycaemia is attractive considering the rising burden of diabetes throughout the world. Whey protein, a by-product of the cheese-making process, can be used to manipulate gut function in order to slow gastric emptying and stimulate incretin hormone secretion, thereby attenuating postprandial glycaemic excursions. The function of the gastrointestinal tract plays a pivotal role in glucose homeostasis, particularly during the postprandial period, and this review will discuss the mechanisms by which whey protein slows gastric emptying and stimulates release of gut peptides, including the incretins. Whey protein is also a rich source of amino acids, and these can directly stimulate beta cells to secrete insulin, which contributes to the reduction in postprandial glycaemia. Appetite is suppressed with consumption of whey, due to its effects on the gut-brain axis and the hypothalamus. These properties of whey protein suggest its potential in the management of type 2 diabetes. However, the optimal dose and timing of whey protein ingestion are yet to be defined, and studies are required to examine the long-term benefits of whey consumption for overall glycaemic control. Keywords: Whey protein, Postprandial glycaemia, Type 2 diabetes, Dietary intervention, Preload, Gastric emptying, Incretins, Gut hormones, Appetite, Amino acids Core tip: Whey protein, a by-product of cheese-manufacture, shows promise in the dietary management of diabetes. Whey can slow gastric emptying, stimulate insulin and gut hormones including the incretins, and thereby reduce postprandial blood glucose, especially when consumed some minutes before a meal. Whey may also suppress appetite and reduce food intake. This review will sum Continue reading >>

Is Milk Protein (casein) Is Harmful For Diabetics? Should They Avoid Dairy Products?

Is Milk Protein (casein) Is Harmful For Diabetics? Should They Avoid Dairy Products?

When it comes to health, I tend to rely on factual evidence as opposed to popular opinion, hyperbole, unsubstantiated hypothesis, or conjecture. To avoid the confusion and distraction caused by meritless debate, I look for a preponderance of evidence... well established correlations having a long history of independently reproducible peer-reviewed clinical studies published in medical journals. As far as the deleterious effects of casein on diabetics, it is the same as with non-diabetics; the science is clear about it, and has been clear for several decades. Recent limited studies which tend to indicate otherwise have yet to be vetted, perfected, independently reproduced, and peer-reviewed. When it comes to my health, I do not rely on outliers - I rely on what the propensity of data indicates, and govern myself accordingly. Casein and animal proteins promote cancer; plant-based proteins do not. Period. Barnard RJ, Gonzalez JH, Liva ME, Ngo TH. Effects of a low-fat, high-fiber diet and exercise program on breast cancer risk factors in vivo and tumor cell growth and apoptosis in vitro. Nutr Cancer. 2006;55(1):28-34. Ornish D, Weidner G, Fair WR, Marlin R, Pettengill EB, Raisin CJ, Dunn-Emke S, Crutchfield L, Jacobs FN, Barnard RJ, Aronson WJ, McCormac P, McKnight DJ, Fein JD, Dnistrian AM, Weinstein J, Ngo TH, Mendell NR, Carroll PR. Intensive lifestyle changes may affect the progression of prostate cancer. J Urol. 2005 Sep;174(3):1065-9; discussion 1069-70. Hart AR, Kennedy H, Harvey I. Pancreatic cancer: a review of the evidence on causation. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008 Mar;6(3):275-82. Population Health, School of Medicine, Health Policy and Practice, University of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk, United Kingdom. [email protected] Thiébaut AC, Jiao L, Silverman DT, Continue reading >>

Extraordinary Reasons Why Whey Protein Is Good For Diabetes

Extraordinary Reasons Why Whey Protein Is Good For Diabetes

Whey protein is one of the two major proteins found in milk and dairy products. The other major protein in dairy products is casein—many people have sensitivities to casein, but few people seem to have any sensitivity to whey protein. When rennin, a protein that curdles milk, is added to milk and other dairy products, the curds (casein) and whey separate, just as they did in the old nursery rhyme. Whey protein is used for a number of purposes—it is used to maintain daily protein intakes, to build muscle mass, and to increase fat loss. Whey isn’t the only protein to increase fat loss—most proteins do, but most proteins aren’t available in an easily dissolved powder as whey is. Whey Protein, Insulin and Blood Sugar There are a number of properties of whey protein that appear to be useful in diabetes. [1] Whey protein is a good source of the amino acid L-cysteine. L-cysteine is used to synthesize glutathione, one of the body’s most important antioxidant. Oxidative stress—the buildup of damaging free radicals—is thought to be one of the underlying causes of insulin resistance and to be responsible for some of the complications of diabetes such as peripheral neuropathy, retinopathy and kidney damage. Whey protein, when added to a meal, also appears to increase insulin secretion and to decrease blood sugar after a meal. (Post-prandial blood glucose)[2] Whey protein can also decrease triglyceride levels in diabetics after meals. In a recent study, blood sugar levels were 28% lower in those who had whey protein along with their meal. Insulin levels were increased (doubled) and, importantly, the insulin response lasted longer. The study was small, only examining the responses of 15 individuals, but the design of the study made the results significant.[3] Whey has Continue reading >>

Does Casein In Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

Does Casein In Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

Does Casein in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes? Does Casein in Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes? Why might exposure to bovine proteins increase the risk of childhood-onset autoimmune type I diabetes? Below is an approximation of this videos audio content. To see any graphs, charts, graphics, images, and quotes to which Dr. Greger may be referring, watch the above video. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that typically strikes children and young adults, in which your own immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells of your pancreas. If untreated, its deadly. But, even with well-managed insulin replacement, it could cut a decade off your life. Families are devastated when a child receives a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Thus, one of modern medicines holy grails is to understand what causes the body to attack itself, in hopes that we canprevent and cure it. Genetic susceptibility plays an important role, but the concordance for type 1 diabetes is only about 50% among identical twinsmeaning even if someone with the same DNA as you gets the disease, theres only about a 50% chance youll get it too, meaning there must be external factors, as well. Some countries have low rates; some have high rates. Japan, for example, has type 1 diabetes rates 18 times lower than the United States. And, thats not just genetics, since when children migrate, they tend to acquire the risk of their new homesuggesting its got to have something to do with the environment, diet, or lifestyle. In fact, the incidence rates vary more than 350-fold around the world. Some countries have hundreds of times higher rates than others, and its on the rise. Researchers looked at 37 populations from around the world, and the incidence is going up about 3% a year. In fact, they couldnt find a s Continue reading >>

Protein Principles For Diabetes

Protein Principles For Diabetes

Dietary considerations can present a Hobson's choice in diabetes. Even when the intake is nutritious, assimilating it can be another matter. Then there is the problem of progression of diabetic complications if one ends up with excess glucose or fat in the system. Excess carbohydrates in a meal, and the resulting uncontrolled blood sugar levels can be detrimental to any number of tissues, from the lens of the eye, to the neurons, small blood vessels and the kidneys . Fat is also a problem with increase incidences of atherosclerosis, large vessel disease and cardiac complications. What, then is the appropriate macronutrient for the diabetic population? Enough medical literature exists to suggest that in diabetes, proteins are probably the best bet. Proteins are the natural choice of the body when faced with diabetes. In uncontrolled diabetes, muscle protein is broken down into amino acids to be converted into glucose by the liver. If left to fend for itself, this can create a commotion within the body. Since proteins have to supply enough energy to substitute for carbohydrates, proteins are broken down faster than they are made. The body ends up with a protein deficit, a situation with subtle, yet far-reaching effects on normal body functions. Importantly, for diabetics, a protein deficit has been shown to impair resistance to infections (Ganong WF). Replenishing the depleting protein stores is a vital requirement of all diabetic diets . Importance of proteins in a diabetic has been well documented. The American Associations of Clinical Endocrinologists have made it clear that not much evidence exists to indicate that the patients with diabetes need to reduce their intake of dietary proteins. The AACE recommends that 10-20% of the calorie intake in diabetes should come Continue reading >>

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