diabetestalk.net

Is Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup Good For Diabetics

Colonoscopy Prep Advice

Colonoscopy Prep Advice

Lucky me ... I have a colonoscopy coming up in a couple weeks. Have had them before, and am not concerned about anything except what to eat the day before, when I'm limited to clear liquids. Of course, everything the doctor recommends I consume is sugar: apple juice, Sprite, Jell-o. (That is basically what I consumed the day prior last time I had a colonoscopy.) The doctor also suggests that if my blood sugar drops below 100, I need to drink four ounces of regular Sprite or ginger ale, re-test, and keep going until my blood sugar does rise above 100. Um, no thanks. My blood sugar is rarely much above 100 at any time, and I don't see this as a reason to intentionally cause it to rise. He also says to take 80% of my evening Lantus dose. (That's the only insulin I take. 80% of my usual 21 units is 16 units.) I realize that the prep advice given probably assumes that I am not in good control, like most American diabetics, but his office was unable to suggest how I might alter the prep for someone who has good control. Those of you who have had such a procedure while you've been in good control, I need your advice. I'm clearly not going to spend all day drinking sugary apple juice and Sprite. I don't use artificial sweeteners, and kicking the diet soda habit 16 months ago was so difficult that I'm really not interested in drinking them again, even just for a day. I'm thinking it's a day of water and chicken broth and tea, basically a fast, which I do not think will be terribly difficult. But if I do that, I'm not sure how much Lantus to take at night. I have no direct experience. That said, I think your plan of broth and tea sounds pretty good. If you do it home-made, you might even get better protein content. So your question of the lantus dose is really more about what yo Continue reading >>

Diabetics & Chicken Noodle Soup

Diabetics & Chicken Noodle Soup

Persons with diabetes face a very high risk of developing heart disease. A diet low in saturated fat, about 16 mg a day, and sodium, no more than 1,500 mg daily, and rich in whole grains and non-starchy vegetables will help protect you against cardiovascular disease. Properly prepared, chicken noodle soup makes a healthy choice on a diabetes diet. Video of the Day Choose whole-grain noodles for your soup, instead of noodles made of refined grains. Whole-grain food items make healthy diabetes choices because whole grains are rich in soluble fiber, a nutrient that may help stabilize your blood glucose levels, lower your blood pressure and reduce your low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In addition, whole grains contain essential fatty acids, vitamin E and most of the B vitamins. Look for ingredient lists topped by 100 percent whole-wheat flour when shopping for noodles. Avoid noodles made from processed and refined grains, like those containing white or enriched wheat flour. Lean Chicken and Broth The healthiest protein sources are low in calories and saturated fat. For your soup, choose lean, skinless chicken breast over fatty cuts. Instead of chicken stock, try preparing your soup broth with low-sodium vegetable stock. Vegetable-based broths tend to contain fewer calories and less saturated fat than canned chicken broths. If you do choose a prepared chicken broth, look for a variety low in fat and sodium. Or make your own stock and skim all visible fat. Non-starchy vegetables make healthy choices on a diabetes diet because they are particularly low in calories and carbohydrates. In fact, according to the American Diabetes Association, non-starchy vegetables should comprise half of all of your lunch and dinner meals. Many store-bought or restaurant-ordered chicken noodl Continue reading >>

Is Chicken Noodle Soup Healthy For You?

Is Chicken Noodle Soup Healthy For You?

Fresh veggies add flavor and vitamins and minerals to chicken noodle soup. What Could You Add to Soup to Make It More of a Meal & More Filling? Theres nothing like a hot bowl of chicken noodle soup on a rainy day or when youre feeling under the weather. The soups steam helps relieve congestion and the warm broth coats a sore throat, but whether that comforting chicken noodle soup is actually healthy depends on the ingredients in the bowl. If you make your own soup with fresh ingredients, you can have a chicken noodle soup full of flavor and nutrients. While they may be convenient, canned varieties of chicken noodle soup are often extremely high in sodium and low in protein, fiber, vitamins and minerals. A typical 1/2-cup serving of condensed, canned chicken noodle soup can contain as much 890 milligrams of sodium. A 303-gram can has 2,139 milligrams of sodium. To put those numbers in perspective, the Institute of Medicine recommends most Americans have no more than 2,300 milligrams of sodium in an entire day. You should have no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day if you have high blood pressure, chronic kidney disease or diabetes, or if you are African American or over 50. Most chicken noodle soups are so high in sodium because salt is used for the primary flavor. To keep the sodium level down, flavor your soup with minced garlic, onion, parsley and bay leaf instead of all that salt. For a soup infused with Asian flavors, use soy sauce or ginger. Those bland, tiny chunks of chicken in canned soups are not very nutritious, and they are hardly filling. For a hearty, heart-healthy source of protein, make your soup with boneless, skinless chicken; always trim away any fat on chicken you use in your chicken noodle soup to keep the fat content low. If you follow a v Continue reading >>

How Do You Dose Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup

How Do You Dose Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. How do you dose Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup I have never figured out the right way to dose this situation. The can says a serving is 1/2 cup of the condensed stuff in the can. But we obviously don't eat it that way - we add 1 can of water. Since you're adding water to the condensed, I would think that a serving would then be 1 cup - 1/2 cup condensed, 1/2 cup water - and dose for 1 cup: e.g. 10 carbs for 1/2 cup condensed would be 10 carbs for 1 cup w/ water added. I hope I dont have that backwards but Im pretty sure its right. Hopefully others will jump in here. :cwds: We using the servings per can, usually it's something odd like 2.5, multiply by the carbs per serving to get the amount in the whole can, and she usually eats half of the can so we divide that # by 2. Works well since you're only adding water. I usually scoop out 1/2 cup of noodles to get the serving size, and then add broth. Since the noodles are really the only thing that counts towards the carbs in the condensed version that's really all you need to be concerned about. The condensed broth that's in the can really has no carbs, the veggies and chicken if you can find it would be negligible. I also sometimes have to combo bolus because often Ian gets a "pasta low" Continue reading >>

Soup's On

Soup's On

Few foods are more comforting than a bowl of soup, especially when the snow is flying outside. For people living with diabetes, soup can also be a smart choice, helping to control appetite. Studies have shown that eating a first course of low-calorie soup before an entrée can reduce the overall intake of calories (soup plus entrée) by 20 per cent. “It’s a great strategy because we know that maintaining a healthy weight is an important part of diabetes management,” says Sandi Williams, registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator with St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto. “Studies suggest that if you start with a high-volume, low-cal food like soup, you’ll end up eating less by the end of the meal.” Eating a low-calorie soup before a meal works as a weight-management strategy because it takes 20 minutes for your brain to get the message from your stomach that it has had enough. Starting with a bowl of soup, explains Ms. Williams, fills your stomach slightly and makes you feel satisfied sooner and on fewer calories. Soup is also a great way to introduce fibre into your meal, says Ms. Williams. Fibre-rich vegetables and pulses (such as beans and lentils) fill you up and help prevent your blood glucose from spiking. The extra veggies don’t hurt either, she says, as most of us aren’t eating enough of them to begin with. But when you head down to your local grocery store to stock up in the soup aisle, be prepared for a bout of label-reading, because convenience comes at a nutritional price. According to Ms. Williams, many canned and packaged soups come with far more than a pinch of salt—even some of those claiming to be sodium-reduced. “The recommended daily intake of sodium for a healthy adult is 1500 mg,” says Ms. Williams, who advises a sodiu Continue reading >>

Why Eating Canned Soup Risks Major Health Problems

Why Eating Canned Soup Risks Major Health Problems

Why Eating Canned Soup Risks Major Health Problems by Sarah Updated: January 25, 2018 Affiliate links Healthy Living Comments: 108 Lets get started with todays lesson in healthy living. Operation Take Back Your Health is now underway: Step 1: Walk to your kitchen pantry and open the door. Step 2: Remove all canned foods especially canned soup. Yes, even the organic ones. Yes, the trash. Thats where they belong. Dont give them away as this is simply passing on the curse of ill health to another unsuspecting soul. Step 4: Do your very best to never, EVER buy anything in a can again. Canned Soup Risks Toxic Chemical Exposure If youve been a reader of this blog for any length of time, you know that canned food is something that is very much a detriment to your health. The reason is not just because the food is nutritionless due to the high temperatures and pressures required during processing. Possibly the most worrisome problem of all is that almost all brands of canned food, except for a very few organic ones, contain the endocrine disruptor bisphenol A. This chemical, better known as BPA, is part of the can lining. It is a byproduct of the chemicals used to prevent corrosion. Those that dont contain BPA contain a very similar chemical known as BPS, which is just as dangerous! Why are BPA and BPS such a HUGE, HUGE problem, particularly for our children? Because they are linked to massive hormone disruption with the serious problem of early puberty, ADHD, obesity, Type 2 diabetes, and the list goes on and on and on. Think this problem is overblown? Consider this. Currently, as many as 10 in 100 white girls, 15 in 100 Hispanic girls, and 25 in 100 African American girls are experiencing breast development as early as7 years old! The earlier a girl goes into puberty, the hi Continue reading >>

Is Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup Good For You?

Is Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup Good For You?

Is campbell's chicken noodle soup good for you? I'm going on a diet so i'm trying to eat healthy and workout. I bought the campbell's chicken noodle soup thinking how bad can soup be for you. But i just checked the back and it's 37% sodium! Am i better off with just eating a salad? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Yes you are much better off with salad. You must buy low sodium canned soups ans all can soups are loaded in sodium unless say low sodium. Salad is excellent choice, or try some heated low sodium chiken broth, or in between meals, drink a glass of hot tea or water which make s you feel less hungry. Sodium causes you to retain water and is not healthy for you in large quanitities I just tried Campbell s Chicken Noodle with 25% less sodium. OK with 25% less sodium it still has a whooping 660mg of sodium. And when I tried it - it was like eating salted soup - not very appetizing and really not very healthy. I had to toss it and next time I will check the label - no reason for a company to put that much salt in a soup - they are killing people with this product. Soup is fantastic. You must NOT buy low sodium soup. You need sodium to live. A can of soup will not put you over your daily sodium limit or harm you in any way. Low sodium soup has almost no flavor. The chicken noodle soup has protein and carbs which you need to live. A salad - almost none. You should try the progresso soups!!! Way lower sodium and way more choices. The chicken noodle has lots of oil and sodium, not so good for water retention when your on a diet lol! well try the low sodium choices.. i mean i don't check the sodium, i check the fat and the calories and progresso light soups have 60 calories per serving and no fat and are soo yummy. Select light soups are soooo g Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Stomach Virus?

What To Eat With Stomach Virus?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. The classic advice is for starchy stuff: rice, crackers, and bananas. What do you all eat when recovering? I also have been avoiding wheat. I think it bothers my stomach. I know this is a repeat conversation, but I did not find the old ones on a search. i just drink ~ usually i will have a fortress liquid protein vial in a large glass of water and just slowly sip on that Chicken and beef or veggie broth, jello, followed by slightly more substantial foods such as puddings and soups with a bit of meat and veggies in them, continuing with lots of fluids. Mother used to give us boiled ham but I don't follow her rationale Sugar free gingerale, sugar free jello, low carb popsicles, and soups. I find cream of chicken soup is rather low carb and about 1/2 cup is usually tolerated. If I can't handle much I usually eat a few oyster crackers. A lot of time you need salt. Green tea is also a good drink, I like the ginger and mint teas. I don't worry about bgs too much while I am sick, I know they will be higher than usual. I usually get Campbell's chicken noodle soup. It's only 8 carbs/1 cup serving and the salty broth and noodles makes me feel better. If I have crackers on hand, i'll have a few of those or toast as well. Anything to make me feel better. When i'm sick, I concentrate on taking care of what's bothering me first, as my blood sugars will fall back in line once the virus/illness passes. ditto everyone else. It's important you keep yourself hydrated and get some neutrition. The broth, chicken soup, diet ginger ale will do you good. I also found a progresso soup called Chicken Cheese Enchilata Continue reading >>

Slow Cooker Chicken Noodle Soup

Slow Cooker Chicken Noodle Soup

Ingredients Directions Rinse and pat dry chicken. Place in a 5-quart or larger crockery slow cooker. Place the peeled and quarted onion, peeled and quartered carrot, and parsley around chicken pieces. Sprinkle with thyme, marjoram, and pepper. Add chicken broth, cover, and cook on low for 7 to 8 hours or on high for 2 1/2 to 3 hours. When done cooking, remove and discard the onion, carrot, and parsley. Skim off and discard all surface fat from the broth. Remove the chicken from broth and cool for about 10 minutes, until cool enough to handle. Remove and discard the chicken skin and bones. Shred chicken. Add shredded chicken back to the slow cooker and bring to a simmer. Add diced onion, diced carrots, diced celery, mushroom, and spinach. Simmer for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, cook noodles according to package directions. Just before serving, add cooked noodles to soup and season with salt and pepper (to taste). Nutrition Information Per serving: 285 calories (22% calories from fat), 31 g protein, 7 g total fat (1.8 g saturated fat), 24 g carbohydrates, 2 g dietary fiber, 72 mg cholesterol, 615 mg potassium, 121 mg sodium Diabetic exchanges: 4 lean protein, 1 1/2 carbohydrate (bread/starch) Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Exp Continue reading >>

Trouble With Soup! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Trouble With Soup! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Since being diagnosed with diabetes two years ago, I haven't had any tinned soup as it is very high in sugar. However, yesterday I wasfeeling a bit down and found a tin of Tesco tomato soup in the cupboard. I ate half a tin of the soup (14g carb) and 1 slice of Burgen bread (11g carb) and took 2.5 units Apidra to cover it - this is slightly more than my usual ratio. My BG went: 1 hour (to see what was happening as I felt lousy) - 12.2 :shock: I then went to bed. I took my usual 1 unit Insuman basal. Woke up this morning 4.1 Anyone shed any light on this? My usual fasting would be high 5s/high 6s. I guess I just need to avoid tinned soup, but I'd like to understand what happened here! Also, if anyone does have any recommendations for any tinned soup that works that would be much appreciated. :lol: I guess I just need to avoid tinned soup, but I'd like to understand what happened here! Also, if anyone does have any recommendations for any tinned soup that works that would be much appreciated. The lesson here Smidge is don't have the soup again! We all react differently to foods and obviously the soup on this occasion caused a major spike in your bg, I stopped eating tinned soup and prefer homemade soup as you can monitor what goes into it, my wife makes a big pan and I split it into individual containers and freeze. Search the web for suggestions on homemade soup and adjust them according to your taste, my bet is they won't cause a spike like the tinned varieties! Noblehead - you are right of course! I have thrown the other half the tin away and will try to find time to make some soup and freeze it over the next few weeks. I guess tomato soup is never g Continue reading >>

Gi Index - Diabetes - Healingwell.com Forum

Gi Index - Diabetes - Healingwell.com Forum

Does anyone follow the GI diet? A couple of years ago I was told by a dietician that this is what I should follow. It seems really good in theory but there's some conflicting information around. I have quite a few diabetic recipe books, and some of the recipes here are not recommended in the GI books. I had muesli for breakfast, and checked the rating in a new GI book I bought yesterday - IT WAS LISTED IN THE RED SECTION (i.e. not to eat, as the book works with a traffic light system). This shocked me, so I looked in a different GI book - it was listed here as around the 40 mark (so quite low). The more I try to understand the more confused I get. It had low fat meat listed in the amber section (but in the other book it had a score of 0, so it would have little effect on the blood sugar). I have an appointment with a dietician soon so I can discuss it then, but in the meantime it's so confusing! I consider myself to have a good understanding with how food affects us, but it's difficult to take in when different sources give me different 'facts'. I would understand if the book was giving a general opinion on foods that you should try to avoid, but it was purely going on the GI index and I therefore cannot understand why lean meat would be in the amber section! Also, yoghurts - I was told these are good by a dietician but bad by a diabetic nurse. Aaargghh! Who's right? Read the labels. You can almost tell just by the carb and fiber count. Obviously, the lower the carbs and sugars and the higher the fiber, the better GI index it will have. Yogert can be good, but most companies add too much fruit and sugar. Find a low carb type and its ok. Otherwise, plain is probably the best. Lowfat yogert makes no difference, its the sugar content. Artificially sweetened will lower the Continue reading >>

28 Canned Soups, Broths, And Stocks Under 500mg Of Sodium | Everyday Health

28 Canned Soups, Broths, And Stocks Under 500mg Of Sodium | Everyday Health

If youre watching your sodium , you know that canned soups can easily send you over your daily limit at times almost hitting the daily recommended amount in a single can! But there are plenty of off-the-shelf options that are lower in salt if you know where and how to look. Weve rounded up more than two dozen canned soups, broths, and stocks that will keep the sodium in check. Campbells Chunky Healthy Request Chicken Noodle At 410 mg of sodium per cup (thats 820mg per can or 36 percent of whats recommended for the day), this chicken noodle soup is at the higher end of a healthy range for sodium, but it is much lower in sodium than traditional canned chicken noodle soups. For example, the Campbells Classic version of this chicken noodle soup contains 1580 mg (69 percent) per can. So, while its definitely a sodium savings, youll still want to watch the sodium for the rest of the day. Health Valley Organic No Salt Added Chicken Noodle For an even lower sodium chicken noodle soup, opt for this version from Health Valley with only 135 mg of sodium per cup thats only 270 mg (12 percent of the daily limit) in the whole can unheard of in the world of soup! Now thats an amount that can fit into any heart healthy day. Plus, with 10 grams (g) of protein per can, it will keep you feeling satisfied, too. Amys Organic Light in Sodium Lentil Vegetable With only 340 milligrams (mg) of sodium per cup (keep in mind that there are usually 2 cups per can), Amys Organic Light in Sodium Lentil Vegetable soup is lower in sodium than most other canned soups. Plus, its made with nutritious organic vegetables and seasonings and is a good source of protein. Lentils are a type of legume and are an excellent source of fiber as well. Together with the other vegetables, they contribute 16 g of fiber Continue reading >>

Enhanced Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup

Enhanced Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup

One of my favorite lunches is a can of Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup. The whole can is roughly 20G of carbohydrates. But I take it for two diversions - having eaten it so often - there are two favorite ways I like to prepare it for myself. Using a can of condensed soup - start off by adding only a 1/2 can of water - not a whole can as suggested. This makes the soup flavor stronger. Then, the two most popular ways I take it: * While cooking, squeeze 1/2 of a lime into the soup - bonus points if you get a little pump in there as well. Done! It's a taste similar to the Lime soups in Mexico! (sopa de lima!) * While cooking, shake a little McCormick Chipotle Chile Pepper into the soup. * Add a little ground red pepper for spice. Enjoy - the Chipotle flavor and the red pepper blend so well with the chicken broth. ps. There is no HFCS in Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup (Condensed) - but there is a little MSG. D.D. Family T1 for 54 years - on Pump since 03/2008 I am so jealous Drew. I remember having Campbells chicken noodle soup when I was little - living in Canada. You can't buy it here in the UK ! Arggggg I am so jealous Drew. I remember having Campbells chicken noodle soup when I was little - living in Canada. You can't buy it here in the UK ! Arggggg Can't you order some and have it shipped to you? D.D. Family Adult-onset Type 1 since 11/2008 * While cooking, squeeze 1/2 of a lime into the soup - bonus points if you get a little pump in there as well. Does it matter what kind of pump you use? Minimed, Animus, Omnipod....? D.D. Family T1 for 54 years - on Pump since 03/2008 No - they don't ship to the UK - well - if I owned one of the lrg supermarkets here - then maybe. It's the same with REAL BEEF hot dogs. I have to take a 3 hr drive ( one way) to get hot dogs & skippy p Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Soups & Stews

Diabetes-friendly Soups & Stews

Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan. Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan. Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan. Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan. Continue reading >>

Soup Really Is Good Food

Soup Really Is Good Food

Being a native New Englander, I’m beginning to brace myself for the cold weather ahead. I admit — I’m not a big fan of frigid temperatures, sleet, or snow, but one thing I really can appreciate about the big chill is soup. Granted, one can eat soup at any time of the year, but there’s nothing like a steaming bowl of nourishing soup on a cold winter’s night. Soup has a lot of good things going for it, but not all soups are created equally nutrition-wise. Soup nutrition Sure, some soups are brimming with fat and calories (think chowders or creamy soups). But the reality is that soup has a lot to offer in terms of nutrition. Vegetables. Not a big fan of vegetables? Reach for soup. Vegetables always taste better when they’re simmering in a chicken or tomato broth. And while the amount of vegetables that you need depends on your gender, age, and activity level, aiming for between 2 and 3 cups of veggies each day is generally the goal. You can help reach that goal by eating soup that contains plenty of vegetables. Fiber. We need between 25 and 38 grams of fiber each day. To reach that goal, you really do need to eat vegetables (along with fruits and whole grains). But you can help meet your vegetable and fiber quota by eating…you guessed it: soup! For an added bonus, choose soups that contain beans, like kidney beans, cannellini beans, or lentils, which are some of the highest-fiber-foods around. Vitamins. Most of us probably aren’t deficient in too many vitamins, but it’s still good to know that you can get reasonable amounts of vitamin C, beta carotene, and B vitamins from soup. Weight control. No, I’m not telling you to go on the cabbage soup diet to lose weight. But there’s credible evidence telling us that kicking off a meal with a bowl of healthy, Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet