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Intermittent Fasting Type 1 Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting with Type 1 Diabetes If your first reaction to intermittent fasting with type 1 diabetes isOh my gosh, my blood sugar would be so low! I could never do that! then definitely keep reading. In this guide, I will cover everything you need to know about intermittent fasting with type 1 diabetes: Whats the point of intermittent fasting? There are 3 general reasons a person might want to pursue intermittent fasting. Weight-loss: This is the most obvious and most common reason to give it a try. Simplicity: Reducing the number of hours each day that you have to think about food, track food, make decisions around food, and cook food can be really freeing! Instead of frantically and unexpectedly skipping meals because of a hectic schedule, intermittent fasting allows you to properly and methodically skip eating during parts of the time. Energy: Once you get going, and youre no longer freaking out about, How hungry will I feel!?!this approach to eating can actually give you quite a boost of energy because your body will be burning fat for fuel instead of relying on sugar from your blood. Body fat is an endless source of energy. Before we get started: if your blood sugar drops just because you dont eat for a handful of hours, youre taking too much background/basal insulin via pump or injection. Talk to your CDE or primary care doctor about basal testing. (Or check out Gary Scheiners book, Think Like a Pancreas and do the basal testing yourself!) Basal testing literally consists of purposefully skipping a meal (or two) in order to see if your insulin keeps your blood sugar steady, or if your blood sugar significantly rises or falls out of your personal goal range. If it rises, youre not getting enough background/basal insulin. If it falls, then youre clearly ge Continue reading >>

Can You Do A 24h Fast With Type 1 Diabetes?

Can You Do A 24h Fast With Type 1 Diabetes?

Recently, I’ve read a lot about fasting, intermittent fasting and how to do it. Intermittent fasting can be done in many ways, depending on your preferences and lifestyle, and basically means to cut down on calories for a limited period of time, to give the body a chance to use its own reserves. This can be especially helpful if you’re trying to lose weight, or keep your blood glucose levels more stable. In some cases, these two are interlinked (read: Type 2 Diabetes). What is important to remember is to still eat enough calories. You just do it within a limited time window. Intermittent fasting makes your body use the energy (food) consumed more efficiently. And no, skipping a meal (or even two) won’t send your body into a crisis-starvation mode. That takes a good few days to happen. Intermittent fasting usually has numbers attached to it, depending on how long you’re fasting for; – 5:2 means you’re restricting calories on 2 days of the week, while eating “normal” the other 5. – 20:4 means you fast for 20 hours, eating one or more meals within the remaining 4 hours. – 24/36/48/72:0 simply means a 24/36/48/72 hour fast. – 16:8 means you eat your meals within an 8 hour time span, fasting the remaining 16 hours. I’ve done a 16:8 fast in my daily life for a few months now. For me it works really well, as it enables me to keep my blood glucose levels more stable for a longer period of time (which is really beneficial on so many levels!). And to be honest, in practice it only means skipping breakfast, and eating lunch and dinner as normal. This feels doable for me, and I can easily function without having breakfast every day. But, is a 24 hour possible to do with insulin dependent Type 1 Diabetes as your BFF? I decided to test it out, in the name of s Continue reading >>

Faux Fasting Diet Regenerates Pancreas To Reverse Diabetes

Faux Fasting Diet Regenerates Pancreas To Reverse Diabetes

Using stem cells to create insulin-producing beta cells that could be transplanted into diabetics is being investigated as a possible cure for type 1 diabetes and treatment for type 2, but new research suggests that a special diet could reprogram cells in the pancreas to do the same thing. Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) claim that a diet that mimics the effects of fasting spurs the growth of new insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreases of mice, essentially reversing the disease. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes center around insulin, or rather, the lack thereof. Put very simply, in type 1 diabetes, the body – specifically, the pancreas – stops producing insulin, while in type 2 diabetes, the body doesn't use insulin properly and eventually is unable to produce enough insulin to compensate. In both type 1 and late-stage type 2 diabetes, insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are lost, meaning many diabetics need to take insulin to replace what's not being made by the pancreas. Looking to discover the effects of a fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) on diabetes sufferers, USC researchers used mice with type 2 diabetes and another group in which type 1 diabetes had been simulated by giving them high doses of a drug to kill their insulin-producing beta cells. They found that mice in both groups – even those in the later stages of the disease – regained healthy insulin production, had a reduction in insulin resistance, and had more stable blood glucose levels. The researchers say the brief, periodic diet, which was designed to mimic the effects of a water-only fast, activated genes that are normally only switched on in the developing pancreases of fetal mice. These genes prompted the production of neurogenin-3 (Ngn3), a protein that le Continue reading >>

Safe Fasting With Diabetes

Safe Fasting With Diabetes

Whether you are honoring an ancient religious practice or heading to the lab for a fasting blood test, care is needed when missing meals with diabetes. Fasting can throw off the delicate balance of food, water, and blood glucose levels in potentially harmful ways. Fasting with diabetes poses significant risks, says Kathaleen Briggs Early, PhD, RD, CDE, of the Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences. Most of the research on fasting and diabetes surrounds Ramadan, the annual Islamic observance that requires fasting from sunrise to sundown for 29 or 30 days. A commentary published in 2010 in Diabetes Care developed in collaboration with the American Diabetes Association (ADA) focused on fasting during Ramadan, though many of the issues it raises are relevant to other types of fasting as well. It says that “most often, the medical recommendation will be not to undertake fasting” if you have diabetes. The paper acknowledges that fasting for spiritual reasons is a personal decision, but one that should include the guidance of a health care provider. A study found that 43 percent of people with type 1 diabetes and 79 percent of people with type 2 diabetes from 13 Islamic countries fast during Ramadan. With that reality, fasting safely becomes a priority for people with diabetes and their care providers. “Anybody with diabetes needs to first talk to their doctor about going on a fast,” says Early, and some experts recommend a pre-fasting medical assessment to help ensure safety. If you are considering fasting, talk to your health care provider about a plan that takes medication, nutrition, and hydration into account. Regularly monitoring blood glucose during fasting is key to avoiding health emergencies. Not eating when taking insulin or certain other diabetes Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Intermittent Fasting

Type 1 Diabetes And Intermittent Fasting

Are there any Type 1 diabetics doing intermittent fasting? If so could you please explain how it's working for you. I have had some success with blood sugar control while fasting. Specifically with using bulletproof coffee. Any insight would be greatly appreciated. Thanks! Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1diabetes

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1diabetes

Intermittent Fasting with Type 1Diabetes Intermittent Fasting. What is it and is it safe to do with type 1 diabetes? I was recently asked to post about intermittent fasting, so here goes nothing. **Please see excerpt at the bottom of this post if you have any doubts!One thing I want to clarify right off the bat, Ive never been a big breakfast eater, so Ive theoretically been intermittently fasting for quite a few years! Intermittent fasting is simply taking an extended period of time off from eating. Most of us do this each night for at least 8-12 hours. Important note: its still important to drink liquids like water, black coffee, or tea. The easiest way that Ive incorporated intermittent fasting into my lifestyle is by following the 16/8 rule. Basically, that boils down to 16 hours of fasting, and an 8 hour time frame to eat. For me, this is simple as I dont eat breakfast, I never really have. So I generally eat my first meal of the day at 12:30 (noon), my last meal at 18:00 (6pm), followed by fasting until lunchtime the next day. Although Dr. Bernstein does not support intermittent fasting, I still do it. It is not an extra choice that I make, I simply just do not eat breakfast (although I do on the weekends). What are the benefits of intermittent fasting? Stable blood sugar. For me, the benefits of fasting from my supper time meal until noon the next day are clear. My blood sugar is stable from 18:00 on day 1 until 12:30 on day 2, all without much effort. That means I eat between 12:30 and 18:00. That ranges from 16-18 hours of stable blood sugars. However, basal rates need to be checked to make sure that intermittent fasting is a safe option. Actually, running a basal test is also, in effect, fasting! Some other benefits that intermittent fasting is thought to pro Continue reading >>

5:2 Fasting Diet

5:2 Fasting Diet

Tweet The 5:2 intermittent fasting (IF) diet, more commonly referred to simply as the 5:2 diet, has become one of the more popular diet plan in recent years. Studies have shown that the diet helps with weight loss and may also reduce insulin resistance, both of which are of particular interest for many people with type 2 diabetes or borderline diabetes. One reason for the popularity of the diet is that it allows a certain amount of flexibility, in comparison to low calorie diets, on most days of the week. Theory behind the diet The idea of the diet is that short periods of fasting prompt the body to repair damage but not enter a starvation mode of conserving energy. Whilst the theory has yet to be conclusively proved, clinical studies have shown promising results for the diet, however it has only been examined over relatively short time spans, of less than a year. How the 5:2 diet works The 5:2 intermittent fasting diet is based on a simple idea. 5 days a week you stick to meeting the daily calorie intake advised for people of a healthy weight, that being: 2,500 kcal per day for men 2,000 kcal per day for women For the other 2 days each week, the diet stipulates that you have only around 25% of the values above, which is equal to: 600 kcal on these days for men 500 kcal on these days for women The fasting days can be taken at any time during the week as long as you do not take 2 fasting days consecutively. Benefits of the 5:2 diet Clinical studies have shown that the benefits of intermittent fasting are largely similar to those of a calorie restricted diets. The most commonly reported benefits among people from following the 5:2 diet: Research has shown that periods of fasting can help to improve life expectancy and decrease risks of diseases including nerve disorders, Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

The pancreas can be triggered to regenerate itself through a type of fasting diet, say US researchers. Restoring the function of the organ - which helps control blood sugar levels - reversed symptoms of diabetes in animal experiments. The study, published in the journal Cell, says the diet reboots the body. Experts said the findings were "potentially very exciting" as they could become a new treatment for the disease. People are advised not to try this without medical advice. In the experiments, mice were put on a modified form of the "fasting-mimicking diet". It is like the human form of the diet when people spend five days on a low-calorie, low-protein, low-carbohydrate but high unsaturated-fat diet. It resembles a vegan diet with nuts and soups, but with around 800 to 1,100 calories a day. Then they have 25 days eating what they want - so overall it mimics periods of feast and famine. Previous research has suggested it can slow the pace of ageing. Diabetes therapy? But animal experiments showed the diet regenerated a special type of cell in the pancreas called a beta cell. These are the cells that detect sugar in the blood and release the hormone insulin if it gets too high. Dr Valter Longo, from the University of Southern California, said: "Our conclusion is that by pushing the mice into an extreme state and then bringing them back - by starving them and then feeding them again - the cells in the pancreas are triggered to use some kind of developmental reprogramming that rebuilds the part of the organ that's no longer functioning." There were benefits in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the mouse experiments. Type 1 is caused by the immune system destroying beta cells and type 2 is largely caused by lifestyle and the body no longer responding to insulin. Further t Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

Intermittent Fasting With Type 1 Diabetes

If you’re into health and fitness you will have heard of Intermittent fasting at some point. Intermittent fasting is a dieting strategy used by athletes, celebrities, and high performance entrepreneurs to improve health, body composition, and improve mental clarity. Like any diet. Intermittent fasting works as long as you can sustain it. The concept behind Intermittent fasting is simple. It involves, Periodic bouts of fasting (i.e. going without food and calorie dense drinks) Which leads to reduced meal frequency and a smaller time frame to eat. This gives the dieter an opportunity to eat larger, more filling and satisfying meals in the specific limited time window. Since you can only eat so much at one meal, less calories are consumed. This helps prevent fat gain and speeds fat loss (provided your calories are set at the right point) – Read here on how to set a calorie baseline. Fasting windows can range from 4-12 hours or more – it all depends on which strategy suits you best (I cover all the different IF strategies inside the members site) The fasting periods increases counter regulatory hormones that liberate fuel for body stores for energy and also suppress appetite (win-win for fat loss) …But, what about people with diabetes? Q. Does it work for us? Q. Is it dangerous? Q. How do you manage insulin and blood glucose levels when you fast for hours? I discuss all of these questions and more in a personal video blog I recorded in Barcelona City earlier this year. Enjoy. PS. For those of that are control freaks about saturated fat and carbs in the diets of people with diabetes. Please do your homework and consider my context is different to yours. Continue reading >>

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

I spend a great deal of time in my clinic dealing with the problems of type 2 diabetes. But occasionally, people ask about type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well. The reason why it is so rare for me is that I treat adult patients where T2D outnumbers T1D by at least 9:1. I was looking at a fascinating study that my friend, Ivor Cummins (The Fat Emperor) had alerted me to a few months ago. Dr. Richard Bernstein is a fascinating character. He had developed T1D as a child of twelve and began to have complications by his 30s. He eventually went to medical school in order to learn better how to treat his own disease. Eventually he decided that the proper treatment was a low carb diet. This was in direct contradiction to the prevailing wisdom of the time (1990s), which included treating patients with insulin and a diet high in carbs. Dr. Bernstein opened up a controversial clinic to treat T1D with a low carb diet and also wrote several best selling books discussing the same topic. Over the years, it has proven to be a safe treatment for T1D. While there are few long-term studies, Dr. Bernstein himself is living proof of the low carb T1D paradigm. In many ways, T1D and T2D are exact opposites of each other. T1D typically affects children who are usually quite skinny. T2D typically affects adults who are usually quite obese. This is not absolute, and we are seeing much more T2D in children as their weights have increased. There are also cases of normal or even underweight patients with T2D. But in general, that is the case. T1D is the severe deficiency of insulin where as T2D is the severe excess of insulin. Nevertheless, people often treat both types of diabetes in the same manner. Both are treated with medications or insulin to keep blood glucose in acceptable levels. Wait, you might Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Prolonged Fasting.

Type 1 Diabetes And Prolonged Fasting.

Abstract AIMS: Fasting is common in several religions. The aims of this study were to determine if prolonged fasting (> 25 h) is safe for individuals with Type 1 diabetes and to identify factors associated with success. METHODS: Patients intending to fast were instructed on insulin dose adjustments, frequent glucose monitoring and when to terminate the fast using a standard protocol. Clinical and epidemiological factors were recorded and a comparison was made between successful and unsuccessful fasters. RESULTS: Of 56 subjects who intended to fast, 37 (65%) were successful. Individuals terminated their fast in the presence of either hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia and adherence to the protocol was high. There were no serious side-effects of fasting. Successful fasters had greater reductions in insulin dosage and higher HbA(1c). There were no differences between individuals taking intermittent insulin injections and those with continuous infusion pumps. CONCLUSIONS: Persons with Type 1 diabetes can participate safely in prolonged fasts provided they reduce their usual insulin dose significantly and adhere to guidelines regarding glucose monitoring and indications for terminating fasting. Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting: Not So Fast

Intermittent Fasting: Not So Fast

I’m sure that at least a few of you have heard or read about the latest trend in weight loss called “intermittent fasting.” The very word “fasting” is probably less than appealing, as it pretty much means you don’t eat or drink anything (except perhaps water) for a specified amount of time. Starvation is not exactly recommended among health professionals. But intermittent fasting is different. Is it something you should try? What is intermittent fasting, anyway? Intermittent fasting has been the talk of the town, so to speak, thanks to two recent books to hit the market: The Fast Diet by Dr. Michael Mosley and Mimi Spencer, and The Overnight Diet by Caroline Apovian, MD. Intermittent fasting essentially means that you skip a meal or severely restrict calories on certain days of the week with the intention of losing weight, controlling blood glucose, and/or decreasing heart disease risk. But on the other days of the week, you can pretty much eat what you want (within reason, of course). For many people, this concept sounds appealing. Limiting calories for a couple days a week doesn’t sound that bad if you can eat what you want the rest of the time. The Fast Diet, also called the The 5:2 Diet has you eat between 500 and 600 calories (women get 500 calories, men get 600 calories) for two days out of the week, spread over two meals of about 250 to 300 calories. These fast days should not be right in a row, and your food choices ideally should be more plant-based and emphasize protein. The premise is that after several hours of fasting, the body burns up its carbohydrate stores and shifts to burning fat for fuel. Many claim that intermittent fasting also helps to blunt appetite. The Overnight Diet emphasizes getting enough sleep; a lack of sleep can disrupt met Continue reading >>

Intermittent Dieting Has More Negatives Than Positives For Weight Loss.

Intermittent Dieting Has More Negatives Than Positives For Weight Loss.

The New Zealand researchers found the risk of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) was increased during the fasting days, as expected, but that the two intermittent fasting plans they tested still managed to produce weight loss and a drop in A1c levels, which is used to assess your risk for diabetes;1 the study is published in Diabetic Medicine. However, three endocrinology experts who reviewed and commented on the study for EndocrineWeb say other approaches are less hazardous and just as, or more effective in producing a healthy weight loss. Evaluating the Research on Intermittent Fasting Researchers from Wellington Hospital and the University of Otago in New Zealand defined intermittent fasting a bit differently than we do here in the US. Participants could eat whatever they wanted five days a week and then they were instructed to fast for the next two days.1 They had to do this for 12 weeks. In this study, the ''fast'' was actually a very low-calorie diet. Men could eat about 600 calories on a fast day and women were limited to 500 calories. At the start, 41 participants who had been living with type 2 diabetes (T2D) for years were randomly assigned to this 5:2 plan, as it is sometimes called. About half of them were instructed to fast for two days in a row during the week; the others were instructed to fast on non-consecutive days. In the consecutive fasting group, the average age was 62 years and their diabetes diagnosis had been made 13 years ago, on average. In the non-consecutive group, the average age was 58 years, and their diagnosis had been made 9 years earlier.1 The men and women were on a variety of medications, including insulin, sulfonylureas, metformin, and oral hypoglycemic agents.1 The researchers made adjustments to their medications in response to lower Continue reading >>

Introduction To Intermittent Fasting

Introduction To Intermittent Fasting

Editor’s Note: Cyrus Khambatta, PhD, lives with type 1 diabetes and coaches his clients in a non-traditional nutritional approach to diabetes management. The views expressed in this article are his own. Intermittent fasting is term coined by the research world that refers to an extended duration of minimal calorie intake. Believe it or not, humans are evolutionarily adapted to performing intermittent fasts – our ancestors performed extended fasts whenever food was unavailable, and feasted only when they could procure enough food to eat. However, in our modern world of abundance, deliberately fasting for an extended period of time is anything but “normal.” Fasting goes against every morsel of modern life, and is in direct opposition to the abundance-based food culture that we have worked so hard to create. In our world of fast food, on-demand food delivery and 24-hour convenience stores, choosing not to eat food can seem strange indeed. I spent my entire graduate career investigating the effects of intermittent fasting in rodents, in order to understand why calorie restriction and intermittent fasting are the gold standards for improving insulin sensitivity. As a result of this active body of research, tens of thousands of people across the world engage in intermittent fasting on a weekly basis, as a means of improving their body composition, losing fat mass, shedding pounds or observing a religious holiday. The research world has taken a large interest in calorie restriction and intermittent fasting, for the explicit purpose of identifying cellular mechanisms that may retard the aging process and promote excellent metabolic health. And in the process of studying intermittent fasting, researchers have uncovered a laundry list of health benefits that confuse even Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet Combined With Beta Cell Regeneration Might Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Fasting Diet Combined With Beta Cell Regeneration Might Reverse Type 1 Diabetes

Periodic fasting has long been demonstrated to have beneficial effects on autoimmune disorders, cancer prevention and treatments, cardiovascular disease, and a myriad of other ailments. This most recent paper by Cheng et al. might add the treatment of Type 1 diabetes to that list[1]. If successful in humans, it has the potential to reverse some or most of the loss of insulin-producing cells within the pancreas. Just as remarkable, the treatment itself is relatively straightforward, consisting of a regimented protocol of periodic fasting-like conditions. Generally speaking, Type 1 diabetes results from an autoimmune mediated depletion of insulin-secreting pancreatic beta islet cells. In contrast, Type 2 results from lower cellular sensitivity to insulin. Type 2 is primarily caused by environmental factors such as poor diet. The current medical approach to treating Type 1 diabetes is the periodic administration of insulin, usually through self-administered injections. Most new therapies focused on curing Type 1 diabetes are looking to repopulating beta islet cells through the use of reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, these approaches are not as simple as the method demonstrated by Cheng et al in this recent study. The treatment consists of a “fasting mimicking diet” (FMD), which for mice corresponds to 3-4 day cycles of a high-fat and low-calorie diet, maintained for at least a month, followed by refeeding. This was performed on transgenic diabetic mice and also normal mice that had their beta cells depleted through the administration of high doses of a toxic drug. Results were also repeated using human diabetic primary beta cells in culture. In this case, the treatment consisted of the addition of human serum from individuals undergoing FMD. Continue reading >>

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