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Insulinogenic Index Food List

Low-carb Theory Regarding Meat/insulin Is Flawed

Low-carb Theory Regarding Meat/insulin Is Flawed

Due to rising obesity and insulin resistance rates, low-carb and Paleo diets have become a popular approach to the growing population of overweight Americans. As stated by Dr. John McDougall, "Advocates of high-protein diets explain the reason people are fat is not because of the fat they eat, but because of hyperinsulinism and insulin resistance. Insulin encourages fat cells to store fat and prevents the release of fat from these cells. Therefore, high levels of insulin, known as hyperinsulinism, would be expected to promote obesity." One high-protein, low-carb website, emphasizes that carbohydrates are the "root of all evil" when it comes to weight loss and health. Consequently, the majority of calories from a low-carb diet come from meat, which contains protein and fat, but no carbs. Although carbs do make our insulin levels go up, Dr. Micheal Greger points out in the video above that scientists have known for over a half century that protein makes it go up as well. An "Insulin Index of Foods" was published in 1997 which listed 38 foods that produced higher insulin levels. This study and subsequent studies showed that any type of meat (beef, chicken, and pork) produced substantial insulin secretion. "In fact meat protein causes as much insulin release as pure sugar." Meat raised insulin levels higher than a large apple, a cup of oatmeal, a cup and a half of white flour pasta. Below we've highlighted a few points from the Insulin Index: "Some of the protein-rich foods (beef, cheese, eggs) had larger insulin responses per gram than did many of the foods consisting predominately of carbohydrate." "Carbohydrate is not the only stimulus for insulin secretion." Protein-rich foods can also stimulate insulin secretion without increasing blood glucose concentrations. "A low-f Continue reading >>

Insulinogenic Properties Of Different Types Of Foods

Insulinogenic Properties Of Different Types Of Foods

Does anyone have any good lists or references to the different levels of insulin released from various types of food? I know that sugar and dairy have higher responses than say protein, but I am under the impression that different types of protein trigger different levels of insulin. My goal is to create a list of the amount of insulin released from various food groups in general, and within that, the amount of insulin released by each type, ie. the amount of insulin released in response to glucose, fructose, lactose, etc.; or beef, chicken, liver etc.; or butter, cream, CO, etc. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Hope that makes sense. Continue reading >>

Should We Eat Based On Food Indexes?

Should We Eat Based On Food Indexes?

A short while ago, I did a post on insulin and body fat (Insulin, Body Fat and You). As I pointed out in that post, among insulin’s many roles is that it serves as a pro-storage hormone that promotes the formation of new tissue. Whenever you eat foods that provokes a substantial insulin release from your pancreas, your body is signaled to build either fat, muscle or both. Obviously, the more structured resistance training you follow and the better you time your insulin spikes, the better able you are to use insulin’s mass building effects for muscle growth and not fat. Sadly, the common eating pattern in North America is to eat insulin producing foods without much foresight, which is part of the reason we battle the bulge. Wild swings in insulin also tend to provoke increased hunger, which is not good if you are trying to control intake and by extension, body weight. I think it goes without saying that teaching people how to avoid crazy swings in insulin is a good thing. In the 1980’s, David Jenkins from The University of Toronto, was the first to quantify how quickly food is digested and raises blood sugar. His system became known as the glycemic index (GI). The creation of the glycemic index was a quantum leap forward in highlighting how seemingly similar foods can have wildly different biochemical properties in our bodies. In fact, the GI was such a popular and powerful idea that it spawned an entire series of diet books and programs, books that still can be found in bookstores today. Unfortunately, subsequent research has shown us that are several major problems with basing food choices solely off the glycemic index. One of the major problems is that the glycemic index was derived studying foods in isolation. In reality, we typically eat mix-meals which throws Continue reading >>

Insulin Index

Insulin Index

The Insulin Index of a food represents how much it elevates the concentration of insulin in the blood during the two-hour period after the food is ingested. The index is similar to the Glycemic Index (GI) and Glycemic Load (GL), but rather than relying on blood glucose levels, the Insulin Index is based upon blood insulin levels. The Insulin Index represents a comparison of food portions with equal overall caloric content (250 kcal or 1000 kJ), while GI represents a comparison of portions with equal digestible carbohydrate content (typically 50 g) and the GL represents portions of a typical serving size for various foods. The Insulin Index can be more useful than either the Glycemic Index or the Glycemic Load because certain foods (e.g., lean meats and proteins) cause an insulin response despite there being no carbohydrates present, and some foods cause a disproportionate insulin response relative to their carbohydrate load. Holt et al.[1] have noted that the glucose and insulin scores of most foods are highly correlated,[2] but high-protein foods and bakery products that are rich in fat and refined carbohydrates "elicit insulin responses that were disproportionately higher than their glycemic responses." They also conclude that insulin indices may be useful for dietary management and avoidance of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia. Explanation of Index[edit] The Insulin Index is not the same as a glycemic index (GI), which is based exclusively on the digestible carbohydrate content of a food, and represents a comparison of foods in amounts with equal digestible carbohydrate content (typically 50 g). The insulin index compares foods in amounts with equal overall caloric content (250 kcal or 1000 kJ). Insulin indexes are scaled relative to white b Continue reading >>

Glycemic Index List Of Foods

Glycemic Index List Of Foods

A printable glycemic index list of foods for weight management can guide your food choices and menu planning. When you learn a few principles of low glycemic eating you will find that you can easily follow the low glycemic way of eating. It's the carbohydrate foods that affect blood sugar. Fats and protein do not. It's important to eat low glycemic carbs that are high in fiber and nutrients and avoid the starchy, more processed high glycemic carbohydrate foods. all white foods including breads, pastries, muffins, doughnuts, bagels, biscuits, corn bread, croissants, baguettes, hamburger and hot dog buns, pancakes, most commercial breakfast cereals, refined flour crackers, cakes and refined tortillas. all canned fruit, jams, jellies containing high fructose corn syrup and other high glycemic additives, most commercial brands peanut butter (use ones that contain only nuts,) soft drinks, box drinks and other commercial fruit drinks, sports drinks, gatorade and fruit juices. white potatoes, potato chips, white rice, processed foods in boxes, any foods with added sugar, any foods with high fructose corn syrup, frozen desserts, ice cream, candy, sugary snacks. watermelon, bananas, overly ripe fruit, dates, prunes, raisins, pineapple. beets, carrots, corn, parsnips. sweetened almond, soy and coconut milks. These foods stimulate fat-storage and cause food cravings. Let the printable list of low glycemic foods guide your way of eating. Low glycemic foods are in their natural state. Plan your meals around fresh vegetables and fruits. Look at what's in season where you live if possible and let those foods dictate your menus for the week. They are foods for diabetic diets as well as to lose fat! When it comes to buying foods in a box or jar you will have to be good at reading labels Continue reading >>

List Of Foods That Do Not Cause Insulin Release

List Of Foods That Do Not Cause Insulin Release

Contrary to what many believe, carbohydrates -- that is, sugar and starch -- are not the only macronutrient that stimulates the release of insulin, the hormone responsible for clearing excess glucose from the bloodstream and packing it, in the form of fatty triglycerides, into fat cells. Protein also stimulates insulin release. Dietary fat is the only one of the three macronutrients that does not cause insulin release. Therefore, food that is made up entirely of, or predominantly of, fat is the only type that does not cause insulin release. Note that this categorization does not apply to type I diabetics, who are not able to produce insulin at all. Video of the Day Olive Oil and Other Plant-Derived Oils Oil is pure plant-source fat, whether it is olive, canola, sunflower, sesame, peanut, coconut, soy or corn. One ounce of oil is about 28 grams of fat because 1 ounce converts to about 28 grams in the metric system. It makes no difference to this equation whether the fat is saturated or unsaturated. It is probably more helpful, and certainly more accurate, to think of oil as being fat, rather than containing fat. Dietary fat by itself, including these foods, does not cause insulin release. Two tbsp. butter, about 1 ounce, contain 22 grams of fat and no carbohydrates or protein. The other 6 grams in the 28 grams ounces of butter is made up mostly of water, along with a small amount of milk solids. Butter eaten by itself does not stimulate the release of insulin. Nearly all of cream cheese's macronutrient value is in fat, as 1 ounce of cream cheese contains 9 grams of fat, but only 1 gram of carbs and 2 grams protein. That would mean that it stimulates little insulin release. One ounce of macadamia nuts contains 21grams fat, with only 4 grams carbohydrate and 2 grams protei Continue reading >>

The Food Insulin Index Trumps Carb Counting

The Food Insulin Index Trumps Carb Counting

The new food insulin index can work much better than carbohydrate counting, which for years has been considered to be the gold standard for improving glycemic control. For those of us who have diabetes, this index is also a more comprehensive guide to blood sugar control than the glycemic index. For years the limitation of the food insulin index (also known as just the insulin index) was the few foods tested. The original 1997 study, which in 2003 I reviewed in detail for the first time in the article “Insulin Index”on my personal website, tested only 38 foods. We had to wait until 2011 for the index to grow to about 120 foods in “Prediction of postprandial glycemia and insulinemia in lean, young, healthy adults.” I reviewed that study here at “Manage Your Blood Sugar Better with the Insulin Index.” Now, a much more extensive study of the food insulin index is available, and it is further expanded to include 26 more tested foods. The study, titled “Clinical Application of the Food Insulin Index to Diabetes Mellitus,” is Kirstine Bell’s Ph.D. dissertation from Australia’s University of Sydney. The entire 282-page dissertation plus a dozen appendices is free online. These are the foods most recently tested for their food insulin index: It’s no coincidence that Kirstine Bell’s Ph.D. comes from the University of Sydney. That’s where Professor Jennie Brand-Miller was Bell’s supervisor has led much of the world’s research of both the insulin and glycemic indexes for more than two decades. Carb Counting Doesn’t Help One of the most significant findings to come out of Bell’s work is that carbohydrate counting simply doesn’t work well enough. She led a systematic review and meta-analysis of the “Efficacy of carbohydrate counting in type 1 di Continue reading >>

Reader Response: Insulin Index

Reader Response: Insulin Index

Reader Pete asked for some thoughts on the “Insulin Index,” a measurement chart similar to the glycemic index. While the glycemic index calculates the relative blood sugar rise induced by given foods, the insulin index evaluates the insulin response generated by 38 different foods. The insulin index, which first made its appearance in a 1997 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition article, was primarily the creation of Susanne Holt, a graduate student at the time and now a doctor. Interestingly, Holt, her supervisory co-authors, or other researchers haven’t chosen to conduct further research to update the “preliminary” results of their insulin index study since its creation eleven years ago now. While Holt and her co-authors found a high correlation between glycemic index and insulin index measurements, they stumbled upon an intriguing exception. High protein, virtually no-carb foods like meat and eggs, while low on the glycemic index, measured high on the insulin index. In other words, while the meat and eggs didn’t cause a spike in blood sugar the way most carbohydrates do, they did result in an unexpectedly significant rise in insulin. (Baked goods, with their high levels of refined carbs, elicited a very high rise in insulin as well. Of course, this comes as less of a surprise.) Obviously, the index has some eyebrow-raising potential, especially in those of us who choose a high protein diet. But there’s more to the story here. First off, let’s remember that the protein-rich foods didn’t result in the physical stress of blood sugar spikes. But what about that rise in insulin? Why? Should I be concerned about that omelet I ate for breakfast? Insulin, in and of itself, is a good and necessary thing. It promotes the storage of nutrients after all. In ou Continue reading >>

The Latest Food Insulin Index Data

The Latest Food Insulin Index Data

Understanding the factors that our requirement for insulin is critical to good managing and avoiding diabetes and maintaining good metabolic health. Living with someone who has Type 1 Diabetes for fifteen years I’ve gained an intimate understanding of how different foods will take your blood glucose levels on a wild ride. In this article, I will share my insights from the latest food insulin index data and how we can apply it to optimise our insulin and blood glucose response to the food we eat. Since she was ten, my wife Monica’s had to manually manage her blood sugars as they swing up with food and then drop again when she injects insulin. High blood glucose levels make her feel “yucky”. Plummeting blood glucose levels due to the mega doses of insulin don’t feel good either. Low blood glucose levels drive you to eat until you feel good again. This wild blood glucose roller coaster ride leaves you exhausted. If you have diabetes, you are likely familiar with this feeling. The dietary advice she received over the past three decades living with Type 1 has been sketchy at best. When she was first diagnosed, Monica tells the story of being made to eat so much high carb food that she hid it in the pot plants in her hospital room. When we decided we wanted to have kids, we found a great doctor who helped us to understand how to match insulin with carbs, but moderating the input of carbohydrate that necessitates insulin was never mentioned by physicians, endocrinologists or diabetes educators. Then in early 2014, I came across Jason Fung’s Aetiology of Obesity series on YouTube where he discussed the food insulin index research that had been carried out at the University of Sydney which seemed to provide more insight into our insulin response to food. I hoped that Continue reading >>

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