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Insulin Resistance Diet

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

We recently touched on how you can use the ketogenic diet to control symptoms of diabetes such as elevated glucose and triglycerides. In this article, we examine research showing the impact that the ketogenic diet has on levels of the hormone insulin, a key regulator of blood sugar in the body. What is Insulin’s Role in the Body? Before we look at the research, we need to know our main players. Insulin is a protein-based hormone produced by beta-cells located in the pancreas. The pancreas, which is located under the stomach, also produces enzymes that aid with digestion. Insulin’s primary purpose is to regulate the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates. The digestive system breaks down carbohydrates, such as sugars and starches, into a molecule called glucose. This compound can be used by cells to produce energy through a process called cellular respiration. Insulin allows cells in the body absorb glucose, ultimately lowering levels of glucose in the blood stream. After a meal is consumed, blood glucose levels increase and the pancreas responds by releasing insulin into the blood. Insulin assists fat, liver, and muscle cells absorb glucose from the blood, resulting in lower levels of blood glucose. Insulin stimulates liver and muscle tissues to store excess glucose as a molecule called glycogen and also reduces glucose production by the liver. When blood sugar is low, the hormone glucagon (produced by alpha-cells in the pancreas) stimulate cells to break down glycogen into glucose that is subsequently released into the blood stream. In healthy people who do not have type II diabetes, these functions allow levels of blood glucose and insulin to stay in a normal range. What Is Insulin Resistance and Why Is It a Problem? Unfortunately, for many Americans and other peopl Continue reading >>

Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance

Prediabetes & Insulin Resistance

What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach. The pancreas contains clusters of cells called islets. Beta cells within the islets make insulin and release it into the blood. Insulin plays a major role in metabolism—the way the body uses digested food for energy. The digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates—sugars and starches found in many foods—into glucose. Glucose is a form of sugar that enters the bloodstream. With the help of insulin, cells throughout the body absorb glucose and use it for energy. Insulin's Role in Blood Glucose Control When blood glucose levels rise after a meal, the pancreas releases insulin into the blood. Insulin and glucose then travel in the blood to cells throughout the body. Insulin helps muscle, fat, and liver cells absorb glucose from the bloodstream, lowering blood glucose levels. Insulin stimulates the liver and muscle tissue to store excess glucose. The stored form of glucose is called glycogen. Insulin also lowers blood glucose levels by reducing glucose production in the liver. In a healthy person, these functions allow blood glucose and insulin levels to remain in the normal range. What happens with insulin resistance? In insulin resistance, muscle, fat, and liver cells do not respond properly to insulin and thus cannot easily absorb glucose from the bloodstream. As a result, the body needs higher levels of insulin to help glucose enter cells. The beta cells in the pancreas try to keep up with this increased demand for insulin by producing more. As long as the beta cells are able to produce enough insulin to overcome the insulin resistance, blood glucose levels stay in the healthy range. Over time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes and prediabetes because the bet Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Diet Plan

Insulin Resistance Diet Plan

If you're carrying extra weight and not getting sufficient exercise, you may be at risk of insulin resistance, which is when your body does not effectively use the insulin it produces. Most people who have insulin resistance do not know they have it, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disorders; if left untreated, it can ultimately lead to type 2 diabetes. Losing weight and following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or DASH diet, may help reverse insulin resistance. Video of the Day When trying to lose weight to reverse insulin resistance, you must eat fewer calories than you currently consume. Use an online food diary to help you count your usual calorie intake. Decreasing your daily intake by 500 calories produces a 1-pound weekly weight loss. Grains are an important source of energy on your diet plan. How much you need to eat each day depends on your weight loss calorie needs. For a 1,600- to 2,000-calorie diet, aim for six to eight servings a day. Eat fewer servings if you need fewer calories. A grain serving includes one slice of bread or 1/2 cup of cooked rice. Most of your grains should come from whole grains, such as whole-grain breads and cereals, to maximize nutrient and fiber intake. Fruits and vegetables are filling and low in calories. On your insulin resistance diet plan, eat three to five servings of vegetables each day and four to five servings of fruit. A vegetable serving is equal to 1 cup of raw vegetables or 1/2-cup cooked, while a serving of fruit is equal to a medium piece of whole fruit or 1/2 cup of fresh cut fruit. Protein choices on your DASH diet for insulin resistance include poultry, fish and lean red meat. Choosing leaner sources of protein reduces your intake of calories and saturated fat. Continue reading >>

Here's What Just One Day Of Binge Eating Does To Your Body

Here's What Just One Day Of Binge Eating Does To Your Body

If you eat healthy six days out of the week, you’re allowed to go crazy on the seventh, right? Not exactly: Just one day of binge eating on high fat food can mess with your body, a new study in the journal Nutrients suggests. In the study, researchers recruited 15 healthy volunteers and gave them a pretty pleasant task: For one day, eat a diet full of tasty, high fat foods—like sausage, bacon, fried eggs, burgers, and cheesecake—totaling 78 percent more total calories than their normal daily requirement. Then, they measured their blood sugar readings and compared it to their levels before their feast. The results? One day of high-fat bingeing decreased their whole-body insulin sensitivity by 28 percent. Insulin sensitivity refers to how sensitively your body reacts to insulin, a hormone that allows your cells to absorb blood sugar from the blood and use it for energy. If your insulin sensitivity is diminished, your body may need more and more insulin to help absorb the blood sugar. Eventually, your pancreas may be unable to crank out enough insulin to complete the task, so the excess blood sugar will begin to build up in your blood stream. That can lead to prediabetes or diabetes down the line. This findings of this study show that just one day of overeating fatty foods can mess with your body’s ability to process sugar effectively. “Sustained over-production of insulin—by the pancreas—can lead to pancreatic dysfunction and an inability to produce insulin when it is needed,” study author Carl Hulston said in a statement. Now, there are a couple of caveats: First, because of how the study was designed, the researchers can’t tell for sure what part of the diet was the problem. Was it the greater number of calories overall? The higher percentage of fats? Continue reading >>

Therapeutic Diet For Insulin Resistance

Therapeutic Diet For Insulin Resistance

Home Dr. Rachelle S. Bradley Solutions Counseling Naturopathic Medicine Homeopathy Self-care Nutrition Prevention & Healing Policies/Fees/Contact Links Events/Lectures Return to the Nutrition main page Therapeutic Diet for Insulin Resistance This moderate-carbohydrate, moderate-protein and moderate-fat diet is focused on real foods as the solution to Insulin Resistance Syndrome (IR), sometimes called Metabolic Syndrome, Syndrome X, or pre-diabetes. It is mainly refined foods, especially sweets and refined flour products, combined with deficient exercise that gets people into trouble. A program based on whole foods, not more refined food products, is the best long-term solution in IR, and a host of other health problems as well. It is also recommended to take a good multiple vitamin/mineral. Based on human evolutionary history and physiology this should be your most natural and optimal diet. It reflects what our Paleolithic ancestors (i.e., before agriculture) evolved eating over a million years and, as such, has the highest potential of supporting healing and preventing disease. In addition, this diet is naturally alkalizing, which is considered by some people to be healthier than the typical American acidifying diet. If you need more recipe support than this handout provides, a popular diet that is close to this IR diet is The South Beach Diet by Arthur Agatston, M.D. We also recommended reading The Paleo Diet by Loren Cordain, Ph.D. It gives a good background on the problems of the modern diet and the advantages of the Paleolithic diet. However, use this handout as your main reference and refer to these books only for background and recipes. It will take at least 2 to 3 months to reestablish normal insulin sensitivity. If there is severe IR or obesity it could take mu Continue reading >>

How To Diagnose, Prevent And Treat Insulin Resistance [infographic]

How To Diagnose, Prevent And Treat Insulin Resistance [infographic]

What You Need to Know about Sugar and Insulin Resistance In today’s post our fructose journey comes to a sweet conclusion, with answers to the questions that really matter: How much sugar is safe for you to eat? How much fructose and glucose is in your favorite foods, drinks, and sweeteners? How can you tell if you have insulin resistance (damaged carbohydrate metabolism)? What are some of the common clues? What tests can you ask your doctor to run? What can you do to take control of your health? I’ve included an infographic of 10 simple strategies that go beyond cutting added sugars, to improve your metabolism and prevent/treat common diseases. Earlier in this series we discovered that fructose is not scarier than glucose. In fact, consuming too much glucose is even riskier than consuming too much fructose because glucose is a more powerful trigger for “insulin resistance.” It is excess glucose that raises blood sugar and insulin levels, turns off fat burning, shifts fat and cholesterol production into overdrive, feeds cancer cells, and sets the stage for inflammation throughout the body.1) People with insulin resistance are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes in the future, so insulin resistance is often referred to as “pre-diabetes.” So, should you focus on reducing the amount of glucose-y food you eat and lean towards fructose-y foods instead? Good luck with that…people talk about fructose as though it’s a separate sugar from glucose, but practically speaking, it’s not. In real foods, fructose never exists alone—wherever fructose is, glucose is right there beside it, so it’s not easy to separate them in your diet. Even the vast majority of manufactured foods and beverages contain a mixture of fructose and glucose, as you’ll see in the Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

What is insulin resistance? Insulin is a hormone that facilitates the transport of blood sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream into cells throughout the body for use as fuel. In response to the normal increase in blood sugar after a meal, the pancreas secretes insulin into the bloodstream. With insulin resistance, the normal amount of insulin secreted is not sufficient to move glucose into the cells – thus the cells are said to be “resistant” to the action of insulin. To compensate, the pancreas secretes insulin in ever-increasing amounts to maintain fairly adequate blood-sugar movement into cells and a normal blood-sugar level. What are some insulin resistance symptoms? There are usually no obvious, outward signs of insulin resistance. However, when you are severely insulin resistant, dark patches of skin called acanthosis nigricans can develop on the back of the neck. Sometimes a dark ring forms around the neck. These dark patches can also occur on the elbows, knees, knuckles and armpits. More importantly, insulin has less visible effects on metabolic reactions throughout the body, including converting calories into fat. Insulin resistance influences the liver enzymes that produce cholesterol and acts on the kidneys (which can contribute to high blood pressure). High insulin levels also have a role in the process that regulates inflammation. In time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes, itself a risk factor for heart disease. Insulin resistance can be diagnosed with blood tests that show low levels of HDL cholesterol (the “good” cholesterol), a high triglyceride level, a high fasting insulin level or a high uric acid level. What are the causes of insulin resistance? There are genetic factors that can contribute to the development of insulin resista Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Quiz

Insulin Resistance Quiz

According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than 86 million Americans suffer from metabolic syndrome (often referred to as pre-diabetes). Pre-diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance that develops when the body has trouble using the insulin that it produces. The more severe your insulin resistance, the greater your chance of developing diabetes and heart disease. Our Insulin Resistance Calculator helps determine your extent of insulin resistance, and also provides clinically-based dietary recommendations that may help reduce your levels of insulin resistance. Continue reading >>

Metabolomic Analysis Of Insulin Resistance Across Different Mouse Strains And Diets

Metabolomic Analysis Of Insulin Resistance Across Different Mouse Strains And Diets

Abstract Insulin resistance is a major risk factor for many diseases. However, its underlying mechanism remains unclear in part because it is triggered by a complex relationship between multiple factors including genes and the environment. Here we used metabolomics combined with computational methods to identify factors that classified insulin resistance across individual mice derived from three different mouse strains fed two different diets. Three inbred ILSXISS strains were fed high fat or chow diets and subjected to metabolic phenotyping and metabolomics analysis of skeletal muscle. There was significant metabolic heterogeneity between strains, diet and individual animals. Distinct metabolites were changed with insulin resistance, diet and between strains. Computational analysis revealed 113 metabolites that were correlated with metabolic phenotypes. Using these 113 metabolites, combined with machine learning to segregate mice based on insulin sensitivity we identified C22:1-CoA, C2-carnitine and C16-ceramide as the best classifiers. Strikingly, when these three metabolites were combined into one signature, they classified mice based on insulin sensitivity more accurately than each metabolite on its own or other published metabolic signatures. Furthermore, C22:1-CoA, was 2.3-fold higher in insulin resistant mice and correlated significantly with insulin resistance. We have identified a metabolomic signature comprised of three functionally unrelated metabolites that accurately predicts whole body insulin sensitivity across three mouse strains. These data indicate the power of simultaneous analysis of individual, genetic and environmental variance in mice for identifying novel factors that accurately predict metabolic phenotypes like whole body insulin sensitivity. Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

A A A What is Insulin Resistance? Insulin is a hormone that is produced by the beta cells found in the pancreas. Insulin is an important hormone that has many actions within the body including those involved in metabolism (control) of carbohydrates (sugars and starches), lipids (fats), and proteins. When insulin resistance develops, tissues in the body – particularly muscle and fat tissues- do not respond appropriately to insulin. In fact, more insulin is needed to elicit the same response from these tissues. As a result, higher levels of insulin are needed in order for insulin to continue to exert its physiologic effect. There are many causes of insulin resistance, including a strong association with genetics (an inherited component). In addition, insulin resistance is often associated with the following conditions: infection or severe illness, the metabolic syndrome, obesity, pregnancy, steroid use and with other medications, and Aside from the well known association of insulin resistance with the metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity, elevated cholesterol levels, and high blood pressure; there are several other medical conditions that are associated with insulin resistance specifically. While the associations are clear, whether insulin resistance is the cause of these conditions is not yet known. While insulin resistance is usually seen long before diabetes develops, in cases in which medical attention has lapsed, insulin resistance can present as type 2 diabetes. The accumulation of fat in the liver is a manifestation of the disordered control of lipids that occurs with insulin resistance. The extent of liver damage can range from mild to severe. Newer evidence suggests that fatty liver may even lead to cirrhosis of the liver, and possibly liver cancer. Insulin re Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

Tweet Insulin resistance is the name given to when cells of the body don’t respond properly to the hormone insulin. Insulin resistance is the driving factor that leads to type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes and prediabetes. Insulin resistance is closely associated with obesity; however, it is possible to be insulin resistant without being overweight or obese. Modern research has shown that insulin resistance can be combatted by treatment methods that reduce how much insulin the body is producing or taking via insulin injections or insulin pumps. Reducing insulin resistance can be achieved by following low-carbohydrate and ketogenic diets. What is insulin resistance? The role of insulin is to allow cells of the body to take in glucose to be used as fuel or stored as body fat. [282] It also means that glucose is more likely to build up in the blood and this can lead to too high blood sugar levels. When the body becomes resistant to insulin, it tries to cope by producing more insulin. People with insulin resistance are often producing too more insulin than healthy people. Producing too much insulin is known as hyperinsulinemia. Symptoms of insulin resistance Initially, insulin resistance presents no symptoms. The symptoms only start to appear once it leads to secondary effects such as higher blood sugar levels. When this happens, the symptoms may include: Lethargy (tiredness) Hunger Difficulty concentrating (brain fog) Other signs that often appear in people with insulin resistance include: Weight gain around the middle (belly fat) High blood pressure High cholesterol levels If insulin resistance develops into prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, the symptoms will include increased blood glucose levels and more of the classic symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Causes of insulin r Continue reading >>

Breakfast Ideas For The Insulin Resistant

Breakfast Ideas For The Insulin Resistant

Insulin resistance is a condition in which your cells become unable to absorb glucose because they no longer respond to the presence of insulin. As a result, your blood sugar levels rise and your risk for developing Type 2 diabetes increases. If you are insulin resistant, alter your diet to prevent spikes in blood sugar that can contribute to insulin resistance. A variety of healthy and delicious breakfast options can fuel your morning without raising your blood sugar to unhealthy levels. Eggs Eggs are a classic morning food that offer a breakfast-perfect blend of nutritional value, digestibility and convenience. Their high-protein content and virtually no sugar make eggs an ideal option for anyone with insulin resistance. You can cook eggs in many ways from simple to elaborate. Boil them ahead of time for a quick and portable meal or snack, whip them up quickly for scrambled or fried eggs or for the ultimate in modern convenience, poach your eggs in a microwave egg poacher. If your cholesterol level runs high and your doctor has advised you to limit or avoid eggs, use egg whites or egg substitutes. Yogurt Plain yogurt is a smooth, creamy treat for any meal and an ideal low-sugar breakfast food. Pair your yogurt with a sprinkle of nuts or sunflower seeds for added flavor and texture. Though the process of yogurt-making eliminates much of the lactose -- the natural sugar in milk -- some lactose remains. Plain yogurt contains about 17 grams of sugar per cup, fruited yogurt contains up to 40 grams of sugar per cup and yogurt sweetened with artificial sweetener contains 19 grams of sugar per cup. Ask your doctor or nutritionist about including yogurt in your diet. If you use a blood-sugar monitor, experiment to find out how plain yogurt affects your blood sugar and how much Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For Insulin Resistance

Diet Tips For Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance increases your risk for developing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. But a diagnosis of insulin resistance is only a warning sign. You may be able to prevent diabetes with healthy lifestyle choices, including regular exercise and eating a balanced diet. Generally, it’s best to choose whole, unprocessed foods and avoid highly processed and prepared foods. Foods that are highly processed, such as white breads, pastas, rice, and soda, digest very quickly and spike blood sugar levels. This puts extra stress on the pancreas, which makes the hormone insulin. Saturated fats have also been associated with insulin resistance. Healthy, unsaturated fats, such as those recommended below, are a better choice. Eating high-fiber foods and mixed meals, not just carbohydrates alone, can help slow digestion and take pressure off the pancreas. Here are some foods that you can mix and match to create satisfying but healthy dishes for any meal. Vegetables Vegetables are low in calories and high in fiber, making them an ideal food for people trying to manage their blood sugar. The best options are fresh, low-sodium canned, and frozen vegetables. Healthy options include tomatoes, spinach, colorful peppers, greens such as spinach. collard, and kale, and cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts. Vegetable juices may seem healthy, but they tend to be not as filling and aren’t as fibrous as fresh vegetables. Fruits Munch on some fruit for fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Choose fresh or frozen fruits. Canned varieties without added sugars are fine in a pinch, but they don’t have the fiber that fresh and frozen fruits do since the skins are removed. Go for fruits that are higher in fiber, such as apples, berries, bananas, grapes, plums, and p Continue reading >>

10 Diet Tips To Fight Insulin Resistance

10 Diet Tips To Fight Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance is very commonly seen in people who have diabetes, Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or are obese. And there is something that links all these diseases together — a poor diet. Insulin resistance is a lifestylecondition, and your diet has a huge role to play here. In fact, changing your diet is one of the single-most effective ways to reverse insulin resistance, especially when it’s coupled with regular exercise, a good sleep hygiene and stress management. The right diet for insulin resistance can alter insulin signaling pathways to improve blood sugar control, help you lose weight, and also make you feel more energetic. 10 Principles For The Best Diet For Insulin Resistance Fill Up On Whole Foods The best diet for insulin resistance is one that focuses on eating a variety of raw, whole foods. If the food comes in a ready-to-eat packet, it has no business being on your plate! Processed foods and sugars are the WORST enemies of insulin resistance. They turn into simple sugars readily as they are highly processed to remove healthy fiber, making them digest rather quickly. Plus they are very high in calories, devoid of healthy nutrients, and can aid inflammation. Instead, choose to eat more fresh vegetables, fruits, lean cuts of meat, wild-caught fish, healthy fats, nuts, and seeds. In fact, a Mediterranean diet can improve insulin sensitivity and heart health, as it focuses on whole foods – plenty of fruits and vegetables, along with quality fats and proteins. Cut Back On Carbohydrates All carbohydrates get broken down into sugars, which only worsen your insulin resistance. This is why it’s a good idea to cut back on your intake of carbohydrates, particularly of refined carbs. Refined carbohydrates with a high glycemic index are best avoided, as t Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

What is Insulin? Insulin is a fat storing blood sugar regulating master hormone that is involved in multiple body functions beyond its metabolic role. A few examples include triglyceride and fat synthesis, electrolyte balance of sodium and potassium, feeding behaviors and cognitive and emotional brain function. What is Insulin Resistance? Insulin resistance (IR), might also known as syndrome X or metabolic syndrome, is a cluster of symptoms (weight gain, cravings and increased appetite, skin tags, gum disease, low energy) and health risk factors (abnormal, not necessarily high, blood sugar, high triglycerides and cholesterol, polycystic ovarian syndrome, high blood pressure) all resulting from abnormal insulin function. What is important to know is that just like diabetes, with IR there may be no symptoms at all. Insulin resistance is an early-stage in Type 2 diabetes but not everyone with IR will develop diabetes. Fifty percent of those with essential hypertension are insulin resistant. (1). How Many People Are Affected by Insulin Resistance? IR is more common than you think, in the United States, an estimated 60 to 70 million individuals are affected by insulin resistance, that’s 1 out of 4 people. More than 40% of individuals older than 50 years may be at risk for insulin resistance; however, it can affect anyone at any age (2) especially overweight children and adolescents regardless of race. You can connect with this link to see a table of the prevalence of insulin resistance by country. Causes of Insulin Resistance There are several causes of insulin resistance: Genetics and family history of diabetes, pre-diabetes Ethnic origin (African American, Alaska Native, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino, or Pacific Islander American) Age Hormone malfuncti Continue reading >>

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