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Importance Of Diabetic Diet Compliance

Nutritional Considerations In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Nutritional Considerations In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

INTRODUCTION Diet is one of the most important behavioral aspects of diabetes treatment. Basic principles of nutritional management, however, are often poorly understood by both clinicians and their patients. The role of nutrition and the development of a medical nutrition therapy (MNT) plan for a patient with type 2 diabetes are discussed here. Nutrition for patients with type 1 diabetes, as well as diets for the prevention of diabetes and for weight loss in general, are discussed separately. GOALS OF NUTRITIONAL THERAPY The nutrition prescription for patients with type 2 diabetes should optimally manage the "ABCs" of diabetes control: glycated hemoglobin (A1C), blood pressure, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. The prescription must be tailored for the individual patient to further address existing or at-risk complications related to diabetes or other concomitant conditions. Continue reading >>

Adherence To Therapies In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Adherence To Therapies In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Introduction The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is increasing globally and has become a major public health problem. In the USA, a study of 17,306 people over 20 years of age showed that those diagnosed with diabetes increased significantly from 6.5% in the 1999–2002 period to 7.8% in 2003–2006 [1]. In 2011, 366 million people worldwide had diabetes and it is predicted that by 2030, this figure will be 552 million [2]. Diabetes is currently among the top five causes of death in most high-income countries and resulted in 4.6 million deaths globally in 2011. The majority of cases of diabetes mellitus are type 2, and the greatest numbers of people with this disease are aged from 40 to 59 years [2]. The increase in type 2 diabetes is associated with obesity, hypertension, and an increasingly elderly population. Over the last 18 years in the USA, the proportion of adults in the age group 40–74 years with a body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 has increased from 28% to 36%, while the proportion undergoing physical activity 12 times a month or more has decreased from 53% to 43%, exacerbating the obesity problem [3]. However, despite strong clinical recommendations for individuals with a history of diabetes to adopt a healthier lifestyle, adherence to improved diet and exercise is poor [3]. Although type 2 diabetes usually occurs in people over the age of 40 years, it is becoming increasingly common in children, adolescents and young adults due to reduced physical activity and unhealthy eating patterns, leading to obesity [4]. The majority of patients with type 2 diabetes fail to control glycemia with diet and exercise and require pharmacotherapy—in general, initially monotherapy with an oral hypoglycemic agents (OHA); however, owing to the progressive nature of t Continue reading >>

Improving Adherence To Diabetes Self-management Recommendations

Improving Adherence To Diabetes Self-management Recommendations

In Brief Improved health outcomes for individuals with diabetes depend on integrating self-management into daily life. A wide variety of educational, behavioral, and affective interventions are available that individually produce modest improvements in patient adherence to treatment recommendations in diabetes and related chronic illnesses and that work somewhat better when used in combination. A summary of selected successful interventions is presented. Diabetes is one of the chronic illnesses for which self-management plays a central role in care. In this regard, it is similar to hypertension or congestive heart failure but quite different from some other chronic illnesses such as breast cancer. To optimize their health, individuals with diabetes may be advised regarding diet and exercise, frequent medical examinations, annual specialized examinations of their eyes and feet, and, for many, prescribed multiple oral or injected medications every day. Until there is a cure for diabetes, these behaviors must be sustained for a lifetime. Matters are made more complicated by the high prevalence of comorbidity among adults with diabetes: they are at increased risk of hypertension and lipid disorders. These conditions may require still more medical management, which must be integrated with the treatment of diabetes itself. For those unfortunate enough to develop the vascular complications of diabetes, still more demands of self-management are imposed. Managing one’s diabetes is a complex task that touches nearly every important aspect of daily life, and we providers might marvel that any individual manages to do it at all. Success requires an alliance between patients and their health care providers, one or more from a team including physicians, nurses, dietitians, diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetics & Non-compliance

Diabetics & Non-compliance

Diabetics can develop high levels of glucose in their bloodstreams. Without proper diet, exercise, regular checkups and monitoring of blood glucose levels, high glucose can lead to several complications, including some that are life-threatening. Despite this danger, health professionals find too many diabetic patients don't follow medical advice for controlling their disease. Video of the Day Medically, noncompliance, also referred to as nonadherence, means not following a physician's recommendations. Typically, diabetics may be directed to follow a specific kind of diet, take prescribed medication and exercise. Physicians and counselors may recommend additional lifestyle changes for the patient's optimal health. Examples of Noncompliance A noncompliant diabetic patient may not check his blood glucose levels regularly. He make take his medication incorrectly or not at all. He may fail to lose weight, stop smoking or exercise. His diet may contain too much fat and too many carbohydrates to control blood glucose levels, and he may not visit his doctor for regular check-ups. Diabetics who are noncompliant do not realize or accept that proper self-care will have a positive effect in the long-term. As a result, they are in danger of developing complications that affect the eyes, kidneys, heart, nerves, feet and more. Over time, uncontrolled diabetes can lead to permanent damage of these areas as well as stroke, heart disease and blindness. Dangers of High Glucose High blood glucose, or hyperglycemia, occurs when the body doesn't have enough insulin or can't use insulin effectively. Hyperglycemia has a major impact on the complications of diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body burns fat instead of glucose for energy. It's a serious condition, affecting primarily Continue reading >>

The Nurse's Role In Diabetes Management

The Nurse's Role In Diabetes Management

The Nurse’s Role in Diabetes Management by Jami Diabetes Mellitus is a very complex chronic disease. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), almost 20.8 million people in the United States have type II diabetes and many of them do not even know they have it (2008). Over time, high blood sugar can cause damage to blood vessels, nerves, and the kidney; these complications can lead to cardio vascular disease, blindness, kidney failure, amputation, and death. Diabetics are also more likely to get serious illnesses or infections. This is why it is essential for nurses to teach diabetic patients the importance of compliance by proper diet, insulin techniques, and close blood glucose monitoring in order to reduce these risks. When the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin to keep a healthy balance of insulin/glucose this condition is called type II diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that helps blood sugar called glucose get into cells which then creates energy for the body. When there is a lack of insulin, glucose is unable to get into the cells and it builds up in the blood and will soon start to causes damage to the body. The ADA states that high blood glucose levels can lead to short-term problems from cells being starved from energy and that leads to long-term complications where the constant high levels will start to affect the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and heart (2008). This is why it is important for diabetics to understand the disease in order to prevent or delay some of these complications. Nutrition is one of the key strategies against diabetes yet most people with type II diabetes are over weight from eating an unhealthy diet. In the past the ADA set unrealistic goals about diet and weight control. Instead of ideal weight being based upon height and body t

The Importance Of Healthy Eating When You Have Diabetes

The Importance Of Healthy Eating When You Have Diabetes

Your browser does not support the video tag. Healthy eating may be the most important tool you have in managing your diabetes. It can make your blood glucose management easier, because what you eat has an immediate effect on your blood glucose level. Here's why: When you eat, most of the food is turned into glucose, a form of sugar, which enters the bloodstream. If you choose foods that cause your blood glucose to rise too high, and it remains high over time, health problems may develop. By making healthy food choices, you can bring your blood glucose into a healthy range and keep it there. Healthy eating can help you lose weight or maintain a healthy weight, which can also improve your blood glucose and reduce the complications of diabetes, like heart disease, kidney disease and eye disease. And, if you exercise regularly along with making healthy food choices, you may find you need less medication. So what are these healthful food choices? Everyone can benefit from choosing from a wide variety of fresh, unprocessed foods, like: whole grains, pastas, beans, lentils, fruits, vegetables, fat-free or low-fat milk and cheeses, and lean meats. But making these changes isn't easy. Take some time now to think about your lifestyle, and diabetes management, and how the food choices you make fit into your management plan. Is there a place in your lifestyle where you can focus on making small changes to help bring your blood glucose into a healthy range? If you are unsure about how to make healthy food choices, meet with a registered dietitian. A registered dietitian can help you learn what foods are healthier than others and give you some tips and tricks to help make healthy eating a part of your life. To see how your food choices affect your diabetes, you need to monitor your b Continue reading >>

Nutritional Recommendations For Individuals With Diabetes

Nutritional Recommendations For Individuals With Diabetes

Go to: INTRODUCTION This chapter will summarize current information on nutritional recommendations for persons with diabetes for health care practitioners who treat them. The key take home message is that the 1800 calorie ADA diet is dead! The modern diet for the individual with diabetes is based on concepts from clinical research, portion control, and individualized lifestyle changes. It cannot simply be delivered by giving a patient a diet sheet in a one-size-fits-all approach. The lifestyle modification guidance and support needed requires a team effort, best led by an expert in this area; a registered dietitian (RD), or a referral to a diabetes self-management education (DSME) program that includes instruction on nutrition therapy. Dietary recommendations need to be individualized for and accepted by the given patient. It’s important to note that the nutrition goals for diabetes are similar to those that healthy individuals should strive to incorporate into their lifestyle. Leading authorities and professional organizations have concluded that proper nutrition is an important part of the foundation for the treatment of diabetes. However, appropriate nutritional treatment, implementation, and ultimate compliance with the plan remain some of the most vexing problems in diabetic management for three major reasons: First, there are some differences in the dietary structure to consider, depending on the type of diabetes. Second, a plethora of dietary information is available from many sources to the patient and healthcare provider. Nutritional science is constantly evolving, so that what may be considered true today may be outdated in the near future. Different types of diabetes require some specialized nutritional intervention; however, many of the basic dietary princ Continue reading >>

The Prevention And Control The Type-2 Diabetes By Changing Lifestyle And Dietary Pattern

The Prevention And Control The Type-2 Diabetes By Changing Lifestyle And Dietary Pattern

Go to: INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus or type-2 diabetes, is one of the major non-communicable and fastest growing public health problems in the world, is a condition difficult to treat and expensive to manage. It has been estimated that the number of diabetes sufferers in the world will double from the current value of about 190 million to 325 million during the next 25 years.[1,2,3] Individuals with type-2 diabetes are at a high risk of developing a range of debilitating complications such as cardiovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, nephropathy, changes to the retina and blindness that can lead to disability and premature death. It also imposes important medical and economic burdens. Genetic susceptibility and environmental influences seem to be the most important factors responsible for the development of this condition. However, a drastic increase of physical inactivity, obesity, and type-2 diabetes has been recently observed. The fact indicates that obesity and physical inactivity may constitute the main reasons for the increasing burden of diabetes in the developed world.[4,5,6,7,8,9,10] Fortunately, because environmental factors are modifiable, disease manifestation from these factors is largely preventable. Diet is one of the major factors now linked to a wide range of diseases including diabetes. The amount and type of food consumed is a fundamental determinant of human health. Diet constitutes a crucial aspect of the overall management of diabetes, which may involve diet alone, diet with oral hypoglycemic drugs, or diet with insulin.[11,12,13,14,15] Diet is individualized depending on age, weight, gender, health condition, and occupation etc. The dietary guidelines as used in this review are sets of advisory statements that give quick dietary advic Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet

Diabetic Diet

If you have diabetes, your body cannot make or properly use insulin. This leads to high blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels. Healthy eating helps keep your blood sugar in your target range. It is a critical part of managing your diabetes, because controlling your blood sugar can prevent the complications of diabetes. A registered dietitian can help make an eating plan just for you. It should take into account your weight, medicines, lifestyle, and other health problems you have. Healthy diabetic eating includes Limiting foods that are high in sugar Eating smaller portions, spread out over the day Being careful about when and how many carbohydrates you eat Eating a variety of whole-grain foods, fruits and vegetables every day Eating less fat Limiting your use of alcohol Using less salt NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Diet (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Diet (beyond The Basics)

TYPE 2 DIABETES OVERVIEW Diet and physical activity are critically important in the management of the ABCs (A1C, Blood pressure, and Cholesterol) of type 2 diabetes. To effectively manage glycated hemoglobin (A1C) and blood sugar levels, it is important to understand how to balance food intake, physical activity, and medication. Making healthy food choices every day has both immediate and long-term effects. With education, practice, and assistance from a dietitian and/or a diabetes educator, it is possible to eat well and control diabetes. This article discusses diet in the management of type 2 diabetes. The role of diet and activity in managing blood pressure and cholesterol are reviewed separately. (See "Patient education: High blood pressure, diet, and weight (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: High cholesterol and lipids (hyperlipidemia) (Beyond the Basics)".) Articles that discuss other aspects of type 2 diabetes are also available. (See "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Overview (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Insulin treatment (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Alcohol, exercise, and medical care (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Preventing complications in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)".) WHY IS DIET IMPORTANT? Many factors affect how well diabetes is controlled. Many of these factors are controlled by the person with diabetes, including how much and what is eaten, how frequently the blood sugar is monitored, physical activity levels, and accuracy and consi Continue reading >>

Role Of Self-care In Management Of Diabetes Mellitus

Role Of Self-care In Management Of Diabetes Mellitus

Abstract Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic progressive metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia mainly due to absolute (Type 1 DM) or relative (Type 2 DM) deficiency of insulin hormone. World Health Organization estimates that more than 346 million people worldwide have DM. This number is likely to more than double by 2030 without any intervention. The needs of diabetic patients are not only limited to adequate glycemic control but also correspond with preventing complications; disability limitation and rehabilitation. There are seven essential self-care behaviors in people with diabetes which predict good outcomes namely healthy eating, being physically active, monitoring of blood sugar, compliant with medications, good problem-solving skills, healthy coping skills and risk-reduction behaviors. All these seven behaviors have been found to be positively correlated with good glycemic control, reduction of complications and improvement in quality of life. Individuals with diabetes have been shown to make a dramatic impact on the progression and development of their disease by participating in their own care. Despite this fact, compliance or adherence to these activities has been found to be low, especially when looking at long-term changes. Though multiple demographic, socio-economic and social support factors can be considered as positive contributors in facilitating self-care activities in diabetic patients, role of clinicians in promoting self-care is vital and has to be emphasized. Realizing the multi-faceted nature of the problem, a systematic, multi-pronged and an integrated approach is required for promoting self-care practices among diabetic patients to avert any long-term complications. Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic progressive metab Continue reading >>

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