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Hypoglycemia Diet

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is a condition that causes the sugar (glucose) in your blood to drop too low. This can happen in people who do not have diabetes. The 2 types of non-diabetic hypoglycemia are fasting hypoglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia. Fasting hypoglycemia often happens after the person goes without food for 8 hours or longer. Reactive hypoglycemia usually happens about 2 to 4 hours after a meal. When your blood sugar level is low, your muscles and brain cells do not have enough energy to work well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Fasting hypoglycemia: Certain medicines or herbal supplements such as fenugreek, ginseng, or cinnamon Alcohol Exercise Medical conditions such as liver disease, hypothyroidism, and tumors Eating disorders or malnutrition Stomach surgery or hemodialysis Reactive hypoglycemia: The causes of reactive hypoglycemia may be unknown. Hyperinsulinism Meals high in refined carbohydrates such as white bread or foods high in sugar Prediabetes Any surgery of the digestive system What are the signs and symptoms of non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Blurred vision or changes in vision Dizziness, lightheadedness, or shakiness Fatigue and weakness Fast or pounding heartbeat Sweating more than usual Headache Nausea or hunger Anxiety, Irritability, or confusion How is non-diabetic hypoglycemia diagnosed? Blood tests are done to measure your blood sugar levels. These tests may also be done to find the cause of your hypoglycemia. Fasting tests may be done. You may have an overnight fasting test or a 72-hour fasting test. After you have fasted overnight, your blood sugar levels will be tested 2 times. For a 72-hour fasting test, you will not be given food for a period of up to 72 hours. During th Continue reading >>

Diets And Treatments For Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Diets And Treatments For Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Dear Alice, I need general information on hypoglycemia and about diets and treatments. Sincerely, Not So Sweet Dear Not So Sweet, You're probably sweeter than you think! Hypoglycemia is the medical name for an unusually low blood sugar (a.k.a., glucose) level. Excess insulin, along with glucose deficiency, usually causes hypoglycemia. Glucose is vital for health because it provides energy for the brain, central nervous system, and all of the body's cells. If a person is unable to maintain adequate blood glucose levels, major organs such, as the brain, are deprived of the fuel they need. When someone has low blood sugar, they may experience: Heart palpitations Fatigue Pale skin Shakiness Anxiety Sweating Hunger Irritability Tingling sensation around the mouth Crying out during sleep Over time, it’s possible to experience more severe symptoms as hypoglycemia worsens. Symptoms could include: Confusion, abnormal behavior or both, such as the inability to complete routine tasks Visual disturbances, such as blurred vision Seizures Loss of consciousness Hypoglycemia may be caused by several factors. One cause is type I diabetes. Type I diabetes is a chronic disease that impairs a person's ability to produce an adequate amount of insulin to control glucose levels. Insulin must be injected and hypoglycemic drugs can be taken in order to lower the glucose level in the body. Other causes include certain medications, excessive alcohol consumption, illnesses affecting the liver (such as hepatitis), an overproduction of insulin, and hormone deficiencies. Treatment of hypoglycemia may involve treating any underlying causes, monitoring blood sugar levels, and consuming glucose tablets or simple carbohydrates to manage immediate symptoms. Determining how much food is needed to raise b Continue reading >>

What To Eat When You Have Low Blood Sugar

What To Eat When You Have Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia is closely associated with diabetes, but according to Native Remedies, low blood sugar signals a deficiency of essential vitamins, minerals, amino acids and essential fatty acids. Making the necessary diet changes to treat hypoglycemia is fairly simple. According to Reactive Hypoglycemia, to successfully managing low blood sugar requires selecting the best foods to eat and when to eat those foods. Diet Low blood sugar puts the body in a weakened state because the body requires glucose for energy. Foods rich in Vitamins C, E, and B-complex enhance sugar and carbohydrate tolerance to normalize sugar metabolism so the body has the necessary energy it needs to function properly. According to Mayo Clinic, eating small meals every two to three hours throughout the day can help maintain normal blood sugar levels. New Medicine suggests eating high-protein foods such as salmon, chicken, mackerel, fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans and legumes that can stabilize blood sugar levels. Snacking between meals can help manage your blood sugar levels. Try snacking on nuts and seeds such as pumpkin and sunflower seeds. You also can drink fresh milk, buttermilk or fruit juices with your scheduled meals. Food-Med.com suggests avoiding refined and processed foods such as white sugar, white flour and products made using such foods. Reduce the amount of salt and citrus fruits you eat. Instead eat apples, berries, peaches and pineapples. The best vegetables to eat include eggplant, asparagus, beets, carrots, cucumbers, lettuce, peas, spinach and tomatoes. Emergency Foods If you suffer from low blood sugar, Reactive Hypoglycemia suggests carrying these "emergency foods" when you're away from the house such as 8 pieces of Lifesavers candy, 2 tbsp of raisins, 7 small gumdrops, fruit jui Continue reading >>

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is the condition when your blood glucose (sugar) levels are too low. It happens to people with diabetes when they have a mismatch of medicine, food, and/or exercise. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia, a rare condition, is low blood glucose in people who do not have diabetes. There are two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia: Reactive hypoglycemia, which happens within a few hours of eating a meal Fasting hypoglycemia, which may be related to a disease Glucose is the main source of energy for your body and brain. It comes from what we eat and drink. Insulin, a hormone, helps keep blood glucose at normal levels so your body can work properly. Insulin’s job is to help glucose enter your cells where it’s used for energy. If your glucose level is too low, you might not feel well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? The two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia have different causes. Researchers are still studying the causes of reactive hypoglycemia. They know, however, that it comes from having too much insulin in the blood, leading to low blood glucose levels. Types of nondiabetic hypoglycemia Reactive hypoglycemia Having pre-diabetes or being at risk for diabetes, which can lead to trouble making the right amount of insulin Stomach surgery, which can make food pass too quickly into your small intestine Rare enzyme deficiencies that make it hard for your body to break down food Fasting hypoglycemia Medicines, such as salicylates (such as aspirin), sulfa drugs (an antibiotic), pentamidine (to treat a serious kind of pneumonia), quinine (to treat malaria) Alcohol, especially with binge drinking Serious illnesses, such as those affecting the liver, heart, or kidneys Low levels of certain hormones, such as cortisol, growth hormone, glu Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Symptoms To Look Out For & Ways To Naturally Treat Them

Hypoglycemia Symptoms To Look Out For & Ways To Naturally Treat Them

Uncontrolled glucose levels are one of the most common health problems in the world. Hypoglycemia symptoms frequently affect people with prediabetes or diabetes but are also linked with other health problems, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol and even arthritis. And although it’s rarely mentioned, hypoglycemia has been called “an under-appreciated problem” that’s the most common and serious side effect of glucose-lowering diabetes drugs. (1) Those who are at risk for both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are not only people who are ill, overweight or inactive — anyone who consumes a poor diet and has trouble with normal glucose metabolism can develop symptoms. The standard American diet, which tends to be very high in things like refined grains and sugar but low in nutrients like healthy fats and fiber, contributes to hypoglycemia and related diseases. What are some clues you might be experiencing hypoglycemia symptoms, and what kind of things can you do to help manage them? Symptoms of hypoglycemia are often confused with other health conditions and can include sudden hunger, irritability, headaches, brain fog and shakiness. By managing your intake of empty calories, improving your diet, and paying attention to how meal timing and exercise affects you, you can help control low blood sugar symptoms and prevent them from returning. What Is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition caused by low blood sugar levels, also sometimes referred to as low glucose. Glucose is mostly found in carbohydrate foods and those containing sugar and is considered to be one of the most important sources of energy for the body. (2) Here’s an overview of how glucose works once it enters the body and the process of how our hormones regulate blood sugar levels: When we Continue reading >>

Low Blood Glucose (hypoglycemia)

Low Blood Glucose (hypoglycemia)

What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also called low blood glucose or low blood sugar, occurs when the level of glucose in your blood drops below normal. For many people with diabetes, that means a level of 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or less. Your numbers might be different, so check with your health care provider to find out what level is too low for you. What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia? Symptoms of hypoglycemia tend to come on quickly and can vary from person to person. You may have one or more mild-to-moderate symptoms listed in the table below. Sometimes people don’t feel any symptoms. Severe hypoglycemia is when your blood glucose level becomes so low that you’re unable to treat yourself and need help from another person. Severe hypoglycemia is dangerous and needs to be treated right away. This condition is more common in people with type 1 diabetes. Hypoglycemia Symptoms Mild-to-Moderate Severe Shaky or jittery Sweaty Hungry Headachy Blurred vision Sleepy or tired Dizzy or lightheaded Confused or disoriented Pale Uncoordinated Irritable or nervous Argumentative or combative Changed behavior or personality Trouble concentrating Weak Fast or irregular heart beat Unable to eat or drink Seizures or convulsions (jerky movements) Unconsciousness Some symptoms of hypoglycemia during sleep are crying out or having nightmares sweating enough to make your pajamas or sheets damp feeling tired, irritable, or confused after waking up What causes hypoglycemia in diabetes? Hypoglycemia can be a side effect of insulin or other types of diabetes medicines that help your body make more insulin. Two types of diabetes pills can cause hypoglycemia: sulfonylureas and meglitinides . Ask your health care team if your diabetes medicine can cause hypoglycemia. Although ot Continue reading >>

Diet For Hypoglycemia Without Diabetes

Diet For Hypoglycemia Without Diabetes

The type of hypoglycemia that occurs in people without diabetes is referred to as reactive hypoglycemia. Reactive hypoglycemia would be the results of too much insulin secreted or not enough glucagon released after a meal, which lead to low blood sugar levels a few hours after eating. If you blood sugars are too low -- below 70 mg/dL -- you may feel dizzy, light-headed, tired, hungry and confused. A few changes to your diet can help you prevent reactive hypoglycemia. Video of the Day Instead of eating two to three large meals, split your food intake into five to six smaller meals. Eating too much at once can stimulate the overproduction of insulin and increase your risk of experiencing an hypoglycemic episode. Space your meals evenly throughout the day, every two to three hours, and don't forget to reduce the amounts of food you eat at each meal to avoid gaining weight. For example, if your lunch usually is a sandwich, an apple and a yogurt, divide your meal into two parts. Have the first part at one time and save the remaining for later. Choose Low-Glycemic Index Carbohydrates Carbohydrate-containing foods with a high-glycemic index make your blood sugar levels peak, overstimulate the secretion of insulin and can often result in reactive hypoglycemia within a few hours. Avoid processed and refined carbohydrates such as white flours, white bread, breakfast cereals, crackers, baked goods, sweets and desserts. Replace these foods with low-glycemic index carbohydrates that will help you stabilize your blood sugar levels. Low-glycemic index carbohydrate foods include old-fashioned oatmeal, steel-cut oat, stone-ground whole grain flour, sourdough bread, temperate climate fruit, barley, quinoa, basmati rice and whole-grain pasta. Never eat carbohydrates on alone. Protein help Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

People with diabetes get hypoglycemia () when their bodies don't have enough sugar to use as fuel. It can happen for several reasons, including diet, some medications and conditions, and exercise. If you get hypoglycemia, write down the date and time when it happened and what you did. Share your record with your doctor, so she can look for a pattern and adjust your medications. Call your doctor if you have more than one unexplained low blood sugar reaction in a week. Most people feel symptoms of hypoglycemia when their blood sugar is 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or lower. Each person with diabetes may have different symptoms of hypoglycemia. You'll learn to spot yours. Early symptoms include: Confusion Dizziness Feeling shaky Hunger Headaches Irritability Pounding heart; racing pulse Pale skin Sweating Trembling Weakness Anxiety Without treatment, you might get more severe symptoms, including: Poor coordination Poor concentration Numbness in mouth and tongue Passing out Ask your doctor if any of your medicines can cause low blood sugar. Insulin treatment can cause low blood sugar, and so can a type of diabetes medications called "sulfonylureas." Commonly used sulfonylureas include: Glibenclamide (Glyburide, Micronase) Gliclazide Older, less common sulfonlyureas tend to cause low blood sugar more often than some of the newer ones. Examples of older drugs include: You can also get low blood sugar if you drink alcohol or take allopurinol (Zyloprim), aspirin, Benemid, probenecid (Probalan), or warfarin (Coumadin) with diabetes medications. You shouldn't get hypoglycemia if you take alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, biguanides (such as metformin), and thiazolidinediones alone, but it can happen when you take them with sulfonylureas or insulin. You can get low blood sugar Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Diet For Dogs

Hypoglycemia Diet For Dogs

Because hypoglycemia causes an unsafe drop in blood sugar, it is important to recognize and treat its underlying cause as soon as symptoms appear. If your veterinarian has diagnosed your dog or puppy with the disease, a combination of diet and medication may be required to regulate his condition. Here are a few nutrition guidelines to follow when planning meals for your hypoglycemic dog. Frequency Feed hypoglycemic dogs several (4 to 6) small meals over the course of a day in order to help regulate insulin absorption. Protein Diets that are high in protein will help provide hypoglycemic dogs with the necessary energy without overloading their pancreas. Fats Hypoglycemic dogs should eat a diet that is high in Omega-3 and other healthy fats. Carbohydrates Variety Dextrose Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Diet

Hypoglycemia Diet

Source People with hypoglycemia have problems regulating their blood sugar levels, and most are advised to adopt a specific hypoglycemia diet to help minimize blood sugar swings. Some elements of the diet are common for all hypoglycemia sufferers, but there's also a certain degree of tailoring to fit individual situations required for optimal results. Your doctor can help with the fine-tuning, but here's a rundown of the basics. Cause of Hypoglycemia The cause of hypoglycemia can vary quite a bit, ranging from simply not eating or eating the wrong foods to taking certain medications and diabetes. Whatever the cause, the goal is to keep blood sugar levels as even as possible throughout the day. In many cases, this can be achieved by following a specific diet. What to Eat or Drink Some foods are better than others for preventing hypoglycemia. Many foods that help maintain optimum blood sugar levels are complex carbohydrates that are low on the glycemic index, a scale based on how fast blood sugar levels rise after consuming a food or beverage. Foods that are high on the glycemic index tend to cause rapid blood sugar spikes and plunges. Hypoglycemia Friendly Foods and Drinks Lean meat, poultry or fish Whole grains, which includes oats, barley, quinoa, buckwheat, brown rice and wheat Low-fat dairy products such as yogurt, milk and cheese Oats (avoid pre-sweetened oatmeal) Eggs Legumes Nuts (avoid honey roasted, chocolate covered or sugar coated varieties) Seeds Soluble fiber fruits including apples, bananas, oranges, peaches, grapes, prunes, pears, berries, avocados and plums Soluble fiber vegetables including potatoes, sweet potatoes, beets, onions, carrots, peas, mushrooms, cucumbers and broccoli Water Herbal teas Decaffeinated tea or coffee Foods and Drinks to Avoid Proc Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Diet For Hypoglycemia?

What Is The Best Diet For Hypoglycemia?

Various diets have been proposed for hypoglycemia over the years. The earliest treatment was a high-protein, high-fat diet with a minimum of carbohydrates, in the belief that all carbohydrates stimulated the pancreas to produce insulin. Such diets had mixed results and are certainly not healthy in the long run. They have largely been abandoned but variations still exist, such as the Atkins diet and more recently Barry Sears’ “zone” diet which involves a 30/30/40 ratio between protein, fat and carbohydrate. The prominent American nutritionist Paavo Aerola started a change in thinking about hypoglycemia treatment in the 1970s when he advocated a largely vegetarian diet with an emphasis on complex carbohydrates. Aerola’s diet was popular for many years and very successful. However, it relies heavily on dairy products for protein – which doesn’t suit everyone. More recently, a concept known as the “glycemic index” of foods has been developed. The glycemic index represents the amount by which a food raises the blood sugar level, with glucose having an index of 100. It is interesting that foods such as white bread can raise the blood sugar almost as much as ordinary white sugar, whereas as whole-grain breads cause a much slower rise in blood sugar. I have proved this myself – before I knew anything about glycemic indexes. When I was experimenting with the high-carbohydrate, low-fat diets I often had a white bread roll with a small amount of low-fat cheese (no butter) and salad for lunch. I would always get a headache during the afternoon following such lunches but I persisted because I thought it was a “healthy” low-fat meal and it had no-sugar. Occasionally, I would have a thick cheese sandwich on wholemeal bread (with butter) and a glass of milk – su Continue reading >>

Appointments At Mayo Clinic

Appointments At Mayo Clinic

I think I have reactive hypoglycemia. How can I address my symptoms? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Reactive hypoglycemia (postprandial hypoglycemia) refers to low blood sugar that occurs after a meal — usually within four hours after eating. This is different from low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) that occurs while fasting. Signs and symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia may include hunger, weakness, shakiness, sleepiness, sweating, lightheadedness and anxiety. It's possible to have symptoms that are similar to reactive hypoglycemia without actually having low blood sugar. True reactive hypoglycemia symptoms that are caused by low blood sugar occurring after eating are uncommon. For the majority of people with postprandial symptoms, the actual cause of the symptoms is not clear but may relate to what food was eaten or variations in the timing of the food moving through the stomach and intestinal tract. Generally, a medical evaluation is done to determine whether symptoms are caused by low blood sugar — and whether symptoms resolve once blood sugar returns to normal. Further evaluation of reactive hypoglycemia depends on the severity of symptoms. For the majority of people, reactive hypoglycemia usually doesn't require medical treatment. It may help, however, to pay attention to the timing and composition of your meals: Eat a well-balanced diet, including lean and nonmeat sources of protein, and high-fiber foods, including whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Avoid sugary foods, especially on an empty stomach. Be sure to eat food if you're consuming alcohol, and avoid using sugary soft drinks as mixers. Eat several small meals and snacks throughout the day, no more than three hours apart during the waking hours. Most people will try to find out what dietary changes ar Continue reading >>

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormally low level of sugar, or glucose, in the blood. Hypoglycemia is not a disease in itself, it is a sign of a health problem. The brain uses a lot of energy and needs glucose to function. Because the brain cannot store or manufacture glucose, it needs a continuous supply. Signs of low blood sugar include hunger, trembling, heart racing, nausea, and sweating. Hypoglycemia is commonly linked with diabetes, but many other conditions can also cause low blood sugar. This article will discuss the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoglycemia, and the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. We will also look at how to prevent it. Here are some key points about hypoglycemia. More detail is in the main article. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a symptom of another condition. Early symptoms include hunger, sweating, and trembling. A common cause is diabetes. Alcohol abuse and kidney disorders can also lower blood sugar levels. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition where there is not enough glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Levels of blood sugar are below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Adults and children with mild hypoglycemia may experience the following early symptoms: hunger tremor or trembling sweating irritability a pale face heart palpitations accelerated heart rate tingling lips dizziness weakness Severe hypoglycemia is sometimes called diabetic shock. It may involve: concentration problems confusion irrational and disorderly behavior, similar to intoxication inability to eat or drink Complications If a person does not take action when symptoms of hypoclycemia appear, it can lead to: A person who regularly experiences hypoglycemia may become unaware that it is happening. They will not notice the warning signs, and this can lea Continue reading >>

What To Eat When You Have Low Blood Sugar

What To Eat When You Have Low Blood Sugar

When your blood sugar dips, it can leave you feeling hungry, shaky, and lightheaded. This can happen to anyone who hasn’t eaten in several hours. When blood sugar drops below normal levels, it’s called hypoglycemia. In people with diabetes, hypoglycemia can be a life-threatening complication of diabetes medication, other health problems like infection, or inadequate caloric intake. You can lower your chances of low blood sugar—and treat it when it occurs—with some simple steps. Know the Symptoms Sugar, or glucose, is a key source of energy for the body. When blood sugar drops, you may get these symptoms: Hunger Shakiness Sweating Dizziness Lightheadedness Confusion Anxiety Feeling tired or sleepy Headache What You Can Do Most of the sugar or glucose in your blood comes from carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the sugars and starches in grains, beans, vegetables, fruit, milk and milk products, honey, and sugar. If you don’t have diabetes and you’re feeling the unpleasant effects of a drop in blood sugar, eat or drink something with carbohydrates. Good choices are a piece of fruit, a few whole wheat crackers, a glass of milk, or a carton of yogurt. In people with diabetes, hypoglycemia can come on suddenly and needs to be treated right away so it doesn’t get worse. Eat or drink a quickly digested carbohydrate food, such as: ½ cup fruit juice ½ cup of a regular soft drink (not a diet soda) 1 cup of milk 5 or 6 hard candies 4 or 5 saltine crackers 2 tablespoons of raisins 3 to 4 teaspoons of sugar or honey 3 or 4 glucose tablets or a serving of glucose gel Each of these choices provides about 15 grams of carbohydrate. Wait for 15 or 20 minutes, then check your blood sugar with a blood glucose meter. If your blood sugar is still low, have another portion of carb Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Author: Frank W. Jackson, M.D. Purpose Hypoglycemia is the term for a blood glucose level that is lower than normal. When foods are digested in the body, they are broken down into many nutrients. These nutrients are absorbed into the bloodstream to be used in performing various body functions. One of these nutrients is glucose, a sugar that provides fuel to the body. The process that regulates the amount of sugar in the blood is complex. Adrenaline is a part of this complicated process. Everyone has experienced a rush of adrenaline at some time — that “love-at-first-sight” feeling, or the pounding heart after narrowly escaping an accident. Adrenaline is produced by the adrenal glands located on top of the kidneys. The sudden release of adrenaline is what causes the symptoms of hypoglycemia — apprehension, hunger, sweating, rapid heartbeat, and faintness. Hypoglycemia can occur from certain illnesses, such as liver disease and some types of tumors. These conditions cause a type of hypoglycemia called organic hypoglycemia. They usually require specific medical treatment or surgery. There is another type of hypoglycemia. In some people, the body simply responds differently to the digestion of foods. Some foods are digested and absorbed rapidly, resulting in a burst of glucose entering the bloodstream. In most people the body adjusts smoothly. It would be like two children trying to balance a see-saw. There may be a slight teetering or swinging up and down as the children shift their weight to achieve the balance. In some people, however, the response is like an actively rocking see-saw swinging up and down. The body over-reacts and sets the process in motion to reduce blood glucose. The result is a glucose level that is too low. Then the body releases adrenaline, i Continue reading >>

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