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Hypoglycemia Consume Food Or Drink That Is High In Sugar

Treating Low Blood Sugars Quickly

Treating Low Blood Sugars Quickly

Unless you are eating a meal right away, the best treatment for lows is a combination of simple and complex carbohydrates plus some protein. Quickly treating lows lessens stress hormone release and lowers the chance of the blood sugar going high after a reaction. You'll feel better if the body is quickly resupplied with the fuel it needs. Your brain, muscles and other cells will thank you for not prolonging their misery. Treatment Plant For Hypoglycemia Eat 15 to 20 grams of fast acting carbohydrates immediately. Consider how much unused bolus insulin may still be active. Decide whether complex carbohydrates and/or protein are needed to keep you stable until you eat your next meal. Test your blood sugar 30 minutes later to make sure it has risen. Repeat step 1 if necessary. After a moderate or severe low blood sugar, wait 30 to 45 minutes before driving or operating machinery. A return to normal coordination and thinking is slower than the return to a normal blood sugar. You may need to eat more than 20 grams for a low: when you took a carb bolus for a meal but never ate it. when it has been only an hour or two since your last injection of rapid insulin. when you have been more physically active. Glucose is the "sugar" in blood sugar and may also be referred to as dextrose on labels. It comes in tablets, such as Dex4 or BD Glucose tablets, and in certain candies like Sweet Tarts. Glucose breaks down quickly and reaches the blood as 100 percent glucose, which makes it the best choice for raising the blood sugar quickly. Another good product for raising your glucose is Glucolift Glucose Tablets. Table sugar consists of one glucose molecule and one fructose molecule, so when it breaks down in the stomach, only half is immediately available as glucose. Fruit juices, like or Continue reading >>

Suggested Meal Plan For A Hypoglycemia Diet

Suggested Meal Plan For A Hypoglycemia Diet

Hypoglycemia is a condition that occurs when the level of sugar in the blood drops to below 70 milligrams per deciliter. The condition causes weakness, sweating, dizziness, confusion and shakiness, but these symptoms can be avoided by following a diet that keeps blood sugar levels stable throughout the day and by planning healthy meals in advance. Many traditional breakfast foods, like processed cereals, pancakes, bagels, fruit juices and jams, are low in protein and high in carbohydrates. Both of these characteristics can create a sharp rise in the level of sugars in the blood, triggering the symptoms of hypoglycemia within just a few hours after eating. To keep blood sugar levels stable, stick to breakfast meals that include eggs, nuts, cheese, smoked salmon, whole fruits, nut butters, plain yogurt, olive oil and vegetables. For example, indulge in a bowl of plain yogurt topped with fresh berries instead of sugary cereal. Skip toast and jam and instead have steel-cut oats with with sliced strawberries or an omelet with mushrooms and Swiss cheese. Lunch Ideas Carb-rich lunches like sandwiches, burgers and french fries can trigger hypoglycemia. To keep your blood sugar levels on track, opt for lunches that include a healthy balance of protein, fats and a small amount of carbs that are rich in fiber. A large salad is the perfect base for your lunch. Top it with avocado slices, an olive-oil based vinaigrette, almonds and chicken, or make an Asian version with ginger-based dressing and pork. Try a Greek variation with chicken, feta cheese, olives and red onions. Omelets, frittatas, bean-rich soups, or lean fish with shredded-zucchini "pancakes" are other easy, tasty suggestions. Dinner Ideas Skip pasta or pizza and instead choose meals that include protein, healthy fats, n Continue reading >>

Treating Low Blood Sugar

Treating Low Blood Sugar

You are at risk of having a low blood sugar reaction if you: Skip or delay a meal or snack Take too much insulin or eat too few carbohydrates Exercise Drink alcohol, especially without eating carbohydrates Check your blood sugar if you have any of these symptoms: Weakness and/or fatigue Headache Sweating Anxiety Dizziness Shaking Increased heartbeat If your blood sugar is less than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl): Eat 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrate (sample foods listed below) Wait 15 minutes and then recheck your blood sugar If your blood sugar is still less than 100 mg/dl, take another 15 grams of carbohydrate and retest your blood sugar in another 15 minutes. Repeat if necessary. Important: If you have frequent low blood sugars speak to your doctor. You may need changes in your medication and/or meal plan. Quick Carbohydrate Guide for Treating Low Blood Sugars If your blood sugar is less than 70 mg/dl, you need 15 to 30 grams of a quickly absorbed carbohydrate, like the ones listed below. Each of the following servings provides 15 grams of carbohydrate. Candies and Other Sweets 5 small gum drops 12 gummy bears 6 large jelly beans 5 Life Savers 15 Skittles 1 Tablespoon honey, jam or jelly 1 Tablespoon sugar in water 4 Starburst Beverages 1/2 cup apple juice 1/2 cup orange or grapefruit juice 1/2 cup pineapple juice 1/2 cup regular soda (not diet) 1/3 cup grape juice 1/3 cup cranberry juice 1/3 cup prune juice 1 cup fat free milk Fruits 1/2 banana 1 small apple 1 small orange 1/2 cup applesauce 2 tablespoons of raisins 15 grapes Other 3 to 4 glucose tablets 1 tube glucose gel Note: The foods listed above are easily absorbed and will raise blood sugar levels quickly. Foods that contain protein or fat — such as chocolate, candy bars, ice cream, cookies, crackers and Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

Definition and Symptoms: Hypoglycemia is a condition in which the sugar level in the blood falls below normal levels (hypo=under and glycemia=blood sugar/glucose). Many people suffer from hypoglycaemia today and not surprisingly so, since most of the foods that are freely available and consumed by the general public, are high in fat and have a high GI value. The most common form of hypoglycemia occurs after a meal is eaten. This is called reactive hypoglycemia. High GI foods, except when eaten during, or after exercise, cause most people’s blood glucose to surge upwards within a short period of time i.e. 30-60 minutes after ingestion. The human body then reacts, or overreacts in the case of a person suffering from hypoglycaemia, by releasing insulin to counteract the threat of a sustained high blood glucose. This causes a rapid fall in blood glucose resulting in the typical stress-like symptoms of low blood sugar i.e. tremor, heart palpitations, sweating, anxiety, sleepiness, weakness and the very common feeling of chronic fatigue. Hypoglycemia can also affect mental function and lead to restlessness, irritability, poor concentration, lethargy and drowsiness. These symptoms are noticed very clearly in non-diabetics in GI research done by scientists, especially if high GI foods are eaten. Consequences: There seems to be the general opinion that, if one suffers from hypoglycemia, one should eat a lot of sweets (or rather according to modern day thinking, high GI foods), since there is a lack of glucose in the blood. This is entirely untrue, since it is actually the high GI foods that bring on the hypoglycemia as explained above. If on top of eating high GI foods, one consumes a lot of fat (which causes the body’s insulin to work less effectively), it is only a questio Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And Diet

Hypoglycemia And Diet

What Is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, is a relatively rare condition. The symptoms include shakiness, weakness, faintness, headaches, mental dullness, and confusion. Such symptoms can be caused by any number of other problems, including stress. The only way to diagnose hypoglycemia is through a glucose tolerance test—the same type of test used to diagnose diabetes. Effects of Hypoglycemia Glucose is a type of sugar found in the blood. Eating a meal causes blood glucose levels to rise. Normally, as levels of glucose in the blood increase, the pancreas produces insulin. The insulin causes body cells to absorb the glucose and a gradual drop in the blood sugar level results. In a person with hypoglycemia, the body produces too much insulin in the presence of glucose. This causes a sudden drop in the blood sugar level. The High-Protein Myth Doctors used to recommend eating sugar-restricted, high-protein meals four or more times a day to help control hypoglycemia. But such treatment may actually impair glucose tolerance in patients.1 The main sources of protein for many individuals—animal products—are also high in saturated fat which can contribute to the development of diabetes,2,3 as well as numerous other health problems, from heart disease to breast cancer. Hypoglycemia and Diet The best way to control hypoglycemia is through a diet similar to that used to control diabetes mellitus: a reduction in simple sugars, a large intake of complex carbohydrates, and frequent feedings. Candy, sodas, and even fruit juices (which manufacturers often sweeten with lots of sugar) are all high in sugar and should be avoided. Foods that are high in soluble dietary fiber slow carbohydrate absorption and help to prevent swings in blood sugar levels. For som Continue reading >>

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormally low level of sugar, or glucose, in the blood. Hypoglycemia is not a disease in itself, it is a sign of a health problem. The brain uses a lot of energy and needs glucose to function. Because the brain cannot store or manufacture glucose, it needs a continuous supply. Signs of low blood sugar include hunger, trembling, heart racing, nausea, and sweating. Hypoglycemia is commonly linked with diabetes, but many other conditions can also cause low blood sugar. This article will discuss the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoglycemia, and the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. We will also look at how to prevent it. Here are some key points about hypoglycemia. More detail is in the main article. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a symptom of another condition. Early symptoms include hunger, sweating, and trembling. A common cause is diabetes. Alcohol abuse and kidney disorders can also lower blood sugar levels. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition where there is not enough glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Levels of blood sugar are below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Adults and children with mild hypoglycemia may experience the following early symptoms: hunger tremor or trembling sweating irritability a pale face heart palpitations accelerated heart rate tingling lips dizziness weakness Severe hypoglycemia is sometimes called diabetic shock. It may involve: concentration problems confusion irrational and disorderly behavior, similar to intoxication inability to eat or drink Complications If a person does not take action when symptoms of hypoclycemia appear, it can lead to: A person who regularly experiences hypoglycemia may become unaware that it is happening. They will not notice the warning signs, and this can lea Continue reading >>

Appointments At Mayo Clinic

Appointments At Mayo Clinic

I think I have reactive hypoglycemia. How can I address my symptoms? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Reactive hypoglycemia (postprandial hypoglycemia) refers to low blood sugar that occurs after a meal — usually within four hours after eating. This is different from low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) that occurs while fasting. Signs and symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia may include hunger, weakness, shakiness, sleepiness, sweating, lightheadedness and anxiety. It's possible to have symptoms that are similar to reactive hypoglycemia without actually having low blood sugar. True reactive hypoglycemia symptoms that are caused by low blood sugar occurring after eating are uncommon. For the majority of people with postprandial symptoms, the actual cause of the symptoms is not clear but may relate to what food was eaten or variations in the timing of the food moving through the stomach and intestinal tract. Generally, a medical evaluation is done to determine whether symptoms are caused by low blood sugar — and whether symptoms resolve once blood sugar returns to normal. Further evaluation of reactive hypoglycemia depends on the severity of symptoms. For the majority of people, reactive hypoglycemia usually doesn't require medical treatment. It may help, however, to pay attention to the timing and composition of your meals: Eat a well-balanced diet, including lean and nonmeat sources of protein, and high-fiber foods, including whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Avoid sugary foods, especially on an empty stomach. Be sure to eat food if you're consuming alcohol, and avoid using sugary soft drinks as mixers. Eat several small meals and snacks throughout the day, no more than three hours apart during the waking hours. Most people will try to find out what dietary changes ar Continue reading >>

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Effects Of Alcohol On Diabetes

Alcohol, which is made from fermented yeast, sugars, and starches is a very commonly used substance. In fact, 87.6% of adults aged 18 and over have consumed it at some point in their lifetime. It is also known as a depressant due to its capability to depress the central nervous system. About 71% have drank in the past year. When enjoyed in moderation, alcohol does not pose a risk, and actually has some health benefits to it. However, for those with diabetes, it can be a struggle to maintain a safe blood sugar while drinking. It is very easy to become hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) or hyperglycemic (high blood sugar), depending on which type of diabetes you have and the medications that you take. Understanding the effects drinking has on diabetes is very important. This article discusses the risks and benefits of drinking. It also explains what drinks are best for individuals with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Can I drink if I have diabetes? You can most certainly drink alcohol with diabetes. The key, just like many other things, is to do so in moderation. Also, if your blood sugar is not under good control, you should not drink because it can cause it to become too high or too low. Your doctor should be aware of your drinking habits so that they can make sure that you are not experiencing any complications related to it. I recommend reading the following articles: How does alcohol affect diabetes and my blood sugar levels? Normally, the liver is the organ that stores and secretes glucose to the cells in the body to fuel them when you are not eating. The liver is also responsible for cleansing the body of toxins. The liver does not recognize alcohol as food. Instead, it sees it as a drug and a toxin. When alcohol is in the system, the liver changes gears and begins to deto Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, is when blood sugar decreases to below normal levels.[1] This may result in a variety of symptoms including clumsiness, trouble talking, confusion, loss of consciousness, seizures, or death.[1] A feeling of hunger, sweating, shakiness, and weakness may also be present.[1] Symptoms typically come on quickly.[1] The most common cause of hypoglycemia is medications used to treat diabetes mellitus such as insulin and sulfonylureas.[2][3] Risk is greater in diabetics who have eaten less than usual, exercised more than usual, or have drunk alcohol.[1] Other causes of hypoglycemia include kidney failure, certain tumors, such as insulinoma, liver disease, hypothyroidism, starvation, inborn error of metabolism, severe infections, reactive hypoglycemia, and a number of drugs including alcohol.[1][3] Low blood sugar may occur in otherwise healthy babies who have not eaten for a few hours.[4] The glucose level that defines hypoglycemia is variable.[1] In people with diabetes levels below 3.9 mmol/L (70 mg/dL) is diagnostic.[1] In adults without diabetes, symptoms related to low blood sugar, low blood sugar at the time of symptoms, and improvement when blood sugar is restored to normal confirm the diagnosis.[5] Otherwise a level below 2.8 mmol/L (50 mg/dL) after not eating or following exercise may be used.[1] In newborns a level below 2.2 mmol/L (40 mg/dL) or less than 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL) if symptoms are present indicates hypoglycemia.[4] Other tests that may be useful in determining the cause include insulin and C peptide levels in the blood.[3] Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) is the opposite condition. Among people with diabetes, prevention is by matching the foods eaten with the amount of exercise and the medications used.[1] When Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating Guidelines For People With Reactive Hypoglycemia

Healthy Eating Guidelines For People With Reactive Hypoglycemia

Introduction Reactive hypoglycemia is low blood glucose (sugar) that occurs within four hours after eating. Symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia may include anxiety, fast heartbeat, irritability (feeling very stressed or nervous), shaking, sweating, hunger, dizziness, blurred vision, difficulty thinking and faintness. Follow the tips below to help keep your blood glucose levels steady and prevent symptoms of hypoglycemia. Steps You Can Take Eat small balanced meals or snacks throughout the day (about every three hours). Choose a variety of healthy foods from at least three of the four food groups at each meal and two of the food groups at each snack. A meal of chili (Meat and Alternatives, Vegetables and Fruit) with cornbread (Grain products) and a glass of milk (Milk and Alternatives) contains all four food groups. Limit foods and drinks high in sugar such as doughnuts, frozen desserts, fruit flavoured drinks and soft drinks. Avoid long stretches of time between meals. Choose foods that are high in soluble fibre and starchy foods that have a low glycemic index at each meal. These types of foods can help keep blood glucose levels stable. Foods high in soluble fibre include: oatmeal, oat bran and barley dried peas, beans and lentils vegetables and fruits with their skin. Aim for 5-10 grams of soluble fibre per day. Starchy foods low in glycemic index include: oats, converted/parboiled rice, barley and bulgur breads made from stone ground flour and heavy mixed grain such as pumpernickel bread dried beans, peas and lentils. Most vegetables, fruits and low-fat milk products have a moderate or low glycemic index and can be included at each meal. Talk to a registered dietitian for help with choosing and adapting recipes to add low glycemic index foods in your meal plan. If you d Continue reading >>

The Fastest & Slowest Carbohydrates For Low Blood Sugars

The Fastest & Slowest Carbohydrates For Low Blood Sugars

Treating a low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) might seem easy: eat something with carbohydrates. But to ensure that you’re getting the best source of carbohydrate that will raise your blood sugar as quickly as possible isn’t as simple as you might’ve thought. For the most part, my relationship with diabetes is a positive one. Checking my blood sugar and taking shots doesn’t evoke any significant negative emotion in my mind (although, don’t get me wrong, I’d love a cure). However, treating a low blood sugar with something I’ve used a hundred-zillion times before, like glucose tabs, tends to make me feel sick to my stomach. Literally, the idea of consuming another juice box to treat another low makes me feel sick to my stomach and it evokes a sense of disgust. “I don’t want to drink another freaking juice box or eat one more freaking glucose tab!” Today, I no longer buy juice boxes for treating lows. And I have dozens and dozens of glucose tabs…but I am sick of that taste. Sick of the connection of how I feel when I’m low with whatever food I’m using to treat it. It’s an emotional connection I’ve made to my diabetes management that is negative. So I find new carbohydrates to treat my low blood sugars on a regular basis. Unfortunately, like I said, different types of carbohydrate take different amounts of time to break down into glucose and get into your bloodstream. I spoke with my friend, Mara Schwartz, who lives with Type 1 diabetes, and is a colleague of mine at TeamWILD (We Inspire Life with Diabetes) as the Director of Special Projects. She is a registered nurse, a diabetes educator and a clinical researcher at the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes in Aurora, CO. She shared with me the fastest and slowest sources of carbohydrate fo Continue reading >>

How To Treat A Low Blood Glucose

How To Treat A Low Blood Glucose

A blood glucose of less than 70 mg/dl in general is considered a low blood glucose. Because you may feel some of the symptoms of low blood glucose when your glucose is normal, be sure, if possible, to check your blood glucose when you think it is low. The symptoms of a low blood glucose are: Sweaty and shaky Weak Headache Confused Irritable Hungry Pale Rapid heart rate Uncoordinated If your blood glucose is low, follow the steps below to treat: Follow the 15-15 rule: Eat or drink something from the list below equal to 15 grams of carbohydrate (carb). Rest for 15 minutes, then re-check your blood glucose. If it is still low, (below 70), repeat step 1 above. If your next meal is more than an hour away, you will need to eat one carbohydrate choice as a snack to keep your blood glucose from going low again. If you can't figure out why you have low blood glucose, call your healthcare provider, as your medicine may need to be adjusted. Always carry something with you to treat an insulin reaction. Use food from the list below. Foods equal to One Carbohydrate Choice (15 grams of carb): 3 Glucose tablets or 4 Dextrose tablets 4 ounces of fruit juice 5-6 ounces (about 1/2 can) of regular soda such as Coke or Pepsi 7-8 gummy or regular Life Savers 1 Tbsp. of sugar or jelly Call your doctor Call your doctor or healthcare provider if you have a low blood glucose reaction and do not know what caused it. If you pass out If you have type 1 diabetes and you do not take care of low blood glucose, you may pass out. If you do, a drug called glucagon should be injected into your skin, like you do with insulin. This can be done by a family member or friend who has been taught how to do it. Since glucagon may cause you to vomit, you should be placed on your side when the injection is given. I Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Author: Frank W. Jackson, M.D. Purpose Hypoglycemia is the term for a blood glucose level that is lower than normal. When foods are digested in the body, they are broken down into many nutrients. These nutrients are absorbed into the bloodstream to be used in performing various body functions. One of these nutrients is glucose, a sugar that provides fuel to the body. The process that regulates the amount of sugar in the blood is complex. Adrenaline is a part of this complicated process. Everyone has experienced a rush of adrenaline at some time — that “love-at-first-sight” feeling, or the pounding heart after narrowly escaping an accident. Adrenaline is produced by the adrenal glands located on top of the kidneys. The sudden release of adrenaline is what causes the symptoms of hypoglycemia — apprehension, hunger, sweating, rapid heartbeat, and faintness. Hypoglycemia can occur from certain illnesses, such as liver disease and some types of tumors. These conditions cause a type of hypoglycemia called organic hypoglycemia. They usually require specific medical treatment or surgery. There is another type of hypoglycemia. In some people, the body simply responds differently to the digestion of foods. Some foods are digested and absorbed rapidly, resulting in a burst of glucose entering the bloodstream. In most people the body adjusts smoothly. It would be like two children trying to balance a see-saw. There may be a slight teetering or swinging up and down as the children shift their weight to achieve the balance. In some people, however, the response is like an actively rocking see-saw swinging up and down. The body over-reacts and sets the process in motion to reduce blood glucose. The result is a glucose level that is too low. Then the body releases adrenaline, i Continue reading >>

Eating To Prevent Low Blood Sugar

Eating To Prevent Low Blood Sugar

Understanding Hypoglycemia Your body breaks down the food you eat into a type of sugar called glucose. After you eat a meal or snack, that glucose makes its way into the bloodstream, causing the level of sugar in your blood to increase. Your pancreas responds by releasing the hormone insulin, which allows glucose to leave the bloodstream and enter into body tissues (including the liver, for later use). When the sugar supplied by your last meal is more or less used up, insulin levels go back down to keep your blood sugar from falling further. In addition, stored sugar is released back into the bloodstream from the liver with the help of another hormone called glucogon. Normal levels of blood glucose levels vary depending on when levels are measured and can range from 70- 145 milligrams per deciliter. Most people’s systems are remarkably adept at maintaining a fairly steady blood sugar level. However, for people with hypoglycemia, which technically means "low blood sugar," this process doesn't come as easily. While it is not considered a disease itself, hypoglycemia is a medical condition that has many uncomfortable symptoms. Frequent episodes of hypoglycemia can also be related to other medical diagnoses, most commonly diabetes. There are two types of hypoglycemia. Fasting hypoglycemia occurs when you have not eaten for eight or more hours. It can be caused by certain conditions that disrupt your body’s ability to balance the levels of glucose in the blood: eating disorders, and diseases of the kidney, liver, pancreas, and pituitary or adrenal glands. Taking a high dose of aspirin may also lead to fasting hypoglycemia. Non-fasting (reactive) hypoglycemia occurs after eating a high-carbohydrate meal or snack. If your body is unable to respond appropriately, it release Continue reading >>

The 4 Foods That Will Steady Your Blood Sugar

The 4 Foods That Will Steady Your Blood Sugar

Wondering what blood sugar has to do with you, if you don’t have diabetes? Keeping your blood sugar levels as steady as possiblenow may help you avoid getting diabetes later. “As you get older, your risk for type 2 diabetes goes up,” says Alissa Rumsey, Registered Dietitian and Spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Since you can’t modify your age, it is important to take other steps to lower your risk, including maintaining a healthy weight, getting enough exercise, and balancing your diet to prevent spikes in blood sugar.” Controlling your blood sugar will also just make you feel better. “It’s best to control blood sugar—it keeps your energy stable,” says Leann Olansky, M.D., an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic. “If your blood sugar doesn’t vary that much before and after a meal, that’s a healthier way to be.” Unrelated to diabetes, symptoms of occasional high blood sugar aren’t life-threatening, but rather unpleasant and only potentially dangerous if you suffer from other health problems. “When your blood sugar is too high, it can make you feel sluggish,” says Dr. Olansky. “When it’s higher still, it can lead to dehydration and make your blood pressure unstable, and cause you to urinate more often, especially at night.” But when your blood sugar remains chronically high, insulin, a hormone that’s supposed to help your body store sugar as energy, stops working as it should. “Prolonged high blood sugar levels can lead to insulin resistance, meaning your body isn’t able to use insulin properly,” says Rumsey. “Over time this insulin resistance can develop into diabetes, when insulin isn’t able to keep your blood sugar within normal levels.” Current research reveals an association between spik Continue reading >>

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