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How To Control Sugar Level In Blood With Diet

How To Control Diabetes: 10 Tips To Maintain Blood Sugar Level

How To Control Diabetes: 10 Tips To Maintain Blood Sugar Level

Living a diabetic life is a challenge. You need to constantly monitor your diet and ensure that your blood sugar level is well under control. One of the major diseases affecting millions and millions of people in the country today, diabetes is life-long and deadly. It is a condition when the hormone called insulin that is produced by the pancreas is unable to break down glucose into energy, and as such, the blood sugar level increases in the body. What one eats plays a crucial role for diabetics, and monitoring it constantly along with following regular meal schedule ca help tremendously. Physical activity is a must too to ensure that insulin is utilized by the body. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes and looking for all sorts of ways to keep a check on your blood sugar level, here are some common and uncommon tips that can help you - 1. Lose Those Extra Kilos According to Dr. Shashank Joshi, Endocrinologist, Lilavati & Bhatia Hospital, "Being overweight causes insulin resistance and makes it difficult for the body to maintain appropriate blood glucose levels. For those who are overweight, dropping 5- 10 per cent of your weight can help. Work with your doctor to manage your weight and if necessary consult a dietician." 2. Follow a Balanced Diet with Complex Carbs According to Preeti Rao, Health and Wellness Coach, "Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables, lean protein and good sources of fat. Foods to avoid are those rich in trans fats (also called hydrogenated fat), processed food, and sugar. Complex carbohydrates are rich in fiber and are not highly processed like refined carbohydrates. They take longer to digest and hence provide a sustained source of energy for a longer duration." 3. Benefits of Barley A recent study done by Lund University in Sweden states tha Continue reading >>

Treatment

Treatment

If you have gestational diabetes, the chances of having problems with the pregnancy can be reduced by controlling your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You'll also need to be more closely monitored during pregnancy and labour to check if treatment is working and to check for any problems. Checking your blood sugar level You'll be given a testing kit that you can use to check your blood sugar level. This involves using a finger-pricking device and putting a drop of blood on a testing strip. You'll be advised: how to test your blood sugar level correctly when and how often to test your blood sugar – most women with gestational diabetes are advised to test before breakfast and one hour after each meal what level you should be aiming for – this will be a measurement given in millimoles of glucose per litre of blood (mmol/l) Diabetes UK has more information about monitoring your glucose levels. Diet Making changes to your diet can help control your blood sugar level. You should be offered a referral to a dietitian, who can give you advice about your diet, and you may be given a leaflet to help you plan your meals. You may be advised to: eat regularly – usually three meals a day – and avoid skipping meals eat starchy and low glycaemic index (GI) foods that release sugar slowly – such as wholewheat pasta, brown rice, granary bread, all-bran cereals, pulses, beans, lentils, muesli and porridge eat plenty of fruit and vegetables – aim for at least five portions a day avoid sugary foods – you don't need a completely sugar-free diet, but try to swap snacks such as cakes and biscuits for healthier alternatives such as fruit, nuts and seeds avoid sugary drinks – sugar-free or diet drinks are better than sugary versions; be aware that fruit juices and smoothies contain s Continue reading >>

Balance Your Blood Sugar, Keep Off The Weight

Balance Your Blood Sugar, Keep Off The Weight

Your Video is Loading Guess what percentage of dieters keeps the weight off for more than two years: 75%? 60%? 50%? The sad truth is only 15-20% of dieters keep the weight off, with 80-85% of people who lose weight regaining it (plus some!) after two years. It’s time to shift your mindset when it comes to dieting. By focusing less on fads and more on maintaining a healthy balance of what you eat, you’ll impact your body on a level most diets don’t even consider: Stabilizing your blood sugar. Your blood sugar level is the amount of glucose from what you eat that’s circulating in your bloodstream to provide energy to cells immediately or be stored for future use. A well-balanced blood sugar level is crucial to your overall fitness and well-being, regulating your hormones, triggering your body to burn stored fat, and increasing your metabolism to help you lose weight. Unfortunately, most people’s blood sugar is not properly balanced. If you’re getting too much glucose, it leads to high blood-sugar levels, which your body can’t break down and stores as fat. Ironically, not getting enough sugar can also lead to putting on extra pounds! Eating too little glucose can lead to a low blood sugar level, causing your body to go into “starvation mode” where it burns your lean muscle instead of the fat – a double whammy to your system and your diet. Fortunately, nutritionist Mark MacDonald and Dr. Oz have a 6-step plan to balance your blood sugar, allowing you to lose weight and keep it off! Step 1: Eat in 3s What’s the key to eating in 3s? It’s easy! Eat every 3 hours, and divide your plate into thirds: one-third protein, one-third fat, and one-third carbs. Our bodies “want” to eat every 3 hours, as it’s their natural eating schedule dating back from ea Continue reading >>

7 Morning Rituals Proven To Lower Morning Blood Sugar Naturally

7 Morning Rituals Proven To Lower Morning Blood Sugar Naturally

If you’re a diabetic, you may find that your blood sugar levels are at their peak in the morning. This is due to the fasting period overnight. It’s common for blood sugar tests to require a period of fasting beforehand to get the best natural levels. You need to get your blood sugar levels down right away. The good news is you don’t necessarily need to rely on medication. While you will want to take medication in the way that your doctor has prescribed, you will still want to follow these seven-morning rituals. It is possible to reverse type II diabetes and focus on a healthier and more natural lifestyle. Even if you’re not a diabetic, you will want to keep your morning blood sugar levels down. Here are the seven must-follow morning rituals that have proven to lower the blood sugar levels on a morning completely naturally. Wait, Why Is Your Blood Sugar Up In the Morning? Why is it that your blood sugar levels will rise overnight? You don’t eat anything, so how can you possibly add any glucose to your system? Well, those who suffer from type II diabetes will find this is most problematic. The body still creates glucose throughout the night. It needs to, whether you’ve eaten something or not. This natural process is called gluconeogenesis, and there is nothing you can do to stop it – nor would you want to. In a healthy person, this process doesn’t cause a major problem. Those with diabetes will find the gluconeogenesis process is increased. That means your body produces more glucose naturally than it would if you were healthy. Let’s not forget that the stress hormone cortisol also plays a part. This increases slowly on a morning until it reaches a peak early in the morning. The cortisol will elevate the blood sugar levels, so you end up with naturally hi Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Sugar: Normal Levels And Testing

Fasting Blood Sugar: Normal Levels And Testing

Fasting blood sugar provides vital clues about how the body is managing blood sugar levels. Blood sugar tends to peak about an hour after eating, and declines after that. High fasting blood sugar levels point to insulin resistance or diabetes. Abnormally low fasting blood sugar could be due to diabetes medications. Knowing when to test and what to look for can help keep people with, or at risk of, diabetes healthy. What are fasting blood sugar levels? Following a meal, blood sugar levels rise, usually peaking about an hour after eating. How much blood sugar rises by and the precise timing of the peak depends on diet. Large meals tend to trigger larger blood sugar rises. High-sugar carbohydrates, such as bread and sweetened snacks, also cause more significant blood sugar swings. Normally, as blood sugar rises, the pancreas releases insulin. Insulin lowers blood sugar, breaking it down so that the body can use it for energy or store it for later. However, people who have diabetes have difficulties with insulin in the following ways: People with type 1 diabetes do not produce enough insulin because the body attacks insulin-producing cells. People with type 2 diabetes do not respond well to insulin and, later, may not make enough insulin. In both cases, the result is the same: elevated blood sugar levels and difficulties using sugar. This means that fasting blood sugar depends on three factors: the contents of the last meal the size of the last meal the body's ability to produce and respond to insulin Blood sugar levels in between meals offer a window into how the body manages sugar. High levels of fasting blood sugar suggest that the body has been unable to lower the levels of sugar in the blood. This points to either insulin resistance or inadequate insulin production, an Continue reading >>

13 Foods That Won’t Raise Blood Glucose

13 Foods That Won’t Raise Blood Glucose

Part 1 of 15 A healthy diet is essential to reversing prediabetes. There are no foods, herbs, drinks, or supplements that lower blood sugar. Only medication and exercise can. But there are things you can eat and drink that have a low Glycemic Index (GI). This means these foods won’t raise your blood sugar and may help you avoid a blood sugar spike. In addition to diet changes, staying or becoming active is also important. Learn which foods you can add to your diet plan. You may be able to prevent prediabetes or type 2 diabetes by adding more of these foods, spices, and drinks into your diet. Eat them as healthy alternatives to sugar, high GI carbohydrates, or other treats. Want more info like this? Sign up for our diabetes newsletter and get resources delivered right to your inbox » Part 2 of 15 Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) are important components of a healthy blood sugar eating plan. They can improve insulin sensitivity. They can also help increase feelings of satiety, and have a healthy impact on blood pressure and inflammation. MUFAs are a key nutrient in avocados. Studies have shown avocados can lower the risk of metabolic syndrome. This is a group of risk factors that can increase the risk of diabetes. It can also raise the risk of blood vessel disease like heart disease and stroke. Avocados also have a low GI. For a unique, diabetes-friendly dessert, try making Oh She Glow’s natural, no sugar added, raw avocado chocolate pudding. Part 3 of 15 Protein helps the body maintain and repair itself. Since protein doesn't impact blood sugar levels, it doesn't have a GI ranking and won’t raise blood sugar levels. Protein also increases satiety, so relying on protein to feel full instead of bread, rice, or pasta may be Continue reading >>

Eating Six Times A Day On A Diet To Lower Blood Sugar

Eating Six Times A Day On A Diet To Lower Blood Sugar

Managing blood glucose levels can be a difficult process often leading to less than ideal outcomes for diabetics. According to a “Diabetes Care” study, a little over half of diabetics have been able to reach their average blood glucose goals between 1988 and 2010. Could frequent, small meals be a key to more stable blood glucose control? Diabetics struggle with insulin resistance, which is the condition that causes blood glucose levels to be abnormally high hours after consuming meals, according to Kathleen Mahan and Sylvia Escott-Stump, authors of “Krause’s Food and Nutrition Therapy.” A number of factors, including physical activity, types of foods eaten and overall portion sizes, influence blood glucose levels. The American Diabetes Association advises eating smaller, more frequent meals instead of eating the more traditional two to three meals, citing benefits such as more stable blood glucose and better appetite control, which leads to a lower calorie intake. Frequent Meals and Blood Glucose A study in the “Diabetes Care” compared glucose response in participants receiving two different meal patterns: group A received six small, equal calorie meals while group B received two larger meals. Even though total daily calorie counts were equal for each group, it was observed that group A's average peak glucose value was 84 percent lower than group B's. The researchers from Horsens Hospital in Denmark noted that not only was glucose control much improved in group A, insulin levels of this group were also significantly lower. Sample Menu Consuming six meals daily does require some planning to assure that healthy meals and snacks are available throughout the day; adhering to this regimen means eating something small every two to three hours, as noted by the 20 Continue reading >>

A Beginner’s Guide To Paleo And Blood Sugar

A Beginner’s Guide To Paleo And Blood Sugar

Confused about blood sugar? Here’s a quick and basic overview of what it is, what kinds of diet and lifestyle factors can affect it, and what that means from the perspective of a Paleo diet and lifestyle framework. What Is Blood Sugar? The “sugar” in “blood sugar” isn’t the same thing as table sugar. Biologically, “sugars” are simple carbohydrates, the building blocks of all the carbohydrates in everything you eat (including table sugar, but also including other foods that contain carbohydrates, like potatoes). One type of simple carbohydrate or “sugar” is glucose, which is the “sugar” measured when somebody measures your “blood sugar.” A more accurate name for it is “blood glucose,” which is what you’ll see in most studies. So having high blood sugar doesn’t mean that you ate a lot of table sugar and the sugar is now in your bloodstream; it means you ate a lot of carbohydrates (from any source) and the sugar (glucose) is now in your bloodstream. Any digestible carbohydrate can raise blood sugar, although some raise it higher and faster than others. Problems with Blood Sugar Regulation In healthy people, blood sugar is automatically regulated. You eat some carbs and your blood sugar rises, but insulin appears to the rescue and lowers blood sugar levels by storing the glucose for you to use later between meals (that’s an incredibly simplified explanation, and the reality is very complicated, but if you want more on insulin, you can read about it here). That’s how it works in healthy people. But problems with blood sugar regulation are incredibly widespread. In fact, some of them are so common we’ve almost stopped seeing them as problems – like the mood and energy rollercoaster that leaves you trying to drag yourself out of a mi Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

While a low carb diet appears to be useful on the whole, there are also many foods shown to help. Either by lowering blood sugars and/or improving insulin sensitivity. This articles looks at 10 of the best foods and supplements for lowering blood sugars, based on current research. Just know they should never be used in place of your diabetes medication, but rather alongside. 1. Resistant Starch Lowers Sugars After Meals Starches are long chains of glucose (sugar) found in oats, grains, bananas, potatoes and various other foods. Some varieties pass through digestion unchanged and are not absorbed as sugar into the blood. These are known as resistant starch. Many studies show resistant starch can greatly improve insulin sensitivity. That is, how well the body can move sugar out of the blood and into cells for energy. This is why it’s so useful for lowering blood sugar levels after meals (1, 2). The effect is so great that having resistant starch at lunch will reduce blood sugar spikes at dinner, known as the “second meal effect” (3). Problem is many foods high in resistant starch, such as potatoes, are also high in digestible carbs that can spike blood sugar. Therefore resistant starch in supplement form – without the extra carbs – is recommended. Summary: Supplemental resistant starch is a fantastic option for those struggling to control sugars or have hit a plateau. 2. Ceylon Cinnamon Several cinnamon compounds appear to prevent the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream, minimising blood sugar spikes. It may also dramatically improve insulin sensitivity (4, 5). In a recent clinical trial, 25 poorly-controlled type 2 diabetics received either 1 gram per day of cinnamon or placebo (dummy supplement) for 12 weeks. Fasting blood sugar levels in the cinnamon gro Continue reading >>

Healthy Eating For Blood Sugar Control

Healthy Eating For Blood Sugar Control

If you have diabetes, a healthy eating plan for you is not that different from a healthy eating planfor people withoutdiabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) echoes the dietary guidelines recommended for the general public — that is, a diet centered on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes (peas and beans), and low-fat dairy products. However, you'll want to pay special attention to your carbohydrate intake. Vegetables, fruits, and whole grains provide more nutrition per calorie than refined carbohydrates and tend to be rich in fiber. Your body digests high-fiber foods more slowly — which means a more moderate rise in blood sugar. For most people with diabetes, carbohydrates should account for about 45% to 55% of the total calories you eat each day. Choose your carbohydrates wisely — ideally, from vegetables, whole grains, and fruits. Avoid highly refined carbohydrates such as white bread, pasta, and rice, as well as candy, sugary soft drinks, and sweets. Refined carbohydrates tend to cause sharp spikes in blood sugar, and can even boost triglycerides and lower helpful HDL cholesterol. Fiber comes in two forms: insoluble fiber, the kind found in whole grains, and soluble fiber, found in beans, dried peas, oats, and fruits. Soluble fiber in particular appears to lower blood sugar levels by improving insulin sensitivity, which may mean you need less diabetes medicine. And a number of studies suggest that eating plenty of fiber reduces the chances of developing heart disease — and people with diabetes need to do all they can to lower their risk. For more on healthy diet essentials, plus information on managing (and avoiding) type 2 diabetes, buy Healthy Eating for Type 2 Diabetes from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Healthy Foods To Eat To Lower Blood Sugar While Pregnant

Healthy Foods To Eat To Lower Blood Sugar While Pregnant

High blood sugar levels during pregnancy can lead to gestational diabetes, putting you and your developing baby at risk. During pregnancy, your body makes more insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels, but sometimes you don’t produce enough. Gestational diabetes may cause your baby to have breathing difficulties, jaundice, low blood sugar and obesity later in life. It puts you at risk for having a larger baby, which can lead to problems in the delivery room and high blood pressure. With diet and exercise, you may be able to control your blood sugar levels without taking insulin or medication. Video of the Day Carbohydrate-containing foods are ranked by how they affect your blood sugar levels, which is known as the glycemic index. High-glycemic index foods digest rapidly, raising blood sugar levels. They are usually refined and processed, such as white breads and rice, baked goods and many breakfast cereals. Low-glycemic index foods take longer to digest and help you avoid spikes in blood sugar. These are whole, natural foods like beans, seeds, whole grains such as oatmeal and barley, and fruits and vegetables. During pregnancy, avoid refined and processed foods and stick to whole foods. Clinical nutritionist Stella Metsovas told the Mom.me website that she recommends eating foods rich in probiotics. Probiotics are live bacteria, similar to the friendly bacteria in your stomach, that promote digestive health. Friendly bacteria regulate metabolism of carbohydrates, which keeps your blood sugar levels in a healthy range. Metsovas suggests eating kimchee. You can also opt for natural yogurt with active cultures, but steer clear of those with extra sugar and corn syrup, which will counteract the benefits of the probiotics. Fiber is listed on a nutrition label under c Continue reading >>

What Type Of Pregnancy Diet Should I Follow If I Have Gestational Diabetes?

What Type Of Pregnancy Diet Should I Follow If I Have Gestational Diabetes?

Good nutrition is especially important during pregnancy if you've developed gestational diabetes. Diabetes develops when your body can't efficiently produce or use insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas that allows cells to turn sugar in your blood (glucose) into usable fuel. When large amounts of glucose accumulate in your blood, it means that your cells aren't getting the fuel they need. High blood sugar can be harmful for you and your developing baby, so it's important to try to control it. One way to keep your blood sugar levels under control is to follow a specific meal plan. I strongly recommend seeing a registered dietitian who can create a diet particularly suited to you, based on your weight, height, physical activity, and the needs of your growing baby, as well as your level of glucose intolerance. She'll also take into account your personal food preferences. (Note: If dietary changes aren't sufficient to keep your blood sugar in a healthy range, you'll need to take insulin as well. If your practitioner prescribes insulin injections, you'll need to meet again with your dietitian to reassess your diet.) A dietitian starts by determining how many calories you need each day. Then she teaches you how to determine portion sizes and how to balance your meals with just the right amounts of protein, carbohydrates, and fat. She also assesses your current eating habits to make sure you're getting enough vitamins and minerals. Here are some general dietary guidelines: Eat a variety of foods, distributing calories and carbohydrates evenly throughout the day. Make sure both your meals and your snacks are balanced. The American Diabetes Association recommends that you eat three small-to-moderate-size meals and two to four snacks every day, including an after-dinner snack. Continue reading >>

5 Foods That Lower Your Blood Sugar Quickly

5 Foods That Lower Your Blood Sugar Quickly

Eating a whole foods, plant-based diet is one of the simplest ways to manage your blood sugar and elevate your health to a whole new level. Your blood sugar controls several different hormonal responses in the body, all of which contribute to your energy, your mood, and even your hunger levels. Healthy blood sugars are also vital to prevent or manage Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and hypoglycemia. Eating a diet that supports your blood sugar can also help prevent obesity. Plant-based foods are jam-packed with fiber, which is the main reason they’re so supportive of blood sugar levels. Fiber slows down the release of sugar within the bloodstream, which helps steady insulin levels. This prevents those blood sugar “ups and downs” that foods high in refined sugars, animal foods, and highly- processed foods can cause. To take care of your blood sugar, all you have to do is prioritize higher fiber sources of whole foods versus foods lower in fiber, such as foods with refined or added sugars, animal products (which dramatically raise insulin), and most processed foods. To keep things easy and simple, focus on eating foods that do support your blood sugar instead of focusing on those that don’t. As you’ll see, there are some pretty delicious plant-based foods and meals you can make with them that support your blood sugar. These foods will keep you energized, satisfied, provide your body with vitamins, minerals, fiber, healthy fats, and even some protein too! 1. Magnesium-Rich Leafy Greens All leafy greens such as: kale, spinach, romaine, arugula, collards, turnip greens, all lettuces, Swiss chard, dandelion greens, and any other green you can think of, are absolutely wonderful for your blood sugar. However, a few are especially rich in magnesium, which is acts like a Continue reading >>

10 Best Foods For Diabetes And Blood Sugar

10 Best Foods For Diabetes And Blood Sugar

Some foods have a bigger impact on your blood sugar than others. Knowing which ones are the best for keeping blood sugar levels steady is especially important when you have diabetes, but it's a good idea for everyone. Your dietary goal is to choose foods that help keep your blood sugar level on an even keel. That typically means whole, minimally processed foods. Here are… Continue reading >>

Top Diabetic Diet Tips For Indians

Top Diabetic Diet Tips For Indians

People suffering from diabetes have double the risk of getting a heart attack and developing mental health issues. But the good news is, most cases of type 2 diabetes can be reversed. Taking steps to control your diabetes does not mean to live in deprivation, it rather means eating in moderation and maintaining the right balance. Here we bring to you some diet tips which will not leave you hungry or deprived. Nutrition No matter whether you are a diabetic or not, the nutrition needed by your body is same as for any other normal person (without diabetes). So, you don't need to consume anything special, though you need to take care of the number of calories you intake. Your choice of food matters and most importantly the carbohydrates. Lose weight Fortunately, you have more control over your health than you think. By eating healthy, doing some physical activity and losing weight you can control your diabetes and even reverse it in some cases. By losing just 5 to 10 per cent of your weight, you can lower your blood sugar level, lower blood pressure and lower cholesterol. Also, losing weight and eating healthy will have a profound effect on your energy, mood and sense of well-being. So even if you already developed diabetes it's not too late to make positive changes. Diabetic diet for Indians The per day calorie intake should be between 1500 to 1800 calories. A diabetic diet should have at least three vegetables and two fruits each day. Avoid consuming dry fruits Dry fruits seem like a healthy snacking option but for diabetic people it's not really the case. The fructose in dry fruits may spike your sugar level. So, try having fresh fruits instead of dry fruits. Some home remedies to control diabetes Green tea: This tea is unfermented and hence has high polyphenol content, Continue reading >>

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