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How Many Calories Should A Diabetic Have A Day?

How Many Calories Should A Diabetic Eat Daily?

How Many Calories Should A Diabetic Eat Daily?

Diabetics must monitor their diets carefully to keep blood-sugar levels under control and prevent complications. As with healthy adults, a diabetic's caloric needs depend on gender, weight and physical activity level. If you have diabetes, discuss your calorie and nutrition requirements with your doctor or dietitian. Video of the Day 1,200 to 1,600 Calories The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse recommends a 1,200- to 1,600-calorie diet for small women who exercise, small and medium-sized women who want to lose weight and medium-sized women who are relatively inactive. This diet should include six servings of starches, two servings of milk and other dairy products, three servings of vegetables, 4 to 6 oz. of meat or meat substitutes, two servings of fruit and up to three servings of fats. 1,600 to 2,000 Calories The diabetes clearinghouse recommends a 1,600- to 2,000-calorie diet for the following: large women who want to lose weight, small men who don't need to lose weight, medium-sized men who are relatively inactive and medium-sized and large men who want to lose weight. This diet should include eight servings of starches, two servings of milk and dairy products, four servings of vegetables, three servings of fruit, 4 to 6 oz. of meat or meat substitutes and up to four servings of fats. 2,000 to 2,400 Calories The diabetes clearinghouse advises a 2,000- to 2,400-calorie diet for medium-sized and large adults who are physically active and large men who don't need to lose weight. This diet should include 10 servings of starches, two servings of milk and dairy products, four servings of vegetables, four servings of fruit, 5 to 7 oz. of meat or meat substitutes and up to five servings of fats. Diabetes exchange lists provide specific serving-size information so Continue reading >>

What To Eat, How Much, And When

What To Eat, How Much, And When

Meal planning is one of the most important things you can do to keep your blood sugar in control. Paying attention to what you're eating, how much, and when might seem like a huge challenge at first, but these tips can help make it easier. Quality: What Can I Eat? Having diabetes doesn't mean you can't eat food you enjoy. You can keep eating the foods you like. Just make sure to include lots of nutritious, healthy choices. Healthy, nutritious choices include whole grains, legumes (dried beans, peas, and lentils), fruits, vegetables, non-fat or low-fat dairy, and lean meats, such as fish and poultry. These foods are high in vitamins, minerals, fiber, and lean protein, and low in saturated fat, cholesterol, and refined sugar. Healthier food choices aren't only good for people with diabetes. They're good for everyone. People who eat a variety of these foods every day have a well-balanced diet and get the nutrients their bodies need. Quantity: How Much Can I Eat? Learning about serving sizes is key to meal planning. Food labels on packaged foods and many recipes tell you what a serving size is. These labels tell you how many calories, carbohydrates, protein, and fat are in each serving. You'll need to know serving sizes to help you choose foods that keep your blood sugar from going too high after you eat. If you take fast-acting insulin to control your blood sugar, knowing the serving size will tell you how much insulin you need to take before you eat. Eating carbohydrates affects your blood sugar more than other foods. The more you eat, the faster and higher your blood sugar will rise. Eating fat and protein can affect how quickly your body turns carbohydrates into sugar. When you know the amount of carbohydrate, protein, and fat you're eating at a meal, you can learn to c Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

How Many Carbs Should A Diabetic Eat?

Figuring out how many carbs to eat when you have diabetes can seem confusing. Meal plans created by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) provide about 45% of calories from carbs. This includes 45–60 grams per meal and 10–25 grams per snack, totaling about 135–230 grams of carbs per day. However, a growing number of experts believe people with diabetes should be eating far fewer carbs than this. In fact, many recommend fewer carbs per day than what the ADA allows per meal. This article takes a look at the research supporting low-carb diets for diabetics and provides guidance for determining optimal carb intake. Glucose, or blood sugar, is the main source of fuel for your body's cells. In people with diabetes, the body's ability to process and use blood sugar is impaired. Although there are several types of diabetes, the two most common forms are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin, a hormone that allows sugar from the bloodstream to enter the body's cells. Instead, insulin must be injected to ensure that sugar enters cells. Type 1 diabetes develops because of an autoimmune process in which the body attacks its own insulin-producing cells, which are called beta cells. This disease is usually diagnosed in children, but it can start at any age, even in late adulthood (1). Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is more common, accounting for about 90% of people with diabetes. Like type 1 diabetes, it can develop in both adults and children. However, it isn't as common in children and typically occurs in people who are overweight or obese. In this form of the disease, either the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells are resistant to insulin's effects. Therefore, too much sugar stays Continue reading >>

Nutritional Recommendations For Individuals With Diabetes

Nutritional Recommendations For Individuals With Diabetes

Go to: INTRODUCTION This chapter will summarize current information on nutritional recommendations for persons with diabetes for health care practitioners who treat them. The key take home message is that the 1800 calorie ADA diet is dead! The modern diet for the individual with diabetes is based on concepts from clinical research, portion control, and individualized lifestyle changes. It cannot simply be delivered by giving a patient a diet sheet in a one-size-fits-all approach. The lifestyle modification guidance and support needed requires a team effort, best led by an expert in this area; a registered dietitian (RD), or a referral to a diabetes self-management education (DSME) program that includes instruction on nutrition therapy. Dietary recommendations need to be individualized for and accepted by the given patient. It’s important to note that the nutrition goals for diabetes are similar to those that healthy individuals should strive to incorporate into their lifestyle. Leading authorities and professional organizations have concluded that proper nutrition is an important part of the foundation for the treatment of diabetes. However, appropriate nutritional treatment, implementation, and ultimate compliance with the plan remain some of the most vexing problems in diabetic management for three major reasons: First, there are some differences in the dietary structure to consider, depending on the type of diabetes. Second, a plethora of dietary information is available from many sources to the patient and healthcare provider. Nutritional science is constantly evolving, so that what may be considered true today may be outdated in the near future. Different types of diabetes require some specialized nutritional intervention; however, many of the basic dietary princ Continue reading >>

How Many Calories Should You Eat A Day?

How Many Calories Should You Eat A Day?

Research shows that the total calories you eat, whether too many or just right, has the biggest effect on your body weight compared with increasing or decreasing carbs, protein, or fat. So how many calories should you eat each day? While the answer is different for everyone, this guide will provide a helpful starting point. Research shows that the total calories you eat, whether too many or just right, has the biggest effect on your body weight compared with increasing or decreasing carbs, protein, or fat. So how many calories should you eat each day? While the answer is different for everyone, this guide will provide a helpful starting point. Research shows that the total calories you eat, whether too many or just right, has the biggest effect on your body weight compared with increasing or decreasing carbs, protein, or fat. So how many calories should you eat each day? While the answer is different for everyone, this guide will provide a helpful starting point. Research shows that the total calories you eat, whether too many or just right, has the biggest effect on your body weight compared with increasing or decreasing carbs, protein, or fat. So how many calories should you eat each day? While the answer is different for everyone, this guide will provide a helpful starting point. Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

How Many Calories Per Day I Need To Control Diabetes

How Many Calories Per Day I Need To Control Diabetes

When we talk about how to control diabetes, your weight plays an important role to achieve it. Losing only 10 to 15% of your weight can significantly help you manage your diabetes effectively. And when you want to lose weight, understanding your “calories per day” requirement and following a diet & exercise plan based on it, is the best way to do it. Generally people see calories as a factor in losing weight but know only this much to say, “Eat less calories than you need, to lose weight”. But what that common advice doesn’t tell you is “How many calories per day do you actually need to be perfectly healthy and still lose the weight?” How many calories per day you need depends on various factors such as age, height, weight, sex, size, activity level and health conditions such as pregnancy. A 30 year old 6 foot male who have moderate level of physical activity requires more calories per day than a 5.5 foot, 60 year old lady who has a very little physical activity. According to U.S. Department of Health, an average built adult male requires around 2700 calories per day to maintain his health and weight and on the other hand an average built adult female requires only 2200 calories per day. How many calories per day we eat and burn is directly related to our health and weight. Let’s explore more about calories in depth to understand it better. What are Calories? Calories are basically units of energy. And here we are specifically talking about food calories in nutrition context. The energy we get from foods and burn doing regular body functions and physical activities. You can understand calories with a simple example as in “Battery Charge/Power” which you charge and when used it gets discharged. So, it’s a continuous cycle of eating and burning the c Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Diet (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus And Diet (beyond The Basics)

TYPE 2 DIABETES OVERVIEW Diet and physical activity are critically important in the management of the ABCs (A1C, Blood pressure, and Cholesterol) of type 2 diabetes. To effectively manage glycated hemoglobin (A1C) and blood sugar levels, it is important to understand how to balance food intake, physical activity, and medication. Making healthy food choices every day has both immediate and long-term effects. With education, practice, and assistance from a dietitian and/or a diabetes educator, it is possible to eat well and control diabetes. This article discusses diet in the management of type 2 diabetes. The role of diet and activity in managing blood pressure and cholesterol are reviewed separately. (See "Patient education: High blood pressure, diet, and weight (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: High cholesterol and lipids (hyperlipidemia) (Beyond the Basics)".) Articles that discuss other aspects of type 2 diabetes are also available. (See "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Overview (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Insulin treatment (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Alcohol, exercise, and medical care (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Preventing complications in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)".) WHY IS DIET IMPORTANT? Many factors affect how well diabetes is controlled. Many of these factors are controlled by the person with diabetes, including how much and what is eaten, how frequently the blood sugar is monitored, physical activity levels, and accuracy and consi Continue reading >>

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,800 Calories

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,800 Calories

By:Victoria Seaver, M.S., R.D., C.D., Digital Meal Plan Editor Healthy eating is the cornerstone of managing diabetes, yet it can be a challenge figuring out what to eat to balance your blood sugar. Here we've created a delicious 3-day meal plan that makes it easier to follow a diabetes diet. In this plan you'll find a mix of nutritious foods including fiber-rich complex carbohydrates, like whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, healthy fats and dairy. This plan limits the amount of foods with refined carbohydrates (think white bread, white rice and sugar), added sugars and saturated fats, which can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing around 3-4 carb servings (45-60 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1-2 carb servings (15-30 grams grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Incorporating a variety of foods, as we do in this meal plan, is a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Meal Prep Tip: Cook or set aside an extra 1/2 cup of black beans tonight at dinner to have for lunch on Day 2. Be sure to rinse canned beans to get rid of excess salt. Breakfast (398 calories, 47 grams carbohydrates) Top yogurt with blueberries, walnuts and honey. Note: We use a small amount of added sweetener, in this case honey, in plain yogurt. People with diabetes can still eat small amounts of sweet foods. And adding the honey to plain yogurt, rather than buying sugary flavored yogurt, allows you to control the amount of sugar. Pairing carbohydra Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational diabetes, which causes higher-than-normal blood sugar levels to be present, occurs during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes testing usually occurs between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. If you have risk factors for diabetes, your doctor may recommend testing earlier in the pregnancy. If you receive a gestational diabetes diagnosis, you’ll need testing 6 to 12 weeks after giving birth to see whether the diabetes is still present. Gestational diabetes usually resolves after you deliver, although you’re at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes later in life. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, gestational diabetes affects 3 to 8 percent of pregnant women in the United States. Gestational diabetes increases the risk of having a large baby, which may cause problems with delivery. It also increases the risk of having a baby born with hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Respiratory distress, jaundice, and low calcium and magnesium levels are also more common in babies whose mothers have gestational diabetes. There’s a higher risk of your baby developing diabetes later in life as well. Changing your diet is generally the first method of treatment for gestational diabetes. The amount of calories you should consume each day depends on a number of factors, such as your weight and activity level. Pregnant women should generally increase their calorie consumption by 300 calories per day from their prepregnancy diet. Doctors recommend three meals and two to three snacks per day. Eating smaller meals more frequently can help you keep your blood sugar levels stable. Your doctor will likely recommend that you monitor your blood sugar levels to help manage gestational diabetes. Testing your blood sugar after meals tells you how that meal affected your blood sugar. Your d Continue reading >>

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,500 Calories

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,500 Calories

Healthy eating is the cornerstone of managing diabetes, yet it can be a challenge figuring out what to eat to balance your blood sugar. Here we've created a delicious 3-day meal plan that makes it easier to follow a diabetes diet. In this plan you'll find a mix of nutritious foods including fiber-rich complex carbohydrates, like whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, healthy fats and dairy. This plan limits the amount of foods with refined carbohydrates (think white bread, white rice and sugar), added sugars and saturated fats, which can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing around 3 carb servings (45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1-2 carb servings (15-30 grams grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Incorporating a variety of foods, as we do in this meal plan, is a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Not sure if this is the right plan for you? Calculate your calorie level and find the diet meal plan that will work best for you. Day 1: Meal Prep Tip: Cook or set aside an extra 2/3 cup of black beans tonight at dinner to have for lunch on Day 2. Be sure to rinse canned beans to get rid of excess salt. Breakfast (344 calories, 39 grams carbohydrates) • 1 1/4 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt • 3/4 cup blueberries • 1 1/2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts • 2 tsp. honey Top yogurt with blueberries, walnuts and honey. Note: We use a small amount of added sweetener, in this case honey, in plain yogurt. People with diabetes can s Continue reading >>

How Many Calories Do You Need?

How Many Calories Do You Need?

There are a number of formulas for predicting approximately how many calories a person needs on a daily basis to remain at the same weight, including the following, called the Mifflin–St. Jeor equations, which calculate your basal metabolic rate (BMR): For men, BMR = (10 × weight) + (6.25 × height) – (5 × age) + 5 For women, BMR = (10 × weight) + (6.25 × height) – (5 × age) – 161 These equations require your weight in kilograms, height in centimeters, and age in years. To calculate your weight in kilograms, divide your weight in pounds by 2.2. To calculate your height in centimeters, multiply your height in inches by 2.54. Next, multiply your BMR by one of the following numbers, according to your usual activity level. This will determine your total daily calorie needs: Sedentary: 1.3 Lightly active: 1.4 (walking or standing but no formal exercise) Moderately active: 1.5 (some exercise) Very active : 1.6 (walking and exercise) Extra active: 1.8 (very hard daily exercise or sports, a physically active job, or training two times a day) Return to Calories: The Key to Weight Control Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should a Person With Diabetes Eat? Protein itself does not have much of an effect on blood sugar levels, though the food the protein is in may. Typically, people with diabetes don't need any more protein than people who don't have diabetes. There are, however, times when less protein isbetter. Protein is one of three essential macronutrients; the other twoare fat and carbohydrate. These are needed in large amounts to maintain health and vital functions. The body uses protein to build, repair, and maintain most of your body's tissues and organs. Proteins are also necessary for immune system function and they help some additional physiological processes. As long as your kidneys are healthy, about 15 to 20 percent of your daily calories should come from protein. This is the same amount suggested for a balanced non-diabetic diet. About 45 to 50 percent of your caloric intake should come from carbohydrates and the rest should come from fat. A person who needs 2,000 calories per day needs about 75 to 100 grams protein per day. It would be more accurate, however, to use the standard formula of 0.8 grams protein per kilogram of body weight. To do the kilogram conversion, divide your weight in pounds by 2.2. For instance, if you weigh 150 pounds, that is equal to 68 kilograms. Divide that by 0.8 and you get a protein goal of 85 grams. According to the USDA Dietary Guidelines , it is recommended to eat 5 1/2 ounces of protein-rich food each day. Foods that are high in protein include meat, fish, seafood, chicken, eggs, dairy products, legumes, nuts, and seeds. One-half chicken breast has 29 grams protein A 3-ounce portion of steak has 26 grams protein When choosing proteins for a diabetic diet, the concern is more with the fats and carbohydrates that these foods Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The right diabetes diet is crucial to managing type 2 diabetes, maintaining stable blood sugar levels, and preserving your overall health. However, it's not as complex or out of the ordinary as you might expect. A smart diabetic diet actually looks a lot like the healthy eating plan doctors recommend for everyone: plenty of fruits and vegetables, simple carbohydrates in moderation, and fats sparingly. Count Calories to Manage Diabetes The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends the following calorie guidelines for people who are managing diabetes: About 1,200 to 1,600 calories a day for small women who are physically active, small or medium-sized women interested in weight loss, or medium-sized women who are not physically active. About 1,600 to 2,000 calories a day for large women interested in weight loss, small men at a healthy weight, medium-sized men who aren't physically active, or medium-sized or large men interested in weight loss. About 2,000 to 2,400 calories a day for medium-sized or large men who are physically active, large men at a healthy weight or who are medium-sized, or large women who are very physically active. Reach for the Right Carbohydrates You can't avoid carbohydrates completely. They are our main source of energy, but they also lead to the biggest fluctuations in blood sugar levels. Choosing your carbohydrates wisely is critical to managing diabetes. Complex carbohydrates, or those that are rich in fiber, should constitute between 45 and 65 percent of your daily caloric intake. To make the best choices, keep these guidelines in mind: Get most or all of your carbohydrates from high-fiber sources like vegetables, beans, fruits, and whole grains. High-fiber foods are digested more slowly, which helps keep your blood sugar levels stable. Av Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Weight Loss

Type 2 Diabetes And Weight Loss

Many people who are diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, in fact in many cases; this is one of the reasons that they have become diabetic in the first place. For many people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, weight loss can bring blood sugar levels back in line and avoid the need for medications such as insulin to control levels. However, for diabetics the process of losing weight can be more complex than for an individual with normal insulin production and controlled blood sugar levels, as there are more factors to consider when starting a diet. Changes in blood sugar must be monitored closely and medications may need to be adjusted as weight is lost. It is also important to keep intake of carbohydrates regular and controlled, whilst still reducing overall food intake to cut calories. For these reasons it is not advisable for a diabetic person to embark on a weight loss regime without the supervision of a health professional. The benefits of weight loss Studies have shown that even the smallest reduction in weight can have positive effects on blood sugar levels, even for very overweight people. Diet and exercise was found to reduce the risk of diabetes in at risk individuals who were overweight and had high blood sugar levels by around 58% in a National Institute of Health study. It is also agreed by experts that 5-10% weight loss in type 2 diabetics significantly reduces blood sugar levels and in some cases can mean they no longer require medications. The American Diabetes Association says that a weight loss of 10 to 15 pounds can have the effects of Lowering blood sugar levels Reducing blood pressure Improving cholesterol levels Reducing the strain on joints such as the knees and hips. Weight loss also gives people more energy, helps them to feel mor Continue reading >>

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