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How Does Fiber Reduce The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

The Importance And Effect Of Dietary Fiber In Diabetes Prevention With Particularconsideration Of Whole Grain Products.

The Importance And Effect Of Dietary Fiber In Diabetes Prevention With Particularconsideration Of Whole Grain Products.

1. Horm Metab Res. 2007 Sep;39(9):687-93. The importance and effect of dietary fiber in diabetes prevention with particularconsideration of whole grain products. Kaline K(1), Bornstein SR, Bergmann A, Hauner H, Schwarz PE. (1)Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus at the Technical University of Dresden, Department of Medicine III, Genetics and Prevention of Diabetes, Dresden, Germany. The state of prediabetes is characterized by an increase in insulin resistanceand a decrease in pancreatic beta cell function. The prestage of type 2 diabetes mellitus can be identified by an impaired glucose tolerance and/or by an impairedfasting blood sugar. Apart from weight loss and increase in physical activity,the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus can also be prevented by dietarychanges. A low-fat diet with a dietary fiber intake of more than 30g/d was shown to represent an effective preventive approach. A high-fiber diet has manypositive effects on the physical health status. In addition to positive effectsin the gastrointestinal tract it has an obvious potential to support weightreduction and to improve disturbances of carbohydrate and fat metabolism. At the present state of knowledge, insoluble dietary fibers as found in whole graincereal products are considered to be especially effective in the prevention oftype 2 diabetes mellitus. A high intake of fruits and vegetables as well aspulses also exerts health-promoting properties. A high-fiber diet also plays animportant role in the prevention of obesity and coronary heart diseases. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/prevention & control* Continue reading >>

Dietary Fiber Reduces Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

Dietary Fiber Reduces Risk For Type 2 Diabetes

Multi-country study finds that cereal fiber has the greatest impact on diabetes risk. Getting plenty of dietary fiber from cereal, fruits and vegetables helps decrease risk for type 2 diabetes, according to results of the world’s largest diabetes study published in Diabetologia. The EPIC-InterAct study investigated the relationship between dietary fiber and type 2 diabetes—a growing global public health issue. Type 2 diabetes currently affects more than 360 million people worldwide. This number is expected to increase to more than 550 million by 2030. Since risk for for type 2 diabetes is closely linked to diet, exercise and weight, the good news is that healthy lifestyle choices can go a long way in preventing this condition. In fact, studies suggest that simply having enough fiber in your diet can reduce risk for type 2 diabetes, although most research on the issue was conducted in the United States. To expand upon these findings, researchers analyzed data from more than 26,000 adults from eight European countries, including Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the UK. Among adults included in the study, 11,559 had type 2 diabetes and 15,258 did not. For nearly 11 years, researchers followed participants and collected information on diet, exercise and overall health. Overall, researchers found that individuals with the highest amount of fiber intake had 18% lower risk of type 2 diabetes than those with the lowest fiber consumption. When reviewing data from this and 18 additional studies, researchers also found that cereal fiber has the greatest impact on diabetes risk. For each 10 gram/day increase in fiber intake from cereal and oatmeal, risk of diabetes decreased by 25%. In comparison, an overall 10 gram/day increase of fiber from Continue reading >>

Less Protein And More Fibre May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Less Protein And More Fibre May Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Less protein and more fibre may prevent type 2 diabetes You may be forgiven for thinking How boring, weve heard this all before! Yes, you may well be aware of some of the facts about dietary factors in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2 DM) but, there has been a lot of new research, giving us a much better idea of the factors involved in both the development and control of T2 DM. A lecture titled Dietary Factors for the Prevention of Diabetes Mellitus presented recently by Prof Rene Blaauw at SASAs Nutrition in NCD Prevention Roadshow, provided many new insights into a metabolic disease that is rapidly increasing all over the world. (NCDs are Non-Communicable Diseases , which include heart disease, cancer and diabetes.) According to Prof Blaauw, T2 DM is associated with chronic, low-grade inflammation, particularly in fat tissue. Signals from the inflamed tissue interfere with the working of insulin and promote insulin resistance (IR), which is regarded as the forerunner of T2 DM. When this type of inflammation occurs, thin and obese individuals react differently. Read: Inflammation important factor in type 2 diabetes Thin people produce macrophages (a type of white blood cell that engulfs and removes harmful components in the body), which have anti-inflammatory effects, while the fat tissue of overweight and obese people produces inflammatory cytokines (proteins that either regulate or interfere with cell signalling). The fact that cytokines can either produce a positive or negative effect, particularly when inflammation is present, has been linked to the development of IR which, if not counteracted by diet, weight loss and exercise, can progress to T2 DM. Strategies to reduce inflammation in the body include weight loss and eating plenty of protective ve Continue reading >>

A High-fiber Diet Reduces Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes? : Health Benefits Of Fruits & Vegetables

A High-fiber Diet Reduces Your Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes? : Health Benefits Of Fruits & Vegetables

In 2011, 366 million people worldwide were living with diabetes, and this number is expected to rise to 552 million by 2030.3 This increase is largely due to people and countries around the globe shifting towards a diet that includes lots of processed sugars, refined grains like white bread, and not enough fruits and vegetables. Health complications typically associated with diabetes include cardiovascular disease, damage to the nerves, kidneys, eyes and feet; skin conditions, hearing impairment and Alzheimers disease.4 In early 2015, researchers from Europe published a study on the connection between a persons fiber intake and their risk of developing diabetes. The study was large, following more than 26,000 people for 11 years.5 They found that participants who consumed the highest amounts of fiber (more than 26 grams each day) were 18% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those with the lowest fiber intake (less than 19 grams each day). The study also found that people who had the most fiber in their diets were less likely to smoke, drank little alcohol and were more physically active than those with low fiber intake. This is important because physical activity and fiber intake play important roles in weight loss and weight maintenance. High fiber intake did not protect participants whose body mass index (BMI) an estimate of body fat based on height and weight was classified as obese. Obesity nullifies the benefits of a high fiber diet. In order to reap the benefits of high fiber intake, a person must be at a healthy weight. The most effective way to pack your diet with fiber is to fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables, including beans like black beans, and to make sure that half of the grains you eat are whole grains. Doing so ensures youre getting Continue reading >>

High-fiber Diets Reduce Type 2 Diabetes

High-fiber Diets Reduce Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a growing global public health epidemic. The number of people suffering from diabetes has risen from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 worldwide. Sadly, this figure is expected to rise to about 642 million by 2040. Type 2 diabetes is, by far, the most prevalent form of diabetes. In the United States, type 2 diabetes accounts for 90-95% of all cases of diabetes. People with diabetes are at increased risk of suffering from serious health complications, such as stroke, kidney failure, heart disease, vision loss, premature death, and amputation of toes, feet, and legs. Numerous findings from several scientific studies have established that diet, exercise, and body weight play a significant role in the causation of type 2 diabetes. Since diet plays a key role in the development of type 2 diabetes, making the right dietary choices can go a long way towards helping protect individuals from type 2 diabetes. In fact, the results of a study published in Diabetologia indicate that a 10 gram/day increase in dietary fiber intake is associated with a 9% reduction in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. How Fiber Protects Against Type 2 Diabetes Excess levels of dietary fat encourages insulin resistance which is chiefly responsible for the build up of high blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes. Studies show that increased dietary fat leads to excess body weight which in turn increases type 2 diabetes risk. This is especially true when combined with the addition of sweetened foods. Eating whole plant foods high in fiber and water content can help. Fiber helps to lower blood sugar levels and maintain a healthy body weight. Soluble fiber, a type of fiber that dissolves in water to form gel, helps to control the amount of sugar floating in the blood by slowing the Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: Six Useful Steps

How To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: Six Useful Steps

Type 2 diabetes is a serious but common disease that can harm many organs of the body. Currently, 40 percent of people in the United States are expected to develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. There are ways to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. This article will look at six of them. Overview of diabetes Diabetes mellitus, or diabetes, refers to a group of metabolic diseases where the body does not adequately produce insulin or use insulin properly. Insulin plays a crucial role in delivering glucose, or sugar, into the cells where it is then used for energy. People with untreated or poorly managed diabetes have abnormally high levels of glucose in their blood. This can lead to organ damage and other complications. Too much glucose in the blood is called hyperglycemia. Symptoms include fatigue, blurry vision, hunger, increased thirst, and frequent urination. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for about 90-95 percent of all diagnosed cases. In type 2 diabetes, the body develops a resistance to insulin. This means the body can't use insulin to absorb blood sugar into the cells to be used for energy. Some people with type 2 diabetes may stop producing enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels within normal ranges. Type 2 diabetes usually affects people who are older. It emerges more slowly than type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may not have noticeable symptoms. A person may have type 2 diabetes without knowing it. Treatment of type 2 diabetes involves diet, exercise, and sometimes medications. Lifestyle changes can also help to prevent type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong disease, thought to be an autoimmune disease that usually develops during childhood and adolescence. In type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Nutrition And Healthy Eating

Nutrition And Healthy Eating

Eat more fiber. You've probably heard it before. But do you know why fiber is so good for your health? Dietary fiber — found mainly in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes — is probably best known for its ability to prevent or relieve constipation. But foods containing fiber can provide other health benefits as well, such as helping to maintain a healthy weight and lowering your risk of diabetes and heart disease. Selecting tasty foods that provide fiber isn't difficult. Find out how much dietary fiber you need, the foods that contain it, and how to add them to meals and snacks. What is dietary fiber? Dietary fiber, also known as roughage or bulk, includes the parts of plant foods your body can't digest or absorb. Unlike other food components, such as fats, proteins or carbohydrates — which your body breaks down and absorbs — fiber isn't digested by your body. Instead, it passes relatively intact through your stomach, small intestine and colon and out of your body. Fiber is commonly classified as soluble, which dissolves in water, or insoluble, which doesn't dissolve. Soluble fiber. This type of fiber dissolves in water to form a gel-like material. It can help lower blood cholesterol and glucose levels. Soluble fiber is found in oats, peas, beans, apples, citrus fruits, carrots, barley and psyllium. Insoluble fiber. This type of fiber promotes the movement of material through your digestive system and increases stool bulk, so it can be of benefit to those who struggle with constipation or irregular stools. Whole-wheat flour, wheat bran, nuts, beans and vegetables, such as cauliflower, green beans and potatoes, are good sources of insoluble fiber. Most plant-based foods, such as oatmeal and beans, contain both soluble and insoluble fiber. However, the amo Continue reading >>

Dietary Fiber For The Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-analysis

Dietary Fiber For The Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-analysis

Abstract Background: The evidence of the relationship between fiber intake and control of diabetes is mixed. The purpose of this study was to determine if an increase in dietary fiber affects glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: Randomized studies published from January 1, 1980, to December 31, 2010, that involved an increase in dietary fiber intake as an intervention, evaluated HbA1c and/or fasting blood glucose as an outcome, and used human participants with known type 2 diabetes mellitus were selected for review. Results: Fifteen studies met inclusion and exclusion criteria. The overall mean difference of fiber versus placebo was a reduction of fasting blood glucose of 0.85 mmol/L (95% CI, 0.46–1.25). Dietary fiber as an intervention also had an effect on HbA1c over placebo, with an overall mean difference of a decrease in HbA1c of 0.26% (95% CI, 0.02–0.51). Conclusion: Overall, an intervention involving fiber supplementation for type 2 diabetes mellitus can reduce fasting blood glucose and HbA1c. This suggests that increasing dietary fiber in the diet of patients with type 2 diabetes is beneficial and should be encouraged as a disease management strategy. Methods Data Sources and Searches A search of PubMed materials dated January 1, 1980, to December 31, 2010, was performed on February 9, 2011, using the keywords “dietary fiber” and “diabetes mellitus.” A search of OVID, the Cochrane Clinical Register of Controlled Trials, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature also was performed using the same keywords. The references within studies that met inclusion criteria were searched for any possible relevant articles that may have been missed by these queries. Study S Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Your doctor’s just told you that you have prediabetes. That means there's a good chance you could get , but you don't have to. There are plenty of things you can do to try to prevent it. Focus on the things you can change, like your diet and how active you are. Don’t dwell on the things you can't do anything about, like your age or your family's medical history. Your doctor can let you know where you stand and what you can do to turn things around. Losing extra pounds, eating better, and becoming more active are some of the most important steps you can take. There are people who aren't overweight who have type 2 diabetes. But added pounds do put you at risk. In one study, being overweight or obese was the single most important thing that predicted who would get diabetes. The study results showed that over 16 years, regular exercise -- at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week -- and a low-fat, high-fiber diet helped prevent it. If you're at high risk for the disease, your doctor may recommend taking medication to hold it off. Several studies show that various types of diabetes drugs, along with a healthy lifestyle, can cut the odds that you'll get it One study showed that people most likely to get it could lower their odds by 31%. They took the prescription diabetes drug metformin and made lifestyle and diet changes. That's good. But the study also showed that drastic lifestyle changes are the best way to avoid diabetes. You'll need to work with a dietitian to come up with a meal plan and talk to a trainer about how to get more exercise. Continue reading >>

Fibre And Diabetes

Fibre And Diabetes

Porridgeis a good source of fibre Increasing the amount of fibre in your diet can help you manage your diabetes. It also helps keep your gut healthy and can reduce your bloodcholesterol, which lowers your risk of cardiovascular disease. If you are trying to maintain a healthy weight, it can also be beneficial. The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN), who looked at the role of fibre in maintaining good health, published these new recommendations in July 2015: adults 16 years and over: 30g per day 11-16 years: 25g per day 5-11 years: 20g per day 2-5 years: 15g per day Currently, the average adult in the UK consumes only around 19g per day. Here, we’ll help you identify foods that are high in fibre and simple ways you can increase your intake. Remember that you’ll also need to increase the amount youdrink. If you have diabetes, or are just managing your weight, the best options for drinks are water, no-calorie/low-calorie sugar-free drinks, unsweetened tea or coffee with milk. What is fibre? Dietary fibre is a type of carbohydrate that’s found in plant-based foods. It’s not absorbed or digested by the body, but plays an important role in maintaining good health. There are two types of dietary fibre – soluble and insoluble. Most foods contain both types, but are usually richer in one type than the other. Soluble fibre Found in oat, oat bran, linseeds, barley, fruit and vegetable, nuts, beans, pulses, soya and lentils. Insoluble fibre Good sources include: wholemeal bread, bran, wholegrain cereals, nuts, seeds and the skin of some fruit and vegetables. Why is fibre important? Having diabetes can increase your risk of cardiovascular disease. Evidence shows that increasing your intake of fibre, especially cereal and wholegrains, can help reduce the risk Continue reading >>

High-fiber Foods Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

High-fiber Foods Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

High-Fiber Foods Reduce Risk of Type 2 Diabetes High-Fiber Foods Reduce Risk of Type 2 Diabetes A high-fiber diet may reduce your risk for type 2 diabetes, according to a cohort study published in Diabetologia. Researchers monitored fiber intake from cereal, fruit, and vegetables for participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct study for about 11 years. Those who ate the most fiber (more than 26 grams per day) experienced an 18 percent reduction in diabetes risk compared to those who consumed the least (less than 19 grams per day). High fiber consumption also led to lower body weight. An additional meta-analysis of 18 studies showed a 9 percent decrease in risk for every 10 grams of fiber consumed. Overall, fiber from cereals contributed the highest risk reduction of up to 25 percent. To help increase your fiber intake, try the fiber checklist . The InterAct Consortium. Dietary fibre and incidence of type 2 diabetes in eight European countries: the EPIC-InterAct Study and a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Diabetologia. Published online May 29, 2015. Continue reading >>

Higher Intake Of Fruits, Vegetables Or Their Fiber Reduces The Risk Of Type2 Diabetes: A Metaanalysis

Higher Intake Of Fruits, Vegetables Or Their Fiber Reduces The Risk Of Type2 Diabetes: A Metaanalysis

Higher intake of fruits, vegetables or their fiber reduces the risk of type2 diabetes: A metaanalysis 2Genetics and Aging Research Unit, MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA 1Department of Biochemistry, Binzhou Medical University, YanTai, ShanDong, China 2Genetics and Aging Research Unit, MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts, USA Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer Received 2015 Apr 1; Revised 2015 May 5; Accepted 2015 May 12. Copyright 2015 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association of the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons AttributionNonCommercialNoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is noncommercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Some previous studies reported no significant association of consuming fruit or vegetables, or fruit and vegetables combined, with type2 diabetes. Others reported that only a greater intake of green leafy vegetables reduced the risk of type2 diabetes. To further investigate the relationship between them, we carried out a metaanalysis to estimate the independent effects of the intake of fruit, vegetables and fiber on the risk of type2 diabetes. Searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE for reports of prospective cohort studies published from 1 January 1966 to 21 July 2014 were ca Continue reading >>

More Evidence That A High-fiber Diet Can Curb Type 2 Diabetes

More Evidence That A High-fiber Diet Can Curb Type 2 Diabetes

People who ate more than 26 grams of fiber a day had an 18 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who ate 19 grams a day or less Fiber may benefit diabetes by altering hormonal signals, slowing down nutrient absorption or altering fermentation in the large intestine, along with promoting feelings of satiety and weight loss The majority of your fiber should come from vegetables, not grains By Dr. Mercola In the US, nearly 80 million people, or one in four has some form of diabetes or pre-diabetes. One in two people with diabetes do not know they have it,1 which increases the odds of developing complications, which can be deadly. Leading a healthy lifestyle is one of the best strategies to prevent, and treat, type 2 diabetes, and even more specifically, eating a high-fiber diet is emerging as a key strategy you can use to lower your risk. More Than 26 Grams of Fiber a Day May Lower Your Diabetes Risk US dietary guidelines call for adults to consume 20-30 grams of fiber per day. I believe an ideal amount for most adults is around 50 grams per 1,000 calories consumed. Most people, however, get only half that, or less. In a recent study conducted by researchers at the Imperial College London, those who had the highest intake of fiber (more than 26 grams a day) had an 18 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those with the lowest intake (less than 19 grams a day).2 The fiber may benefit diabetes by altering hormonal signals, slowing down nutrient absorption or altering fermentation in the large intestine, along with promoting feelings of satiety.3 Eating a high-fiber diet is also associated with weight loss, and the researchers believe this may, in turn, lower diabetes risk. In fact, when the researchers accounted for participants' BMI, th Continue reading >>

How Fiber Helps Control High Blood Sugar

How Fiber Helps Control High Blood Sugar

Are you filling up on fiber? If you have type 2 diabetes, you should be — including high-fiber foods in your diet is a healthy way to control high blood sugar. As an added bonus, you may be able to stay full longer on the correct portion sizes than you would if you were eating more refined foods. And eating lots of soluble fiber (the kind found in oatmeal, beans, and apples, among other foods) may help reduce dangerous visceral belly fat, according to a recent study. "Fiber promotes good bowel health, lowers the risk of cancer and heart disease, and also controls your blood sugar in a certain way," explains Amy Kranick, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator with the adult diabetes program at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. When fiber is digested, your body handles it differently than the way in which refined carbohydrates, such as white flour, are digested. A portion of the fiber simply passes through your digestive system intact. This difference means that eating foods rich in fiber is less likely to cause a spike in high blood sugar. "Fiber doesn't require insulin [to digest], so it isn't counted as part of your carbohydrates," says Kranick. As a result, when you are reading labels and budgeting daily carbohydrates, you can subtract half the grams of dietary fiber from the total carbohydrate count. At the same time, you should be keeping track of how much fiber you eat. Adults need at least 25 grams of fiber daily for best health outcomes, says Kranick. Other Benefits of Fiber Fiber may also help you manage your overall eating habits, says Kranick. Here are some of the additional benefits of eating high-fiber foods: Antioxidants. Many of the foods that contain fiber also contain antioxidants, which are generally good for you Continue reading >>

6 Reasons A High-fiber Diet Is Insanely Healthy For Diabetes

6 Reasons A High-fiber Diet Is Insanely Healthy For Diabetes

Fiber directly improves insulin sensitivity iStock A number of studies have found that eating more dietary fiber for a period of weeks or months is linked to a reduction in biomarkers for insulin resistance. This may be due in part to dietary fiber’s anti-inflammatory effects—high-fiber diets have been associated with reduced blood levels of C-reactive protein, a marker for systemic inflammation—and also to the fact that the short-chain fatty acids that fiber produces when it ferments in the intestinal tract tend to inhibit the breakdown of the body’s fat stores into free fatty acids. This breakdown of fat stores appears to play a major role in creating insulin resistance in the skeletal muscles. iStock Soluble fiber’s general effect of slowing down the digestive process means that the carbohydrates we eat take longer to be broken down into glucose. As a result, the release of glucose into the blood after eating tends to occur more slowly over a longer period of time following a high-fiber meal. This means that glucose doesn’t rise to as high a peak after eating, putting less stress on the glucose metabolism process. iStock The same fermentation process that signals the body to become more responsive to insulin also suppresses glucose production in the liver—countering the liver’s glucose overproduction that occurs as the result of insulin resistance. Fiber makes you feel more full so it’s easier to eat less iStock A number of studies have found that people who eat diets high in fiber feel more full after eating and also feel less hungry between meals. For starters, dietary fiber is simply bulkier than other nutrients. This causes the stomach to become more distended when you eat fiber, which sends appetite-suppressing signals to the brain. Soluble fib Continue reading >>

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