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How Does Diabetes Cause Weight Loss?

Keeping The Pounds On: Causes Of Unexplained Weight Loss

Keeping The Pounds On: Causes Of Unexplained Weight Loss

Our society is obsessed with weight, if you haven’t noticed. More than two thirds of US adults are overweight or obese, there are more diet books published than we can count, and, of course, we have the privilege of watching shows like The Biggest Loser to help keep us in line. And according to government statistics, more than 85% of people with Type 2 diabetes are overweight. So it stands to reason that much of the focus of managing Type 2 diabetes is based on reaching and staying at a healthy weight. It’s important to note that thin people can get diabetes too, and not just Type 1 diabetes. In a 2008 study published in the journal Diabetes Care, adults age 60 to 79 years old with a body-mass index (BMI) of less than 18.5 (which is considered to be underweight) were 30% more likely to get Type 2 diabetes than adults with a “normal” BMI of 18.5 to 24.9. In a society where being thin equates with beauty, youth, intelligence, and success, there is often little sympathy or patience for people who are too thin and who desperately want to gain weight. If you’ve struggled with losing weight and keeping it off, you know all too well how challenging that can be. People who want to gain weight often face the same kind of battle. And to have diabetes on top of that can make it doubly difficult. First things first: identify the cause If you have diabetes, are underweight, and would like to gain weight, it’s helpful to first have a talk with your doctor. Make sure there are no health or medical reasons for you being underweight (especially if you’ve recently lost weight without trying) such as having an overactive thyroid, a digestive disorder (such as Crohn disease), or cancer, for example. A physical exam, blood work, and other tests may be needed to rule out certai Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: 8 Steps To Weight-loss Success

Type 2 Diabetes: 8 Steps To Weight-loss Success

Losing weight is at the top of many people's to-do lists. But for those with type 2 diabetes, weight control is especially important. “Carrying excess body fat increases the body's resistence to insulin, making blood glucose management more challenging,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, CDE, past 2009 national president of health care and education for the American Diabetes Association. "According to the World Health Organization, 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese." In fact, research indicates that the longer someone has a high body mass index or BMI (a common measure of being overweight or obese), the greater their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It’s no secret that losing weight — and keeping it off — isn’t easy. But it is possible, and the benefits for those with diabetes are great. So how do you get started? Experts say the right way to lose weight is to incorporate a healthful diet into your overall diabetes management plan. Diabetes Diet Control: Steps to Success Here's how to get started on the path to weight-loss success: Get physical. Exercise can help keep off the weight. “Research shows that people who increase physical activity along with reducing calorie intake will lose more body fat than people who only diet,” says McLaughlin, now a certified diabetes educator at Nebraska Medicine, Children's Hospital and Endocrine Clinics, in Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska. For confirmation, look at the National Weight Control Registry (NWCR), a database of 10,000 men and women who have lost a significant amount of weight and kept it off. Only 10 percent reached and maintained their weight-loss goal without exercise. Most people in the register chose walking as their form of exercise. Eat breakfast. The most effective diabetes die Continue reading >>

Unexplained Weight Loss With Diabetes

Unexplained Weight Loss With Diabetes

You might be aware that as a metabolic disorder, some forms of diabetes come with excessive weight. But diabetes might also cause a sudden drop in weight too. In fact, many patients who are ultimately diagnosed with diabetes first go to their doctor with concerns about unexplained weight loss. Several mechanisms are behind this symptom. Weight loss can occur as a consequence of high blood sugar, dehydration, muscle breakdown and problems with your thyroid. Video of the Day Although both type 1 and type 2 diabetes can involve fairly dramatic weight loss over several days at the onset of the disease, it tends to be more common among people with type 1. In both cases, the cause is that your body fails to adequately deal with insulin. The job of insulin is to transport glucose from the foods you eat into your cells to provide energy for all the work that’s required to keep you alive. However, most type 1 diabetics don’t produce insulin. Type 2 diabetics either don’t produce enough insulin or their bodies don’t respond to it properly. Consequently, even if you eat normally, that blood sugar simply builds up and gets excreted in your urine. This causes weight loss, but it could also damage your organs if you don't receive treatment. If you experience an unexplained weight loss, surpassing 5 percent of your body weight within days, see your health care provider as soon as possible. Another symptom of diabetes associated with weight loss is frequent urination. When you urinate more frequently and don’t drink enough to replace the lost fluid, you become dehydrated. Urination increases in diabetes, because your kidneys have to work harder to filter the excess glucose building up in your system. The increased glucose in the urine draws fluid from your tissues. When you l Continue reading >>

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

People with diabetes receive mixed messages about weight loss from magazines, newspapers, friends, family, and, yes, even health professionals. Few subjects have accumulated as much misleading and potentially dangerous folklore as the subject of obesity. A common message is that losing weight is just a matter of willpower, and if you have been losing weight and reach a plateau, it's because you've lost your willpower and are no longer following your diet. Furthermore, for people with type 2 diabetes, the message often is that weight loss is the answer to improving glucose control: “If you just lose 20 lb, you won't need insulin.” What does research tell us about these issues, and what should our messages as health professionals be to people with diabetes? Obesity is a serious worldwide problem and is associated with the risk of developing diabetes. Today, more than 1.1 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese.1 In the past 20 years, the rates of obesity have tripled in developing countries that have adopted a Western lifestyle, with the Middle East, Pacific Islands, Southeast Asia, India, and China facing the greatest increase. Consequently, the number of people with diabetes in these countries is expected to increase from 84 million in 2000 to 228 million by 2030. Thus, preventing obesity is a high priority for the prevention of diabetes and other chronic diseases. According to some obesity researchers, it may not be possible to decrease the current numbers of overweight and obese people in the United States, but we need to try to slow or prevent the increase that has been occurring at an alarming rate.2 The hope is that slowing the rising prevalence of obesity will also slow the diabetes epidemic. Can this be accomplished? Thus fa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Lose Weight

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Lose Weight

Weight loss is a common recommendation for treatment for type 2 diabetes. Many people are overweight when they’re first diagnosed, and that extra fat actually increases their insulin resistance (when their bodies can’t properly use the hormone insulin). By losing weight, people with type 2 diabetes can become less insulin resistant, and they’re able to use insulin better. (To learn more about how the hormone insulin works, read our article on how insulin regulates blood glucose levels.) If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and you're overweight, you should get started as soon as possible on a weight loss plan. It is important to work with a registered dietitian to help you figure out a plan that will work for you—a healthy meal plan, physical activity, and realistic goals will help you reach a healthy weight. There are many advantages to losing weight (and not just diabetes-related ones): Boost your energy level Lower your cholesterol levels (especially important for people with type 2 diabetes) Protect your heart (also important for people with diabetes, since heart-related complications are very common) Make it easier to control your blood glucose level As you may already know, losing weight can be a challenge, but don’t let that stop you. Do whatever you need to in order to stay motivated. It is the amount of calories we eat that contributes to weight gain. Make small changes. Learn portion sizes and reduce the amount of snacks in your day to reduce the total amount of calories you consume each day. Find cookbooks with healthier recipes using low-fat options. For a little fun, take our carb counting quiz to see how well you know the carb content of certain foods; this can help you make healthier choices. Work with a registered dietitian Continue reading >>

Unexplained Weight Loss? Why You Need To See A Doctor

Unexplained Weight Loss? Why You Need To See A Doctor

All of us cangain or lose a pound or two; we indulge a little too much,and then we put in a few extra workouts. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy But if you havent tightened the belt on your diet or ramped up your exercise routine and your weight is still dropping, talk to your doctor. While weight loss of just a pound or two isnt a reason for concern, unexplained weight loss of 10 pounds or more may meansomething is wrong. It could be an early sign of diabetes . This weight loss can occur relatively quickly over a few weeks to a couple of months. Insulin is a hormone that allows your body to use glucose (sugar) for energy. If you have type 2 diabetes , your body doesnt use insulin effectively, and cant transport the glucose to the cells. Instead, it builds up in the blood. When the glucose doesnt arrive in your cells, your body thinks its starving and finds a way to compensate. It creates energy by burning fat and muscle at a rapid pace. This causes unexplained weight loss. Your kidneys also begin working overtime to eliminate the excess sugars in the blood. This uses additional energy and can cause damage to the kidneys. Type 1 diabetes has a similar pattern, but instead of being unable to use insulin, your body stops producing it altogether. Unexplained weight loss can occur in people who have type 2 diabetes, but its more commonly found in people with type 1 . Parents are often the first to notice the unusual weight loss in a child with type 1 diabetes. What othersymptoms should you watch for? Weight loss from diabetes is not usually a standalone symptom. It is typically accompanied by other signs and symptoms including: Continue reading >>

Is Weight Loss Caused By Diabetes Dangerous?

Is Weight Loss Caused By Diabetes Dangerous?

home / health & living center / diet & weight management a-z list / is weight loss caused by diabetes dangerous article Is Weight Loss Caused by Diabetes Dangerous? Medical Author: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) is an Attending Physician with the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Associate Director of Clinical Research, Recruitment and Phenotyping with the Center for Androgen Related Disorders, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. I have a friend that is 35 and has diabetes . For the past eightyears, his weight has always been in check and if anything he may have beena little overweight . Just recently, he has lost a lot of weight and he toldme that he weighs less than he did in high school. I think he looks toothin and I am concerned about his health with him being a diabetic. Shouldthere be a concern and what kind of advice can you give me to pass on tohim. We often assume weight loss is good and healthy. A slow steady intentional weight loss using nutritional change and exercise is associated with beneficial effects on the heart, blood pressure , and cholesterol levels . In addition, weight loss can reduce " insulin resistance " and makemuscles and fat tissues more sensitive to circulating insulin levels in the blood. What type of diabetes causes weight loss? A reduction in insulin resistance is problematic because insulin is needed tohelp glucose enter these tissues to be metabolized. If these tissues areresistant to insulin, higher than normal levels are needed for this processto occur. This is often the case in Type 2 diabetes . As a result, a viciouscycle occurs, the higher the insulin levels are, the harder it is to loseweight (insulin is anabolic, and is a hormone that likes to store Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Weight Loss In Some People And Weight Gain In Some Others?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Weight Loss In Some People And Weight Gain In Some Others?

To understand dynamics of body weight first we have to understand Energy balance equation which states Calorie intake - calorie lost = Weight So if, Calorie intake > calorie lost = Weight Gain Calorie intake < calorie lost = Weight Loss Calorie intake = calorie lost = Weight is maintained Let's try to understand it in patients with diabetes Scenarios causing weight gain in Diabetes 1. In patients with type 2 Diabetes some may have predominantly insulin resistance ( cells are not as much sensitive to action of insulin as they should be ) This makes their pancreas to secrete excess insulin in an attempt to overcome this resistance . Excessive insulin coupled with high calorie intake causes weight gain 2. A patient of Type 1 Diabetes or type 2 Diabetes who has good control of glucose but consumes excess calories than he needs is bound to gain weight . A good number of patients resort to defensive eating for the fear of hypoglycemia and this also causes weight gain Scenarios causing weight loss in Diabetes 1. Any patient with uncontrolled diabetes will usually have weight loss . This is due to the fact that cells of our body are deprived of glucose as a source of energy and therefore body resorts to using fat and protein as alternative sources causing weight loss 2. A patient of Type 1 Diabetes or type 2 Diabetes who has good control of glucose but consumes less calories than he needs loses weight . In addition associated thyroid disorders may also have some influence on weight . Continue reading >>

Weight And Diabetes

Weight And Diabetes

A balanced diet and an active lifestyle can help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because weight can affect diabetes and diabetes can affect weight. This is true for kids and teens with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, the body doesn't use glucose properly. Glucose, a sugar, is the main source of energy for the body. Glucose levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin , which is made in the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes , the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Undiagnosed or untreated type 1 diabetes can cause weight loss. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream if insulin isn't available to move it into the body's cells. When glucose levels become high, the kidneys work to get rid of unused sugar through urine (pee). This causes weight loss due to dehydration and loss of calories from the sugar that wasn't used as energy. Kids who develop type 1 diabetes often lose weight even though they have a normal or increased appetite. Once kids are diagnosed and treated for type 1 diabetes, weight usually returns to normal. Developing type 1 diabetes isn't related to being overweight, but keeping a healthy weight is important. Too much fat tissue can make it hard for insulin to work properly, leading to both higher insulin needs and trouble controlling blood sugar. In type 2 diabetes , the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should and blood sugar levels get too high. Most kids and teens are overweight when they're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases a person's risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Also, weight gain in people with type 2 diabetes makes blood sugar levels even harder to control. People with type 2 di Continue reading >>

Unexplained Weight Loss

Unexplained Weight Loss

Tweet Unexplained weight loss is the term used to describe a decrease in body weight that occurs unintentionally and can be a warning sign of diabetes. The amount you weigh is determined by a number of factors including age, your calorie intake and overall health. Once you reach middle adulthood, your weight should remain relatively stable from year to year. Losing or gaining a few pounds here and there is normal, but unexplained weight loss that is significant (10 lbs/4.5kg or more or over 5% of your body weight) or persistent may signal an underlying medical condition. Unexplained weight loss means weight loss that occurs without trying through dieting or exercising. What are the possible causes of unexplained weight loss? Unintentional or unexplained weight loss can be caused by a number of things, including depression, certain medication and diabetes. Potential causes of unexplained weight loss include: Addison’s disease Coeliac disease Chronic diarrhoea Dementia Diabetes mellitus Eating disorders (anorexia and bulimia) Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency HIV/AIDS Hypercalcemia Hyperthyroidism Malnutrition Medicines, including chemotherapy drugs, laxatives, and thyroid medications Parkinson’s disease Recreational drugs, including amphetamines and cocaine Tuberculosis Diabetes and sudden weight loss In people with diabetes, insufficient insulin prevents the body from getting glucose from the blood into the body's cells to use as energy. When this occurs, the body starts burning fat and muscle for energy, causing a reduction in overall body weight. Unexpected weight loss is often noticed in people prior to a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes but it may also affect people with type 2 diabetes. When to call your doctor If you have unintentionally lost more than 5% of your Continue reading >>

7 Scary Reasons Youre Losing Weight Without Trying

7 Scary Reasons Youre Losing Weight Without Trying

7 Scary Reasons Youre Losing Weight Without Trying It's natural for your weight to fluctuate during the year. A swing of a few pounds up or down is normaland nothing to worry about. But if you drop 5% of your body weight in less than six monthsand you can't pinpoint a good explanation for that weight lossit's time to let your doctor know what's up, says Anne Cappola, MD, an endocrinologist and professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania . "It's not common to lose a significant amount of weight without an obvious reason," she says. "If you're losing weight and nothing's changed with your diet or activity, you need to worry about that a little bit." While small or temporary weight fluctuations are normalgaining a few pounds during the holidays, maybe, or losing a few after a stomach bugmore significant weight shifts that don't have an obvious trigger could be an early sign of a serious health condition, says Kerry Hildreth, MD, an assistant professor of geriatric medicine at the University of Colorado . (Want to pick up some healthier habits? Sign up to get healthy living tips and more delivered straight to your inbox !) Here are 7 health issues that could underlie your unexplained weight loss. Weight loss is a common symptom of hyperthyroidism or an over-active thyroid, Cappola says. "If I suspected a thyroid issue, I'd probably look for increased hunger or heart palpitations," she explains. Sleeping problems or feeling hot all the time are two more symptoms of an over-active thyroid, she says. Celiac diseasean autoimmune disorder tied to gluten can cause a drop in weight, and tends to be accompanied by other GI symptoms like diarrhea, says Jamile Wakim-Fleming, MD, a gastroenterologist at Cleveland Clinic . Problems with your pancreas, which produces enzyme Continue reading >>

Why Am I Losing Weight With Type 2 Diabetes?

Why Am I Losing Weight With Type 2 Diabetes?

Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a master’s degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. If you have type 2 diabetes, weight loss can be a good thing. This is assuming the weight loss is part of a balanced approach to your diabetes management, involving sound nutrition and physical activity. Why weight loss is (usually) a good thing Decreased weight is a goal usually associated with type 2 diabetes for many reasons: it helps in lowering blood sugars, decreases your risk of heart disease, and contributes to overall health, to name a few. In fact, a decrease in body weight by as little as five to 10 percent can result in tremendous benefits when talking about blood glucose and health in general. But if you have type 2 diabetes and you’ve had unintentional weight loss, take it as a warning sign, and consult your physician. More on diabetes and weight loss: How Does Losing Weight Help With Type 2 Diabetes? Weight Loss and Diabetes: A Balancing Act There are three worrisome causes of unintentional weight loss for those with type 2 diabetes: 1. Continual high blood sugar With type 2 diabetes, the body is not able to effectively get glucose from the bloodstream into the cells for use in all bodily functions. And if your type 2 diabetes is not managed or controlled, blood sugar gets high very quickly and stays high until something is done about it. If nothing is done to resolve high blood sugar, the glucose that is causing the high blood sugar can’t get into the body’s cells for energy and is excreted in the urine. In other words, if you eat carbohydrates to fuel your body, those carbohydrates that are broken down into glucose aren’t used as fuel, Continue reading >>

One Man's Weight Loss Was A Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes

One Man's Weight Loss Was A Sign Of Type 2 Diabetes

Kim Palmaffy was diagnosed with diabetes at age 51. (KIM PALMAFFY) If you have type 2 diabetes, you may feel abnormally thirsty and have a need to urinate frequently. One other possibility? You may lose weight without even trying. If it sounds like a weight-loss dream come true, it's actually more of a nightmare. Because your body doesn't have enough insulin or is losing sensitivity to insulin, you can't shuttle blood sugar into muscle cells. Blood sugar rises to toxic levels and you begin to excrete that excess sugar into the urine. At this point some people may shed pounds without dieting. Kim Palmaffy, 61, a contractor in Maplewood, N.J., was close to 300 pounds when he began to show signs of type 2 diabetes ten years ago. At 5'10", he knew he needed to lose weight. And then it started happening all on its own. The pounds started flying off, sometimes up to three pounds a week. "I got down to like 250 pounds over a period of weeks." You may feel exhausted His clothes began to fit better, but Palmaffy was feeling terrible. "I couldn't sleep, I started to urinate all the time, and I was always thirsty." It began to interfere with his work. "I had to get off the roof and take a leak all the time, as dumb as it sounds," he says. A visit to his doctors showed that Palmaffy's blood glucose, the type of sugar the body uses for energy, was a whopping 450 mg/dL, four times what's considered normal on a fasting blood glucose test110 mg/dL. ​​"He started me on a whole battery of medications; I found that the medications were very positive," he said. "We finally settled on Glucotrol (glipizide), five milligrams twice a day." He also takes a cholesterol-lowering drug. Palmaffy had to make some dietary changes to cope with the diagnosis. He found it wasn't that difficult. His Continue reading >>

Weight Loss In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Weight Loss In Type 2 Diabetic Patients

A guiding principle in the treatment of type 2 diabetic patients has been the recommendation to lose weight (1,2). This is because the health benefits of weight loss have long been recognized (3). As weight loss progresses and is maintained, an improvement of glycemia may be evidenced by a reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin (4,5). Redmon et al. (6) report in this issue of Diabetes Care the 2-year outcome of a combination of weight loss therapies in type 2 diabetic patients. The end result was a weight loss of 4.6 kg sustained over 2 years, which led to a decrease of HbA1c of 0.5%. While full credit must be given to the authors for their innovative approach, and for their hard and dedicated work, it is disappointing that such a combination therapy program in an excellent medical center with outstanding clinicians and facilities could not lead to a greater weight loss and particularly a greater improvement in blood glucose control. Why is weight loss in obese diabetic patients so modest? Here, as mentioned, in the best of hands, patients who started at a weight of 113.2 kg ended 2 years later at a weight of 108.6, a 4% drop. Why can’t we do better, all of us, in treating type 2 diabetic patients? Therapeutic weight loss in type 2 diabetic patients has been very difficult to achieve. In an 18-month study that compared the use of three sets of dietary guidelines for type 2 diabetes (7), no significant changes in body weight were observed. Diabetologists have often ignored standards of care indicating that lifestyle change with diet and exercise be the initial intervention because of their belief that this is an exercise in futility. Weight loss for anyone is difficult. For type 2 diabetic patients, it has been particularly so. Why? One reason is energy expenditure, whic Continue reading >>

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