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How Do You Increase Your Insulin?

Nine Things That Improve Insulin Sensitivity: Accelerate Fat Loss & Build Muscle Faster!

Nine Things That Improve Insulin Sensitivity: Accelerate Fat Loss & Build Muscle Faster!

Insulin sensitivity is SO important for fat loss because when you are insulin resistant, the body is much more likely to store the food you eat as fat. Insulin resistance also produces inflammation in the body, causing a whole bunch of health problems that any sane person wouldn’t want to deal with. Besides making it nearly impossible to lose significant amounts of body fat or pack on muscle, poor insulin sensitivity has all of the following negative effects: • It reduces athletic performance. • It inhibits sleep and makes you tired. • It slows recovery from training or injury. • Muscle soreness and pain are more severe. • It leads to diabetes if you don’t fix it. • It raises triglycerides and increases heart disease risk • It leads to a boatload of other health problems—you’ve heard the misery suffered by diabetics (sleep apnea, nerve problems, gut issues, eye and feet problems, and so on). Don’t worry! There are simple everyday things you can do to improve insulin sensitivity and optimize everything about your life. This article will give you a quick run-down on how insulin works and what you can do NOW to improve it. What Insulin Is & Why It Matters Insulin is a hormone that is secreted by the pancreas. When you eat a meal, your blood glucose (sugar) rises after you digest the food. Insulin goes into action, binding with your cells in order to store the glucose either in muscle as glycogen (the energy source for the muscle) or as fat. If you are healthy, the body “prefers” to replenish glycogen first, only storing excess glucose as fat if glycogen stores are topped off. When you develop insulin resistance, the cells aren’t readily binding to insulin. The body has to pump out more insulin to get the high blood glucose that’s circulating Continue reading >>

5 Incredibly Powerful Eating Tips That Boost Insulin Sensitivity Naturally

5 Incredibly Powerful Eating Tips That Boost Insulin Sensitivity Naturally

Food provides information to the body. Protein influences everything from muscle growth, appetite control right through to hormone production. Fiber feeds the bacteria in our guts which play a role in the health of our immune system. Carbs influence blood glucose and exercise performance. Vitamin C protects against the damaging effects of high blood glucose and oxidative damage. Salt influences water retention. etc… We could go on forever. The nutritional components of food serve many different roles within the human body. This article aims to highlight 5 key nutritional aspects of food have been shown to improve the action (or sensitivity) of insulin, resulting in improved blood glucose management in people with diabetes. Before we go into details – it is important to understand a few key terms surrounding insulin and diabetes. Key Terms Insulin is a key hormone involved in the use and storage of fuels within the body. Insulin sensitivity refers to how effective the hormone insulin does its job in the body. This varies between individuals and is reduced in people with diabetes. Insulin resistance is when muscle, liver and fat cells do not use insulin properly. As a result, glucose builds up in the blood, overflows into the urine and is excreted out of the body, never fulfilling its role as the body’s main source of fuel. Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by different degrees of insulin resistance, where not enough insulin is produced, or the current insulin produced does not work effectively. Disorders in insulin production and signalling can have widespread and devastating effects on the body’s organs and tissues if left uncontrolled. Therefore, it is important that people with type 1 diabetes (who produce next to no insulin) have an unin Continue reading >>

How To Improve Insulin Levels In Your Body

How To Improve Insulin Levels In Your Body

Insulin is a hormone the pancreas produces that helps transport both glucose and triglycerides from the bloodstream into the cells. Glucose is the body's primary source of energy; every cell needs glucose. Triglycerides are a type of lipid, stored only in fat cells, that is converted to energy when you lack sufficient glucose in your bloodstream. Insulin is released in response to glucose; the faster and higher your glucose levels rise, the more insulin will flood your bloodstream to bring down blood sugar levels. Keeping glucose levels stable will also regulate insulin levels. Video of the Day Avoid added sugars. Sugar, which includes natural sugars such as honey and maple syrup, as well as things like high fructose corn syrup, are the easiest substances for your body to convert to glucose. The more sugar you eat, the faster your blood sugar rises. Often, this triggers the release of too much insulin as your body attempts to compensate for the flood of glucose in your bloodstream. Too much insulin can lead to low blood sugar, signaling your brain that you need more glucose. This triggers hunger, often with a craving for more sweets, starting a vicious cycle of low and high insulin levels that can lead to weight gain and pre-diabetes. Eat a diet high in fiber. Fiber, sometimes called "roughage," is a type of plant-based undigestible carbohydrate. Because your body cannot fully process fiber, it slows digestion and stops your body from being able to produce glucose too quickly. Harvard's Joslin Diabetes Center says that people following a high-fiber diet have lower glucose levels and better insulin control. Fiber also promotes satiety — helping you feel full faster and stay full longer. This can lead to an overall reduction in caloric intake and weight loss. Maintain a Continue reading >>

25 Simple Ways To Improve Insulin Sensitivity & Prevent Diabetes | Poliquin Article

25 Simple Ways To Improve Insulin Sensitivity & Prevent Diabetes | Poliquin Article

25 Simple Ways to Improve Insulin Sensitivity & PREVENT Diabetes We’re going to let you in on a little secret: The FIRST thing you should improve when you want to change your body by losing fat or putting on muscle is to improve insulin sensitivity. Insulin sensitivity is SO important for fat loss because when you are insulin resistant, the body is much more likely to store the food you eat as fat. Insulin resistance also produces inflammation in the body, causing a whole bunch of health problems that any sane person wouldn’t want to deal with. Here are 25 simple actions you can take that improve insulin sensitivity. #1: Do strength training and other anaerobic activities. Exercise is absolutely critical for improving insulin sensitivity because your muscles and cells are desperate for fuel during and after your workout. Training modes that build muscle, such as lifting weights or sprints, are most effective for improving insulin sensitivity because muscle consumes the majority of the energy transported in the blood (as much as 90 percent). For every 10 percent increase in muscle mass, you get an 11 percent reduction in insulin resistance. #2: Endurance exercise works too, but combined training is better. Endurance exercise has a very beneficial effect on insulin sensitivity, but only in trained muscle. So if you’re a runner, you’ll be fairly insulin sensitive in the leg musculature, but less so in the upper body. Therefore, it’s important to do some form of total body exercise and strength training is pretty much a no-brainer as your best option because combined aerobic and resistance programs improve insulin sensitivity more than aerobic training alone. If you’re sedentary and overweight, optimizing carb intake may mean to eat a very low-carb (less than 5 Continue reading >>

High Insulin Foods

High Insulin Foods

Your body draws energy from food by transforming what you eat into glucose, a kind of sugar. A hormone called insulin then works in your bloodstream to release that glucose to your muscles and organs. Most of the time, this system runs like a fine-tuned machine, but in some people, insulin malfunction may result in an unhealthy build-up of glucose. Knowing which foods to avoid helps you balance your insulin and manage blood glucose to stay healthy. Produced in the pancreas, insulin’s main functions are to facilitate the absorption of glucose into your cells and the storage of excess glucose for future use. If you have prediabetes and diabetes, however, your body either can’t produce enough insulin, or it doesn’t use the hormone properly, resulting in too much circulating glucose in your blood. Monitoring your food choices helps you avoid a rush of glucose your body can’t handle. Foods That Spike Blood Sugar Foods containing carbohydrates affect blood sugar the most. Maintaining healthy blood sugar doesn’t mean cutting out this food group altogether though. Instead, avoid those carb-containing foods that digest quickly, taking your blood glucose levels on a hair-raising ride through peaks and valleys. Among the biggest offenders are: Table sugar Regular sodas and other sweetened beverages Baked goods like cookies, cakes and other sugary desserts Candy Processed foods with high sugar content, like cereal, granola and granola bars Refined grains, like white bread, rice, bagels and pasta Jellies and jams Fruit-flavored yogurt and sweetened milk If you do occasionally use processed foods, check the Nutrition Facts label on the packaging for the grams of sugar in a serving. The higher the sugar content, the faster the food will raise your blood sugar. Better Carbs f Continue reading >>

25 Ways To Improve Your Insulin Sensitivity

25 Ways To Improve Your Insulin Sensitivity

114 Comments Insulin does a lot of important things for us. It pulls glucose from the blood and fritters it away into our cells to be burned for energy or stored as glycogen. It prevents hyperglycemic toxicity to neurons, pancreatic cells, the arterial walls and the generation of excessive levels of reactive oxygen species. It even promotes muscle protein synthesis and helps augment muscular hypertrophy, especially following resistance training. Clearly, we need insulin. Without it, we’d die, as type 1 diabetics readily do without an exogenous source. But insulin has other effects, like inhibiting the breakdown of body fat into free fatty acids for energy production. Although locking fatty acids into body fat sounds terrible, it isn’t evidence of insulin being malicious. Lipolysis is temporarily blunted so that we can burn or sequester the glucose coming in. Once the glucose is handled, lipolysis resumes. We oscillate between fat burning and glucose burning, seamlessly switching fuel sources when needed. Sure, we’re not burning any fat when insulin is elevated, but once our insulin levels normalize we’ll be back on track. When you’re insulin sensitive, this is pretty much how it works. You secrete enough insulin to get the job done, but not so much that you gain weight and stop burning fat. What if a person secretes too much insulin in response to a glucose load? What if, for whatever reason (and there are dozens of possible culprits), a person’s cells are resistant to the effects of insulin? What if, to remove the same amount of glucose from the blood, a person secretes twice or thrice the amount of insulin? What happens when insulin stays elevated? Lipolysis is inhibited to an even greater degree. Body fat becomes even harder to burn. Susceptible brain, ar Continue reading >>

How To Increase Insulin Levels

How To Increase Insulin Levels

Expert Reviewed Three Methods:Increasing Your Body’s Production of InsulinTaking Insulin DirectlyHelping Your Body Respond to InsulinCommunity Q&A Diabetes occurs when your body has a problem with the blood sugar-controlling hormone insulin – you don’t make enough insulin, or your body doesn’t respond well to the insulin it makes.[1] Many medications and lifestyle changes can help your body be more sensitive to insulin, which can help if you have type 2 diabetes. However, if low insulin is the problem, you may need to take medications to increase the level of insulin in your body. 1 Take a sulfonylurea medication. Sometimes, diabetes cannot be controlled with lifestyle alone and you need to take medications. Medications such as glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase), glipizide (Glucotrol), and glimepiride (Amaryl) increase how much insulin your body makes.[2] Your doctor will prescribe one of these medications and you will work together to monitor your blood sugar.[3] You might experience weight gain with sulfonylureas, and sometimes they cause low blood sugar. 2 Try a meglitinide medicine. The meglitinides also increase how much insulin your body makes. They work faster than sulfonylureas but don’t last as long, and they’re less likely to cause low blood sugar. If a Meglitinide is right for you, your doctor will prescribe a medication such as repaglinide (Prandin) or nateglinide (Starlix).[4] You might gain weight with these medicines, too. Continue reading >>

14 Natural Ways To Improve Your Insulin Sensitivity

14 Natural Ways To Improve Your Insulin Sensitivity

Insulin is an essential hormone that controls your blood sugar levels. It's made in your pancreas and helps move sugar from your blood into your cells for storage. When cells are insulin resistant, they can't use insulin effectively, leaving your blood sugar high. When your pancreas senses high blood sugar, it makes more insulin to overcome the resistance and reduce your blood sugar. Over time, this can deplete the pancreas of insulin-producing cells, which is common in type 2 diabetes. Also, prolonged high blood sugar can damage nerves and organs. You're most at risk of insulin resistance if you have prediabetes or a family history of type 2 diabetes, as well as if you are overweight or obese. Insulin sensitivity refers to how responsive your cells are to insulin. Improving it can help you reduce insulin resistance and the risk of many diseases, including diabetes. Here are 14 natural, science-backed ways to boost your insulin sensitivity. A good night's sleep is important for your health. In contrast, a lack of sleep can be harmful and increase your risk of infections, heart disease and type 2 diabetes (1, 2). Several studies have also linked poor sleep to reduced insulin sensitivity (3, 4). For example, one study in nine healthy volunteers found that getting just four hours of sleep in one night reduced insulin sensitivity and the ability to regulate blood sugar, compared to getting eight and a half hours of sleep (4). Fortunately, catching up on lost sleep can reverse the effects of poor sleep on insulin resistance (5). A lack of sleep can harm your health and may increase insulin resistance. Making up for lost sleep may help reverse its effects. Regular exercise is one of the best ways to increase insulin sensitivity. It helps move sugar into the muscles for storag Continue reading >>

14 Ways To Lower Your Insulin Levels

14 Ways To Lower Your Insulin Levels

Tips and tricks for keeping your insulin level down. By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Insulin is an extremely important hormone that’s produced by your pancreas. It has many functions, such as allowing your cells to take in sugar from your blood for energy. However, too much insulin can lead to serious health problems. Having high levels, also known as hyperinsulinemia, has been linked to obesity, heart disease and cancer. High blood insulin levels also cause your cells to become resistant to the hormone’s effects. When you become insulin resistant, your pancreas produces even more insulin, creating a vicious cycle. Here are 14 things you can do to lower your insulin levels. 1. Follow a Low-Carb Diet Of the three macronutrients — carbs, protein and fat — carbs raise blood sugar and insulin levels the most.For this and other reasons, low-carb diets can be very effective for losing weight and controlling diabetes. Many studies have confirmed their ability to lower insulin levels and increase insulin sensitivity, compared to other diets. People with health conditions characterized by insulin resistance, such as metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), may experience a dramatic lowering of insulin with carb restriction. In one study, individuals with metabolic syndrome were randomized to receive either a low-fat or low-carb diet containing 1,500 calories.Insulin levels dropped by an average of 50% in the low-carb group, compared to 19% in the low-fat group.In another study, when women with PCOS ate a lower-carb diet containing enough calories to maintain their weight, they experienced greater reductions in insulin levels than when they ate a higher-carb diet. Bottom Line: Low-carb diets have been shown to increase insulin sensitivity and reduce insuli Continue reading >>

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

1 / 8 7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar If you have type 2 diabetes, you know about the importance of making healthy mealtime choices. But just as important is staying away from the wrong foods — those that can spike your blood sugar. That's because simple carbohydrates, like white bread and sugary soda, are broken down by the body into sugar, which then enters the bloodstream. Even if you don't have diabetes, these foods can lead to insulin resistance, which means your body's cells don't respond normally to the insulin produced by the pancreas. Here are seven foods you should avoid for better blood sugar control. Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Diabetes: 41 Foods That Improve Insulin Resistance

How To Reverse Diabetes: 41 Foods That Improve Insulin Resistance

This article was republished with permission from doctorshealthpress.com. A healthy diet is extremely important for anyone, but it’s especially important for diabetics. Many foods we consume are turned into glucose (sugar), which the body uses for energy during the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. When the pancreas fails to produce the hormone insulin, blood sugar cannot get into the body’s cells. (Fortunately, you can help to prevent and even reverse this condition with the diabetes-fighting foods listed below! Plus, you’ll find a helpful summary you can keep referring back to at the end of the article.) According to the annual National Diabetes Statistics Report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 9.3% of Americans suffer from type 1 or type 2 diabetes—that’s more than 29 million people! In fact, it is the seventh most common cause of death in the U.S. The disease can also snowball, and lead to many other serious health conditions, including blindness, nerve disorders, stroke, kidney disease, and heart disease. Natural Foods That Reverse Diabetes Luckily, diabetics can help reverse the condition with simple dietary changes. Food is definitely an important medicine for people with diabetes. What you eat can make all the difference between reversing the disease or making the condition even worse. What foods should diabetics avoid? They are likely some former favorites, such as bacon, French fries, and dairy products. A person with diabetes should stay away from processed foods, especially refined carbohydrates. For instance, pizza night should likely be cancelled. Other high-glycemic-index foods diabetics should avoid include many wheat flour products, white potatoes, white rice, candy, sodas, many cereal products, and especial Continue reading >>

Diet Tips To Improve Insulin Resistance

Diet Tips To Improve Insulin Resistance

Insulin is a hormone that helps the body absorb glucose, keeping blood sugar levels in balance. Insulin resistance makes it harder for glucose to be absorbed. This causes problems for muscles, fat, and the liver, as they need glucose (sugar). Over time, insulin resistance can cause high blood sugar levels and damage cells. Insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes. People with insulin resistance are often diagnosed with prediabetes. They may need extra checks to make sure they don't develop diabetes. Diet and other lifestyle choices can increase the risks related to insulin resistance. Making diet changes can reduce insulin insensitivity. This reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes and the health problems that go with it. Contents of this article: Understanding insulin resistance Glucose is a vital source of energy for the body. However, many of the body's cells can't absorb glucose on their own. The pancreas secretes insulin into the bloodstream. It joins up with glucose, and travels to the body's cells, where it attaches to insulin receptors. Insulin allows the cells to absorb glucose, making sure that: blood sugar levels remain at a safe level muscle, fat, liver, and other cells are able to get energy Insulin resistance makes cells less sensitive to insulin. This means the body has to produce more insulin to keep blood sugar levels healthy. If the pancreas is unable to keep up with the increased demand for insulin, blood sugar levels go up. When this happens, cells can't use all of the excess glucose in the blood. This leads to type 2 diabetes. Diet tips Following a healthful diet plan, such as the Mediterranean Diet, can improve insulin sensitivity. This diet recommends eating lots of seasonal plant-based foods, having fruit as a dessert, and olive oil as the main Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Increase Insulin Sensitivity For Better Fat Loss

10 Ways To Increase Insulin Sensitivity For Better Fat Loss

Your insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism are directly correlated to your body composition. Impair your body’s ability to efficiently store glucose, and you’ll be fighting an uphill battle against fat loss. Here are 10 ways you can increase insulin sensitivity and make it easier to change your body composition for the better. Eat Low-Glycemic Carbohydrates The glycemic index measures a given food’s impact on blood glucose levels. High-glycemic foods cause a rapid rise in blood glucose, which results in your body releasing large amounts of insulin. The constant bombardment of insulin on your cells causes them to become insensitive to insulin’s effects over time – meaning more and more insulin is needed to achieve a similar result. Eating a low-glycemic diet can improve glucose uptake and increase your insulin sensitivity [1]. Here are 100 healthy foods to eat that will all have a minimal impact on your blood glucose. Make Exercise Part of Your Lifestyle Exercise causes a reduction in blood glucose and plasma insulin levels for days after physical activity [2]. One of the main mechanisms for why this happens is the translocation of GLUT4 in fat and muscle tissue. GLUT4 transports the glucose from the food you eat into your cells. When you exercise, a higher number of GLUT4 translocate to muscle cells as compared to fat cells – resulting in a better ability to store glucose in muscle tissue without the presence of insulin. Drink Green Tea Similar to exercise, green tea significantly reduces glucose uptake by fat tissue, and significantly stimulates glucose uptake in muscle [3]. Green tea improves insulin sensitivity by increasing GLUT4 translocation in muscle tissue. EGCG is a catechin antioxidant believed to be responsible for the majority of tea’s hea Continue reading >>

How To Help Your Body Reverse Diabetes

How To Help Your Body Reverse Diabetes

Diabetes rates are rising, in fact it is now considered an “epidemic” in the medical community. The American Diabetes Association reports that: 23.6 million Americans have diabetes 57 million Americans are pre-diabetic 1.6 new cases of diabetes are reported each year For those over age 60, almost 1 in 4 have diabetes Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death Diabetes increases heart attack risk and 68% of diabetes related death certificates report heart related problems 75% of adults with diabetes will develop high blood pressure Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness, kidney failure and nervous system disorders Diabetes costs $174 billion annually Diabetes is a well-established problem and a multi-billion dollar industry. It is medically characterized by Fasting Blood Glucose higher than 126 mg/dL , which ranges between 100-125 mg/dL are considered pre-diabetic and ranges below 99 mg/dL are considered normal. Studies are finding that a fasting blood glucose below 83 mg/dL is actually a better benchmark, as risk of heart disease begins to increase at anything above that. IMPORTANT: There is a difference between Type 1 diabetes (an autoimmune condition) and Type 2 diabetes (lifestyle related). This article refers specifically to Type 2 diabetes. Some medical professionals use an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) to test for diabetes. If you’ve ever been pregnant and had to drink the sickeningly sweet sugar cocktail and then have blood drawn, you are familiar with this one. Basically, a patient is given 50-75 grams of glucose in concentrated solution and his blood sugar response is measured. I’m not a fan of this test because no one should be ingesting that much concentrated glucose, and the test is not a completely accurate measure. (Just a side note: if yo Continue reading >>

Adjusting Insulin Doses

Adjusting Insulin Doses

Tweet Being able to confidently manage and adjust your own insulin doses is a key part of managing type 1 diabetes, and may be required for other diabetes types as well. Being able to confidently manage and adjust your own insulin doses is a key part of managing type 1 diabetes, and may be required for other diabetes types as well. Self-adjustment involves estimating the appropriate amount of insulin to inject through each day to strike a balance between high and low blood sugar levels. Regular blood glucose testing and recording the results will help you to see how your blood sugar numbers change and allow you to improve your overall diabetes management. If you are not altogether confident with adjusting your own insulin doses, speak to your healthcare team. They will be able to advise you about your current dosage requirements and may book you onto a carbohydrate counting and insulin dose adjustment course, such as a DAFNE course. Finding patterns and trends A comprehensive set of records and notes gives you the chance to spot trends in your numbers and see where adjustments may need to be made to your insulin dosing requirements. The more detailed your records are, the better your dosage estimates are likely to be. More information on good practice for recording blood glucose results and downloadable diary sheets can be found on the blood glucose diary page. Carbohydrate counting Knowing what’s in the food you eat is half the battle of diabetes control. Carbohydrates tend to be the largest factor accounting for changes in blood sugar. It’s worth noting that proteins can also affect sugar levels as well. Read more on how to count carbs. Insulin adjustment When you’ve spotted a need to adjust your insulin you’ll then need to decide how to change your insulin do Continue reading >>

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