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How Diabetes Is Related To Diet

Should Parents Be Prosecuted For Failing To Feed Their Children Properly When The Children Are Obese Or Have Contracted Diet-related Diabetes?

Should Parents Be Prosecuted For Failing To Feed Their Children Properly When The Children Are Obese Or Have Contracted Diet-related Diabetes?

No. Plenty of cases of obesity are not related to the food someone eats, but the result of a medical issue that needs treatment. Just today I read about a woman starting a crowdfunding campaign to pay for lipodema treatment (which her insurance refuses to cover). The idea all obesity is related to food is dangerous. Especially when good doctors can overlook a diagnosis that would explain it. Parents should not be judged or prosecuted unless their guilt is without a doubt the cause. How about starting with educational services first? The pediatrician or clinic (in the US most children see a doctor in order to attend school) can set up nutritional counseling for the parents, explain the important role exercise has, and perhaps some therapy to address any underlying emotional issues that prevent making healthier choices. A lot of people simply do not know what healthy nutrition is...just look at some of the questions here on Quora to find examples of this. I believe that most parents want the best for their children but they might not be well equipped to do that in certain aspects of parenting. Lets give them the tools they need to be successful before we start fining, jailing, and ripping families apart. Ask New Question Continue reading >>

Can I Expect Diabetes Patients Have Normal Life?

Can I Expect Diabetes Patients Have Normal Life?

Sympler, Your Health Buddy says, After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. According to the experts, people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, such as: Diabetic retinopathy Kidney disease Cardiovascular disease (heart disease) Higher blood sugars can often be accompanied by associated conditions such as: Higher blood pressure High cholesterol Both help to contribute to poor circulation and further the damage to organs such as the heart, kidneys, eyes and nerves in particular. In some cases, short term complications such as hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis can also be fatal. What can a diabetic patient do to help increase his/her life expectancy? Maintaining good blood glucose control is a key way to prolong the length of your life. Keeping blood sugar levels within the recommended blood Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet

Diabetic Diet

A diabetic diet is a dietary pattern that is used by people with diabetes mellitus or high blood glucose to manage diabetes. There is no single dietary pattern that is best for all people with all types of diabetes. For overweight and obese people with Type 2 diabetes, any weight-loss diet that the person will adhere to and achieve weight loss on is effective.[1][2] Since carbohydrate is the macronutrient that raises blood glucose levels most significantly, the greatest debate is regarding how low in carbohydrates the diet should be. This is because although lowering carbohydrate intake will lead to reduced blood glucose levels, this conflicts with the traditional establishment view that carbohydrates should be the main source of calories. Recommendations of the fraction of total calories to be obtained from carbohydrate are generally in the range of 20% to 45%,[3][4][5] but recommendations can vary as widely as from 16% to 75%.[6] The most agreed-upon recommendation is for the diet to be low in sugar and refined carbohydrates, while relatively high in dietary fiber, especially soluble fiber. People with diabetes are also encouraged to eat small frequent meals a day. Likewise, people with diabetes may be encouraged to reduce their intake of carbohydrates that have a high glycemic index (GI), although this is also controversial.[7] (In cases of hypoglycemia, they are advised to have food or drink that can raise blood glucose quickly, such as a sugary sports drink, followed by a long-acting carbohydrate (such as rye bread) to prevent risk of further hypoglycemia.) Others question the usefulness of the glycemic index and recommend high-GI foods like potatoes and rice. It has been claimed that oleic acid has a slight advantage over linoleic acid in reducing plasma glucose.[ Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Nutrition

Diabetes And Nutrition

People who have diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. Managing diabetes means managing your blood sugar level. What you eat is closely connected to the amount of sugar in your blood. The right food choices will help you control your blood sugar level. Path to improved health Eating well is one of the primary things you can do to help control diabetes. Do I have to follow a special diet? There isn’t one specific “diabetes diet.” Your doctor can work with you to design a meal plan. A meal plan is a guide that tells you what kinds of food to eat at meals and for snacks. The plan also tells you how much food to have. For most people who have diabetes (and those without, too), a healthy diet consists of: 40% to 60% of calories from carbohydrates. 20% calories from protein. 30% or fewer calories from fat. Your diet should also be low in cholesterol, low in salt, and low in added sugar. Can I eat any sugar? Yes. In recent years, doctors have learned that eating some sugar doesn’t usually cause problems for most people who have diabetes — as long as it is part of a balanced diet. Just be careful about how much sugar you eat and try not to add sugar to foods. What kinds of foods can I eat? In general, at each meal you may have: 2 to 5 choices (or up to 60 grams) of carbohydrates. 1 choice of protein. A certain amount of fat. Talk to your doctor or dietitian for specific advice. Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are found in fruits, vegetables, beans, dairy foods, and starchy foods such as breads. Try to have fresh fruits rather than canned fruits, fruit juices, or dried fruit. You may eat fresh vegetables and frozen or canned vegetables. Condiments such as nonfat mayonnaise, ketchup, and mustard are also carbohydrates. Protein. Protein is found in meat, poultry, fish Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Maintaining a healthy diet is important for type 1 diabetes management. A type 1 diabetes diet is designed to provide maximum nutrition, while also monitoring intake of carbohydrates, protein, and fat. However, there’s no single universal diabetes diet. It involves being mindful of how you eat and how your body will respond to certain foods. People with type 1 diabetes need to monitor their blood sugar levels. Without proper diet, exercise, and insulin therapy, a person with type 1 diabetes could experience health complications. Complications associated with type 1 diabetes include: high blood pressure, which increases risk for heart attack, stroke, and poor circulation kidney damage nerve damage skin sores and infections, which can cause pain and may lead to tissue death Following proper dietary guidelines can help mitigate the difficulties of type 1 diabetes and help you avoid health complications. It can also improve your overall quality of life. Just like there’s no standard treatment for type 1 diabetes, there’s no standard diet for diabetes. A nutritionist or dietitian can help you come up with meal plans and create a diet that works for you in the long term. It’s easy to reach for fast food and other processed foods when you’re short on time and money. However, these foods offer minimal nutrients and are high in fat, sugar, and salt. Planning your meals ahead of time and grocery shopping regularly can help cut down on any “emergency eating.” A well-stocked kitchen of healthy food can also cut down on unnecessary sugar, carbohydrates, sodium, and fat that can spike blood sugar. An important aspect of any diabetic diet is consistency. To maintain blood sugar levels, don’t skip meals, try to eat around the same time each day, and pay attention to foo Continue reading >>

Why Don't Primary Care Physicians Advise Their Patients To Diet And Exercise Instead Of Always Prescribing Drugs?

Why Don't Primary Care Physicians Advise Their Patients To Diet And Exercise Instead Of Always Prescribing Drugs?

What reasonably conscious person in the United States doesn’t know that optimal weight through diet and exercise are important aspects of health? See this top curve. Americans are by far the most obese people in the industrialized world. It’s not even close. Obesity leads to more diabetes, more heart disease, more strokes, more dialysis, more back, knee and hip surgeries. Do people really believe that all this is because the primary care physicians aren’t telling their patients to lose weight and exercise? That isn’t even plausible. Seriously, look at just how American is different that other countries regarding obesity and the health problems related to it. This isn’t a healthcare system problem. It’s a societal problem that leads to huge costs in healthcare with ageing. Obesity is one of the biggest drivers of preventable chronic diseases and healthcare costs in the United States. Currently, estimates for these costs range from $147 billion to nearly $210 billion per year. The Healthcare Costs of Obesity Continue reading >>

Is There A Cure For Diabetes?

Is There A Cure For Diabetes?

‘Getting rid of diabetes permanently?’ comes across as very highly unlikely, considering that there really is no science or tech that have such sophistication to achieve that…. I am assuming Diabetes mellitus is our subject matter, and not Diabetes Insipidus. To enlighten us a little, Diabetes is a medical condition where in the human body have a ‘distorted’ metabolism of sugars leading to high levels of blood sugar levels (glucose). The problem is major due to the inability (or poor ability) of the body’s pancreatic cells to breakdown excessive blood glucose. I would not want to bore you with the details of the types of Diabetes, I and II, but the common decimal is that the hormone, insulin, is the medical treatment option for management of diabetic patients, in conjunction with Lifestyle modification. Diabetes is usually ‘Managed’… and cannot simply be gotten rid off. Diabetics, with the guidance of physicians, can live an optimal life by the control their blood glucose levels and preventing complications (especially life threatening complications). Life Threatening Complications of Diabetes[1] every doctor and healthcare giver must be wary about is indeed the fear, and efforts are usually made at totally preventing it. I must say that at the moment, permanence is a feature of diabetes in humans, with ‘good control’ being the handle that keeps diabetes from veering off the side walk. Patients have been recorded to live with it sufficiently into old age. Footnotes Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Be Reversed And If So, How?

Can Diabetes Be Reversed And If So, How?

How do you define reversal? Does it mean achieving a euglycemic state without the aid of medications, in other words, remission? The answers of Jae Starr and User are essentially correct and reflect conventional wisdom. Please read them. However, let's try to take into account newer and experimental interventions as well. In obese patients, there is a remarkable remission-rate of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with bariatric surgery. In one stand-out study, between 82% to 100% of participants with diabetes who underwent Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass, Laparoscopic RYGB, and Sleeve Gastrectomy had a HbA1c of less than 5% three years after surgery while off of diabetes medications (in my clinical experience, the remission rate appears somewhat lower). HbA1c, a measure of long-term glycemic control, usually has a value of less than 5.7% in non-diabetics. Of course, all surgical procedures have their attendant risks and the decision to undergo one cannot be taken lightly. Surgery for weight loss in adults. For Type 1 Diabetics, Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation is still an experimental procedure. Beta Islet Cells normally produce insulin but can be completely destroyed via an auto-immune process, resulting in insulin-dependency. In its 2010 annual report, the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry presented data on 571 patients who received pancreatic islet allo-transplants between 1999 and 2009. According to the report, about 60 percent of transplant recipients achieved insulin independence—defined as being able to stop insulin injections for at least 14 days—during the year following transplantation. By the end of the second year, 50 percent of recipients were able to stop taking insulin for at least 14 days. However, long-term insulin independence is difficult to maintain, Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes With Diet & Food Planning

Managing Diabetes With Diet & Food Planning

Alongside exercise, a healthy diet is an important element of the lifestyle management of diabetes, as well as being preventive against the onset of type 2 diabetes. Maintaining a good diet is also a vital part of keeping tight control of blood sugar levels, itself important for minimizing the risk of diabetes complications.1 The good news for people living with diabetes is that the condition does not preclude any particular type of food or require an unusual diet - the goal is much the same as it would be for anyone wishing to eat a healthy, balanced diet.2 What diet is best for diabetes? Having diabetes does not involve any particularly difficult dietary demands, and while sugary foods obviously affect blood glucose levels, the diet does not have to be completely sugar-free.2 Dietary concerns vary slightly for people with different types of diabetes. For people with type 1 diabetes, diet is about managing fluctuations in blood glucose levels while for people with type 2 diabetes, it is about losing weight and restricting calorie intake.3 For people with type 1 diabetes, the timing of meals is particularly important in terms of glycemic control and in relation to the effects of insulin injection.3 In general, however, a healthy, balanced diet is all that is needed, and the benefits are not confined to good diabetes management - they also mean good heart health.2,4 A healthy diet typically includes a variety of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, skinless poultry and fish, nuts and legumes and non-tropical vegetable oils.4 The following are some general dietary tips for a healthy lifestyle:2-5 Eat regularly - avoid the effects on glucose levels of skipping meals or having delayed meals because of work or long journeys (take healthy snacks with y Continue reading >>

Nutrition Principles And Recommendations In Diabetes

Nutrition Principles And Recommendations In Diabetes

Medical nutrition therapy is an integral component of diabetes management and of diabetes self-management education. Yet many misconceptions exist concerning nutrition and diabetes. Moreover, in clinical practice, nutrition recommendations that have little or no supporting evidence have been and are still being given to persons with diabetes. Accordingly, this position statement provides evidence-based principles and recommendations for diabetes medical nutrition therapy. The rationale for this position statement is discussed in the American Diabetes Association technical review “Evidence-Based Nutrition Principles and Recommendations for the Treatment and Prevention of Diabetes and Related Complications,” which discusses in detail the published research for each principle and recommendation (1). Historically, nutrition recommendations for diabetes and related complications were based on scientific knowledge, clinical experience, and expert consensus; however, it was often difficult to discern the level of evidence used to construct the recommendations. To address this problem, the 2002 technical review (1) and this position statement provide principles and recommendations classified according to the level of evidence available using the American Diabetes Association evidence grading system. However, the best available evidence must still take into account individual circumstances, preferences, and cultural and ethnic preferences, and the person with diabetes should be involved in the decision-making process. The goal of evidence-based recommendations is to improve diabetes care by increasing the awareness of clinicians and persons with diabetes about beneficial nutrition therapies. Because of the complexity of nutrition issues, it is recommended that a registered d Continue reading >>

What To Eat When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

What To Eat When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

It's important to eat a healthy diet when you have type 1 diabetes. That doesn't mean you can't enjoy tasty food, including some of your favorites. With type 1 diabetes, your body stops making insulin. So you take insulin every day either through shots or a pump. It’s also key to track your blood sugar levels. Insulin is only part of the picture. Diet and exercise also play important roles in helping keep your blood sugar levels stable. When you make healthy food choices and eat consistent amounts through the day, it can help control your sugars. It can also lower your chance of diabetes-related problems like heart disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage. Some experts used to think there was a "diabetes diet." They thought people with diabetes had to avoid all foods with sugars or stop eating certain other foods. But when you have type 1, you can eat the same healthy diet as everyone else. Follow some general guidelines: Eat less unhealthy fat. Cut back on the saturated fats you find in high-fat meats like bacon and regular ground beef, as well as full-fat dairy like whole milk and butter. Unhealthy fats raise your chance of heart disease. With diabetes, you face higher-than-average odds of getting heart disease. Make smart food choices to lower that risk. Get enough fiber. It may help control your blood sugar. You can get fiber from whole grains, beans, and fruits and vegetables. Try to get 25-30 grams a day. Those high-fiber foods are always better choices than low-fiber carbs such as refined 'white' grains and processed sugary foods. Carbohydrates are your body's main source of energy. You get them from many foods, like grains (pasta, bread, crackers, and cookies), fruits and vegetables, dairy products, and sugars. Carbs raise your blood sugar levels faster than Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

What is diabetes? When a food containing carbohydrate is eaten, your body digests the carbohydrate into sugar (called glucose), which can then be used as energy by the cells in your body. Diabetes is a condition where your body can’t properly control the amount of glucose in your blood. A hormone called insulin is needed for transferring glucose from the bloodstream to enter the body cells and be converted to energy. In people with diabetes, blood glucose levels are often higher than normal because either the body does not produce insulin (type 1 diabetes) or cannot use insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). High levels of glucose in the bloodstream can lead to short term complications such as: passing large amounts of urine being extremely thirsty and drinking lots of fluids being tired having blurred vision having frequent skin infections and being slow to heal Blood glucose levels are normally between about 4.0 and 8.0 mmol/L. People with diabetes should aim for blood glucose levels as near to normal as possible, but individual targets should always be discussed with your diabetes health care professional. Controlling diabetes is important to prevent serious long term complications such as: heart and circulation problems infections kidney disease eye problems, which can lead to blindness nerve damage to the lower limbs and other parts of the body Types of diabetes There are three types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes affects less than 1% of all Australians. It can appear at any age, but most commonly in childhood and early adult life. People with type 1 diabetes cannot produce enough insulin, and therefore they must inject themselves with insulin several times a day. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, affecting 7.1 % of a Continue reading >>

How Do I Avoid Hereditary Diseases Like Blood Sugar And Blood Pressure By Diet And Exercise?

How Do I Avoid Hereditary Diseases Like Blood Sugar And Blood Pressure By Diet And Exercise?

KYou mean diabetes which causes raised blood sugar, and elevated (high) blood pressure? They aren’t hereditary, but do run in families. We all need blood sugar and blood pressure to be alive, without them we’ll die. Type II Diabetes is strongly correlated with obesity, especially in males, SO DON’T GROW OBESE, mainly by eating very modestly and keep moving, exercise moderately for 150 minutes weekly, or 75 minutes intensively weekly. Being obese is correlated with having hypertension too It isn’t what you eat, but mainly how much you eat. Avoiding sugar and carbohydrates helps a lot to help you avoid growing obese. The Benefits of Aerobic Exercise on Hypertension slides number 6 and 7 shows you that doing aerobic exercises, in this study 4 times a week for 30 minutes, will lower your blood pressure appreciably (sorry, can’t copy paste the images right now). As for preventing diabetes from developing in high risk individuals, in this case pre-diabetics, see my answer What are the precautions for pre-diabetics? discussing the three large trials done in the nineties, the Diabetes Prevention Program DPP see Diabetes Care, the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Program Diabetes Care and the Chinse Daqing Diabetes Prevention Trial The long-term effect of lifestyle interventions to prevent diabetes in the China Da Qing Diabetes Prevention Study: a 20-year follow-up study the results are summarised as: DPP In short its about losing 5% bodyvweight and keeping it off, and excercising a lot. Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Lifestyle Actions For Improving The Health Of The Endocrine System?

What Are The Best Lifestyle Actions For Improving The Health Of The Endocrine System?

This is a very broad question because the endocrine system is only partially interconnected and the interaction between endocrine organs is complex. This is kind of what you are looking at: A lot of control is exerted by the pituitary gland at the base of the brain. The pituitary releases hormones into the circulation that regulate other endocrine organs like the thyroid, adrenal glands and also growth hormone and ADH (important for fluid balance). There are some broad recommendations that can be made for endocrine health. 1. Adequate sleep. Chronic sleep loss affects growth hormone secretion, thyroid function, and adrenal secretion of cortisol. This also decreases leptin production. Leptin is a hormone released by fat cells that suppresses the appetite. Chronic sleep deprivation is related to weight gain, glucose intolerance, and a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. Medscape Log In 2. Avoid being overweight. This leads to insulin resistance and the pancreas has to make and release more insulin to lower blood sugar. This leads to type 2 diabetes and also a higher risk of cancer because insulin is a growth promoter. National Cancer Institute 3. Exercise. This should include resistance exercises to increase muscle mass. Increased muscle mass lowers insulin resistance and lowers insulin levels. It's all good. Muscle Mass Knocks Out Insulin Resistance 4. Diet. There's a lot of stuff out there about diet or supplements and the endocrine system and I'm not sure how much of it is valid. A lot of it sounds pretty kooky. Certainly, having iodine in the diet is needed for thyroid health. Iodine is necessary for adequate production of thyroid hormones that exert important control over metabolism. In America, iodine was added to salt, starting in the early 1900's because there was iod Continue reading >>

I Am Trying To Lose Weight. I Have Reduced My Food Intake By 60%. How Much Water Should I Drink Every Day In View Of Reduced Food Intake?

I Am Trying To Lose Weight. I Have Reduced My Food Intake By 60%. How Much Water Should I Drink Every Day In View Of Reduced Food Intake?

All the answers suggested that - One should not reduce the food intake. But should be in calorie deficit mode. Both the above statements are contradictory to each other. I suggested that I am reducing the food intake by 60%. Every body said that food intake should not be reduced but there should be calorie deficit of about 15 to 25%. Crash dieting is bad for health. The answers suggested that I should refer to BMR table, consult nutrition experts or doctors. Most of the people suggested to drink 3 to 6 liters of water on average. No reasons were given for that suggestion. Question was specifically asking about water intake and not food intake. Now allow me to give feedback - I reduced the food intake for about 2 months. On some of the days I did take nuts and some dry fruits. Say about 15 days. Yes there seems to be some damage. I used to get tired. My resting metabolism crashed. My feet and legs started paining by even minimal walking. My feet started paining - which was not the case earlier even if I were to walk for 30 kms non stop. Now it was just less than 1 kms and sole of the feet will pain. I put on weight after I started eating normal. During the period I was eating less there was no weight loss. Today I weight about 2 kg more than my weight when I started. I am still not able to eat my normal food. I feel uneasy even after eating my very normal food. I cannot dream of eating more than normal food. Where earlier I could eat almost 100% more than normal food it I loved the food. It seems that my blood sugar has gone up. Though I have not taken reading. I am sure if I had continued doing this for another 3–4 months I would have been BP patient and diabetic. I feel some extra pressure on my heart as well. Now I am trying my best to reach my normal food intake an Continue reading >>

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