diabetestalk.net

How Diabetes Is Related To Diet

What Are The Best Lifestyle Actions For Improving The Health Of The Endocrine System?

What Are The Best Lifestyle Actions For Improving The Health Of The Endocrine System?

This is a very broad question because the endocrine system is only partially interconnected and the interaction between endocrine organs is complex. This is kind of what you are looking at: A lot of control is exerted by the pituitary gland at the base of the brain. The pituitary releases hormones into the circulation that regulate other endocrine organs like the thyroid, adrenal glands and also growth hormone and ADH (important for fluid balance). There are some broad recommendations that can be made for endocrine health. 1. Adequate sleep. Chronic sleep loss affects growth hormone secretion, thyroid function, and adrenal secretion of cortisol. This also decreases leptin production. Leptin is a hormone released by fat cells that suppresses the appetite. Chronic sleep deprivation is related to weight gain, glucose intolerance, and a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. Medscape Log In 2. Avoid being overweight. This leads to insulin resistance and the pancreas has to make and release more insulin to lower blood sugar. This leads to type 2 diabetes and also a higher risk of cancer because insulin is a growth promoter. National Cancer Institute 3. Exercise. This should include resistance exercises to increase muscle mass. Increased muscle mass lowers insulin resistance and lowers insulin levels. It's all good. Muscle Mass Knocks Out Insulin Resistance 4. Diet. There's a lot of stuff out there about diet or supplements and the endocrine system and I'm not sure how much of it is valid. A lot of it sounds pretty kooky. Certainly, having iodine in the diet is needed for thyroid health. Iodine is necessary for adequate production of thyroid hormones that exert important control over metabolism. In America, iodine was added to salt, starting in the early 1900's because there was iod Continue reading >>

Dietary Fat And The Development Of Type 2 Diabetes

Dietary Fat And The Development Of Type 2 Diabetes

The recent release of results from the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (FDPS) (1) and the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) (2) strongly confirm the hypothesis that interventions that alter diet and physical activity to achieve weight loss can prevent or postpone the development of type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. The next challenge will be to translate these impressive results into clinical practice. It seems relevant in this context to ask, “What is the best dietary intervention strategy to improve insulin action and prevent diabetes?” In the current issue of Diabetes Care, van Dam et al. (3) assess the association between diet and development of diabetes over a 12-year period in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS). They find that consumption of a high-fat diet and high intakes of saturated fat are associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. However, this association disappears when they adjust for BMI. They also find that frequent consumption of processed meats is associated with an increased risk for diabetes. Does this study alter the recommendations we make to individuals at risk for developing diabetes? Controversy over the role of high-fat diets in insulin resistance A large body of experimental data generated in laboratory animals strongly supports the notion that high-fat diets are associated with impaired insulin action. It appears from animal studies that saturated fats, in particular, have the most detrimental effects. Based on this information, along with the known risks of high saturated fat intake on cardiovascular disease risk, professional organizations such as the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have made recommendations that Americans aim for a Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Be Reversed And If So, How?

Can Diabetes Be Reversed And If So, How?

How do you define reversal? Does it mean achieving a euglycemic state without the aid of medications, in other words, remission? The answers of Jae Starr and User are essentially correct and reflect conventional wisdom. Please read them. However, let's try to take into account newer and experimental interventions as well. In obese patients, there is a remarkable remission-rate of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with bariatric surgery. In one stand-out study, between 82% to 100% of participants with diabetes who underwent Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass, Laparoscopic RYGB, and Sleeve Gastrectomy had a HbA1c of less than 5% three years after surgery while off of diabetes medications (in my clinical experience, the remission rate appears somewhat lower). HbA1c, a measure of long-term glycemic control, usually has a value of less than 5.7% in non-diabetics. Of course, all surgical procedures have their attendant risks and the decision to undergo one cannot be taken lightly. Surgery for weight loss in adults. For Type 1 Diabetics, Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation is still an experimental procedure. Beta Islet Cells normally produce insulin but can be completely destroyed via an auto-immune process, resulting in insulin-dependency. In its 2010 annual report, the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry presented data on 571 patients who received pancreatic islet allo-transplants between 1999 and 2009. According to the report, about 60 percent of transplant recipients achieved insulin independence—defined as being able to stop insulin injections for at least 14 days—during the year following transplantation. By the end of the second year, 50 percent of recipients were able to stop taking insulin for at least 14 days. However, long-term insulin independence is difficult to maintain, Continue reading >>

What To Eat When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

What To Eat When You Have Type 1 Diabetes

It's important to eat a healthy diet when you have type 1 diabetes. That doesn't mean you can't enjoy tasty food, including some of your favorites. With type 1 diabetes, your body stops making insulin. So you take insulin every day either through shots or a pump. It’s also key to track your blood sugar levels. Insulin is only part of the picture. Diet and exercise also play important roles in helping keep your blood sugar levels stable. When you make healthy food choices and eat consistent amounts through the day, it can help control your sugars. It can also lower your chance of diabetes-related problems like heart disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage. Some experts used to think there was a "diabetes diet." They thought people with diabetes had to avoid all foods with sugars or stop eating certain other foods. But when you have type 1, you can eat the same healthy diet as everyone else. Follow some general guidelines: Eat less unhealthy fat. Cut back on the saturated fats you find in high-fat meats like bacon and regular ground beef, as well as full-fat dairy like whole milk and butter. Unhealthy fats raise your chance of heart disease. With diabetes, you face higher-than-average odds of getting heart disease. Make smart food choices to lower that risk. Get enough fiber. It may help control your blood sugar. You can get fiber from whole grains, beans, and fruits and vegetables. Try to get 25-30 grams a day. Those high-fiber foods are always better choices than low-fiber carbs such as refined 'white' grains and processed sugary foods. Carbohydrates are your body's main source of energy. You get them from many foods, like grains (pasta, bread, crackers, and cookies), fruits and vegetables, dairy products, and sugars. Carbs raise your blood sugar levels faster than Continue reading >>

Can A Poor Diet Cause Diabetes?

Can A Poor Diet Cause Diabetes?

There are two different types of diabetes: type-1 and type-2. While the exact cause of type-1 diabetes is unknown, research has shown that poor diet and a lack of exercise are key factors in the development of type-2 diabetes. To avoid type-2 diabetes, consume a diet low in fast foods, trans fats, saturated fats, sugars and processed foods. Video of the Day Type-2 Diabetes About 95 percent of those affected with diabetes have type-2 diabetes, a slow-developing disease that can occur at any age. People with either type-1 or type-2 diabetes have excess glucose, or blood sugar, in their blood that is not removed by the hormone known as insulin. In type-2 diabetics, an insulin resistance develops, and fat, liver and muscle cells no longer respond correctly to insulin. Symptoms of type-2 diabetes can include fatigue, hunger, increased thirst, blurred vision, erectile dysfunction, increased urination and slower healing. MedlinePlus notes that most people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes are overweight because excess fat makes it more difficult for the body to correctly utilize insulin. Several studies have shown that fast-food consumption can further the development of type-2 diabetes. A 2013 study published in the "European Journal of Nutrition" set out to clarify the role of dietary patterns in the onset of type-2 diabetes in overweight people. The study found that diets high in soft drinks and french fries, and low in fruit and vegetables, were associated with a greater risk of type-2 diabetes in overweight participants, particularly among those who are less physically active. A 2005 study published in "Lancet" concluded that fast-food consumption has a strong positive correlation with weight gain and insulin resistance, implying that fast-food intake may promote obesity and Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Nutrition

Diabetes And Nutrition

People who have diabetes have too much sugar in their blood. Managing diabetes means managing your blood sugar level. What you eat is closely connected to the amount of sugar in your blood. The right food choices will help you control your blood sugar level. Path to improved health Eating well is one of the primary things you can do to help control diabetes. Do I have to follow a special diet? There isn’t one specific “diabetes diet.” Your doctor can work with you to design a meal plan. A meal plan is a guide that tells you what kinds of food to eat at meals and for snacks. The plan also tells you how much food to have. For most people who have diabetes (and those without, too), a healthy diet consists of: 40% to 60% of calories from carbohydrates. 20% calories from protein. 30% or fewer calories from fat. Your diet should also be low in cholesterol, low in salt, and low in added sugar. Can I eat any sugar? Yes. In recent years, doctors have learned that eating some sugar doesn’t usually cause problems for most people who have diabetes — as long as it is part of a balanced diet. Just be careful about how much sugar you eat and try not to add sugar to foods. What kinds of foods can I eat? In general, at each meal you may have: 2 to 5 choices (or up to 60 grams) of carbohydrates. 1 choice of protein. A certain amount of fat. Talk to your doctor or dietitian for specific advice. Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are found in fruits, vegetables, beans, dairy foods, and starchy foods such as breads. Try to have fresh fruits rather than canned fruits, fruit juices, or dried fruit. You may eat fresh vegetables and frozen or canned vegetables. Condiments such as nonfat mayonnaise, ketchup, and mustard are also carbohydrates. Protein. Protein is found in meat, poultry, fish Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Causes

Type 2 Diabetes Causes

Type 2 diabetes has several causes: genetics and lifestyle are the most important ones. A combination of these factors can cause insulin resistance, when your body doesn’t use insulin as well as it should. Insulin resistance is the most common cause of type 2 diabetes. Genetics Play a Role in Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes can be hereditary. That doesn’t mean that if your mother or father has (or had) type 2 diabetes, you’re guaranteed to develop it; instead, it means that you have a greater chance of developing type 2. Researchers know that you can inherit a risk for type 2 diabetes, but it’s difficult to pinpoint which genes carry the risk. The medical community is hard at work trying to figure out the certain genetic mutations that lead to a risk of type 2. Lifestyle Is Very Important, Too Genes do play a role in type 2 diabetes, but lifestyle choices are also important. You can, for example, have a genetic mutation that may make you susceptible to type 2, but if you take good care of your body, you may not develop diabetes. Say that two people have the same genetic mutation. One of them eats well, watches their cholesterol, and stays physically fit, and the other is overweight (BMI greater than 25) and inactive. The person who is overweight and inactive is much more likely to develop type 2 diabetes because certain lifestyle choices greatly influence how well your body uses insulin. Lack of exercise: Physical activity has many benefits—one of them being that it can help you avoid type 2 diabetes, if you’re susceptible. Unhealthy meal planning choices: A meal plan filled with high-fat foods and lacking in fiber (which you can get from grains, vegetables, and fruits) increases the likelihood of type 2. Overweight/Obesity: Lack of exercise and unhealthy me Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Because type 2 diabetes is linked to high levels of sugar in the blood, it may seem logical to assume that eating too much sugar is the cause of the disease. But of course, it’s not that simple. “This has been around for years, this idea that eating too much sugar causes diabetes — but the truth is, type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease with many different types of causes,” says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a nutrition coach in Prescott, Arizona, and a medical reviewer for Everyday Health. “Type 2 diabetes is really complex.” That said, some research does suggest that eating too many sweetened foods can affect type 2 diabetes risk, and with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimating that 30.3 million Americans have the disease — and that millions of more individuals are projected to develop it, too — understanding all the risk factors for the disease, including sugar consumption, is essential to help reverse the diabetes epidemic. The Sugar and Type 2 Diabetes Story: Not So Sweet After the suspicion that sugar was the cause of diabetes, the scientific community pointed its finger at carbohydrates. That makes sense, notes Grieger, explaining that simple and complex carbohydrates are both metabolized as sugar, leading blood sugar levels to fluctuate. Yet carbs are processed differently in the body based on their type: While simple carbs are digested and metabolized quickly, complex carbs take longer to go through this system, resulting in more stable blood sugar. “It comes down to their chemical forms: A simple carbohydrate has a simpler chemical makeup, so it doesn’t take as much for it to be digested, whereas the complex ones take a little longer,” Grieger explains. Sources of complex carbohydrates include whole-wheat bread an Continue reading >>

Should Parents Be Prosecuted For Failing To Feed Their Children Properly When The Children Are Obese Or Have Contracted Diet-related Diabetes?

Should Parents Be Prosecuted For Failing To Feed Their Children Properly When The Children Are Obese Or Have Contracted Diet-related Diabetes?

No. Plenty of cases of obesity are not related to the food someone eats, but the result of a medical issue that needs treatment. Just today I read about a woman starting a crowdfunding campaign to pay for lipodema treatment (which her insurance refuses to cover). The idea all obesity is related to food is dangerous. Especially when good doctors can overlook a diagnosis that would explain it. Parents should not be judged or prosecuted unless their guilt is without a doubt the cause. How about starting with educational services first? The pediatrician or clinic (in the US most children see a doctor in order to attend school) can set up nutritional counseling for the parents, explain the important role exercise has, and perhaps some therapy to address any underlying emotional issues that prevent making healthier choices. A lot of people simply do not know what healthy nutrition is...just look at some of the questions here on Quora to find examples of this. I believe that most parents want the best for their children but they might not be well equipped to do that in certain aspects of parenting. Lets give them the tools they need to be successful before we start fining, jailing, and ripping families apart. Ask New Question Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Maintaining a healthy diet is important for type 1 diabetes management. A type 1 diabetes diet is designed to provide maximum nutrition, while also monitoring intake of carbohydrates, protein, and fat. However, there’s no single universal diabetes diet. It involves being mindful of how you eat and how your body will respond to certain foods. People with type 1 diabetes need to monitor their blood sugar levels. Without proper diet, exercise, and insulin therapy, a person with type 1 diabetes could experience health complications. Complications associated with type 1 diabetes include: high blood pressure, which increases risk for heart attack, stroke, and poor circulation kidney damage nerve damage skin sores and infections, which can cause pain and may lead to tissue death Following proper dietary guidelines can help mitigate the difficulties of type 1 diabetes and help you avoid health complications. It can also improve your overall quality of life. Just like there’s no standard treatment for type 1 diabetes, there’s no standard diet for diabetes. A nutritionist or dietitian can help you come up with meal plans and create a diet that works for you in the long term. It’s easy to reach for fast food and other processed foods when you’re short on time and money. However, these foods offer minimal nutrients and are high in fat, sugar, and salt. Planning your meals ahead of time and grocery shopping regularly can help cut down on any “emergency eating.” A well-stocked kitchen of healthy food can also cut down on unnecessary sugar, carbohydrates, sodium, and fat that can spike blood sugar. An important aspect of any diabetic diet is consistency. To maintain blood sugar levels, don’t skip meals, try to eat around the same time each day, and pay attention to foo Continue reading >>

Can I Expect Diabetes Patients Have Normal Life?

Can I Expect Diabetes Patients Have Normal Life?

Sympler, Your Health Buddy says, After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. According to the experts, people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, such as: Diabetic retinopathy Kidney disease Cardiovascular disease (heart disease) Higher blood sugars can often be accompanied by associated conditions such as: Higher blood pressure High cholesterol Both help to contribute to poor circulation and further the damage to organs such as the heart, kidneys, eyes and nerves in particular. In some cases, short term complications such as hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis can also be fatal. What can a diabetic patient do to help increase his/her life expectancy? Maintaining good blood glucose control is a key way to prolong the length of your life. Keeping blood sugar levels within the recommended blood Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

There is no single diabetes diet, meal plan, or diet that is diabetes-friendly that can serve as a correct meal plan for all patients with diabetes (type 2, gestational, or type 1 diabetes). Glycemic index, carbohydrate counting, the MyPlate method, and the TLC diet plan are all methods for determining healthy eating habits for diabetes management. The exact type and times of meals on a diabetic meal plan depend upon a person's age and gender, how much exercise you get and your activity level, and the need to gain, lose, or maintain optimal weight. Most diabetic meal plans allow the person with diabetes to eat the same foods as the rest of the family, with attention to portion size and timing of meals and snacks. Eating a high-fiber diet can help improve blood cholesterol and blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Glycemic index is a way to classify carbohydrates in terms of the amount that they raise blood sugar. High glycemic index foods raise blood sugar more than lower index foods. Some patients with type 2 use supplements as complementary medicine to treat their disease. However, there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of supplements in treating the disease. A diabetes meal plan (diabetes diet) is a nutritional guide for people with diabetes that helps them decide when to consume meals and snacks as well as what type of foods to eat. There is no one predetermined diabetes diet that works for all people with diabetes. The goal of any diabetic meal plan is to achieve and maintain good control over the disease, including control of blood glucose and blood lipid levels as well as to maintaining a healthy weight and good nutrition. Health care professionals and nutritionists can offer advice to help you create the best meal plan to manage your diabe Continue reading >>

I Am Trying To Lose Weight. I Have Reduced My Food Intake By 60%. How Much Water Should I Drink Every Day In View Of Reduced Food Intake?

I Am Trying To Lose Weight. I Have Reduced My Food Intake By 60%. How Much Water Should I Drink Every Day In View Of Reduced Food Intake?

All the answers suggested that - One should not reduce the food intake. But should be in calorie deficit mode. Both the above statements are contradictory to each other. I suggested that I am reducing the food intake by 60%. Every body said that food intake should not be reduced but there should be calorie deficit of about 15 to 25%. Crash dieting is bad for health. The answers suggested that I should refer to BMR table, consult nutrition experts or doctors. Most of the people suggested to drink 3 to 6 liters of water on average. No reasons were given for that suggestion. Question was specifically asking about water intake and not food intake. Now allow me to give feedback - I reduced the food intake for about 2 months. On some of the days I did take nuts and some dry fruits. Say about 15 days. Yes there seems to be some damage. I used to get tired. My resting metabolism crashed. My feet and legs started paining by even minimal walking. My feet started paining - which was not the case earlier even if I were to walk for 30 kms non stop. Now it was just less than 1 kms and sole of the feet will pain. I put on weight after I started eating normal. During the period I was eating less there was no weight loss. Today I weight about 2 kg more than my weight when I started. I am still not able to eat my normal food. I feel uneasy even after eating my very normal food. I cannot dream of eating more than normal food. Where earlier I could eat almost 100% more than normal food it I loved the food. It seems that my blood sugar has gone up. Though I have not taken reading. I am sure if I had continued doing this for another 3–4 months I would have been BP patient and diabetic. I feel some extra pressure on my heart as well. Now I am trying my best to reach my normal food intake an Continue reading >>

Nutrition Principles And Recommendations In Diabetes

Nutrition Principles And Recommendations In Diabetes

Medical nutrition therapy is an integral component of diabetes management and of diabetes self-management education. Yet many misconceptions exist concerning nutrition and diabetes. Moreover, in clinical practice, nutrition recommendations that have little or no supporting evidence have been and are still being given to persons with diabetes. Accordingly, this position statement provides evidence-based principles and recommendations for diabetes medical nutrition therapy. The rationale for this position statement is discussed in the American Diabetes Association technical review “Evidence-Based Nutrition Principles and Recommendations for the Treatment and Prevention of Diabetes and Related Complications,” which discusses in detail the published research for each principle and recommendation (1). Historically, nutrition recommendations for diabetes and related complications were based on scientific knowledge, clinical experience, and expert consensus; however, it was often difficult to discern the level of evidence used to construct the recommendations. To address this problem, the 2002 technical review (1) and this position statement provide principles and recommendations classified according to the level of evidence available using the American Diabetes Association evidence grading system. However, the best available evidence must still take into account individual circumstances, preferences, and cultural and ethnic preferences, and the person with diabetes should be involved in the decision-making process. The goal of evidence-based recommendations is to improve diabetes care by increasing the awareness of clinicians and persons with diabetes about beneficial nutrition therapies. Because of the complexity of nutrition issues, it is recommended that a registered d Continue reading >>

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Simple Steps To Preventing Diabetes

Table of Contents Simple Steps to Lower Your Risk Introduction If type 2 diabetes was an infectious disease, passed from one person to another, public health officials would say we’re in the midst of an epidemic. This difficult disease, once called adult-onset diabetes, is striking an ever-growing number of adults. Even more alarming, it’s now beginning to show up in teenagers and children. More than 24 million Americans have diabetes; of those, about 6 million don’t know they have the disease. (1) In 2007, diabetes cost the U.S. an estimated $116 billion in excess medical spending, and an additional $58 billion in reduced productivity. (1) If the spread of type 2 diabetes continues at its present rate, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes in the United States will increase from about 16 million in 2005 to 48 million in 2050. (2) Worldwide, the number of adults with diabetes will rise from 285 million in 2010 to 439 million in the year 2030. (3) The problems behind the numbers are even more alarming. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness and kidney failure among adults. It causes mild to severe nerve damage that, coupled with diabetes-related circulation problems, often leads to the loss of a leg or foot. Diabetes significantly increases the risk of heart disease. And it’s the seventh leading cause of death in the U.S., directly causing almost 70,000 deaths each year and contributing to thousands more. (4) The good news is that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. About 9 cases in 10 could be avoided by taking several simple steps: keeping weight under control, exercising more, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Our cells depend on a single simple sugar, glucose, for most of their energy needs. That’s why the body Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet