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High Fiber Foods Diabetes

Best Snacks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Best Snacks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes can lead to a wide range of symptoms including high blood pressure, circulation issues, kidney damage, blindness, and skin problems. But the right diet can help manage these symptoms. Healthful snacks for people with diabetes can keep blood sugar in check. They may also help reduce the severity of diabetes symptoms such as high blood pressure. Eating right can feel daunting, particularly at first, but people with diabetes can continue enjoying a wide range of snacks. Foods high in protein High-protein foods include nuts, legumes, animal products such as eggs and cheese, and alternatives to meat such as tofu and mushrooms. Healthful snacks for people with diabetes that are satisfying and rich in protein include: roasted chickpeas apples or celery with almond butter almonds, walnuts, or pistachios trail mix, particularly if it doesn't contain sweetened ingredients hard-boiled eggs plain yogurt, particularly Greek yogurt low-sodium cottage cheese mixed with fresh fruit diced avocado and cherry tomatoes snap peas or other raw veggies with hummus Several of these options can work well as both sweet and savory snacks. Honey-roasted chickpeas provide a good balance of sweet and savory. Nuts can be paired with slices of cheese or dried fruit. Adding nuts or fruit can also make yogurt sweeter or more savory. For the turkey roll-ups, people can use thinly sliced turkey or lettuce to replace the pita. Adding hummus and vegetables makes for a hearty snack. High-fiber snacks Vegetables, legumes, and nuts are excellent sources of fiber. Whole grains, oats, and some fruits are as well. People with diabetes can try some of these high-fiber snacks: smoothies blended with high-fiber, non-starchy vegetables sprouted, whole-grain breads whole-grain or bean pastas oatmeal, mixed wi Continue reading >>

Delicious Fiber-rich Foods To Help You Manage Diabetes

Delicious Fiber-rich Foods To Help You Manage Diabetes

As a group, Americans fall far short of the recommended amount of fiber people should eat every day. This deficiency can be especially harmful when you're trying to manage diabetes and possibly lose weight. “Fiber has a way of working magic in the body,” says Kelly Kennedy, RD, a nutritionist at Everyday Health. “It’s crucial for any healthy diet, but [fiber] can be especially helpful for those with diabetes. This is because fiber works in a number of ways. It can help to lower blood glucose levels — the main goal for those with diabetes.” According to a research review published in the January-February 2012 issue of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, a diet that’s high in fiber may help lower your A1C test results, which measures your average blood sugar control over two to three months. RELATED: 5 Small Steps to Help You Lower Your A1C Fiber can also help lower LDL, or "bad," cholesterol levels, which is a contributing factor to heart disease, notes Kennedy. “Those with diabetes are 2 to 4 times [more] likely to die from heart disease as those who do not have diabetes, so this is an important number to manage. In addition, fiber leads to satiety, or a feeling of fullness, which can make it easier to manage a healthy weight — important for bringing down blood sugar levels and heart disease risk alike.” The National Academy of Sciences recommends daily fiber totals based on age and gender: Men younger than 50 years old should get 38 grams (g) per day Men older than 50 should get 30 g per day Women younger than 50 years old should get 25 g per day Women older than age 50 should get 21 g per day The American Diabetes Association recommends a similar goal of consuming at least 25 g for women and 38 g of fiber for men per day. Dietitia Continue reading >>

How Does Fiber Affect Blood Glucose Levels?

How Does Fiber Affect Blood Glucose Levels?

Fiber is a type of carbohydrate (just like sugars and starches) but since it is not broken down by the human body, it does not contribute any calories. Yet, on a food label, fiber is listed under total carbohydrate. So this gets kind of confusing for people who have diabetes. Carbohydrate is the one nutrient that has the biggest impact on blood glucose. So, does fiber have any effect on your blood glucose? The answer is that fiber does not raise blood glucose levels. Because it is not broken down by the body, the fiber in an apple or a slice of whole grain bread has no effect on blood glucose levels because it isn't digested. The grams of fiber can actually be subtracted from the total grams of carb you are eating if you are using carbohydrate counting for meal planning. So, fiber is a good thing for people with diabetes. Of course, most of the foods that contain fiber (fruits, vegetables, whole grain breads, cereals, and pastas) also contain other types of non-fiber carbohydrate (sugar, starch) that must be accounted for in your meal plan. The average person should eat between 20-35 grams of fiber each day. Most Americans eat about half that amount. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that people with diabetes who ate 50 grams of fiber a day — particularly soluble fiber — were able to control their blood glucose better than those who ate far less. So if fiber does not give us any calories, why exactly should you eat it? There are two types of fiber: insoluble and soluble. Insoluble fiber keeps your digestive tract working well. Whole wheat bran is an example of this type of fiber. Soluble fiber can help lower your cholesterol level and improve blood glucose control if eaten in large amounts. Oatmeal is an example of this type of fiber. Another ben Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: 20 Healthy Foods For Diabetics

Diabetic Diet: 20 Healthy Foods For Diabetics

A diabetic diet consists of foods that are healthy for a controlled diabetic diet. This comprises a list of foods for diabetics that is high in fiber, antioxidants, and vitamins and minerals. The list of foods that we have included in this diabetics diet slideshow are also familiar and easy to find. These are not the only food for diabetics, but including them in your diabetes meal plan will help improve your overall health . High fiber High fiber foods are known to lower blood cholesterol and blood sugar levels. Whole grains, oats, channa atta, millets and other high fiber foods should be included in foods for diabetics. Maida, sooji, noodles, pasta should be avoided. If one feels like consuming pasta or noodles, it should always be accompanied with vegetable /sprouts. Beans Beans have always been the undervalued protein that could work best when used as a substitute for meat. They stay in your digestive system longer and add to the feeling of fullness and a satisfied feeling, aiding weight management, a very good example for food for diabetics. To save time cooking beans, use a pressure cooker. Soaked beans are tender in just 10 to 15 minutes. Barley Barley is great for a healthy diet. Barley includes both soluble and insoluble fiber in abundance. It can be added to soups, cereal and salads. This food for diabetics reduces the rise in blood sugar after a meal by almost 70 per cent, and hence keeps your blood sugar lower and steadier for hours. Carrots While the type of sugar they contain is transformed into blood sugar quickly, the amount of sugar in carrots is extremely low. This food for diabetics are one of nature's richest sources of beta-carotene, which is linked to a lower risk of diabetes and better blood-sugar control. Asparagus Scientists have found regular i Continue reading >>

Eating A High Fiber Diet Can Help Manage Diabetes In An Unexpected Way

Eating A High Fiber Diet Can Help Manage Diabetes In An Unexpected Way

Eating a High Fiber Diet Can Help Manage Diabetes in an Unexpected Way Eating a High Fiber Diet Can Help Manage Diabetes in an Unexpected Way Type 2 diabetics will want to pay attention to this new research. Weve known for a while that eating a high fiber diet is good for our bodies. Fiber is found in plant-based foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds. It helps to keep us full, maintain healthy body weight, reduce chances of overeating, and potentially lower cholesterol and reduce risk for chronic diseases and cancer. Plus, it can support a healthy gut by helping waste pass through your digestive system efficiently. Fiber is great on its own, but a recent study shows it may be even more beneficial for those with type 2 diabetes. According to the study, published in the journal Science, eating a high fiber diet can create the ultimate environment for gut bacteria and help prevent and manage type 2 diabeteswhich occurs when the pancreas cannot make enough insulin or your body becomes resistant to insulin. The six-year study examined two groups with type 2 diabetes over 12 weeks. The control group was given regular type 2 diabetes dietary recommendations and patient education. The test group was given the same calorie goals, but a diet recommendation that was much higher in dietary fiber, including whole grains, traditional fiber-rich Chinese-medicinal foods, and prebiotics. Both groups were given the drug acarbose to help control blood glucose. RELATED: Whats the Difference Between Prebiotics and Probiotics? At the end of the study, those following the high fiber diet had significantly lower blood sugar levels, lost more weight, and their fasting blood glucose levels dropped faster. People with type 2 diabetes typically have lower levels of Continue reading >>

More Evidence That A High-fiber Diet Can Curb Type 2 Diabetes

More Evidence That A High-fiber Diet Can Curb Type 2 Diabetes

People who ate more than 26 grams of fiber a day had an 18 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who ate 19 grams a day or less Fiber may benefit diabetes by altering hormonal signals, slowing down nutrient absorption or altering fermentation in the large intestine, along with promoting feelings of satiety and weight loss The majority of your fiber should come from vegetables, not grains By Dr. Mercola In the US, nearly 80 million people, or one in four has some form of diabetes or pre-diabetes. One in two people with diabetes do not know they have it,1 which increases the odds of developing complications, which can be deadly. Leading a healthy lifestyle is one of the best strategies to prevent, and treat, type 2 diabetes, and even more specifically, eating a high-fiber diet is emerging as a key strategy you can use to lower your risk. More Than 26 Grams of Fiber a Day May Lower Your Diabetes Risk US dietary guidelines call for adults to consume 20-30 grams of fiber per day. I believe an ideal amount for most adults is around 50 grams per 1,000 calories consumed. Most people, however, get only half that, or less. In a recent study conducted by researchers at the Imperial College London, those who had the highest intake of fiber (more than 26 grams a day) had an 18 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those with the lowest intake (less than 19 grams a day).2 The fiber may benefit diabetes by altering hormonal signals, slowing down nutrient absorption or altering fermentation in the large intestine, along with promoting feelings of satiety.3 Eating a high-fiber diet is also associated with weight loss, and the researchers believe this may, in turn, lower diabetes risk. In fact, when the researchers accounted for participants' BMI, th Continue reading >>

Treating Diabetes With Fiber

Treating Diabetes With Fiber

I wrote last week about the amazing benefits of dietary fiber . But what is fiber? It comes in numerous forms. In this entry, well look at what type of fiber to eat, how much to have, and how to make it enjoyable and doable. Fiber is a catchall term for various kinds of plant matter. A common definition is this one from the Linus Pauling Institute: Dietary fiber is a diverse group of compounds, including lignin and complex carbohydrates, which cannot be digested by human enzymes in the small intestine. Because theyre not digested, they pass through into the large intestine. There they are colonized by bacteria and turned into short-chain fatty acids or SCFAs, which have wonderful effects on blood glucose, cholesterol, and the immune system. Scientists have classified fibers in several ways. One common classification is soluble versus insoluble. According to Amy Campbell, soluble fiber is the kind that turns into a gel in the intestines and slows down digestion. I think of it as being like cooked squash: a nice, soothing mush. Insoluble fiber doesnt break down as much. Its in things like carrots and oat bran. It helps to speed the passage of food through the digestive system and adds bulk to stool. If youre dealing with inflammatory bowel or irritable bowel , you want to maximize soluble and decrease insoluble fibers. But from a diabetes angle, it doesnt make much difference, because nearly all plant foods include both types, and both are good. Other terms used for soluble fibers are viscous and fermentable. All these terms are similar. They mean bacteria in the colon can ferment the fiber, and thats what we want. For the most part we can ignore these distinctions. The Institute of Medicine also classes fibers as dietary and functional. Dietary (or intact) fibers come f Continue reading >>

10 Fiber-rich Foods For Your Diabetes Diet

10 Fiber-rich Foods For Your Diabetes Diet

Focus on Fiber, Balance Your Blood Sugar Ready to give your health a clean sweep? Then consider fiber — nature’s broom, says Toby Smithson, RDN, LDN, CDE, spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies. Found in plant-based foods, fiber is a carbohydrate that the body can’t digest, which helps slow the rise in blood sugar following a meal. There are two types of fiber — soluble and insoluble, and they’ve both got big benefits. “Foods high in soluble fiber become gummy or sticky as they pass through the digestive tract, helping to reduce the absorption of cholesterol,” Smithson explains. Insoluble fiber doesn’t dissolve and promotes bowel regularity. Other benefits include weight management, because fiber can help you feel more full and satisfied, and better regulation of blood sugar levels. And since people with diabetes are at double the risk for cardiovascular complications, fiber’s ability to lower cholesterol and blood pressure levels is a great way to improve heart health. To get the recommended 20 to 35 grams per day, include these fiber-rich gems in your type 2 diabetes diet. Continue reading >>

High Fiber Foods For A Diabetic

High Fiber Foods For A Diabetic

Diabetics benefit doubly from a diet of high-fiber food sources that help to control both weight and blood sugar levels. Many diabetics must count and limit the amount of carbohydrates they eat in order to keep blood sugar levels within a safe range. Of the two types of carb foods, you can eat more of those with significant fiber content than those with greater sugar content, without an undue rise in blood sugar, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Video of the Day Many high-fiber foods have naturally low sugar, fat and calorie totals as well, which help you maintain a healthy weight and reduce your risk for diabetes complications. The FDA recommends a 25 g average daily intake of dietary fiber for adults. Diabetic diets should limit high-sugar fruits, especially dried fruits, that have concentrated sugars. This still leaves high-fiber berries and citrus fruits as acceptable fruit food sources, the ADA relates. Domestic and Asian pears also contain moderate to high fiber. An Asian pear has 10 g of fiber, while 1 cup of fresh blackberries and raspberries have 7 g and 8 g respectively, according to the USDA Nutrient Database. Oranges and blueberries contribute moderate amounts of fiber. If you buy canned or frozen fruits, make sure they're packed without added sugar. Green vegetables are another value-added food source for diabetic diets, with very low calories and sugar, and extremely dense beneficial nutrients, including fiber. The USDA lists an abundance of choices with fiber contents of 5 g and up. In 1 cup, cooked collards, turnip greens, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, spinach and artichokes each deliver high fiber content. Whole-wheat breads, pastas, brown rice and barley are food sources rich in fiber. Some ready-to-eat cereals have too many simple c Continue reading >>

Fibre And Diabetes

Fibre And Diabetes

Porridgeis a good source of fibre Increasing the amount of fibre in your diet can help you manage your diabetes. It also helps keep your gut healthy and can reduce your bloodcholesterol, which lowers your risk of cardiovascular disease. If you are trying to maintain a healthy weight, it can also be beneficial. The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN), who looked at the role of fibre in maintaining good health, published these new recommendations in July 2015: adults 16 years and over: 30g per day 11-16 years: 25g per day 5-11 years: 20g per day 2-5 years: 15g per day Currently, the average adult in the UK consumes only around 19g per day. Here, we’ll help you identify foods that are high in fibre and simple ways you can increase your intake. Remember that you’ll also need to increase the amount youdrink. If you have diabetes, or are just managing your weight, the best options for drinks are water, no-calorie/low-calorie sugar-free drinks, unsweetened tea or coffee with milk. What is fibre? Dietary fibre is a type of carbohydrate that’s found in plant-based foods. It’s not absorbed or digested by the body, but plays an important role in maintaining good health. There are two types of dietary fibre – soluble and insoluble. Most foods contain both types, but are usually richer in one type than the other. Soluble fibre Found in oat, oat bran, linseeds, barley, fruit and vegetable, nuts, beans, pulses, soya and lentils. Insoluble fibre Good sources include: wholemeal bread, bran, wholegrain cereals, nuts, seeds and the skin of some fruit and vegetables. Why is fibre important? Having diabetes can increase your risk of cardiovascular disease. Evidence shows that increasing your intake of fibre, especially cereal and wholegrains, can help reduce the risk Continue reading >>

How To Get More Fiber If You Have Diabetes

How To Get More Fiber If You Have Diabetes

Even dressed up, 50 grams of daily fiber is a lot to pack away.(ISTOCKPHOTO)If youve got type 2 diabetes, the quality of food is as important as the quantity. And fiber is the best stuff around. Fiber itself doesnt raise blood sugar because it can't be digested, and that's good. But even better, it can blunt the impact that carbohydrates have on blood sugar. The reason? The intestines take a bit more time to digest fiber-rich foods, and that slows the release of glucose into your bloodstream. You need to check labels and add more fiber A 2000 study of 13 patients showed that patients with diabetes who consumed 50 grams of fiber each day lowered their glucose levels 10% and insulin levels 12% more than those who consumed 24 grams of fiber a day. The problem is that 50 grams of fiber per day is a lot of fiber. Most Americans consume only 15 grams every day, according to the American Heart Association, and the American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes eat 25 to 50 grams daily. While its tough to consume that much, its not impossible. "Check nutrition labels to see how much fiber there is in the foods you eat," says LuAnn Berry, RD, a certified diabetes educator and diabetes specialist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "Then go back to the ones with the most grams of fiber per serving." Good sources of fiber include: Whole grain products, such as whole wheat bread Dried beans, including kidney, black and garbanzos, lentils Oats, which are found in oatmeal Apples and pears with their skins on Berry says you can eat the fiber-high foods alone or add them to recipesfor example, put beans in a salad. However, dont forget to calculate how much carbohydrate you are adding. A half-cup of beans, for example, has the same carbohydrate count as Continue reading >>

The Best Sources Of Fiber For A Diabetic

The Best Sources Of Fiber For A Diabetic

Fiber is the part of plant foods that your body can't digest. It has a number of health benefits, including lowering your risk for high cholesterol and heart disease and helping you control your weight. When diabetics consume a diet high in fiber, they are better able to keep their blood glucose and cholesterol levels under control. Some foods are better sources of fiber than others. The Dietary Reference Intake for fiber is at least 38 grams per day for men aged 50 and under and at least 25 grams per day for women aged 50 and under. However, consuming even more fiber than this may be beneficial for diabetics, notes a study published in 2004 in the "Journal of the American College of Nutrition," which found that diabetics who consumed between 21 and 50 grams of fiber per day had the best cholesterol and blood glucose results. Foods High in Fiber If a food has at least 5 grams of fiber per serving, it is high in fiber, and foods that contain at least 2.5 grams of fiber per serving are good sources of fiber. Beans, whole grains, nuts and fruits and vegetables, especially those that contain peels and seeds that you eat, are all good options for increasing the amount of fiber in your diet, whether or not you are diabetic. Glycemic Index The glycemic index is a scale used to measure how quickly a particular food increases your blood sugar levels. Foods are compared to either white bread or glucose, since these are two foods that quickly cause blood sugar levels to spike. Diabetics may find it easier to control their blood sugar if they consume foods that are low on the glycemic index, including beans, fruits, non-starchy vegetables and whole grains, all of which are also good sources of fiber. Baked goods that are high in sugar are still likely to be high on the glycemic ind Continue reading >>

6 Reasons A High-fiber Diet Is Insanely Healthy For Diabetes

6 Reasons A High-fiber Diet Is Insanely Healthy For Diabetes

Fiber directly improves insulin sensitivity iStock A number of studies have found that eating more dietary fiber for a period of weeks or months is linked to a reduction in biomarkers for insulin resistance. This may be due in part to dietary fiber’s anti-inflammatory effects—high-fiber diets have been associated with reduced blood levels of C-reactive protein, a marker for systemic inflammation—and also to the fact that the short-chain fatty acids that fiber produces when it ferments in the intestinal tract tend to inhibit the breakdown of the body’s fat stores into free fatty acids. This breakdown of fat stores appears to play a major role in creating insulin resistance in the skeletal muscles. iStock Soluble fiber’s general effect of slowing down the digestive process means that the carbohydrates we eat take longer to be broken down into glucose. As a result, the release of glucose into the blood after eating tends to occur more slowly over a longer period of time following a high-fiber meal. This means that glucose doesn’t rise to as high a peak after eating, putting less stress on the glucose metabolism process. iStock The same fermentation process that signals the body to become more responsive to insulin also suppresses glucose production in the liver—countering the liver’s glucose overproduction that occurs as the result of insulin resistance. Fiber makes you feel more full so it’s easier to eat less iStock A number of studies have found that people who eat diets high in fiber feel more full after eating and also feel less hungry between meals. For starters, dietary fiber is simply bulkier than other nutrients. This causes the stomach to become more distended when you eat fiber, which sends appetite-suppressing signals to the brain. Soluble fib Continue reading >>

The Facts About Carbs, Fiber, And Diabetes

The Facts About Carbs, Fiber, And Diabetes

When you watch your diet because you have diabetes, you'll want to pay special attention to carbohydrates, because they can affect your blood sugar level faster than protein or fat. You get carbs from sweets, fruit, milk, yogurt, bread, cereal, rice, pasta, potatoes, and other vegetables. It can help to count your carbs from things you eat or drink, and split them evenly between meals so that it’s in line with how much insulin is available from your body or from medicine. If you get more than your insulin supply can handle, your blood sugar level goes up. If you eat too few carbohydrates, your blood sugar level may fall too low. With carbohydrate counting, you can pick almost any food product off the shelf, read the label, and use the information about grams of carbohydrates to fit the food into your meal plan. Counting carbs is most useful for people who use insulin several times a day or wear an insulin pump, or want more flexibility and variety in their food choices. The amount and type of insulin you are prescribed may affect the flexibility of your meal plan. You don’t have to count carbs. You could use diabetes food exchange lists instead. Ask your doctor or a registered dietitian for their advice on that. Fiber helps control blood sugar. It also helps you lower your “bad” (LDL) cholesterol. Most Americans need more fiber in their diets. The average American only gets about half the fiber needed on a daily basis. You get fiber from plant foods, so plan to eat more of these foods: Cooked dried beans and peas Whole-grain breads, cereals, and crackers Brown rice Bran products Nuts and seeds Although it’s best to get fiber from food sources, fiber supplements can also help you get the daily fiber you need. Examples include psyllium and methylcellulose. Incre Continue reading >>

A Guide To Healthy Low-carb Eating With Diabetes

A Guide To Healthy Low-carb Eating With Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions. It currently affects over 400 million people worldwide (1). Although diabetes is a complicated disease, maintaining good blood sugar control can greatly reduce the risk of complications (2, 3). One of the ways to achieve better blood sugar levels is to follow a low-carb diet. This article provides a detailed overview of low-carb diets for managing diabetes. If you have diabetes, your body cannot process carbohydrates effectively. Normally, when you eat carbs, they are broken down into small units of glucose, which end up as blood sugar. When blood sugar levels go up, the pancreas responds by producing the hormone insulin. This hormone allows the blood sugar to enter cells. In healthy people, blood sugar levels remain within a narrow range throughout the day. In diabetes, however, this system doesn't work the way it is supposed to. This is a big problem, because having both too high and too low blood sugar levels can cause severe harm. There are several types of diabetes, but the two most common ones are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Both of these conditions can be diagnosed at any age. In type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune process destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Diabetics must inject insulin several times a day to ensure that glucose gets into the cells and stays at a healthy level in the bloodstream (4). In type 2 diabetes, the beta cells at first produce enough insulin, but the body's cells are resistant to its action, so blood sugar remains high. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down. Over time, the beta cells lose their ability to produce enough insulin (5). Of the three nutrients -- protein, carbs and fat -- carbs have the grea Continue reading >>

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