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High Fiber Diabetic Meal Plan

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Understanding How Food Affects Your Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates Blood glucose is affected most by carbohydrates. And insulin dosing is typically based on food intake, especially carbohydrates. Knowing what foods contain carbohydrates and the amount of carbohydrates in a meal is helpful for blood glucose control. You should aim to include carbohydrates in each meal. Carbohydrate sources like vegetables, fruits and whole grains (high fiber) are preferred over carbohydrate sources with added fats, sugars and salt. Proteins are a necessary part of a balanced diet and can keep you from feeling hungry. They also do not raise your blood glucose like carbohydrates. However, to prevent weight gain, use portion control with proteins. In people with Type 2 diabetes, protein makes insulin work faster, so it may not be a good idea to treat low blood sugar with protein shakes or mixes. Fats Fats are a necessary part of a balanced diet, especially healthy fats like olive oil and fatty fish. The five food groups Some people believe that a diabetes diagnosis means “goodbye” to good food. Not so. Having diabetes does not mean that you can no longer enjoy good food, or that you have to give up your favorite foods. Living with diabetes means eating regular, healthy meals from the following five food groups: Grains and starches Vegetables Fruits Milk & alternatives Meat & alternatives Making healthy food choices Your dietitian or diabetes educator can help you to develop an eating plan that is right for you and fits into your lifestyle. Here are some guidelines for healthy eating: Healthy eating for diabetes is healthy eating for the whole family. Enjoy having regular meals, starting with breakfast first, then lunch and dinner. Space meals no more than 6 hours apart. Eat a variety of foods in each meal, including healthy fats, lean mea Continue reading >>

How Does Fiber Affect Blood Glucose Levels?

How Does Fiber Affect Blood Glucose Levels?

Fiber is a type of carbohydrate (just like sugars and starches) but since it is not broken down by the human body, it does not contribute any calories. Yet, on a food label, fiber is listed under total carbohydrate. So this gets kind of confusing for people who have diabetes. Carbohydrate is the one nutrient that has the biggest impact on blood glucose. So, does fiber have any effect on your blood glucose? The answer is that fiber does not raise blood glucose levels. Because it is not broken down by the body, the fiber in an apple or a slice of whole grain bread has no effect on blood glucose levels because it isn't digested. The grams of fiber can actually be subtracted from the total grams of carb you are eating if you are using carbohydrate counting for meal planning. So, fiber is a good thing for people with diabetes. Of course, most of the foods that contain fiber (fruits, vegetables, whole grain breads, cereals, and pastas) also contain other types of non-fiber carbohydrate (sugar, starch) that must be accounted for in your meal plan. The average person should eat between 20-35 grams of fiber each day. Most Americans eat about half that amount. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that people with diabetes who ate 50 grams of fiber a day — particularly soluble fiber — were able to control their blood glucose better than those who ate far less. So if fiber does not give us any calories, why exactly should you eat it? There are two types of fiber: insoluble and soluble. Insoluble fiber keeps your digestive tract working well. Whole wheat bran is an example of this type of fiber. Soluble fiber can help lower your cholesterol level and improve blood glucose control if eaten in large amounts. Oatmeal is an example of this type of fiber. Another ben Continue reading >>

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Healthy eating is the cornerstone of managing diabetes, yet it can be a challenge figuring out what to eat to balance your blood sugar. Here we've created a delicious 3-day meal plan that makes it easier to follow a diabetes diet. In this plan you'll find a mix of nutritious foods including fiber-rich complex carbohydrates, like whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, healthy fats and dairy. This plan limits the amount of foods with refined carbohydrates (think white bread, white rice and sugar), added sugars and saturated fats, which can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Incorporating a variety of foods, as we do in this meal plan, is a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Not sure if this is the right plan for you? Calculate your calorie level and find the diet meal plan that will work best for you. Day 1 Meal Prep Tip: Cook or set aside an extra 1/2 cup of black beans tonight at dinner to have for lunch on Day 2. Be sure to rinse canned beans to get rid of excess salt. Breakfast (298 calories, 32 grams carbohydrates) • 1 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt • 1/2 cup blueberries • 1 1/2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts • 2 tsp. honey Top yogurt with blueberries, walnuts and honey. Note: We use a small amount of added sweetener, in this case h Continue reading >>

How To Get More Fiber If You Have Diabetes

How To Get More Fiber If You Have Diabetes

Even dressed up, 50 grams of daily fiber is a lot to pack away.(ISTOCKPHOTO)If youve got type 2 diabetes, the quality of food is as important as the quantity. And fiber is the best stuff around. Fiber itself doesnt raise blood sugar because it can't be digested, and that's good. But even better, it can blunt the impact that carbohydrates have on blood sugar. The reason? The intestines take a bit more time to digest fiber-rich foods, and that slows the release of glucose into your bloodstream. You need to check labels and add more fiber A 2000 study of 13 patients showed that patients with diabetes who consumed 50 grams of fiber each day lowered their glucose levels 10% and insulin levels 12% more than those who consumed 24 grams of fiber a day. The problem is that 50 grams of fiber per day is a lot of fiber. Most Americans consume only 15 grams every day, according to the American Heart Association, and the American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes eat 25 to 50 grams daily. While its tough to consume that much, its not impossible. "Check nutrition labels to see how much fiber there is in the foods you eat," says LuAnn Berry, RD, a certified diabetes educator and diabetes specialist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "Then go back to the ones with the most grams of fiber per serving." Good sources of fiber include: Whole grain products, such as whole wheat bread Dried beans, including kidney, black and garbanzos, lentils Oats, which are found in oatmeal Apples and pears with their skins on Berry says you can eat the fiber-high foods alone or add them to recipesfor example, put beans in a salad. However, dont forget to calculate how much carbohydrate you are adding. A half-cup of beans, for example, has the same carbohydrate count as Continue reading >>

High Fiber Foods For A Diabetic

High Fiber Foods For A Diabetic

Diabetics benefit doubly from a diet of high-fiber food sources that help to control both weight and blood sugar levels. Many diabetics must count and limit the amount of carbohydrates they eat in order to keep blood sugar levels within a safe range. Of the two types of carb foods, you can eat more of those with significant fiber content than those with greater sugar content, without an undue rise in blood sugar, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Video of the Day Many high-fiber foods have naturally low sugar, fat and calorie totals as well, which help you maintain a healthy weight and reduce your risk for diabetes complications. The FDA recommends a 25 g average daily intake of dietary fiber for adults. Diabetic diets should limit high-sugar fruits, especially dried fruits, that have concentrated sugars. This still leaves high-fiber berries and citrus fruits as acceptable fruit food sources, the ADA relates. Domestic and Asian pears also contain moderate to high fiber. An Asian pear has 10 g of fiber, while 1 cup of fresh blackberries and raspberries have 7 g and 8 g respectively, according to the USDA Nutrient Database. Oranges and blueberries contribute moderate amounts of fiber. If you buy canned or frozen fruits, make sure they're packed without added sugar. Green vegetables are another value-added food source for diabetic diets, with very low calories and sugar, and extremely dense beneficial nutrients, including fiber. The USDA lists an abundance of choices with fiber contents of 5 g and up. In 1 cup, cooked collards, turnip greens, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, spinach and artichokes each deliver high fiber content. Whole-wheat breads, pastas, brown rice and barley are food sources rich in fiber. Some ready-to-eat cereals have too many simple c Continue reading >>

Outsmart Diabetes 1-week Meal Plan

Outsmart Diabetes 1-week Meal Plan

You'll choose a meal plan based on two calorie levels: 1,400 or 1,600. (Sedentary, shorter women should follow the 1,400-calorie plan; for men and taller and/or more active women, 1,600 calories is best.) Either way, you'll eat three meals and two snacks a day—each with a healthy dose of the Fat-Fighting 4. Here is the first week of a 1,400-calorie plan. (You can repeat meals to maximize your food dollars or to replace one you don't care for.) [sidebar] DAY 1 Breakfast: Veggie omelet: Cook 1 egg white in a pan with 2 tsp canola, peanut, or olive oil; 1/2 c spinach leaves; 1/2 c mushrooms; and onion, garlic, and herbs as desired. Top with 1/4 c reduced-fat cheese. Serve with 1 slice whole grain toast spread with 1 tsp canola-oil margarine and 1/2 c fat-free milk. Lunch: Mixed-up salad: Toss 2 c vegetable greens, 3/4 c low-fat cottage cheese, and 1/2 c mandarin orange slices with 2 Tbsp light Italian dressing. Top with 2 Tbsp chopped almonds or walnuts. Serve with 5 whole grain crackers (such as Triscuits). Snack: Yogurt: 6 oz light, fat-free, or low-fat flavored yogurt. Dinner: Grilled fish tacos: Place 2 oz grilled fish and 1 c shredded cabbage, seasoned with rice vinegar, between 2 corn tortillas. Top with 2 Tbsp light sour cream. Serve with 2 c veggies (such as eggplant, mushrooms, green beans, and onions) marinated in 2 Tbsp light Italian dressing and 1 tsp olive oil, then grilled. Snack: Hummus and crackers: 2 Tbsp hummus on 2 whole grain rye crispbreads. More from Prevention: Get More Diabetes Recipes and Meal Ideas! [pagebreak] DAY 2 Breakfast: Pancakes: Top 3 buckwheat or whole wheat pancakes (6" diameter) with 1 tsp canola oil margarine and 1 Tbsp 100% fruit spread (or 2 Tbsp sugar-free syrup). Serve with 1 c fat-free milk or calcium-enriched soy or rice bever Continue reading >>

Eating Well With Diabetes: Caribbean And African Diets

Eating Well With Diabetes: Caribbean And African Diets

Many of the staple foods in Caribbean and African diets are good for your health. From leafy green vegetables to fresh mango to beans, there are lots of nutrient-rich choices. However, fried foods and sweets are also popular and should be limited. If you have diabetes, you can work with your healthcare team to develop a plan that’s right for you. It will probably include exercise, a meal plan, blood glucose monitoring, and perhaps medication. This article will focus on the dietary changes that you can make. What is type 2 diabetes? Diabetes is a disease where the pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body does not use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. When the body is working well, insulin helps carry sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells where it is used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body's cells do not receive enough glucose, so it stays in your blood. High blood glucose (or high blood sugar) can lead to heart, kidney, vision and blood vessel problems. Who has a higher risk of diabetes? Some ethnic groups in Canada have a higher risk of getting diabetes, including people of African descent. There are certain genes that affect insulin function. Having these genes increases your risk of diabetes. These genes are commonly found in high risk populations such as people with an African heritage. What to eat…and when If you have diabetes, it is important to eat every 4 to 6 hours to keep your blood sugar levels stable. Try to have three daily meals at regular times and have healthy snacks when you are hungry. A balanced meal has foods from at least 3 of the 4 food groups: Vegetables and Fruit Grain Products Milk and Alternatives Meat and Alternatives You can work with a Registered Dietitian to make a personal meal plan. Continue reading >>

Eating Healthfully With Diabetes: Your Menu Plan

Eating Healthfully With Diabetes: Your Menu Plan

Carbohydrates raise blood sugar faster than proteins or fats. They also have the biggest effect on your blood sugar. Fiber, protein, and fat can curb the rise in blood sugar after a meal. So aim for variety.Eat a mixture of carbohydrates, protein, and fat to manage your blood sugar better and stay full longer. But make sure to choose quality carbohydrates and smart fats, such as: Healthy carbs: Vegetables, beans, whole grains, and fruit Smart fats: Fish, nuts and seeds, avocado, olives, extra virgin olive oil, and canola oil Check your blood sugar after meals. Look for patterns between what you eat and drink and your blood sugar levels after. You also may want to track how many grams or servings of carbohydrates you eat with each meal and try to keep it about the same from meal to meal. This can also help you take charge of your blood sugar. Eating a healthy, balanced diet when you have diabetes doesn't mean you can't eat foods that taste good. In the sample menu and recipes below, the meals have a good balance of protein and fat and a great source of fiber. You can plug them into your diet -- in the right portion sizes -- along with the other fruit, vegetables, grains, dairy, protein, or fats in your plan. Dont forget to watch salt, too. That's part of healthy eating with diabetes. Eating less salt has been shown to help prevent and treat high blood pressure. Read labels and choose foods that are low in sodium. Here's how you might work in a high-fiber carbohydrate along with some lean protein and "good" fat. Whole-grain cereal (hot or cold) with fruit Whole-grain bread, English muffin, or bagel Whole-grain waffles or pancakes with fruit A higher omega-3 egg blended with 2 egg whites for an egg dish. Add vegetables such as spinach, broccoli, or tomatoes. Low-fat milk Continue reading >>

Seven-day Diabetes Meal Plan: Options For Healthful Eating

Seven-day Diabetes Meal Plan: Options For Healthful Eating

A diabetes meal plan can help. A good meal plan can help people to meet their nutritional needs, eat an appropriate mix of foods, and lose weight if needed. A 7-day diabetes meal plan not only provides a week's worth of healthful eating, but it also makes shopping and cooking duties simpler and can help people save money. Two menus for 7 days The ideal diabetes meal plan will offer menus for three meals a day, plus two snacks. Plans tend to suggest consuming 1,500 to 1,800 calories a day. The number of calories people with diabetes need to eat each day will vary, depending on their activity level, height, and gender, and whether they're trying to lose, gain, or maintain their weight. The meal plans below provide a maximum of three servings of healthful, high-fiber carbohydrate choices at each meal or snack. Diet plans for weight loss Carrying excess weight puts additional stress on the body's ability to use insulin and regulate blood sugar levels. Unfortunately, close to 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, according to the Obesity Society. It is helpful for most people with diabetes to consider weight loss guidelines when developing a meal plan. Under the guidance of a doctor, many choose to follow a reduced calorie plan. Step-by-step guide to meals for a week These three practices can help people with diabetes enjoy a healthful, varied diet and successfully manage their blood sugar: balancing carbohydrates, proteins, and fat to meet dietary goals measuring portions accurately planning ahead With these ideas in mind, the following steps can help people with diabetes put together a healthful 7-day meal plan: note daily targets for calories and carbohydrates see how many portions of carbohydrates and other foods will meet those targets divide those p Continue reading >>

6 Reasons A High-fiber Diet Is Insanely Healthy For Diabetes

6 Reasons A High-fiber Diet Is Insanely Healthy For Diabetes

Fiber directly improves insulin sensitivity iStock A number of studies have found that eating more dietary fiber for a period of weeks or months is linked to a reduction in biomarkers for insulin resistance. This may be due in part to dietary fiber’s anti-inflammatory effects—high-fiber diets have been associated with reduced blood levels of C-reactive protein, a marker for systemic inflammation—and also to the fact that the short-chain fatty acids that fiber produces when it ferments in the intestinal tract tend to inhibit the breakdown of the body’s fat stores into free fatty acids. This breakdown of fat stores appears to play a major role in creating insulin resistance in the skeletal muscles. iStock Soluble fiber’s general effect of slowing down the digestive process means that the carbohydrates we eat take longer to be broken down into glucose. As a result, the release of glucose into the blood after eating tends to occur more slowly over a longer period of time following a high-fiber meal. This means that glucose doesn’t rise to as high a peak after eating, putting less stress on the glucose metabolism process. iStock The same fermentation process that signals the body to become more responsive to insulin also suppresses glucose production in the liver—countering the liver’s glucose overproduction that occurs as the result of insulin resistance. Fiber makes you feel more full so it’s easier to eat less iStock A number of studies have found that people who eat diets high in fiber feel more full after eating and also feel less hungry between meals. For starters, dietary fiber is simply bulkier than other nutrients. This causes the stomach to become more distended when you eat fiber, which sends appetite-suppressing signals to the brain. Soluble fib Continue reading >>

A Guide To Healthy Low-carb Eating With Diabetes

A Guide To Healthy Low-carb Eating With Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions. It currently affects over 400 million people worldwide (1). Although diabetes is a complicated disease, maintaining good blood sugar control can greatly reduce the risk of complications (2, 3). One of the ways to achieve better blood sugar levels is to follow a low-carb diet. This article provides a detailed overview of low-carb diets for managing diabetes. If you have diabetes, your body cannot process carbohydrates effectively. Normally, when you eat carbs, they are broken down into small units of glucose, which end up as blood sugar. When blood sugar levels go up, the pancreas responds by producing the hormone insulin. This hormone allows the blood sugar to enter cells. In healthy people, blood sugar levels remain within a narrow range throughout the day. In diabetes, however, this system doesn't work the way it is supposed to. This is a big problem, because having both too high and too low blood sugar levels can cause severe harm. There are several types of diabetes, but the two most common ones are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Both of these conditions can be diagnosed at any age. In type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune process destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Diabetics must inject insulin several times a day to ensure that glucose gets into the cells and stays at a healthy level in the bloodstream (4). In type 2 diabetes, the beta cells at first produce enough insulin, but the body's cells are resistant to its action, so blood sugar remains high. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down. Over time, the beta cells lose their ability to produce enough insulin (5). Of the three nutrients -- protein, carbs and fat -- carbs have the grea Continue reading >>

7-day High-fiber Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

7-day High-fiber Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

7-Day High-Fiber Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories By:Victoria Seaver, M.S., R.D., Digital Meal Plan Editor for EatingWell The best plan to help you lose weight, improve gut health, help your heart, lower diabetes risk & help you poop better. Fiber is a nutrition rock star with some pretty amazing health benefits. Research credits eating more fiber with weight loss, healthier gut bacteria, more regularity in your gut (aka better poops), a healthy heart and decreased risk of diabetes. Fiber is a nutrition rock star with some pretty amazing health benefits . Research credits eating more fiber with weight loss, healthier gut bacteria, more regularity in your gut (aka better poops), a healthy heart and decreased risk of diabetes. So if fiber can do all that, why are 95% of Americans still not getting enough? On average, Americans only eat 16 grams of fiber a dayfar from the 28 grams recommended in the 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Planning out your meals and snacks each week to meet the recommended amount of fiber can be a challenge. In this 7-day high-fiber meal plan, it's all planned for you to make it simpler and still delicious to get your fill every day. The meals and snacks in this plan include plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts and seeds; not only that, but the foods in each category are known to have the highest fiber contentthink raspberries, broccoli, oatmeal, black beans and chia seeds. Whether you follow this meal plan exactly or just take a few ideas from here and there, you'll have a much easier time getting the fiber you need to feel better and stay healthy. If you're not used to eating high-fiber foods, introduce them into your diet slowly and drink extra water throughout the day. Eating too much fiber, too quickly can lead to stomac Continue reading >>

Incredible Advantages Of A High Fiber Diet For Diabetes

Incredible Advantages Of A High Fiber Diet For Diabetes

There is one thing in nutrition that most experts and organizations agree upon. And that is: fiber is a healthy component of our diet. Still, the power of a high fiber diet is grossly underestimated. And when it comes to managing your type 2 diabetes, dietary fiber plays an even more important role. BUT there is one major problem… Most people aren't getting enough fiber – most people consuming under 15 g per day when we need at least 25-38 grams per day. And most diabetics get fiber from the wrong places – from high carb foods like whole wheat instead of low carb sources like non starchy vegetables or nuts and seeds. Here we'll go over some of the health benefits of eating a high fiber diet, the different types of fiber and we'll also cover a range of delicious high fiber foods with proven benefits for type 2 diabetes. Types of Fiber When it comes to fiber, there are many different types to be found in various food sources: Inulin. Found in artichokes, garlic, leeks, onions, asparagus, chicory root, wheat and rye. Resistant starch. Found in cooked and cooled rice and potatoes, beans and legumes, grains, seeds and green bananas. Pectin. Mainly found in apples, oranges, citrus peels, carrots, cherries and apricots, along with smaller amounts in other fruits and berries. Oligofructose. Like inulin, this fiber is also found in artichokes, garlic, leeks, onions, chicory and asparagus. Fructooligosaccharides. Found in a wide range of fruits and vegetables but particularly bananas, onions, garlic and asparagus. Cellulose. Forms the structure of most vegetables so eating an abundant variety is important. You won't hear of these types of fiber much. Instead, you will often hear the terms “soluble fiber” and “insoluble fiber.“ Soluble fibers turn into viscous gel-li Continue reading >>

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

The Best 7-day Diabetes Meal Plan

This 1,200-calorie meal plan makes it easy to follow a diabetes diet with healthy and delicious foods that help to balance blood sugar. The simple meals and snacks in this 7-day plan feature complex carbohydrates (think whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables), lean protein and healthy fats. We limited refined carbohydrates (like white bread, white pasta and white rice) as well as added sugars, which can spike your blood sugar quickly. We've also cut back on saturated fats and sodium, as they can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be difficult—choose a variety of nutritious foods, as we do in this meal plan, and add in daily exercise for a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Day 1 Breakfast (294 calories, 41 g carbohydrates) • 1/2 cup oats cooked in 1/2 cup each 2% milk and water • 1 medium plum, chopped • 4 walnut halves, chopped Top oats with plum and walnuts. A.M. Snack (96 calories, 18 g carbohydrates) • 3/4 cup blueberries • 1/4 nonfat plain Greek yogurt Top blueberries with yogurt. Lunch (319 calories, 37 g carbohydrates) Turkey & Apple Cheddar Melt • 2 slices whole-wheat bread • 2 tsp. whole-grain mustard, divided • 1/2 medium apple, sliced • 2 oz. low-sodium deli turkey • 2 Tbsp. shredded Cheddar cheese, divided • 1 cup mixed greens Top one slice of bread with 1 tsp. mustard, apple, turkey and 1 Tbsp. cheese. Top the other Continue reading >>

High-fiber Recipes

High-fiber Recipes

CONTRAVE® (naltrexone HCI/bupropion HCl) is a prescription weight-loss medicine that may help adults with obesity (BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2), or who are overweight (BMI greater than or equal to 27 kg/m2) with at least one weight-related medical condition, lose weight and keep the weight off. CONTRAVE should be used along with diet and exercise. One of the ingredients in CONTRAVE, bupropion, may increase the risk of suicidal thinking in children, adolescents, and young adults. CONTRAVE patients should be monitored for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. In patients taking bupropion for smoking cessation, serious neuropsychiatric adverse events have been reported. CONTRAVE is not approved for use in children under the age of 18. Stop taking CONTRAVE and call a healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms, especially if they are new, worse, or worry you: thoughts about suicide or dying; attempts to commit suicide; depression; anxiety; feeling agitated or restless; panic attacks; trouble sleeping (insomnia); irritability; aggression, anger, or violence; acting on dangerous impulses; an extreme increase in activity and talking (mania); other unusual changes in behavior or mood. Do not take CONTRAVE if you have uncontrolled high blood pressure; have or have had seizures; use other medicines that contain bupropion such as WELLBUTRIN, APLENZIN or ZYBAN; have or have had an eating disorder; are dependent on opioid pain medicines or use medicines to help stop taking opioids such as methadone or buprenorphine, or are in opiate withdrawal; drink a lot of alcohol and abruptly stop drinking; are allergic to any of the ingredients in CONTRAVE; or are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical Continue reading >>

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