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Healthy Pancreas Diet

Diet And Nutrition For Epi | Creon (pancrelipase) Videos

Diet And Nutrition For Epi | Creon (pancrelipase) Videos

A healthy diet for someone with CF is different than what most people consider to be a healthy diet. Its really important for kids living with CF to eat a lot of high-calorie and high-fat foods. Weve been very diligent about making sure Sabrina gets the nutrition she needs. Ive been learning more about nutrition and learning about good food options that are both healthy and high in calories. My mom has done a lot to help me, things like helping me make good food choices, whether its preparing healthy meals or always making sure I have snacks packed in my backpack for school. She also reminds me about taking my pancreatic enzymes. She has bugged me so much that its just become a habit. There are all sorts of ways for people like me who have EPI due to CF get the nutrients they need. Almonds, I love almonds. Sometimes salted, sometimes not, depending on my mood. Ive actually enjoyed Brussels sprouts since my dad cooked them for me, and were actually growing them in our garden. And I love rice. Rice is my favorite. I work closely with my dietitian to make sure Im getting all of the nutrition I need from my food. I want to do my part to make sure that Im making good food choices every day. CREON is a prescription medicine used to treat people who cannot digest food normally because their pancreas does not make enough enzymes due to cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis (which is the swelling of the pancreas that lasts a long time), pancreatectomy (which is the removal of some or all of the pancreas), or other conditions. CREON may increase your chance of having a rare bowel disorder called fibrosing colonopathy. The risk of having this condition may be reduced by following the dosing instructions that your doctor gave you. Do not crush or chew CREON capsules or its content Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis | Healthlink Bc

Pancreatitis | Healthlink Bc

Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas , an organ in your belly that makes the hormones insulin and glucagon . These two hormones control how your body uses the sugar found in the food you eat. Your pancreas also makes other hormones and enzymes that help you break down food. Usually the digestive enzymes stay in one part of the pancreas. But if these enzymes leak into other parts of the pancreas, they can irritate it and cause pain and swelling. This may happen suddenly or over many years. Over time, it can damage and scar the pancreas. Most cases are caused by gallstones or alcohol misuse. The disease can also be caused by an injury, an infection, or certain medicines. Long-term, or chronic, pancreatitis may occur after one attack. But it can also happen over many years. In Western countries, alcohol misuse is the most common cause of chronic cases. In some cases doctors don't know what caused the disease. The main symptom of pancreatitis is medium to severe pain in the upper belly. Pain may also spread to your back. Some people have other symptoms too, such as nausea, vomiting, a fever, and sweating. Your doctor will do a physical examination and ask you questions about your symptoms and past health. You may also have blood tests to see if your levels of certain enzymes are higher than normal. This can mean that you have pancreatitis. Your doctor may also want you to have a complete blood count (CBC), a liver test, or a stool test. Other tests include an MRI, a CT scan, or an ultrasound of your belly (abdominal ultrasound) to look for gallstones. A test called endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram, or ERCP, may help your doctor see if you have chronic pancreatitis. During this test, the doctor can also remove gallstones that are stuck in the bile duct . Continue reading >>

Help Take Pain Out Of Pancreatitis With Your Diet

Help Take Pain Out Of Pancreatitis With Your Diet

Written by Deborah Gerszberg, RD, CNSC, CDN Clinical Nutritionist, The Pancreas Center “What can I eat?” This is a popular question asked by those suffering from chronic pancreatitis or who have experienced acute pancreatitis and would like to do everything in their power to prevent another attack. First, let’s make sure everyone understands what pancreatitis is. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas and is usually very painful. The pancreas releases excessive enzymes and basically begins to digest itself. In order to heal, many patients must follow a liquid diet. Sometimes patients must avoid taking liquids by mouth. If you are suffering from an acute episode of pancreatitis, it is very important to call your doctor and follow their instructions. Sometimes hospitalization is necessary. Now let’s discuss the diet for chronic pancreatitis. It is most important that you understand what not to eat and why. There are a few things you must completely avoid, such as alcohol and fried/greasy/high fat foods (such as creamy sauces, fast food, full fat meat and dairy, and anything fried). These foods can cause your pancreas to release more enzymes at once than it normally would, leading to an attack. There are also foods that you should eat only sparingly, if at all. These include refined carbohydrates (white bread, sugar, and high fructose corn syrup) which cause your pancreas to release more insulin than more wholesome complex carbohydrates (such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and legumes). In general, I recommend minimizing processed foods, which are either high in fat, high in refined sugars, or sometimes both. You may be surprised I didn’t say to avoid foods containing fat. This is usually unnecessary and also unhealthy for most people suffering from c Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis Diet Tips And Information

Pancreatitis Diet Tips And Information

By George Cranston | Digestive Disorders | Rating: If you have recently been diagnosed with this disease, whether acute or chronic, you may be looking for helpful pancreatitis diet tips and information. Usually doctors will tell you what your diagnosis is and perhaps give you a few pointers along with some prescription medications, but most often it is not enough information to go on. Anyone looking to better understand the disease itself and how to treat it should begin with common known causes before exploring dietary tips. In order to better understand pancreatitis you should first know that the pancreas is a gland located next to the duodenum and directly behind the stomach. Its primary function is twofold. First it secretes digestive enzymes which are utilized to digest proteins, carbs and fats. Its second function is in releasing insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. These two substances are hormones necessary in glucose metabolism in which the body regulates how foods are converted to energy or stored as fat. Pancreatitis refers to a disease which results in the pancreas becoming inflamed. Before getting to the ultimate causes and treatments, it is important to understand that there are actually two forms of the disease, acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis will manifest quite suddenly while chronic pancreatitis will usually be accompanied by constant debilitating pain. Either type can be life threatening requiring hospitalization and/or surgery in extreme cases. Common symptoms of acute pancreatitis include pain in the upper abdomen, nausea, a swollen or tender abdomen, increased heart rate and even fever. Sometimes the pain in your abdomen will radiate toward the back as well. The symptoms of chronic pancreatitis are much the same as the acu Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis Diet

Pancreatitis Diet

The pancreas is the part of your body that helps you regulate the way that your body processes sugar. The pancreas also serves an important function in releasing enzymes and helping you digest food. When your pancreas becomes swollen or inflamed, it cannot perform its function. This condition is called pancreatitis. Because the pancreas is so closely tied to your digestive process, it’s affected by what you choose to eat. In cases of acute pancreatitis, pancreas inflammation is often triggered by gallstones. But in cases of chronic pancreatitis, in which flare-ups recur over time, your diet might have a lot to do with what’s causing the problem. Researchers are finding out more about foods you can eat to protect and even help to heal your pancreas. To get your pancreas healthy, focus on foods that are rich in protein, low in animal fats, and contain antioxidants. These include lean meats, beans and lentils, clear soups, and dairy alternatives (such as flax milk and almond milk). These are foods that your pancreas won’t have to work as hard to process. Research suggests that some people with pancreatitis can tolerate up to 30-40% of calories from fat, when the fat is from whole-food plant sources or medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs). Others do better with much lower fat intake, often restricted to 50 grams or less per day. Spinach, blueberries, cherries, and whole grains can work to protect your digestion and fight the free radicals that damage your organs. If you’re craving something sweet, reach for fruit instead of added sugars since those with pancreatitis are at high risk for diabetes. Consider cherry tomatoes, cucumbers and hummus, and fruit as snack food go-tos. Your pancreas will thank you. Foods to limit include: red meat organ meats fried foods fries an Continue reading >>

I Need A Complete List Fo A Pancreatitis Diet

I Need A Complete List Fo A Pancreatitis Diet

I need a complete list fo a pancreatitis diet I know the basic foods to eat when a person has pancreatitis . I need a list many items to eat or to avoid. The doctor said to avoid mint ? Is it ok to eat sweat potato, soy milk, pickles, marmalade, Pedialyte for potassium, vinager, vitamin C, low acid orange juice, vitamin E, What kind of juice can I have in the morning-prune,pear,peach,V8.... pizza, salad dressing, candy, pretzels, sherbit, cooked oatmeal, bananas, baby foods, green tea, chocolate, no fat lactaid milk, and more. Does such a list exist? hi, if you have searched the net and been unable to find anything specific to help you with your query, the person with pancreatitis should ask their doctor to refer them to a dietician, this way they can ensure that their diet is as good as it possibly can be. as a rule they should be aiming for a diet that is low in fat and high in carbs and protein to lessen the workload on the pancreas, with specific foods it is usually a trial and error approach, but try to avoid rich foods and overly large meals. hope this helps Dairy or other products made from whole milk, or cheese It is not very specific, but it is all they offered me. The key is fat content and preparation. Most of the foods on the AVOID list are high-fat. I have been doing OK with coffee, tea and orange juice, so I don't think you need to worry about those. Banana are high in potassium, somthing they pump into you after an attack, so I think you're good there too. They didn't say anything about acidic drinks to me. Oatmeal is good. Candy is often high in sugar but low fat so it should be good in moderation (unless you have diabetes). The bugaboo with pretzels is salt and if they were browned using butter. Foods to AVOID with Pancreatitis (from my personal experi Continue reading >>

Faux Fasting Diet Regenerates Pancreas To Reverse Diabetes

Faux Fasting Diet Regenerates Pancreas To Reverse Diabetes

Using stem cells to create insulin-producing beta cells that could be transplanted into diabetics is being investigated as a possible cure for type 1 diabetes and treatment for type 2, but new research suggests that a special diet could reprogram cells in the pancreas to do the same thing. Researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) claim that a diet that mimics the effects of fasting spurs the growth of new insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreases of mice, essentially reversing the disease. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes center around insulin, or rather, the lack thereof. Put very simply, in type 1 diabetes, the body – specifically, the pancreas – stops producing insulin, while in type 2 diabetes, the body doesn't use insulin properly and eventually is unable to produce enough insulin to compensate. In both type 1 and late-stage type 2 diabetes, insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are lost, meaning many diabetics need to take insulin to replace what's not being made by the pancreas. Looking to discover the effects of a fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) on diabetes sufferers, USC researchers used mice with type 2 diabetes and another group in which type 1 diabetes had been simulated by giving them high doses of a drug to kill their insulin-producing beta cells. They found that mice in both groups – even those in the later stages of the disease – regained healthy insulin production, had a reduction in insulin resistance, and had more stable blood glucose levels. The researchers say the brief, periodic diet, which was designed to mimic the effects of a water-only fast, activated genes that are normally only switched on in the developing pancreases of fetal mice. These genes prompted the production of neurogenin-3 (Ngn3), a protein that le Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis

Introduction Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas, an organ that produces several enzymes to aid in the digestion of food, as well as the hormone insulin, which controls the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. The pancreas is located in the upper abdomen, behind the stomach. When the pancreas is inflamed, the body is not able to absorb the nutrients it needs. Pancreatitis may be either acute (sudden and severe) or chronic. Both types of pancreatitis can cause bleeding and tissue death in or around the pancreas. Mild attacks of acute pancreatitis can improve on their own, or with dietary changes. In the case of recurring pancreatitis, however, long-term damage to the pancreas is common, sometimes leading to malnutrition and diabetes. Necrotizing pancreatitis (in which pancreatic tissue dies) can lead to cyst-like pockets and abscesses. Because of the location of the pancreas, inflammation spreads easily. In severe cases, fluid-containing toxins and enzymes leak from the pancreas through the abdomen. This can damage blood vessels and lead to internal bleeding, which may be life threatening. Signs and Symptoms Common signs and symptoms of pancreatitis include the following: Mild to severe, ongoing, sharp pain in the upper abdomen that may radiate to back or chest Nausea and vomiting Fever Sweating Abdominal tenderness Rapid heart rate Rapid breathing Oily stools (chronic pancreatitis) Weight loss What Causes It? There are several possible causes of pancreatitis. The most common are gallstones, which block the duct of the pancreas (for acute pancreatitis), and excessive alcohol consumption (for chronic pancreatitis). Certain drugs, including azathioprine, sulfonamides, corticosteroids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and antibiotics such as tetracy Continue reading >>

The Best Dog Foods For Dogs With Pancreatitis

The Best Dog Foods For Dogs With Pancreatitis

The Best Dog Foods for Dogs With Pancreatitis The Best Dog Foods for Dogs With Pancreatitis 2009-08-26The Best Dog Foods for Dogs With Pancreatitis Pancreatitis is a painful disorder that occurs in dogs when the pancreas becomes inflamed. Successful treatment relies on letting the pancreas rest as much as possible and providing supportive care. Dogs who have repeated bouts of pancreatitis should be fed low-fat diets for life to prevent further recurrence. There are prescription diets created especially for dogs with pancreatitis and other gastrointestinal conditions, but they can be very expensive. High-quality, all-natural, low-fat dog foods are available at most pet food suppliers and contain limited ingredients that meet the guidelines for feeding dogs with pancreatitis. Some people prefer to cook for their dogs, and certain foods are highly recommended and quite soothing for dogs suffering from pancreatitis. The pancreas is a gland within the abdomen, near the liver. It is made up of two parts, each with its own function. One part produces enzymes that enter the intestine and aid in digestion, while the other portion produces insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels and metabolism. There are two forms of pancreatitis: acute and chronic. According to Dr. Mary Labato, DVM, internal medicine, Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, "Pancreatitis can be very serious ... It can run the gamut from mild with vomiting to life-threatening and the cause of rapid death. ... Acute pancreatitis is the inflammation of the pancreas that occurs abruptly with little or no permanent pathologic change. ... Chronic pancreatitis is a continuing inflammatory disease that is often accompanied by irreversible changes." Common symptoms include loss of appetite, lethargy Continue reading >>

5 Warning Signs Your Pancreas Is In Trouble

5 Warning Signs Your Pancreas Is In Trouble

Quick, say the first thing that pops into your head when you read the word "pancreas." If you said "cancer," you're not alone. Most people only think about their pancreas when they hear about pancreatic cancer—which is the deadliest form of cancer in terms of 5-year survival rates. "Part of the reason survival rates are so low is that identifying pancreatic cancer early is difficult," says Andrew Hendifar, MD, codirector of pancreas oncology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Early detection is also tough when it comes to non-cancer pancreas problems, says Ted Epperly, MD, president of Family Medicine Residency of Idaho. Tucked deep in your abdomen, your pancreas is a long, flat organ that produces enzymes and hormones that aid in digestion. While symptoms of pancreas issues can be persnickety, both Epperly and Hendifar say there are a handful of warning signs that warrant a call to your doctor. Here are 5 of them. (Want to pick up some healthier habits? Sign up to get healthy living tips delivered straight to your inbox!) If you notice your stool is light colored and floating, that's a sign of poor nutrient absorption. (Here are 7 things your poop says about your health.) "The enzymes your pancreas produces help you digest fats in your diet," Hendifar explains. Along with breaking down fats, your pancreas helps your body absorb fat-soluble vitamins like A, E, and K, he says. When pancreatic disease messes with your organ's ability to properly manufacture those enzymes, the result is feces that looks paler and is less dense. You may also notice your poop is oily or greasy. "The toilet water will have a film that looks like oil," Hendifar says. That's the dietary fat your body failed to break down, he explains. If you notice your poop looks funky now and th Continue reading >>

Finding The Best Diet For Dogs With Pancreatitis | Petmd

Finding The Best Diet For Dogs With Pancreatitis | Petmd

Our understanding regarding how best to feed (or not feed) dogs with pancreatitis has undergone significant changes over the last few years. Back when I was in veterinary school in the 1990s, we learned that dogs with pancreatitis should be fasted for 24-48 hours. This protocol was based on a reasonable assumption food passing through the intestinal tract would stimulate the pancreas to secrete digestive enzymes, thereby increasing pancreatic inflammation. But now, research in people and dogs is revealing the harmful effects that prolonged fasting can have on the structure and function of the gastrointestinal tract, including its important role in the immune system. The cells that line the intestinal tract depend on absorbing energy and nutrients that pass by after a meal. When a dog does not eat, the lining of the intestinal tract changes: the villi (fingerlike projections that increase the intestines absorptive surface) shrink, local immune tissue is reduced, the intestinal wall becomes leaky, promoting the absorption of bacteria and toxins, and inflammation increases, both within the digestive tract and systemically. Also, there is some evidence that when the pancreas is inflamed it does not secrete digestive enzymes in response to the presence of food in the same way that a healthy pancreas does, which casts even more doubt on the practice of prolonged fasting. We dont have studies in dogs that directly answer the question of when and how to best start feeding dogs with pancreatitis, but many veterinarians are switching to an as soon as possible mind set. We should still not be feeding dogs that are actively vomiting (theres no point if they cant keep it down), but the effective antiemetic medications that are now available (e.g., maropitant) often allow us to get Continue reading >>

Diets For Dogs With Pancreatitis

Diets For Dogs With Pancreatitis

Fetch | Portland Maine's Local Independent Store For Dogs & Cats You are here: Home / animal health / Diets for Dogs with Pancreatitis Zip has had two bouts of pancreatitis, once, in an instance of worst-timing-possible, while I was away on a silent retreat with no phone or internet access. Hes now 11 yrs old, and thriving, as near as anyone can tell, as he looks and moves like a much younger pug. I manage his health with the assumption that the most important thing to watch is the pancreatitis. Watching that also keeps his weight low, which is a factor in longevity. Ive been reading up on pancreatitis again, both because Ive noticed how recommendations can change in the nutritional world or how we often are given contradictory guidance (eg, one vet told me that protein is as important to watch as fat, and no other vet Ive talked to has agreed in fact Ive read elsewhere that low protein diets, due to the necessarily high starch content, are a trigger) and because one of our favorite customers, Max the chocolate labradoodle, has just been diagnosed & I want to be sure to give the best advice I can. What causes pancreatitis? Most sources agree on a short list of possibles: sudden overload of high fat food (especially around holidays when dogs are given say the skin from the roast turkey) hyperlipidemia, or high fat levels in the blood hypercalcemia, or high calcium blood levels bacterial infection/contaminated food or water pesticides & some chemical flea & tick products Generally, keeping the fat content low (low is usually considered no more than 10% dry matter) is recommended for dogs with a history of pancreatitis. Most sources add that once a dog has recovered from an acute episode, he or she may be able to return to their normal (ie not necessarily low fat) diet. W Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet For Diabetes 'could Repair Pancreas'

Fasting Diet For Diabetes 'could Repair Pancreas'

Fasting Diet for Diabetes 'Could Repair Pancreas' A form of fasting diet for people with diabetes could help repair cells in the pancreas, new research suggests. 'Rebooting' the organ in this way could help insulin-producing cells repair themselves and start producing the hormone. Insulin is needed to help keep blood sugar levels from getting too high or too low. Experts say the findings could one day have implications for people with type 2 diabetes and potentially for type 1 diabetes as well. The study examined whether a diet alternating between fasting and normal food intake in mice could improve the function of the insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and help regenerate destroyed cells. It involves eating a very limited number of high-fat calories for 5 days and then returning to a normal diet. Measurement of 4 biomarkers associated with a water-only diet suggest that the diet has the same physiological effects on the body as more extreme fasting. For this reason, the diet is called a 'fasting-mimicking' diet. Studies have suggested that this kind of diet can persuade the body to slow down the ageing process and regenerate new cells. They attribute this to a fall in 3 types of genes associated with stress and ageing. The study, published in the journal Cell, says that these experiments in mice show that during periods of fasting, the cells go into 'standby' mode. Then, when feeding begins again, new cells are produced that have the potential to become insulin-producing. The research team, led by the University of Southern California, say that laboratory tests on tissue samples from people with type 1 diabetes produced similar effects. Much more research will be needed before these experiments can be shown to work in people. However, the researchers say they hav Continue reading >>

Alkaline Foods Can Help Fight Pancreatic Cancer

Alkaline Foods Can Help Fight Pancreatic Cancer

Alkaline Foods Can Help Fight Pancreatic Cancer Alkaline Foods Can Help Fight Pancreatic Cancer So, youve been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.Youve gone through conventional methods, but you STILL WANT MORE. You know theres SOMETHING ELSE.Well, youre right. There is something else. Did you know that alkaline foodsare the BEST foods you can give your pancreas to help heal itself? The pancreas is a gland thats essential for proper digestion. The pancreas produces alkaline pancreatic juice naturally;it has a pH level between 7.8 and 8.0. According to the pH scale, thats within healthy range (see pH scale below). 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7Healthy 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 So when you eat foods such as pork (pH 3.0), beef (pH 4.0) or drink coffee , alcohol or sodas especially colas (pH 2.3 and below) on a continual basis you are creating an acid environment. This leads to a chronic problem called acidosis. A constant acid environment or acidosis is the major root of sickness and disease and will finally develop into various diseases including cancer! Since the pancreas is a gland thats naturally alkaline, is essential to digestion and is directly affected by the foods we eat , an alkaline diet would be the BEST support for your pancreas. You can help turn pancreatic cancer around by including moreAlkaline Foods in your diet. Heres a partial list: Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis Symptoms & Treament | Wake Gastroenterology

Pancreatitis Symptoms & Treament | Wake Gastroenterology

Pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas. The pancreas is a large gland behind the stomach and close to the duodenum. The duodenum is the upper part of the small intestine. The pancreas secretes digestive enzymes into the small intestine through a tube called the pancreatic duct. These enzymes help digest fats, proteins, and carbohydrates in food. The pancreas also releases the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. These hormones help the body use the glucose it takes from food for energy. Normally, digestive enzymes do not become active until they reach the small intestine, where they begin digesting food. But if these enzymes become active inside the pancreas, they start digesting the pancreas itself. Acute pancreatitis occurs suddenly and lasts for a short period of time and usually resolves. Chronic pancreatitis does not resolve itself and results in a slow destruction of the pancreas. Either form can cause serious complications. In severe cases, bleeding, tissue damage, and infection may occur. Pseudocysts accumulations of fluid and tissue debris may also develop. And enzymes and toxins may enter the bloodstream, injuring the heart, lungs, and kidneys, or other organs. Some people have more than one attack and recover completely after each, but acute pancreatitis can be a severe, life-threatening illness with many complications. About 80,000 cases occur in the United States each year; some 20 percent of them are severe. Acute pancreatitis occurs more often in men than women. Acute pancreatitis is usually caused by gallstones or by drinking too much alcohol, but these arent the only causes. If alcohol use and gallstones are ruled out, other possible causes of pancreatitis should be carefully examined so that appropriate treatment if available c Continue reading >>

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