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Green Salads For Diabetics

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

It's not always easy to follow your diabetes meal plan day after day, but these delicious recipes may help. Appetizer recipes Beverage recipes Bread recipes Breakfast recipes Dessert recipes Main dish recipes Salad recipes Sandwich recipes Sauce and dressing recipes Side dish recipes Soup recipes Vegetable recipes Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Salad

Mediterranean Salad

Remember we mentioned the Mediterranean-style diet when we talked about the link between diabetes and Alzheimer’s last week? This salad is the Mediterranean diet on a plate. The nice thing about this salad is that the recipe is totally flexible. Don’t like salmon? Use chicken, chickpeas, or beans as your protein instead. No cucumbers in the house? No problem. Out of kale? Use whatever leafy greens you have on hand. Hate olives? Leave them out. Not eating dairy? Skip the feta. Reduce the fat by skimping on the dressing and adding fewer olives. Reduce the sodium by adding less of the olives, pepperoncini, and feta cheese. Also, roasted red peppers in a jar tend to be high in sodium, but it’s easy to roast your own. Simply cook red bell peppers over an open flame or under the broiler until the skin turns black. Put them in a covered bowl until cool enough to handle, then peel and chop. Make the salad vegetarian by substituting chickpeas or white beans for the salmon. Make it vegan by skipping the feta cheese. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Karyn Wofford is a type 1 diabetic who has been educating herself about health and wellness for 14 years. She has been an Emergency Medical Technician for 5 years and is now studying to become a Health and Wellness Specialist. Her aspiration in life is to bring helpful information to those seeking to be as healthy as they can be. Disclaimer: This information is not intended to take the place of medical advice. Always discuss any dietary or lifestyle changes with your doctor first. Continue reading >>

Easy Green And Red Bean Salad

Easy Green And Red Bean Salad

Try using flat-leaf parsley for the dressing. It’s more distinctly flavoured than curly parsley. Tips Dressing the beans well in advance allows them to absorb all the flavours, but if you dress the salad greens too far in advance they become soft and lose their crunch. If you need to display the food in advance, such as for a buffet, you can serve the bean salad in a small dish set among the green leaves. Ingredients 5 oz green beans, trimmed and cut into small pieces (150 g) 1 15-oz (425mL) can red kidney beans, rinsed and drained 1 15-oz (425 mL) can flageolet beans or Great Northern beans, rinsed and drained 1 15-oz (425 mL) can chickpeas, rinsed and drained 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley (25 mL) Juice of 1 lemon 2 tbsp white wine vinegar (25 mL) 5 tbsp olive oil (75 mL) Freshly ground black pepper Lettuce leaves to garnish Instructions Lightly steam the green beans over boiling water 5 to 6 minutes or until crisp-tender. Cool in iced water and drain. Place in a large bowl with kidney beans, flageolet beans and chickpeas and mix well. In a jar with a tight-fitting lid, shake together the parsley, lemon juice, vinegar, olive oil and pepper. Pour over the bean mixture and toss lightly to mix. Cover and chill until served. Just before serving, place the lettuce leaves around the edge of a large serving dish. Spoon the bean mixture over the leaves and serve. Makes 6 to 8 side-salad servings. Notes Food Choice Values (per serving) Carbohydrate Choices 2½ Meat & Alternatives 2 Fats 1 This recipe made available with permission by Key Porter Books Ltd. Copyright © 1995 by The British Diabetic Association. The Everyday Diabetes Cookbook is available in stores across Canada. (1/6 of recipe) Calories 397 Total fat 14 g Saturated fat 2 g Cholesterol 0 mg Sodium 9 mg Carbohydra Continue reading >>

Salad Recipes

Salad Recipes

This section includes everything from simple tossed salads and summer picnic salads to gourmet salads for lunch or dinner. Salads that include a variety of green vegetables are a good source of fiber, which helps regulate the digestive system and aids weight management. They are low calorie and carbohydrate content and have a low glycemic index – which makes them a great choice for people with type 2 diabetes. Dark green leafy vegetables, like kale and spinach, are rich in vitamins A, C, and E. All of our salad recipes provide nutritional information to make meal planning for diabetes easier. This Asian-inspired recipe is alive with shades of green from spinach and bok choy and distinct flavors of soy sauce, ginger and garlic. And when you arrange the bok choy over fresh spinach, the warmth gently and slightly wilts the spinach leaves. The result is a mouth-watering medley of tastes and textures. To turn this salad into a complete meal, top it with grilled or seared tofu, grilled or roasted chicken breast, or grilled or steamed shrimp. Recipe for Spinach Salad with Seared Bok Choy, Ginger and Cilantro from our Salads recipe section. A hearty, comfort food meal with rich flavor. Buy beef brisket that weighs almost 2 pounds before trimming as there is quite a bit of fat to discard. If a sliced brisket is preferred over the shredded variety, cook about 30 minutes less than recommended above. Serving size: 1/2 cup (125 mL) beef, 1/3 cup (75 mL) sauce. Recipe for Fall-Apart Beer Brisket from our Main Dishes recipe section. Grilled chicken breast is combined with a roasted garlic vinaigrette to create a healthy and exciting salad or main course. Recipe for Chicken, Strawberry and Fennel Salad from our recipe section. Tuna is a sturdy fish that is easy to grill or broil. If Continue reading >>

Lettuce And Diabetes

Lettuce And Diabetes

Lettuce greens for sale at a farmers market.Photo Credit: Christina-J-Hauri/iStock/Getty Images Dieters often eat plenty of lettuce because it fills you up and provides essential nutrients, such as folate and vitamins A and K, without providing a lot of calories. Likewise, other nonstarchy vegetables, including lettuce, can be a good choice for diabetics due to their low carbohydrate content and minimal effects on blood sugar levels. A study published in "Diabetes Care" in December 2004 found that people who ate more green, leafy vegetables, such as lettuce, were less likely to develop type-2 diabetes than people who didn't eat these vegetables often. Legumes, dark yellow vegetables and fruits were also associated with a decreased risk for diabetes. The glycemic index estimates the effect of a food on your blood sugar levels, with foods having a low score being less likely to cause spikes in blood sugar levels than those with a high score. Lettuce and most other nonstarchy vegetables have very low glycemic index scores, according to the American Diabetes Association, so you don't have to worry about them greatly increasing your blood sugar levels. A cup of lettuce only contains about 5 to 10 calories and 1 to 2 grams of carbohydrates, depending on the type. When counting carbohydrates, one serving of vegetables is considered 5 grams of carbohydrates, which you wouldn't reach unless you ate more than 2 cups of lettuce. This is why the American Diabetes Association says you don't need to count the carbohydrates in nonstarchy vegetables like lettuce unless you eat more than 2 cups of raw vegetables or 1 cup of cooked. The American Diabetes Association recommends diabetics eat at least three to five servings of nonstarchy vegetables each day. Choosing a type of lettuce tha Continue reading >>

6 Easy Salad Recipes To Help Control Diabetes

6 Easy Salad Recipes To Help Control Diabetes

“I don’t want to eat like a rabbit!” This is what I hear when I encourage increased leafy greens and vegetables to people with diabetes. However, there is a proverbial goldmine of nutrients in salad that can help people with diabetes decrease blood sugar and get needed nutrients. Salad doesn’t have to be boring! We can help with 6 easy salad recipes to help control diabetes and make you love eating your greens. According to The American Diabetes Association, as of 2012 over 29.1 million people in the United States were diagnosed with diabetes. This is over 9.3% of the American population. These numbers are shockingly on the rise all because of the way we are choosing to eat. Our diets are too high in fat cholesterol, sodium, and processed foods. Go to your cupboard. Take out a box of packaged food. Turn it over and read the ingredients. Are there things on there you can’t read or understand? Should you really be eating it? Fresh Is Best Think about where you shop. If you go around the perimeter of your local grocery store, all of the fresh non-processed items are around the perimeter of the store. Here you will find all the best ingredients for wholesome and fresh foods. Bare salad would be best for people with diabetes, because it is actually the toppings and dressings that make it bad for you. Choosing the right ingredients can still keep things tasting good and good for you. Our expert taste team found six of the best tasting and easy to make salads that are diabetes friendly. Actually, they are good enough for the whole family to enjoy right along with you! We’ve even included recipes for people watching gluten intake and vegetarians too. Let’s take a look. For more diabetes related information read the following: 1. Salmon Topped Spinach Salad and Lem Continue reading >>

The Eatingwell Cobb Salad | Diabetic Connect

The Eatingwell Cobb Salad | Diabetic Connect

This Cobb salad is true to the original with all the good stuffchicken, eggs, bacon, avocado and a tangy dressing. But we cut the saturated fat in half and doubled the amount of healthy monounsaturated fat. Weve left the blue cheese optional, but the salad is so nutritious you might just want to go ahead and indulge yourself with a little bit anyway. 8 ounces shredded cooked chicken breast, (about 1 large breast half; see Tip) 2 large eggs, hard-boiled (see Tip), peeled and chopped 1/2 cup crumbled blue cheese, (optional) Whisk vinegar, shallot, mustard, pepper and salt in a small bowl to combine. Whisk in oil until combined. Place salad greens in a large bowl. Add half of the dressing and toss to coat. Divide the greens among 4 plates. Arrange equal portions of chicken, egg, tomatoes, cucumber, avocado, bacon and blue cheese (if using) on top of the lettuce. Drizzle the salads with the remaining dressing. Tips: To poach chicken breasts, place boneless, skinless chicken breasts in a medium skillet or saucepan and add lightly salted water to cover; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low and simmer gently until chicken is cooked through and no longer pink in the middle, 10 to 15 minutes. To shred the chicken, use two forks to pull it apart into long shreds. To hard-boil eggs, place in a single layer in a saucepan; cover with water. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low and cook at the barest simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from heat, pour out hot water and fill the pan with a mixture of cold water and ice cubes; let stand until the eggs are completely cooled. Continue reading >>

Salad Recipes For Diabetics

Salad Recipes For Diabetics

By Linda Johnson Larsen B.S. Food Science & Nutrition, Cookbook Author Salads can be a healthy choice for diabetics as long as you follow a few rules. Make sure you use the freshest ingredients and choose healthy ingredients that are low in carbohydrates. Remember all carbohydrates should be restricted on a diabetic diet, not just sugary foods. Add lots of vegetables and lean meats, such as chicken and fish, to your salad recipes. Virtually everyone loves chicken salad. This recipe is very low in carbohydrates. Lean meats like chicken that contain lots of protein are a good choice for diabetics, since protein can help repair cell damage . This low-fat salad is full of flavor from mustard, lemon juice, and herbs. Serve it on dark leafy greens for even more nutrition. 2 rotisserie chickens OR 6 cups cubed cooked chicken Remove the meat from the cooked chickens, discarding the skin, and cube. Add to a large bowl with the celery and pecans. Combine all the dressing ingredients in a medium bowl and mix with a wire whisk until combined. Pour the dressing over the salad ingredients and toss to coat. Cover and refrigerate the salad for two to three hours to blend flavors before serving. Makes 8 servings. Per 1 cup serving: Calories 164, Sodium 337 mg, Cholesterol 15 mg, Fat 8g, Carbohydrates 4g Dark leafy greens are a great source of fiber and nutrients, such as iron and calcium. Diabetics should eat lots of foods high in fiber. Choose greens like kale, Romaine lettuce, mesclun, chard, and spinach for your salads. Likewise, avocados have lots of healthy fat that can fill you up and protect your heart. This salad is very high in vitamins A and C (more than 50 percent of daily value), nutrients essential for good health. You can use this dressing for any other salad, as well. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Salads

Diabetic Salads

Spinach with Garlic Vinaigrette You would think all salads are healthy, but some can be loaded with hidden fat and sugar. These salads are slimmed down and perfect for a diabetic diet. First is our Spinach with Garlic Vinaigrette. Use this simple and fast recipe to pair with pasta dishes or a meaty main course. The light, crisp, and tasty blend will accentuate a heavier meal. View Recipe: Spinach with Garlic Vinaigrette Persimmon-Walnut Oil Salad This simple salad is made special with the use of high-quality ingredients. Choose crisp, globe-shaped Fuyu persimmons, which remain firm even when ripe. The heart-shaped Hachiya persimmon, which does not become sweet until its flesh is quite soft, is better suited for baking. View Recipe: Persimmon-Walnut Oil Salad You May Like Continue reading >>

The Best Salad Fixings

The Best Salad Fixings

David Mendosa / @davidmendosa , Patient Expert Recently I wrote here about the tastiest and healthiest salad dressing, which you can easily prepare at home. If you can find anything like it at a restaurant, I would be surprised. The best you can do when eating out is to use a traditional olive oil and vinegar dressing. Complementing the best salad dressing are the best salad fixings. You can easily prepare this salad and salad dressing at home for the nutrition that all of us, whether we have diabetes or not, need. Even when you eat out, you can find often good salad fixings along with many others that you might regret eating. If you can stand the crowds and the usual lack of ambiance, you can find the best ingredients in the deli section of Whole Foods stores. Many of their ingredients are organic. Salad bar restaurants are sprouting up all over the country. While I dont know of any others that offer organic fixings, if you pick and choose, you can find a great variety of ingredients at Souplantation and Sweet Tomatoes out West and some Midwest and Southern states, Fresh Choice in California, Texas, and Washington, or Souper Salad in some Western, Midwestern, and Southern states. Here in Colorado we have eight Mad Greens restaurants. You can even get a so-called salad at the major fast food places, if you would otherwise starve to death. But as with everything else gastronomic, choosing and preparing the ingredients yourself is best. Any salad worthy of that name has to start with green leafy vegetables. Spinach, particularly baby spinach, is probably the best choice both for nutrients and taste and is what I usually use as the basis of my salad. Other excellent green leafy choices include arugula, watercress, dandelion greens, and anything that bears the name lettuce Continue reading >>

Diabetic Greek Salad Recipe

Diabetic Greek Salad Recipe

Preparation time: 20 minutes. Ingredients 2 large tomatoes, thickly sliced 1 medium cucumber (about 7 inches long), thinly sliced 1 small onion, thinly sliced and separated into rings 1/3 cup Kalamata olives 2 teaspoons capers 1/4 cup chopped parsley 1/4 cup crumbled reduced-fat Feta cheese Dressing: 1 clove garlic, crushed (or 1 teaspoon bottled garlic) 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1/2 cup fresh-squeezed lemon juice 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil Directions Combine tomato slices, cucumber slices, and onion rings on a large platter or in a large bowl. Top with olives, capers, parsley, and crumbled Feta. Place garlic, pepper, and lemon juice in a food processor or blender and pulse 4 times. With the food processor or blender running (hold lid partially over top of blender to keep ingredients from splashing out), carefully pour oil in a slow, steady stream, processing until smooth. Pour dressing over salad and serve (if salad is in a bowl, toss gently to coat). Yield: 6 servings. Serving size: 1/6 of salad. Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories: 130 calories, Carbohydrates: 8 g, Protein: 2 g, Fat: 10 g, Saturated Fat: 2 g, Sodium: 220 mg, Fiber: 2 g Exchanges per serving: 2 nonstarchy vegetable, 2 fat. Carbohydrate choices: 1/2. This recipe was developed by Tami Ross, a Diabetes Nutrition Specialist and Certified Diabetes Educator in Lexington, Kentucky. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

Corn Salad

Corn Salad

Ingredients Directions Boil the corn in a large pot of water for 3 minutes. Remove and allow to cool to the touch. Cut off kernels and place in a large bowl. You should have about 2 cups. Lightly coat a non-stick skillet with cooking spray and sauté the onion until wilted. Add the chili powder and cumin; sauté another minute. Combine with the corn. Add the red and green bell pepper, tomato, and cilantro to the corn mixture. In a small cup, combine the oil, vinegar, salt (if using), and pepper. Drizzle over the salad. Serve at room temperature. Nutrition Information Per serving: 129 calories (27% calories from fat), 3 g protein, 4 g total fat (0.6 g saturated fat), 23 g carbohydrates, 4 g dietary fiber, 0 cholesterol, 16 mg sodium Diabetic exchanges: 1 1/2 carbohydrate (1 bread/starch, 1 vegetable), 1 fat Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

Green Salad With Raspberry Vinaigrette

Green Salad With Raspberry Vinaigrette

Looking for a lower-carb side dish? This festive salad is easy to put together and makes for a light, yet tasty side on Thanksgiving - or any other day of the month! MAKE IT GLUTEN-FREE: Confirm that the ingredients you are using are gluten-free, and this recipe can be gluten-free. In a small bowl, whisk dressing ingredients. In a medium salad bowl, toss together salad ingredients. Drizzle dressing over salad and toss gently to coat. From Healthy Calendar Diabetic Cooking by Lara Rondinelli, RD, LDN, CDE, and Chef Jennifer Bucko by Lara Rondinelli, RD, LDN, CDE, and Chef Jennifer Bucko Find November's featured recipes in Healthy Calendar Diabetic Cooking! It includes an entire years worth of recipes along with grocery lists to make it easier than ever to eat healthy! Don't stray from healthy habits this holiday season! Here are some solutions to the holiday dilemmas you encounter every year... Wondering what to do when hunger hits at the mall? Ideas for healthier snacks and quick meals you can grab on-the-go... Calculate the number of calories you should eat each day to maintain your present body weight: Please select an option before you continue. I don't do any physical activity other than what I need to do for my usual activities, such as going to work or school, grocery shopping, or doing chores around the house. I do some moderate exercise every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk about 1.5 to 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's moderately active. I am very active every day in addition to doing my usual activities. For example, I walk more than 3 miles a day at about 3 to 4 miles an hour. Or I do something else that's very active. This number estimates how many calories you should eat per day to Continue reading >>

Lettuce Salad Wrap With Tzatziki Sauce Diabetes Friendly

Lettuce Salad Wrap With Tzatziki Sauce Diabetes Friendly

You are here: Home / Diabetes Friendly Recipes / Lettuce Salad Wrap With Tzatziki Sauce Diabetes Friendly Lettuce Salad Wrap With Tzatziki Sauce Diabetes Friendly Lettuce Salad Wrap With Tzatziki Sauce Diabetes Friendly Cleanse your bodies with wholesome Salads with DFT team, this week! To know more about DFT click here . For more recipes please read until the end of the post. The wholesome feeling a salad provides is in itself an appetizing thought for me. If they can be made interesting and delicious too, that will leave nothing wanting. They involve such less work too. I love chickpeas in anything. They are wholesome, delicious, protein and fiber rich and make an excellent addition to salads. They are infact bring about increased chances of satiety and blood sugar regulation. See foot notes if you wish to know more. In addition the crunchy juicy vegetables and the zingy dressing make this salad very nutritious and delicious indeed. I can have this everyday. You can mix and match your choices of non starchy vegetables, sprouts and enjoy with the same sauce. This recipe was inspired by this recipe here (connoisseurusveg.com) and the sauce from here (greek.food.com). The sauce will keep for a few days in the refrigerator. Vegetables: These make 2 cups of non-starchy vegetables which are high in fiber, have low Glycemic Index. Generally non-starchy vegetables have 5 g of carbohydrates in 1/2 cup cooked or 1 cup raw. Most of this is fiber and hence need not be counted unless you eat more than 1 cup of cooked or 2 cups raw at a time. For more info. regarding non-starchy foods read here (diabetes.org) Garbanzo beans provide significant amounts of protein, fiber, iron, magnesium, manganese, copper, phosphorus, folate and vitamin B-6. Although they also contain a lot of carb Continue reading >>

3 Easy Salad Recipes To Help Control Diabetes

3 Easy Salad Recipes To Help Control Diabetes

Diabetes is one of the most rampant diseases of our time, and when you take a look at the average North American diet you begin to see why. According to the American Diabetes Association, in 2012 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the population, had diabetes. [1] Sadly, diabetes rates are still rising steadily because we are not doing enough to adjust our diets, despite the wealth of nutritional information available to us. A study completed by the CDC & Research Triangle Institute concluded that, if recent trends in diabetes prevalence rates continue linearly over the next 50 years, future changes in the size and demographic characteristics of the U.S. population will lead to dramatic increases in the number of Americans with diagnosed diabetes. [2] Finding The Right Foods When you are diabetic, changes in diet are pretty well a must. Finding the right diet for some people can be a bit tricky, as we are often tempted by other foods or run out of creative ways to enjoy healthy meals. The truth is, the average person might look at something like a salad and think that it’s a healthy option for a diabetic given the low sugar content, yet many times we turn around and throw a sugar laden dressing on top of that salad, which entirely compromises our well-intentioned effort. Below is a short list of salads which can be good for a diabetic diet. If you are adventurous and want to try an interesting fruit which can help treat diabetes, check out bitter melon. Research has shown some very promising things with this plant. 1. Spinach With Garlic Vinaigrette Ingredients: 6 cups baby spinach leaves, or about 6 ounces 2 minced garlic cloves 1/4 cup sliced red onion 1/4 tsp black pepper, ground 1/8 tsp salt 1 1/2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 1 tbsp white wine vinegar 1/2 tsp Dijon Continue reading >>

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