diabetestalk.net

Grazing And Type 2 Diabetes

Grazing

Grazing

I will take a portion of 15 grapes to work and eat them over a period of 2 hours. OR it might be 25 mini shredded biscuits. How does this affect my bg testing? Do I need to stop this? I think both examples are acceptable carb limits. I really think it depends on what your bg levels are when you graze. After you eat you want to return to a normal bg, usually around 100 or under, before you eat again. If you are constantly grazing you may be keeping bg in a high state too long. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. I will take a portion of 15 grapes to work and eat them over a period of 2 hours. OR it might be 25 mini shredded biscuits. How does this affect my bg testing? Do I need to stop this? I think both examples are acceptable carb limits. It would appear if you are sticking to 15 grams of carbs or less and this works for you then it is the thing to do. However, it is hard to graze like that and get a true reading as you are feeding yourself most of the time. Just a suggestion, don't guess at what are acceptable carb limits, read labels and another good site for carb servings and serving sizes is www.calorieking.com . Diabetes is a lot of trial and error and the only way to see what works for you, not anyone else. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Not sure use your meter either one would shoot me high. If you can do that then its great but the meter is the only way to know. Make sure to wash hands with soap and water a Continue reading >>

You Should Ignore This Terrible Piece Of Popular Dieting Advice

You Should Ignore This Terrible Piece Of Popular Dieting Advice

You Should Ignore This Terrible Piece of Popular Dieting Advice by Suhas G. Kshirsagar author of The Hot Belly Diet: A 30-Day Ayurvedic Plan to Reset Your Metabolism, Lose Weight, and Restore Your Bodys Natural Balance to Heal Itself Share Post Of all the lessons in The Hot Belly Diet, one of the most important goes against the conventional dieting wisdom that says you should eat several small meals throughout the day. This is harmful advice. Heres why. Although religions have maintained for centuries that fasting is good for the soul, the scientific evidence has been accumulating in just the last hundred years or so. In the early 1900s doctors began prescribing it to treat disorders like epilepsy, diabetes, and obesity. But today we have an impressive body of research to show that intermittent fasting, which includes everything from periodic fasts lasting a few days to merely skipping a meal or two on some days of the week, can increase longevity and delay the onset of diseases that tend to cut life short, including dementia and cancer. The exact mechanism is still an active area of research, but we think that part of the benefits stem from the creation of certain biomolecules during the fast that ultimately protect the body. Intermittent fasting mildly stresses the body, resulting in a revving of your bodys cellular defenses against molecular damage or cell death. We know, for instance, that fasting triggers higher levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein that helps prevent brain cells from dying. Low levels of BDNF are associated with numerous brain-related disorders, from depression to Alzheimers disease. Fasting also ramps up your bodys ability to remove damaged cells and molecules. Moreover, its famous for increasing the bodys responsiveness Continue reading >>

Grazing | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Grazing | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community A friend of mine who is a sports physiotherapist, in his early 50s and in excellent shape (though with appalling taste in music :wink: ), swears by "grazing" - eating small meals or healthy snacks often throughout the day and almost never eating a full-sized, normal meal, much less a big meal. When I told him I was diabetic he argued I should do the same, as the effect on my blood sugar levels (assuming I eat the right kind of stuff in the first place) would be better. This seems, logically, to make sense. Anybody out there who knows more than I do about nutrition (i.e. probably everybody on this forum) have an opinion on this? My 10yr old T1 persists on grazing often, with dyer results, usual high bs'. The thing is logically it makes sense, but in theory, it all adds up. We carb count and counter act with multiply injections for extra grazing, for us it doesn't really work. 4 injections a day (Levemir and Huamalog) is more than enough, but find for those grazing periods (and growing children would graze all day if allowed) it all adds up to more injections.Even if he tries to stay below 10g of carbs per snack, for us its just not worth it. Unless i send him to jog round the block every time he feels the urge :lol: If anyone has the perfect grazing diet plan that works i'd love to here it, A great thread Dobbs, it should set off a whole lot of debating, I thought grazing was the habit some people have of eating food whilst walking round shopping in a supermarket :lol: I thought grazing was the habit some people have of eating food whilst walking round shopping in a supermarket :lol: I hope you put the wrappers through the checkout :roll: Grazing on lo Continue reading >>

Grazing As A Diabetic

Grazing As A Diabetic

Posted by Catherine | October 29, 2015 | snacking | 0 | Modern research would seem to indicate that a quarter of what we eat in total in the day is in snacks. Nothing at all wrong with that if you are taking into account the calories in those snacks. In fact many diabetics find it more comfortable and easier to eat little and often. Where these grazing habits become dangerous is when you are taking in empty calories such as artificially sweetened drinks or alcohol. Its a funny thing but the body does not feel as satiated when it has drinks it doesnt feel the fullness it would do with the equivalent amount of calories from solid food. One of the most effective ways of cutting down on portion sizes, is to be aware of what you are eating. That means that when you eat you dont sit in front of the television and just stuff calories in your mouth. You have to take the time to concentrate fully on what you are eating. That means you are not having any distractions of your phone, or outside noises or anything else you are just concentrating on eating. It also helps to chew your food well and eat very slowly. It takes at least half an hour for the stomach to tell the brain that it has had enough to eat. It cant do so if you bolt the food down. Another great way to cut down on calories is to use a smaller plate. In Leos case when he was first starting to cure his diabetes I actually dug out my grandparents dinner service. There were only three plates left but they were substantially smaller than modern plates. You dont have to use this option it is possible to buy a small plate just for you. Many people dismiss this as being overly simplistic but try it for a week and it doesnt work what have you lost? Stop your meal when you have eaten about 12 my bites, put down your fork and Continue reading >>

"grazing" Versus Regular Meals: Dieters Weigh The Evidence

By Kathleen Doheny HealthDay March 28, 2014, 6:00 AM "Grazing" versus regular meals: Dieters weigh the evidence For weight loss, some swear by "grazing" -- eating several small meals throughout the day -- instead of eating fewer meals at more traditional mealtimes. Now, a small study comparing both approaches finds it doesn't matter which tactic you use, as long as you reduce total calories. Women who ate five meals on one test day and two regular meals on another (consuming the same total calories each day) burned the same amount of calories both days, researchers found. Diet trends to help you lose weight in 2014 Despite folklore that grazing somehow revs up your metabolism, it doesn't appear to be the case, said study researcher Dr. Milan Kumar Piya. "If you eat two meals or five, as long as it's the same number of calories; there is no difference in energy expenditures, so there is no effect on weight loss," said Piya, a clinical lecturer with the U.K. National Institute for Health Research, at University Hospital Coventry and University of Warwick. He presented the findings Tuesday at a Society for Endocrinology meeting in Liverpool, England. Those hoping to lose weight can choose the approach they prefer, Piya said. Based on the new findings, he said he would now tell patients trying to lose weight: "You have your own ways of eating and doing things. As long as you eat fewer calories [to lose weight], you will be fine." He compared the approaches in 24 women, including some who were normal weight and some who were obese . The lean women, on average, were age 34, while the obese women, on average, were 42. The women were given either two meals or five meals on two separate days, and the researchers measured calories burned, comparing each woman's own individual da Continue reading >>

Two Hefty Meals, Not Grazing All Day On Food, Is Best For Diabetics, Says Study

Two Hefty Meals, Not Grazing All Day On Food, Is Best For Diabetics, Says Study

Two hefty meals, not grazing all day on food, is best for diabetics, says study By Judy Mottl | May 16, 2014 04:32 PM EDT Forget what the experts have been claiming about how to keep energy levels up. just focus on eating two hefty breakfast and lunch meals, especially if you suffer from Type 2 diabetes. That's the reveal from a new study Friday published in Diabetologia. Eating two meals instead of six during the day is more effective for controlling weight and blood sugar for those diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. "Eating only breakfast and lunch reduced body weight, liver fat content, fasting plasma glucose, C-peptide and glucagon, and increased OGIS, more than the same caloric restriction split into six meals. These results suggest that, for type 2 diabetic patients on a calorie-restricted diet, eating larger breakfasts and lunches may be more beneficial than six smaller meals during the day," states a press release on the study . The research was conducted by Dr. Hana Kahleov, Diabetes Centre, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic, and colleagues. The study involved 54 patients, of which 25 were women, who were handling diabetes with oral medication. The group was asked to follow one of two regimens - the 'grazing' approach of six small meals or the two big meals early in the day. Both diet approach had the same macronutrient and calorie content. The researchers found body weight decreased in both regimens, but more for those eating two meals. "Novel therapeutic strategies should incorporate not only the energy and macronutrient content but also the frequency and timing of food. Further larger scale, long-term studies are essential before offering recommendations in terms of meal frequency," states the release. Continue reading >>

Is Grazing Good For You? - Consumer Reports

Is Grazing Good For You? - Consumer Reports

America's snack habit might be whats expanding our waistlines, but there is a way to have your snack and stay healthy, too Oh, how times have changed. Just a generation ago, between-meal eating was rare among Americans, with many people firmly believing it was a sure way to spoil their appetite. Today, we have a serious snack habit. The snack-food market is a $33-billion business in the U.S. Ninety percent of adults nosh on any given day, according to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveyand about 40 percent munch on snacks three times a day or more. According to a 2015 report from the market research firm Mintel, people say they snack primarily to satisfy a craving or to boost energy. But surveys might not be capturing the subtle triggers that nudge people to nibble because consumers are probably not aware of them. The desire to be healthy drives some consumers snack choices , but people also want to indulge themselves. And food manufacturers are positioning their products to appeal to those dual desires. More than seven in 10 snack foods on the market today are advertised as being better for you, according to Innova Market Insights. The question is, though, are they really? Find out how some favorite snack foods protein shakes , snack bars , veggie chips , and yogurt rated for taste and nutrition in Consumer Reports' tests. Take snacks with protein claims on the label, for example. Protein is one of the biggest trends in snack foods today, says Amy Keating, R.D., a test project leader at Consumer Reports. If you see a protein claim on, say, a brownie, you might think that its not just OK to eat that brownie, but that eating it is good for you. Our food-test team took a close look at foods often eaten as snacks that carry protein claims . In comparing t Continue reading >>

What Are Your “diabetes Landmines?” The Seven Mistakes I Always Make And What I Learned Trying To Avoid Them

What Are Your “diabetes Landmines?” The Seven Mistakes I Always Make And What I Learned Trying To Avoid Them

twitter summary: Adam shares seven diabetes landmines – his mistakes that routinely lead to out-of-range blood sugars – and some solutions he’s been trying short summary: In this article, I share my own “diabetes landmines”– seven small mistakes I seem to make again and again that “explode” into out-of-range blood glucose values. These include: overcorrecting low blood sugars with too many carbs; overcorrecting a high with too much insulin (“stacking”); snacking directly out of the package; eating when I am not hungry; eating too quickly or overeating; eating too close to bedtime; and not increasing my basal rate following a night of poor sleep or on a day with little exercise. I also identify some solutions I’ve been using to try to overcome these mistakes. After writing my last column on the 22+ short-term factors that affect blood glucose, I wondered... “Even though diabetes is very unpredictable, are there some consistent reasons why my blood glucose falls out of range?” Yes. I call these my “diabetes landmines”– small mistakes I seem to make again and again that seem to “explode” into out-of-range blood glucose values. The list below highlights the seven mistakes I routinely make, and also details some solutions I’ve been trying out. Writing this list and the potential solutions was highly valuable for me; for the past few weeks, I’ve been more aware of my own “diabetes landmines” and have felt more equipped and motivated to avoid them. Try writing your own list along with some solutions, and email me at adam.brown(at)diaTribe.org or tweet me at @asbrown1 with what you find! Mistake#1: Overcorrecting low blood sugars with too many carbs, only to go high afterwards. I consider myself someone with a lot of willpower, but wi Continue reading >>

Is Grazing Good For Diabetes?

Is Grazing Good For Diabetes?

What if you ate frequent, small meals, instead of a few big ones? You wouldn’t need as much insulin at any one time. Maybe postmeal spikes would be much smaller. What does science say about this approach? The question mainly applies to people with Type 2 who still make some insulin. They may have enough insulin to cover a small meal, but not a normal American meal. If you are injecting rapid-acting insulin, more meals would mean more, smaller shots. Eating very frequent, very small meals is sometimes called “grazing.” Some evidence shows that it improves insulin function. In one small study, people were assigned in random order to eat a “nibbling diet,” which consisted of 17 snacks per day, or the usual three meals per day. (Both diets had the same amount of total food and types of food.) The nibblers made less insulin, although their sugars were about the same as the regular eaters. That shows their insulin was used more efficiently. Grazing has been very popular at times for weight loss and diabetes management. It’s not so popular now. A Czech study presented in 2013 found that grazing was less effective for weight loss than eating two main meals a day. No differences were found in glucose levels or insulin function. Some experts still strongly recommend grazing. The Pritikin Longevity Center compares frequent very small meals to weight-loss surgery. Weight-loss surgery is often touted as a diabetes “cure,” or at least a highly effective treatment. But why does it help? Weight-loss surgery leaves a person with a very small stomach, maybe the size of an egg. Pritikin’s website says, “Post- surgery life means very small meals, eaten very slowly and chewed thoroughly, for the rest of one’s life.” That grazing diet may be what appears to be “curi Continue reading >>

Grazing Vs Two Large Meals—which Is Better For Insulin Sensitivity?

Grazing Vs Two Large Meals—which Is Better For Insulin Sensitivity?

New study suggests that eating two large meals per day improves insulin sensitivity and promotes weight loss better in patients with type 2 diabetes than grazing Conventional dietary wisdom holds that eating frequent but small meals—“grazing”—helps to maintain steady blood glucose and promotes weight loss. New research from the Czech Republic calls that theory into question. The study suggests that eating two large meals per day improves insulin sensitivity and promotes weight loss better in patients with type 2 diabetes than grazing, even when the total number of daily calories is the same. “The data suggest that eating fewer, larger meals—a hearty breakfast and lunch—can be healthy and beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes,” said Hana Kahleova, MD, PhD, researcher at the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine in Prague. “Our results support the ancient proverb, ‘Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper.’” The randomized, crossover study included 54 adults with type 2 diabetes (average age, 59). Patients were assigned eating plans designed to cut their intake by 500 calories per day for 24 weeks. Participants had well-controlled diabetes, with an average A1c of 7.2%, but were overweight, with an average body mass index (BMI) of 32.6. Before beginning their new eating plans, the patients participated in group meetings and received individual counseling, noted Dr. Kahleova, who recently presented the study results at the American Diabetes Association’s 73rd Scientific Sessions in Chicago. For 12 weeks the participants ate 6 meals per day—breakfast, lunch, dinner, and three snacks. For the other 12 weeks they ate only a large breakfast between 6:00 and 10:00 a.m. and a large lunch between 12:00 and Continue reading >>

'grazing' To Avoid Spikes In Blood Sugar Which Lead To Over-eating Is A Myth | Daily Mail Online

'grazing' To Avoid Spikes In Blood Sugar Which Lead To Over-eating Is A Myth | Daily Mail Online

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day - that's what we are told and most of us would probably agree. Its importance in fighting obesity has been endorsed by global gurus, including the U.S. Surgeon General. Part of the same dogma is that we should eat smaller amounts of food at regular intervals - 'grazing' - to avoid spikes in blood sugar and the subsequent lows, which lead to over-eating and weight gain. But these are nutritional myths unsubstantiated by any good trials. The fact is: skipping breakfast is perfectly fine. Many of us feel we can never skip breakfast, let alone manage without eating for more than 4 hours in the day For many people, the idea of going without food for more than a few hours will seem odd, but the reality is that we fast regularly - for ten to 12 hours overnight without any problems, and fasting is also a tenet of many religions. Many of us feel we can never skip breakfast, let alone manage without eating for more than four hours in the day, without feeling faint, complaining of a 'hypo' and reaching for a chocolate biscuit. Yet 30 per cent of Europeans and Americans regularly flout this advice - so are they risking their health? In Southern European countries, which have higher rates of skipping the first meal of the day, 'breakfast' is often a quick espresso by the bus stop. Despite this 'risky behaviour', they are generally healthier and don't faint or binge-eat before lunch. Yet 30 per cent of Europeans and Americans regularly flout this advice - so are they risking their health? So why do we think breakfast is so important? Put simply: indoctrination and lobbying from the breakfast cereal companies, compounded by a whole series of poor-quality research. These studies, often reported in the media, showed that people who skippe Continue reading >>

The Art Of Grazing: Diabetes Forecast

The Art Of Grazing: Diabetes Forecast

By Tracey Neithercott; Recipes by Robyn Webb, MS, LN Some time ago, after an embarrassing night with a block of cheese and a sleeve of Saltines, I decided that for the next week I would eat three meals a day. Nothing more. Well, here's the thing about this kind of strict regimen: There's always cheating involved. For me, it came in the form of ravenous trips to the vending machine, mindless munching between meals, and postdinner snacks when my stomach still wouldn't stop grumbling. Stretching the time between meals, I reasoned, was doing nothing but making me eat more. So I took a different tack: grazing throughout the day. According to Julia Zumpano, RD, a dietitian with the Cleveland Clinic, eating multiple small meals in lieu of three squares could help you lose weight and better control your diabetes. And a 2001 study published in the British Medical Journal found that eating frequent small meals may lower your cholesterol; in the study, people who ate six small meals a day had 5 percent lower total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels than those who ate only one or two meals even though that first group consumed more calories. "Six small meals is more healthy for someone who is trying to watch their cholesterol and their diabetes," says Zumpano. "You tend to eat less and pay attention to what you're eating." But before you start snacking your way to better health, be warned: You can't just add a few extra meals to your day and hope to lose weight. In order to get the benefits of eating frequent small meals, you must also downsize the breakfast, lunch, and dinner you're already consuming. "Snacking is good but you need to eat less or you're going to go over your calories," says Zumpano, who suggests cutting each of your typical meals in half. Once you've slashed Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - A Personal Journey

Type 2 Diabetes - A Personal Journey

Ideas based on my personal experiences in learning how to manage type 2 diabetes. I stress that I am a diabetic, not a doctor nor a dietician. I have no medical qualifications beyond my own experience. Nothing written here is intended as medical advice, and any ideas you may decide to use should be discussed first with your doctor. "Ozgirl", a good friend on the alt.support.diabetes newsgroup, introduced me to "grazing" as a blood glucose management tool some years ago. She developed her own method to combat her pronounced reactive hypoglycemia and I found that the method was very effective. As a diabetic one of my management goals is to try to keep my BG's as stable and as close to normal as I can. I found that eating the traditional "three square meals" daily caused problems and it became much easier when I broke those meals up into a series of smaller meals and snacks. Dinner is still my biggest meal, but the others are all small. And I rarely feel hungry. Breakfast, as soon as possible after waking, usually 5-6:30am. An hour or two after dinner, a small snack Effectively I rarely go more than three hours without eating something, but the portion I eat is very small. When I say a small snack, that is the equivalent of half an apple, or a cracker with cheese, or a half-cup of yoghurt with berries; that's the sort of portion sizes I mean. Breakfast is equivalent to an egg or two and a slice of ham; lunch an open sandwich, or a soup, or a stir-fry or similar. The total calories in the day are the same; they are just spread across the time more evenly. By testing after each of these snacks or small meals I've also found that I need to start with a very low carb breakfast but as I approach the evening I can eat higher carbohydrate snacks without spiking. That's why I can Continue reading >>

Grazing My Way Through Manhattan

Grazing My Way Through Manhattan

By Alma Schneider in Blog: Prediabetes Predicament On July 29, 2016 My love affair with food began in childhood but when I was a little kid. I never dreamed that I could attend a food event that was the size of six football fields, with countless vendors luring me to their stands so I could sample their delicious, new, savory and sweet products from all over the world. Sound like a fantasy? Its not. The International Fancy Food Show is quite possibly the most titillating event in New York City and its takes place annually at the Javitz Center. Attending this delightful, gastronomic affairwhich is truly a feast for the sensesis something I eagerly anticipate. My friend Julie and I havent missed a show in nearly 20 years and I consider it a culinary, and physical, badge of honor that I have completed this event in my third trimester of pregnancy three times. (With the advent of the fit bit, I saw that we walked/grazed an astounding 5.2 miles in this years show.) Over the years, Julie and I have attempted to bring other friends to the show but no one seems to have the stamina necessary to keep up with our impressive taste testing. We are no-nonsense food samplers and take our coverage of the 180,000 products (everything from soup to nuts, literally) displayed by 2,400 exhibitors from over 50 countries and regions very seriously. Sorry but we are professionals eaters and cant risk being slowed down by novices. Every year, we spot different culinary trends. Salsa was the star of the late nineties; the early 2000's saw the popcorn craze take off. Flavored water has been front and center in the last few years and this year we noticed numerous low-sugar products that are perfect for, you guessed it, diabetes! Being recently diagnosed with prediabetes, I was especially pleased Continue reading >>

Grazing - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Grazing - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I have just gone to grazing every 2 to 3 hours a week ago. Doing this keeps my blood sugar at about 104 to 107. Depending on what I eat it may go to 112 for a short time. My fasting is always close to 104. (Think my liver plays tricks at night). My last A1c was 5.7---- Because I'm grazing and keeping my BG levels as stated, I wonder if my next A1c will be higher. Before I started grazing my BG would sometimes be in the 70's and 90's. Fasting then, was 92 to 95. Thinking I should go back to regular meals. I am not grazing, but my diet plan includes two snacks per day. It seems to help me. As long as they are very low carb. What are you grazing on? How often and how much? Im trying to get my daughters to let my grand kids eat 4 little meals spaced apart instead of the traditional 3 meals and you " don't get up until your plate is finished" I know every body sitting at the table for dinner is a family tradition but maybe on weekends only. Have healthy snacks available and space those carbs out. Maybe they grow up a little healthier? Playstation and x-box are making it hard on us though. My snacks are things like celery and cream cheese ... or a hard-boiled egg ... or my fake meat, wrapped around cheese ... or cheese and olives. Controlled, pre-measured portions, too. I eat something every three hours. That includes three meals & two-three snacks. I'm eating moderately low carb & my snacks are usually things like almonds, string cheese, cottage cheese, berries, full fat yogurt, etc. With my new diet I eat much fewer calories before. As a result, I will feel an energy drop off after 2-3 hours of m Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet