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Good Food To Eat While Taking Metformin

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Metformin is a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. You may have heard that metformin can also help you lose weight. But is it true? The answer is a resounding maybe. Here’s what you should know about what metformin can do for weight loss, as well as why your doctor may prescribe it for you. According to research, metformin can help some people lose weight. However, it’s not clear why metformin may cause weight loss. One theory is that it may prompt you to eat less by reducing your appetite. It may also change the way your body uses and stores fat. Although studies have shown that metformin may help with weight loss, the drug is not a quick-fix solution. According to one long-term study, the weight loss from metformin tends to occur gradually over one to two years. The amount of weight lost also varies from person to person. In the study, the average amount of weight lost after two or more years was four to seven pounds. Taking the drug without following other healthy habits may not lead to weight loss. Individuals who follow a healthy diet and exercise while taking metformin tend to lose the most weight. This may be because metformin is thought to boost how many calories you burn during exercise. If you don’t exercise, you likely won’t have this benefit. In addition, any weight loss you have may only last as long as you take the medication. That means if you stop taking metformin, there’s a good chance you will return to your original weight. And even while you’re still taking the drug, you may slowly gain back any weight you’ve lost. In other words, metformin may not be the magic diet pill some people have been waiting for. It has been shown to reduce weight in some, but not others. One of the benefits of metformin Continue reading >>

Metformin – What Every Diabetic Should Know

Metformin – What Every Diabetic Should Know

Diabetes affects millions of people throughout the world and for all the ones who know that they have it and are doing something to control it there will be just as many who do not know they have it. It is caused by the pancreas not creating enough insulin and this leaves you with too much sugar in the blood as your body can not process it properly. Metformin is a drug that is used to treat diabetes. Its main role is in regulating the amount of sugar in the body and this alone will help the diabetic. It only treats type 2 diabetes and there are other medicines available for those suffering from type 1. It is a member of a group of drugs known as biguanides and they have been used effectively for some time. How Does It Work? Metformin manages to control the amount of sugar in the blood in three distinct ways. Firstly it works on the food that you eat. Most foods have some degree of sugar in them and too much can cause the diabetes to become worse. The amount that the body absorbs is important and Metformin makes sure that not too much gets through. If too much does get through the body cannot deal with it and it is then that you become ill. Secondly it keeps down the amount of sugar that is produced by the liver. If this can be slowed down, there will be less sugar travelling around the body and the outcome will be that you are less likely to be ill. Its final function is to make sure that insulin is regulated. It works on both injected insulin and that produced naturally by the body. As a result of this some people who already have to inject may find that they no longer have to do this, or at least cut down the amount of times they have to do it. It will be important how much Metformin that you take and the amount will be prescribed by your doctor. This will be an exact Continue reading >>

Breakfast / Metformin - 3 Fat Chicks On A Diet Weight Loss Community

Breakfast / Metformin - 3 Fat Chicks On A Diet Weight Loss Community

I am ramping up to a total of 2000 MG of Metformin within 1 month. This first week I was taking 1 500mg pill with dinner. On Monday I start taking 1 in the morning and one with dinner. Then 1 morning 2 dinner.. and ultimately 2 morning, 2 dinner. Generally, I eat an Activia yogurt, 1 string cheese and a small handful of almonds or a banana or a peanutbutter crunchy granola bar. I ALWAYS have the Activia and string cheese and vary the rest based on how hungry I am. I'm worried this won't be enough. Any thoughts? Ideas? Should I be eating more? I don't check my blood sugar yet. I have the first education class on Wednesday so I just don't know... Any personal experience you want to share? I am on 1000 morning and at supper. I have about 15 and no more than 20 carbs for breakfast and protein. The stomach upset goes away after a while. One slice 13 carb wheat bread with 1 tbs peanut butter one small apple sliced, with 1 tbs peanut butter and 1 oz cream cheese 2 eggs and one slice toast with butter flavored spray I don't have stomach upset any more. Metformin must be taken with food, but it's effectiveness for bs control is enhanced if it is taken about 15 minutes before you eat. Continue reading >>

Foods To Eat While Taking Metformin

Foods To Eat While Taking Metformin

Metformin is a prescription medication used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Metformin can be taken alone or in conjunction with other medications, such as insulin. It is important to eat a healthy diet. A dietician can make recommendations for your particular case, but most people with diabetes eat a healthy variety of foods in moderation and follow regular mealtimes. Video of the Day Carbohydrates are broken into two main categories—sugars (simple carbohydrates) and starches (complex carbohydrates). Carbohydrates break down into blood sugar during digestion. Focus on eating complex carbohydrates such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and low-fat dairy products. Many people with diabetes use the Glycemic Index (GI) to choose foods. The higher GI foods tend to cause a greater increase in blood sugar. Low GI foods tend to be higher in fat. Non-starchy vegetables like spinach, carrots, broccoli and great beans are choices. Eat brown rice and whole wheat pasta. Include high-fiber foods. Aim for 25 to 30 grams of fiber daily. Dietary fiber consists of the parts of plant foods that the body cannot digest. Fiber decreases the risk of heart disease and helps control blood sugar levels. Great sources of fiber include vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole-wheat flour, wheat bran and nuts. Include dry beans such as kidney and pinto beans. Heart healthy dieting is extremely important for a person with diabetes due to the increased risk of heart disease and stroke caused by the accelerated development of clogged or hardened arteries. Limit your intake of saturated fats to less than 7 percent of your daily calories. Eat as little trans fat as possible. Choose monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats instead. Sources of monounsaturated fats include olive and canola oil. Continue reading >>

Best Time To Take Metformin Before Or After?

Best Time To Take Metformin Before Or After?

Best time to take Metformin before or after? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Best time to take Metformin before or after? First, When should we take metformin before a meal or after a meal? I always have understood to take them with food??? I am on 1500 mg Metformin. I take one 500 pill in the morning after I eat one after lunch and one after Dinner/or later in the evening if I forget at dinner. I really think I need to go on 2000 mg per day. I have high readings, like 127-150 in the mornings. The readings all vary because of what I eat at dinner or before bedtime. I fix a good dinner and eat a little of everything. Even if it is white potato, bread, desert or etc. I almost know that is what puts my readings up in the mornings. Sometimes I eat too much potato. I am always hungry and love to eat. I only weigh 106 lbs. I wonder if that might allow me to have higher reading??...smile! Hi Betty: If you're having higher morning readings, try taking your dinner metformin just before bedtime and see if that helps. As long as your stomach isn't empty, you should be okay. If you double up on your evening dose, you may notice some gastric symptoms. Also, do you notice a better blood sugar when you avoid potatoes and bread? For me, metformin or not, I can't do potatoes and bread. The times I do decide to have some bread, I have it for lunch and exercise afterwards to help combat the blood sugar rise. Dinner for me is the smallest meal of my day, as i'm least active then. I try to make it the least carbs of the day as well. I have the bulk of my carbs for lunch when i'm up and about. I am on 2 750's per day. I personally find taking th Continue reading >>

Missing Meals? Avoid Dangerous Blood Sugar If You Have Diabetes

Missing Meals? Avoid Dangerous Blood Sugar If You Have Diabetes

Skipping a meal is typically no big deal. But if you have  diabetes , missing meals can throw off the important balancing act between food intake and medication. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy The result is blood sugars that are too low (hypoglycemia) or too high (hyperglycemia) — and that’s dangerous. “If you take medications for diabetes that can cause low blood sugars, you should try not to skip meals,” says registered dietician Dawn Noe. “If you’re just not up to eating on a regular schedule, talk to your doctor about diabetes medications that won’t cause low blood sugars,” she says.  When you’re ill or just don’t feel like eating much, it’s important to monitor your blood sugar levels more closely than ever. How often depends on whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and what medications you take. For type 1 diabetes: Be sure to monitor your blood sugar before meals and before bedtime, typically four times per day, says diabetes specialist Bartolome Burguera, MD . Beyond that, check your blood sugars if you notice symptoms of low blood sugar. Those symptoms include: For type 2 diabetes: If you are taking a sulfonylurea medication, check your blood sugars at least twice a day — in the morning and at bedtime. “It’s important to keep in mind that sulfonylureas may cause blood sugar to drop during the day if you don’t eat anything after taking your medication,” Dr. Burguera says. If your only treatment is metformin, you may not need to check your blood sugar more than once a day. This medication doesn’t typically cause hypoglycemia. It is important to be aware of the symptoms Continue reading >>

Should You Take Diabetes Medications Metformin And Glipizide With Food?

Should You Take Diabetes Medications Metformin And Glipizide With Food?

Dear Pharmacist, I have been taking metformin for years now. I was already told to take it with food, but after taking it for a while I quit eating with it and seem to have no problems. My doctor recently added a medication called glipizide, which also says take with food. Can I eventually quit eating with this medication, too since I’m just not really a breakfast eater? Dear Most Important Part of your Day, This is a great question, as I can see how the two medications can seem like very similar situations. The directions to take these medications with food are for different reasons, and therefore should be followed differently. Metformin is advised to take with food because it can cause nausea when you first start taking it. For many people, however the nausea can subside as your body adjusts to it. With glipizide, the medication actually works to directly lower your blood sugar more than metformin. For this reason, it is important to always and forever eat with your glipizide dose. Unlike metformin, glipizide can cause low blood sugar episodes, especially when you don’t eat with it. If you absolutely never eat breakfast, then you may consider just waiting to take your glipizide with your first meal of the day. Even if that’s at lunch, it would be safer than taking this medication on an empty stomach. If you do experience a low blood sugar episode (clammy, sweaty palms, heat/cold intolerance, mental confusion) the best treatments can involve drinking orange juice or milk, a non-diet soda, or placing a piece of hard candy (that is not sugar free) in your mouth. If the episode is severe, it can also be a good idea to follow up with a bite of peanut butter, or some longer source of protein. Continue reading >>

Surviving Metformin

Surviving Metformin

What was your first week on Metformin like? Horrendous? Terrible? Filled with waves of nausea? The sickest you’ve felt in your life? Let’s reminisce for a minute: About a dozen years ago, on December 24, I went to the doctor for a routine physical. Are you envious of my holiday plans? This was in the years before Pinterest, so I was carrying on with regular life activities on Christmas Eve morn rather than bedazzling the cap of an Elf on the Shelf. Anyway, at the Christmas Eve check-up, my physician mentioned that he had read promising things about Metformin being used in women with PCOS. We chatted about Metformin for a bit, talked about other PCOS things, finished up the tests, and then I headed to the pharmacy to pick up the prescription. We had our traditional Christmas Eve dinner of ham, funeral potatoes, salad with asparagus and strawberries; rolls, and other delicious items. Breaking with tradition, this year’s Christmas Eve dinner was followed by Metformin for me. After dinner, we read the Christmas story from the Bible, watched a short film depicting the events in Luke 2, read a new Christmas book, and headed off to bed. That’s when the fun began. In sum: Worst Christmas Ever. Pros: Family, friends, gifts, good music, good food. Cons: Visiting the loo every 15 minutes, constant nausea, wanting to curl up in bed and not wake up for days. Public Service Announcement: Do not start Metformin for the first time on the day prior to a major holiday. My first year on Metformin was pretty rough. I felt like I had morning sickness every single day. I had diarrhea and nausea every morning. When I skipped a few doses hoping for relief, my symptoms would be twice as bad when I re-started. Looking back, I’m actually amazed that I kept taking the medication. If I st Continue reading >>

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

Does Metformin Cause Weight Loss? What To Know Before You Take It

If you’re managing type 2 diabetes with metformin (Glucophage), you might be well acquainted with unwanted side effects of this drug — namely, upset stomach, diarrhea, muscle aches, and sleepiness. These can be a figurative and literal pain, but you might welcome one side effect of metformin with open arms, particularly if you’ve struggled to lose weight. Metformin isn’t a weight loss drug, but researchers have found a link between the drug and weight loss. In fact, a long-term study published in April 2012 in the journal Diabetes Care that was conducted by the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) concluded that the drug could serve as a treatment for excess body weight, although more studies are needed. What Is Metformin and How Does It Work? “[Metformin] has been considered a first-line medication in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, and it mainly acts by lowering the amount of glucose released by the liver,” says Minisha Sood, MD, an endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “It also helps a hormone called insulin to work better by helping muscles use glucose in a more efficient manner. When insulin works better (and insulin sensitivity improves), a person’s insulin levels are lower than they would be otherwise.” There’s no cure for type 2 diabetes, but the right combination of medication and healthy lifestyle can stabilize blood sugar levels, which, of course, is the end goal of any diabetes treatment. As the medication helps your body properly metabolize food and restores your ability to respond to insulin, you’ll not only feel better, you can potentially avoid complications of high blood sugar, such as heart disease, kidney damage, nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), and eye damage (retinopathy). Why Does Metformin Cause Weight Lo Continue reading >>

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

September 30, 2015 by Dr. Brooke in Be Better , Eat Better , pcos 3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin Metformin is recommended by doctors for women with PCOS that want to loose weight or otherwise manage their PCOS and insulin resistance. But there are 3 very important things that you need to know about it including the fact that it's not the only option! Let me first say, I dont hate Metformin for women with PCOS . For some women it really does help spur ovulation, control blood sugar and help with some weight management but.its not without its share of issues. And its definitely not the magic bullet for weight loss although its usually presented that way. How Metformin (or its generic form: Glucophage) Works Metformin is typically given with meals throughout the day, or more commonly now the extended release version is given once with dinner or at bedtime. While only having to pop a pill one time per day is always appealing, this once a day dosing (especially at bedtime) is where I see the most problems with my patients. It lowers both fasting and post meal glucose levels by decreasing the glucose absorption in your intestines after a meal; as well as decreasing the amount of glucose your liver makes for later use. It also does help improve insulin sensitivity by increasing glucose movement into a cell. All sounds good so far right? Not so fast, here are the most common issues I see in women using Metformin: Metformin is notorious for causing sometimes severe digestive issues including stomach pain or upset, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and even a sense of body weakness or metallic taste in the mouth in some. And it is touted as not causing low blood sugar as many older blood sugar lowering drugs did, however I see it every day in my practice that Metformin can m Continue reading >>

Foods You Can Eat While Taking Metformin

Foods You Can Eat While Taking Metformin

Meformin Diet: Metformin is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes or non-insulin dependent diabetes. It is used alone or in combination with other diabetic medications. It works to lower blood glucose levels and allows the glucose to enter your body to produce energy. Type 2 diabetes may lead to blood vessel damage in the eyes, heart, kidney and nerves. Diet, exercise and weight loss may lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is available in many forms such as tablet, liquid version and two long acting forms. Here is a list of foods you can eat while taking metformin. Always consult your health care provider first. Healthy diet plan for metformin: Metformin is used with a proper diet, exercise and also with other medications to control high blood sugar. You must take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. It is important to check the glucose level several times even when you taking this medication. Eat a consistent amount of food every day. Take medications same time every day as directed by your doctor. This might improve blood sugar level and lower the risk of diabetes. Exercise for half an hour. Ask your doctor first. Brand names for metformin include: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet and Fortamet. List of foods you can eat while taking metformin: 1. Carbohydrates: There are two types of carbohydrates which includes simple and complex. Simple carbs are found in refined sugar, flour and fruits. Complex carbohydrates are found in whole grains, beans, nuts and vegetables. It contains good amounts of fiber. It is easily digestible by the body and also provides steady source of energy. For adults, you can have 4 carbs servings at each meal and 1 to 2 carbs servings as snack. Muffins and cereals: You can eat oroweat double fiber Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Young women with PCOS often have elevated insulin levels and are more likely to develop diabetes. Metformin is a medication often prescribed for women with PCOS to help prevent diabetes. A lifestyle that includes healthy nutrition and daily exercise is the most important part of a PCOS treatment plan. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ in the body called the pancreas. The food you eat is broken down into simple sugar (glucose) during digestion. Glucose is absorbed into the blood after you eat. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells of the body to be used as energy. If there’s not enough insulin in the body, or if the body can’t use the insulin, sugar levels in the blood become higher. What is insulin resistance? If your body is resistant to insulin, it means you need high levels of insulin to keep your blood sugar normal. Certain medical conditions such as being overweight or having PCOS can cause insulin resistance. Insulin resistance tends to run in families. What can insulin resistance do to me? High insulin levels can cause thickening and darkening of the skin (acanthosis nigricans) on the back of the neck, axilla (under the arms), and groin area. In young women with PCOS, high insulin levels can cause the ovaries to make more androgen hormones such as testosterone. This can cause increased body hair, acne, and irregular or few periods. Having insulin resistance can increase your risk of developing diabetes. How can I lower my insulin levels? You can help lower your insulin levels naturally by eating fewer starches and sugars, and more foods that are high in fiber and low in refined carbohydrates. Low glycemic foods, on the other hand, don’t raise your blood sugar or insulin levels as much as foods that are high in sugar or refined carbohydr Continue reading >>

Grapefruit & Metformin

Grapefruit & Metformin

Metformin is a drug used to treat Type 2 diabetes, a condition in which the body does not properly process insulin, leading to high blood sugar levels or hyperglycemia. This drug works by decreasing the amount of glucose your body makes and absorbs from food. Additionally, metformin bolsters your body's reaction to insulin, which helps to lower blood sugar. When you take a medication like metformin, it interacts with enzymes and chemicals in your body through a process called metabolism. Other medications or foods such as grapefruit may influence the way your body metabolizes drugs. Metformin Metformin comes in liquid and tablet form and is taken with meals throughout the day. Typically, diabetics begin on a low dose of metformin and monitor their blood sugar to determine how well the medication is working. Your physician will increase your dose as needed. In some rare cases, metformin may cause a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. You should call emergency medical services immediately if you experience extreme lethargy, weakness, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, irregular heartbeat, shortness of breath, flushed skin, rapid or labored breathing, muscle pain, chills or dizziness. Grapefruit and Drug Metabolism Grapefruit and other citrus fruits and juices contain chemicals that impair your body's ability to metabolize some drugs. With metabolism slowed, medications build up in your body and have the potential to reach lethal levels. Unfortunately, it doesn't matter if you eat grapefruit with your medication or consume it at a different time of day. If a drug interacts with grapefruit or other citrus products, you'll need to eliminate them from your diet. Potentially Harmful Interaction Grapefruit juice is rich naringin, an antioxidant compound with blood s Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Metformin is often one of the first medications prescribed to people with diabetes, according to the Canadian Diabetes Association (see reference 2 under Highlights of Revisions). It helps lower your blood sugar levels by decreasing the amount of glucose, or sugar, produced by your liver. It also helps your insulin, the hormone that gets the sugar out of your blood and into your cell, work better. (see reference 1 pg 1 under Clinical Pharmacology under Mechanism of Action para 1). While you do not need to avoid any foods when taking metformin, you may need to limit or avoid alcohol (see reference 1 pg 8 under alcohol intake.). Metformin and Alcohol If your doctor has prescribed metformin to help you get better control over your blood sugar, you should not drink an excessive amount of alcohol, including beer, wine or hard liquor (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). Too much alcohol causes metformin to breakdown too much lactate, which is a by-product of glucose and amino acids, and may lead to lactic acidosis (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). If you drink alcohol, it's OK to have moderate amounts while on metformin, which means up to 1 drink a day for women and 2 drinks a day for men (see reference 3 pg x). But everyone is different, so be sure to talk to your doctor first to a safe amount of alcohol for you. Lactic acidosis is actually not very common when taking metformin, but it can be dangerous, and even deadly, according to the Food and Drug Administration (see reference 1 pg 15). Symptoms that warrant an immediate call to your doctor include difficulty breathing, stomach pain, diarrhea, muscle cramps, unusual sleepiness or weakness or an all-around achiness. Continue reading >>

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