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Gestational Diabetes Chinese Food

Diabetic Guide To Chinese Food

Diabetic Guide To Chinese Food

How can you stay healthy and still enjoy Chinese food? You can do it by planning ahead, choosing wisely and watching how much you eat. Choose traditional food dishes that are high in fiber, vitamins and minerals, and low in fat. Great choices are beans, peas, tofu, bean sprouts and dark green vegetables such as Chinese broccoli, choy sum, watercress, Chinese chives, Chinese yard-long beans and amaranth also known as Chinese spinach. Other Chinese vegetables that are rich in iron are Chinese mushroom, seaweed and black fungus. Go for the mung beans (green gram beans), yellow bean and black bean dishes for soup or desserts with artificial sweetener. Sweet potatoes are also high in fiber and very nutritious which can be boiled or made into dessert with taro and tapioca using artificial sweetener. Whole wheat and rye bread and cornbread are good sources of fiber and are good for everyone. Watch out for dishes loaded with lard such as moon cakes. Also watch out foods that are loaded with fat and cholesterol such as Chinese sausages that are made with pork loin or pork or duck liver and roasted pigs or pork or ducks. Lastly, watch out for foods that are high in salt such as salty duck eggs and salty fish. For some people who like dim sum, choose steamed dumplings instead of fried dumplings and should limit to 5-6 servings for brunch. Choose fresh vegetables that are steamed or stir-fried with light vegetable oil or simmer into soup. Vegetables and grains should fill up most of your plate, but leave room for some lean meat, poultry or fish. Be sure to choose stir-fired chicken with dark green vegetables and remove the skin instead of the fried variety. For something different, try steamed fish with garlic and scallion in light vegetable oil and salt. What's for dessert? It's h Continue reading >>

Eating Out

Eating Out

Having diabetes doesn’t deprive you of eating out. If you eat out regularly, you will need to pay close attention to food choices and serving sizes to manage your weight and diabetes. Don’t limit your enjoyment by thinking you need to go to a special restaurant or eat special meals just because you have diabetes. You’ll soon discover that many restaurants serve foods that are suitable for healthy eating. Most will also value your patronage and are more than happy to help if you can’t find something suitable on the menu. Ask restaurant staff about the dish of your choice and the way it’s been cooked, and request simple changes if required. Try to choose meals that: Are lower in fat and particularly low in saturated fat Contain breads, cereals (preferably wholegrain), vegetables (including legumes) and/or fruits Do not have a large amount of sugar added. Insulin & Eating Out When eating out there a few things you need to consider. Your meal may be served later than usual, so to avoid a ‘hypo’, take your insulin with you and give your injection as the meal arrives. Be sure to choose a meal with enough carbohydrate. Ask for extra bread, rice, potato, fruit or fruit juice if you need more. If you are having a bigger meal with more carbohydrate than usual, you may need to increase your insulin dose prior to the meal on that special occasion. Discuss this with your doctor, dietitian or Credentialled Diabetes Educator first. What to Drink When you arrive ask for a jug of iced water before ordering other drinks. Throughout the meal drink: Water: plain, mineral or soda Low joule/calorie soft drinks Coffee, tea, herbal tea. Don’t drink fruit juice (unless you need additional carbohydrates). If you want to drink alcohol limit it to: 2 standard drinks a day for men 1 Continue reading >>

Eating Out With Gestational Diabetes

Eating Out With Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes (GDM) can sometimes make you feel like you’re missing out. Missing out on a casual snack, a rich and creamy meal, that extra soda or that piece of cake you’ve been coveting. And GDM comes about at a time in your pregnancy when you’re probably tired and want to indulge a little. Annoyingly GDM is there, shaking its head at you, ordering you to put down the hot chips and put your hands where it can see them. By now, after looking through GestationalDiabetesRecipes.com, hopefully you’ll have noticed that there is in fact a whole lot of delicious food you can eat despite how you felt after your initial diagnosis. And yes, cooking with GDM does take planning and some re-thinking your approach to food, but once you understand the basics you’ll feel empowered and hungry! So managing your meals in the ‘safety’ of you own kitchen is all well and good, but what happens when you want to eat out or order in? Here are some helpful tips for approaching these kinds of meals. Article written by Lisa Taylor (GestationalDiabetesRecipes.com founder) and Natasha Leader (Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator and GestationalDiabetesRecipes.com In-Kitchen Dietitian) “Surely it’s okay just this once…” It’s tricky to say just how often eating out should be done. It depends on the quality of what you’re eating and your overall health. When you’re pregnant there is more to think about from a food safety perspective, which can reduce your options and can in turn push you towards not so healthy options – unless you plan carefully. Food prepared outside the home is more likely to be higher in sodium (salt) and unhealthy fats compared to what you might make at home and this has implications for general health in the long t Continue reading >>

Dining Out With Diabetes: Chinese Restaurants

Dining Out With Diabetes: Chinese Restaurants

Chinese food is one of the most popular dining options in North America – many people will admit to having at least one Chinese take out menu stashed in a kitchen drawer. However, as is the case with most ethnic cuisine, America’s version of Chinese food tends to differ from traditional preparations in ways that make it challenging to incorporate into a healthy diet. People with diabetes need to be especially careful, because certain entrees are high not only high in carbs, but also in fat and sodium. More than Just Oodles of Noodles The great thing about Chinese food is the tremendous variety that it offers. You can eat healthy foods if you look closely at the menu and know what to pick. Steamed rice, veggie dishes, and soups are just a few examples of lighter options for people with diabetes who are trying to watch their calories and carbs. Even certain beef entrees can be part of your meal plan. For example, a 3 oz serving of broccoli with beef and 1/2 a cup of steamed rice from Panda Express has about 300 calories and 20 grams of carbs, an acceptable amount for most diabetes meal plans. Veggies are a staple in Chinese dishes and are much lower in carbs than starchy sides like fried noodles. Be creative and try bok choy, sprouts, shitake mushrooms, or eggplant as side dishes with 3-4 ounces of meat or tofu. Diabetes Diners: Keep it fun If you really want to order a favorite dish, be smart: focus on the flavor and keep your portions small. Many of the most popular entrees, like sweet & sour pork and lemon chicken, are deep-fried and therefore have higher fat and calories. Other favorites, like fried rice and chow mein, are often high in carbs and fat. One way to eat healthy is to ask for the sauce on the side and enjoy a lighter version of your favorite dish. For Continue reading >>

Chinese Takeaway | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Chinese Takeaway | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My kids want to treat mum to her favourite Takeaway on mothers day (Despite my offer to help them cook her a nice leg of lamb :cry: ) Any suggestions for what from at typical Chinese takeaway menu might be a bit more suitable for me other than my usual chicken chow mein and egg fried rice ???? Mat the honest answer is no as far as I would say. If her favourite was Indian then its a completely different matter as a lot of Indian food is completely fine. I tried making a low carb safe Chinese but only once. It was a complete disaster. The problem is many of the dishes are cooked in sweet sauces and apart from plain beansprouts things get pretty high carb very quickly. Even water chestnuts are 30g / 100g and 30g is about six bits at most. Chow mein has noodles which some people find they are quite tolerant to but not many. Curry sauce instead of sweet and sour is still a killer. Eat the chicken or the prawns out of S&S balls and leave the batter - what's the point you want to enjoy what you eat. So if you go you're going to take a hit. If you can walk rather than drive try drinking some gin or vodka before going as that may help you not spike! Continue reading >>

Dining Out With Gestational Diabetes

Dining Out With Gestational Diabetes

Everyday Health Diabetes Gestational Diabetes Sticking with your diet plan in restaurants doesn't have to be difficult. Learn how to order healthy foods when you go out to eat. Medically Reviewed by Niya Jones, MD, MPH Gestational diabetes is diabetes that occurs for the first time when you become pregnant. As in other kinds of diabetes, gestational diabetes leads to too much sugar in your blood.. If you have gestational diabetes, you will need to control your blood sugar with exercise, a gestational diabetes diet , and sometimes with medication. But just because you have gestational diabetes doesn't mean you can't go out to eat. You just need to follow the same rules as you would at home and make healthy choices. "We generally recommend a diet for a woman with gestational diabetes that gets about 50 percent of calories from carbohydrates," says Kelly O'Connor, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. "Good sources of carbohydrates are whole-grain breads and cereals, fresh fruits, low-fat dairy products, potatoes, whole-wheat pasta, and brown rice. We try to have the women consume as close to the same amount of carbohydrates each day as possible," says O'Connor. One thing to keep in mind if you do go out to eat is timing. "We recommend women with gestational diabetes eat every two to three hours , which translates into three meals a day and two to three snacks a day. Putting a moderate amount of carbohydrate into your body every few hours keeps blood sugar stable throughout the day," advises O'Connor. You can avoid problems by making reservations that coincide with your regular meal times. Try to go to restaurants at less busy times so you don't get stuck waiting too long for a table. Some Tips for Dining Out With Ges Continue reading >>

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

How to keep your blood sugar in check when dining out. By the dLife Editors Going out to eat is fraught with challenges for people who need to watch their blood sugar. There’s the giant portion size issue, the unknown ingredients, and the “special-occasion effect.” That’s the way we tell ourselves it’s ok to make unhealthy choices on special occasions. Our idea of what constitutes a special occasion is pretty subjective. Here are some tips on making d-friendly choices in restaurants, by type of cuisine. What to Order at Italian Restaurants Italian restaurants can be full of high-carbohydrate foods like bread, pasta, pizza, risotto, and gnocci. Many of these combine refined carbs with processed meats like sausage and pepperoni, and batters or breading (think eggplant Parmesan or fried mozzarella). Things you can do: Ask your server to skip the bread basket for your table. If you’re going to splurge and have pasta, ask for it as a side dish and don’t eat more than the size of your fist. That’s one cup of pasta, or about 45 grams of carbohydrate. Order unbreaded chicken or veal baked with sauces like piccata, marsala, puttanesca, francese, or cacciatore. Other good choices include: Caesar salad with grilled or baked fish, escarole and beans, and minestrone soup. What to Order at Mexican Restaurants Mexican food can be full of carbohydrates with large portions of rice, beans, and tortillas. Things you can do: At the very least, limit portion sizes. Ask to have half your plate wrapped to go before you even start eating. Skip the rice; ask for black beans or salad in its place. If you love chips and salsa, take a handful and then ask for the basket to be removed from the table. Order soft chicken or fish tacos and eat the fillings with a fork, skipping the tor Continue reading >>

Eating Out

Eating Out

In the fast lane Everyone'’s allowed to indulge once in a while, and it’'s no different if you'’ve got diabetes. Here'’s our guide to how eating out will affect your glucose. More and more of our meals are eaten out. It’'s a quick and easy option –– but not always as healthy as food you cook yourself. Fast food tends to be higher in fat and salt than if you rustle up a similar meal at home. But as long as you’'re eatinglow-fat meals and snacksfor the majority of the week, eating out isn'’t a problem. Some of the options Fabulous fish and chips The bad news is there's loads of fat in a plate of fish and chips, and that means too many calories. It'’s not a good meal for anyone to eat on a regular basis. Ordering a smaller portion might help, but it still shouldn'’t be eaten often. The good news is that chippy-style chips are cut thicker and so absorb less fat than French fries. If you know you are going to be eating fast food, such as fish and chips, for your tea, aim to eat more fruit during the day and salad and vegetables with your lunch. Burger binge Sorry, but burgers aren'’t much better than fish and chips. The buns that burgers come in ensure you'’ll get plenty of carbohydrates, so perhaps you could skip the fries or order a small portion. Avoiding cheeseburgers will reduce the fat content, as will leaving off the mayo. Some burger chains sell side salads, which are a good choice and help balance the meal – as long as they don'’t get drenched in a high-fat sauces or dressings. Ordering diet drinks is another good idea. However, don'’t be fooled by the milkshakes –– they contain lots of fat and sugar. Chinese chow Guess what, Chinese meals can be high in fat too. Why not stick to the stir-fry dishes, providing they are served with Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes #67

Gestational Diabetes #67

I've just been diagnosed with GD. I had it first time round, just diet control, skipped 2 pregnancies and here we are again. Pretty sure it's relating to my weight but I was checked early on in pregnancy and sugar levels were fine. I was just wondering which bread everyone is using. I was using white, got diagnosed (only this wk) so I got helga's wholemeal as it was on sale but it still seems to leave my levels quite high, not over just up there in comparison to everything else I eat. Can anyone tell me a really good low gi bread please. Having read the last thread on GD it's definitely made me adjust my attitude, and knowing I can get support from the lovely women here is very reassuring. I was diagnosed at 28 weeks, currently 31 weeks and just finished my first 2 weeks testing and keeping a food diary, in prep for dietician visit on Monday. My situation is slightly different from many of the women I've read so far, I had zero risk factors, am usually labelled as 'underweight' in BMI (am perfectly healthy though), and haven't put on extra weight aside from baby bump throughout my pregnancy. As you can imagine, a massive shock, there's been many tears shed and some very down moments. Guess my pancreas is just a bit slack and struggling to keep up. Haven't had to change my diet all that much, have had to increase my activity though. Find my levels change day to day even though I might be eating the exact same things, so it all depends on the amount of activity I do. Luckily I do have low fasting levels consistently - hope it stays that way. Trying to get over the negatives and focus back on having a wonderful birth experience and healthy baby. How is everyone else coping with keeping positive? It's hard when you get a high reading to keep upbeat for the rest of the day. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Food Choices At Chinese Restaurants

Diabetic Food Choices At Chinese Restaurants

The National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse reports that about 23.6 million Americans have diabetes. If you have diabetes, your body has difficulty processing carbohydrates from your diet, and your blood sugar levels are high. Many typical menu items at Chinese restaurants are unhealthy for individuals with diabetes, but some choices can be part of a healthy diet to control blood sugar levels. Study the menu and order nutritious items that can fit into your carbohydrate-controlled, healthy diet. Video of the Day Limit your consumption of high-carbohydrate Chinese restaurant foods such as fried rice, steamed rice, chow mein, lo mein and other noodle dishes. The American Diabetes Association suggests that most individuals with diabetes should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal to help prevent surges in blood sugar levels. A cup of rice or noodles has 44 to 50 grams of carbohydrates. Vegetables, chicken, fish and tofu are low-carbohydrate options. Increase Fiber Consumption Order high-fiber menu items to help control your blood sugar levels. Individuals with diabetes who consume more high-fiber foods, such as whole grains, fruits, legumes and vegetables tend to have better blood sugar control, according to a study published in the January-February 2011 edition of the journal “Endocrine Practice." Ask for extra vegetables in each dish, order brown instead of white rice and eat orange slices instead of sweets to increase your fiber intake. You are at risk for developing heart disease if you have diabetes, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. A healthy diet can help you lower your cholesterol levels and reduce your heart disease risk. Fried foods, such as egg rolls, fried rice, General Tsao’s chicken and fried noodle dishes, are Continue reading >>

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes as a Food Lover Whether food is your comfort, your hobby, or your profession, gestational diabetes is tough. Here's what you can eat. [Photograph: Shutterstock ] In the first few months of my pregnancy, friends often asked me how I was dealing with life without wine, beer, and cocktails; without buttery pieces of toro at my beloved neighborhood sushi bar; without the various other foods most people avoid when they're carrying a baby. Early on, none of those things mattered much to me; I was too sick to crave much more than mac and cheese. Coffee and wine started to taste oddly bitter and flat to me, but it didn't seem that awful to wait 40 weeks to get back to enjoying them. My local bar always managed to serve me some creative alcohol-free concoction. (Pineapple juice and savory Cel-ray? Highly recommended.) I took advantage of California's citrus season, buying pounds of floral Oro Blanco grapefruits and tangerines for making fresh juice. Fruit never tasted better: I sent my husband on wild goose chases for out-of-season mangoes, and celebrated the early arrival of local strawberries by eating a pint every day. And I had ice cream: pints of salted caramel at home, cones of Bi-Rite's insanely rich buffalo-milk soft serve during walks around the park. In challenging moments in those first few months, Max reminded me that "at least it's an excuse to eat all the ice cream you could desire." (I never did convince him to ship me some homemade pints of this crazy chocolate number from New York.) But in mid-March I found myself undergoing a hazing ritual pretty much all pregnant women experience: you show up at the hospital with an empty stomach, get your blood drawn, and then chug a bottle of extra-strong Continue reading >>

Associations Of Dietary Habits, Physical Activity And Cognitive Views Withgestational Diabetes Mellitus Among Chinese Women.

Associations Of Dietary Habits, Physical Activity And Cognitive Views Withgestational Diabetes Mellitus Among Chinese Women.

1. Public Health Nutr. 2014 Aug;17(8):1850-7. doi: 10.1017/S1368980013001882. Epub2013 Aug 7. Associations of dietary habits, physical activity and cognitive views withgestational diabetes mellitus among Chinese women. Li Q(1), Xiong R(2), Wang L(3), Cui J(2), Shi L(1), Liu Y(2), Luo B(2). (1)1Department of Dietetics,Nanfang Hospital,Southern Medical University,1838 N. Guangzhou DaDao,Guangzhou 510515, People's Republic ofChina. (2)2School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine,Southern Medical University,1023 S. Shatai Road,Guangzhou 510515, People's Republic ofChina. (3)3Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology,College of Public Health,East Tennessee State University,Johnson City,TN,USA. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between dietary habits, physical activityand cognitive views and the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) inChinese women.DESIGN: A cross-sectional study to explore the potential risk factors of GMDthrough the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, an FFQ and aself-designed structured questionnaire, respectively.SETTING: Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China.SUBJECTS: Chinese pregnant women (n 571) who underwent a 75-g oral glucosetolerance test at their 24th to 28th gestational week.RESULTS: Thirteen per cent of the investigated women were identified as havingGDM, and an increased intake of local featured foods and lower physical activity were observed in the GDM-positive group v. the GDM-negative group. Women whoregarded early-pregnancy morning sickness as relevant to fetal abnormalities and those with unlimited dietary intake after the ending of morning sickness both hadan increased risk for GDM (P = 0018 and P = 0038, respectively). After multiplelogistic regression analysis, cognitive views for unlimited food intakesubseq Continue reading >>

Yes! You Can Eat Chinese Food During Pregnancy

Yes! You Can Eat Chinese Food During Pregnancy

Yes! You Can Eat Chinese Food During Pregnancy Chinese food restaurants in the United States have become more Americanized with fifty percent or more of the menu fried with kitchen grease and various ingredients matching those found in homemade hair masks. As an expectant mother, specifically in the last trimester, your stomach might growl like a gray wolf prowling for food. The baby needs to be fed. Doctors counsel expectant mothers on the side effects of devouring fast food, regardless of cravings. Instead of opting for the grease, think about organic and nutritious green veggies and complex carbohydrates that take just a few minutes to cook on your stovetop: chinese broccoli, bok choy, and napa cabbage. Now, do not confuse these Chinese delicacies with MSG contaminated, fat saturated, and sodium drenched Chinese takeout that Americans order when they do not want to cook dinner. Ask your doctor, "No greasy hamburgers, but what about Chinese food?" Your body will thank you later when you have enough energy for nightly feedings because you took care of yourself during those precious nine (actually ten) months of pregnancy. After substituting those regular trips through Chinese takeout windows with cooking the finest Chinese culinary delights at home, your body may start craving bok choy with wonton noodles, Chinese broccoli with brown rice, and napa cabbage in chicken broth. These commonly served dishes are providing tons of nutrients to your unborn child, helping prevent excess weight gain, gestational diabetes, and more. Bok choy, Chinese broccoli, and napa cabbage are calcium rich veggies and vital for your babies bone development. Brown rice is a rich source of vitamins like B6 and magnesium, helping reduce nausea and vomiting while pregnant. Napa cabbage is a grea Continue reading >>

Happy Chinese New Year! Kung Hei Fat Choi!

Happy Chinese New Year! Kung Hei Fat Choi!

So it's the year of the monkey this year, and the year I was born! I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes last year on Chinese New Years Day and it was a big shock and upset as Chinese New Year is like Christmas or Thanksgiving. It's all to do with family and eating! I missed out on my family meal as I had no idea what I could eat or not, I had no idea on food pairing and the 8 golden rules back then. Many will celebrate Chinese New Year this year (which falls on Monday 8th February) with gestational diabetes and since learning about how best to help control blood sugar levels with gestational diabetes through my own pregnancy, I've found my TOP recipes to share with you which you can try for Chinese New Year (or just for a change to your day to day meals). If you can't tolerate takeaways then these are also some great alternatives. *Please note you need to substitute the following foods to make the recipe tolerable for gestational diabetes: Corn flour for wholemeal flour Sugar for sweetener Jasmine rice for Basmati/brown wholegrain Click on the titles below for links to the recipes... This is a takeaway favourite! This is a spicy alternative to the chicken and cashew nuts My all time favourite and similar to the one my mum makes at Chinese New Year! You can add some Chinese veg like Pak Choi or Choi Sum - if you can't get any then spinach and broccoli is always very tasty too. This is a great one for vegetarians for a main or can be a side veggie dish - it's very filling because of the tofu, and super tasty! And this is a great to make and have as left over lunch! Use left over roast chicken from your Sunday roast. And no Chinese meal can be complete without fried rice so here is one which is GD friendly and tasty!! Happy Chinese New Year - Enjoy everyone! Image cre Continue reading >>

The Take-away! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

The Take-away! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Ok A slightly naughty but fun topic - The takeaway.. So when you fellow diabetics have a takeaway - if you do - What do you opt for, what are the healthier choices for us to have - For example - Im opting for thai over chinese when the possiblity of one comes up as it seems a tiny bit better and easier to predict than a chinese. Any other good suggestion people can share - Wat they have from the indian? Or other takeaway establishments - That lean toward the healthier side? Does anyone ask their local takeawy to prepare their food in a different way to help out or anything like that? I wondered how people went about the takeaway! As I don't eat takeaways that often I don't worry to much about whether it's healthy or not, was I to eat them on a regular basis then I would certainly opt for a healthier option. I tend to stick to the same Chinese takeaway as I know the portion size well and can inject the right amount of insulin (from past experiences) usually I'll have the Chinese chicken curry with egg fried rice and a side-dish of garlic mushrooms if I'm ravenous :twisted: No take-aways for me or eating out as I have MSG intolerance and even have to be careful with portion size of meat because of the glutamic acid. I do know that McDonalds are in a minority and none of their food contains MSG, so, if cornered and desperate for some food while out and about, I will opt for their fish but without all the white gunge they usually swamp it in. They are always accommodating with me and go out of their way to serve me a piece of fish with a carton stuffed full of salad :thumbup: Chinese: crispy duck or lamb, chilli oil or chop suey or dry ribs or chicken sou Continue reading >>

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