diabetestalk.net

Fruits Good For Diabetes

Fruit For A Diabetes Diet: What To Know Before You Snack

Fruit For A Diabetes Diet: What To Know Before You Snack

People with type 2 diabetes know that they need to pay attention to their carbohydrate intake. Of the three main macronutrients in food — protein, fat, and carbohydrates — it's the carbohydrates that directly affect blood sugar levels, and this includes the carbohydrates in fruit. But a study published in August 2013 in the British Medical Journal looked at the association between fruit and type 2 diabetes and found that fruit can still be a crucial part of a good diabetes diet. The study, which followed nearly 190,000 people over a number of years, found that eating whole fruits — especially blueberries, grapes, and apples — significantly reduces the risk for type 2 diabetes. On the flip side, drinking more fruit juices actually increases the risk for diabetes. “If you have type 2 diabetes, you do need to watch your sugar," says Katie Barbera, RD, CDE, of Northwell Health Systems in New Hyde Park, New York. She explains that while both whole fruit and fruit juice have carbohydrates, a small piece of whole fruit is equal to about 4 ounces (oz) of fruit juice. So if you drink 12 oz of fruit juice, you could be getting more than you need. “And whole fruits have a lot of other advantages for a diabetes diet," Barbera adds. Understanding the Carbohydrates in Fruit Like vegetables and grains, fruits contain carbs. You need the fruits for a healthy diet, but with type 2 diabetes you also need to keep track of the carbs. Still, figuring out which fruits are best for diabetes is about more than counting carbs — it's also important to take into account the beneficial nutrients certain fruits provide. “Whole fruits are an excellent source of antioxidants," Barbera says. "They have a lot of fiber, so they make you feel fuller and satisfy your hunger. They also add Continue reading >>

50 Best Foods For Diabetes

50 Best Foods For Diabetes

For most of us, dialing back on sugar and simple carbs is an effective way to fast-track weight loss. But for those living with diabetes, it can be a matter of life and death. Diabetics are two to four times more likely than people without diabetes to die of heart disease or experience a life-threatening stroke, according to the American Heart Association. And for those who don’t properly control their condition, the odds of health issues—which range from cardiovascular trouble to nerve damage and kidney disease—increases exponentially. Luckily there are plenty of delicious foods that are compatible with diabetes. We tapped registered dietitians and certified diabetes educators for their top food picks that are low-carb and low-sugar, but still high in flavor. These superfoods will keep your blood sugar in check without skimping on flavor. Bonus: Most of these foods are also packed with essential vitamins and antioxidants to fight off inflammation and keep your energy levels high. While you’re stocking up your grocery cart with these staples, be sure to avoid the 75 Unhealthiest Foods on the Planet. This nutty, trendy whole grain is a good source of fiber and protein, making it a smart pick for a diabetes diet, Sarah Koszyk, RDN tells us. “With the fiber and protein combination found in quinoa, you’ll feel fuller and have better blood sugar control. Protein also helps with the uptake of carbohydrates so the body can process them more easily. I suggest enjoying quinoa in a salad or casserole.” Elizabeth Snyder, RD, CDE says you can still eat carbs if you’re diabetic. You just have to watch out for portion sizes: “The trouble [with eating carbs as a diabetic] lies in eating more carbohydrates than we need, as the body will choose to store any extra energ Continue reading >>

Food And Diabetes

Food And Diabetes

Dietary Advice for people with Type 2 Diabetes When you have Type 2 diabetes your nutritional needs are the same as everyone else—no special foods or complicated diets are needed. The key to eating well with diabetes is eating regularly, watching your serving size and following a healthy eating plan that is low in refined sugars and fat. This means choosing lower fat options when eating meat, poultry, dairy products and spreads, enjoying a good variety of fresh fruit and vegetables, getting the majority of your energy from unrefined and whole grain starches (e.g. potatoes and wholegrain bread and cereals) and keeping high sugar, high fat foods as treats only. You need more than 40 different nutrients for good health and no single food supplies them all. Eating a wide variety of foods is the key to ensuring that you get all the nutrients you need. Our “Healthy eating for people with type diabetes booklet” is an easy-to-read guide which has been prepared specifically for people with type 2 diabetes and for those waiting to see a dietitian, however the booklet provides useful guidance for everyone interested in developing healthy eating habits. Useful resources: Healthy eating for people with type 2 diabetes booklet Getting active for better health Continue reading >>

25 Best Fruits For Diabetics

25 Best Fruits For Diabetics

Are you a diabetic? Are you worried about foods with a high glycemic index? Don’t worry. We are here to give you the best fruits that you can relish without worrying about your blood sugar levels. Would you like to know more? Keep reading! Diet For Diabetics: Diabetics do not have to eliminate all sugary foods from their regular meals. Sugar or glucose is a vital requirement for the human body. It fuels us with energy so that we can stay active all day. But when you have to deal with diabetes, it is necessary to take care of your sweet cravings in an appropriate manner. Hence, portion control is essential for every diabetic. So, what would be the best practical way to ensure diabetics get their required intake of sugar? Fruits: The Ultimate Food For Diabetics: Most would prefer a healthier and natural way, and what better way is there to go with than fruits! A quick light snack, an after meal desert, or simply blended and squeezed into a refreshing drink, fruits can be consumed in many ways. Fruits also provide us with roughage, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. But how would fruits benefit a diabetic? Well, in addition to the various nutrients fruits give, the simple sugars or carbs in them are a whole lot easier for the body to process. Also, these are the healthier kind of sugars the body needs. Diabetes may cause weight loss, resulting in severe health adversities. Including fruits in their diet regimen can contribute towards reducing the excessive weight of many diabetics. One of the effects of diabetes is that it makes people hungry all the time, and the intake of certain fruits can create the feeling of fullness. Again, too much of anything can prove to be bad for you. Thus, when consuming fruits, a diabetic must be cautious and careful while picking the fru Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

10 Diabetic Friendly Fruits To Help You Manage Diabetes Better

Diabetes mellitus (DM) commonly referred to as Diabetes, is a chronic disorder. It occurs when the pancreas does not secrete enough insulin or when the cells of the body become resistant to insulin. In either case, the blood sugar cannot get into the cells for storage, which then leads to serious complications. Diabetes, perhaps more than any other disease, is strongly associated with the western diet, as it was uncommon in cultures consuming a 'primitive diet'. However as cultures switch from their native diets, to the foods of commerce; their rate of diabetes increases eventually reaching the proportions seen in the western societies. However, what's alarming is the fact that India Is home to 62 million diabetics and the number is estimated to be 100 million by 2030. Obesity is seen as one of the major contributing factors to the development of insulin resistance in approximately 90% of the individuals with type-2 diabetes. In most cases, achieving ideal body weight is associated with the restoration of normal blood sugar levels. Hence dietary modifications and treatment are fundamental to the successful treatment of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. There are some specific foods that have been shown to produce positive effects on blood sugar control. These foods have a low glycemic index and glycemic load and are high in fiber. When it comes to diabetics eating fruits, there is a lot of confusion and information is very misleading. Just remember that moderation is the key here. TIPS TO ENJOY FRUITS IF YOU ARE DIABETIC: - Always eat fruits that are fresh, local and in season. - Eat fruits that have a low glycemic index. - Fruits should not be eaten with your main meals, its best to have fruits in between meals and as a snack. - Fruits with high glycemic index should be Continue reading >>

9 Of The Worst Eating Habits For Diabetes

9 Of The Worst Eating Habits For Diabetes

You’re a breakfast skipper istock/ShotShare We always hear that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but this may be particularly true for individuals with diabetes, says Alison Massey, RD, a registered dietitian and director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Waiting too long to eat in the morning might result in hypoglycemia or blood glucose that is too low. Here are tricks to treat hypoglycemia every diabetic should know. “Even when my clients aren’t typical ‘breakfast eaters,’ I encourage them to incorporate a small snack into their morning routine, like a Greek yogurt with some berries or a hard-boiled egg and slice of whole grain toast,” she says. It doesn’t have to be a sit-down meal, but make sure you have something healthy in your body so you don’t crash. Follow these healthy breakfast rules for diabetics. istock/GMVozd Research suggests that excessive fat intake (more than 30 percent of total calories) may worsen insulin resistance. Stay away from meals that tend to contain high amounts of saturated fat, like those from fast food restaurants. While the mechanism isn’t clearly understood, some research has found a modest benefit in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) on insulin resistance, as well as decreasing liver fat. MUFAs are good-for-you fats found in avocados, olive oil, nut butters, and seeds, to name a few. A diet that is high in MUFAs and lower in saturated fats is also associated with improvements in cardiovascular health, lower LDL cholesterol, and reduced triglycerides and blood pressure, says Massey. Here are clear signs you aren't eating enough healthy fats. From Merrill Lynch istock/alle12 Overindulging in protein could impact your blood glucose levels, especially if that protein Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes

Your food choices matter a lot when you've got diabetes. Some are better than others. Nothing is completely off limits. Even items that you might think of as “the worst" could be occasional treats -- in tiny amounts. But they won’t help you nutrition-wise, and it’s easiest to manage your diabetes if you mainly stick to the “best” options. Starches Your body needs carbs. But you want to choose wisely. Use this list as a guide. Best Choices Whole grains, such as brown rice, oatmeal, quinoa, millet, or amaranth Baked sweet potato Items made with whole grains and no (or very little) added sugar Worst Choices Processed grains, such as white rice or white flour Cereals with little whole grains and lots of sugar White bread French fries Fried white-flour tortillas Vegetables Load up! You’ll get fiber and very little fat or salt (unless you add them). Remember, potatoes and corn count as carbs. Best Choices Fresh veggies, eaten raw or lightly steamed, roasted, or grilled Plain frozen vegetables, lightly steamed Greens such as kale, spinach, and arugula. Iceberg lettuce is not as great, because it’s low in nutrients. Low sodium or unsalted canned vegetables Go for a variety of colors: dark greens, red or orange (think of carrots or red peppers), whites (onions) and even purple (eggplants). The 2015 U.S. guidelines recommend 2.5 cups of veggies per day. Worst Choices Canned vegetables with lots of added sodium Veggies cooked with lots of added butter, cheese, or sauce Pickles, if you need to limit sodium -- otherwise, pickles are okay. Sauerkraut, for the same reason as pickles -- so, limit them if you have high blood pressure Fruits They give you carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Most are naturally low in fat and sodium. But they tend to have more carbs Continue reading >>

7 Of The Best Fruits For Diabetics (based On Sugar And Nutrients)

7 Of The Best Fruits For Diabetics (based On Sugar And Nutrients)

Fruits are the perfect snack. They are loaded with nutrients and fiber, relatively low in calories, and easy to bring to work. However, they do contain naturally occurring sugars, sometimes in large amounts. This can be a concern for those who struggle to manage their blood sugars. This article takes a science-based look at the most suitable fruits for diabetics. 1. Blueberries Blueberries are quite low in sugar, with 10 grams per 100 grams of fruit (1). But that sugar is also accompanied by 2 grams of fiber. This is important because when sugar and fiber are eaten together, blood sugar levels don’t spike as quickly (2, 3). It’s the reason 10 grams of sugar from fresh fruits will not have the same effect on blood sugar levels as 10 grams of sugar from a candy bar. In addition, blueberries provide loads of other beneficial nutrients and antioxidants that protect our cells from damage. Interestingly, a study on over 187,000 people tracked over two decades found those who ate the most blueberries had more than a 25% lower risk of getting diabetes than those who ate the fewest (4). Blueberries are great for a snack, and you can even enjoy them in salads. Although they can be particularly expensive, know that frozen blueberries are still nutritious and often much more affordable. 2. Strawberries Strawberries contain even less sugar than blueberries, with only 5 grams per 100 grams of fruit (5). This makes them a great choice for diabetics. They also provide fiber, manganese, folate, and a lot of vitamin C. In fact, 100 grams of strawberries (5-6 large strawberries) provides 98% of our daily vitamin C requirements. Strawberries are a great addition to breakfast foods like oats or yogurt, but they are also delicious on their own. 3. Blackberries Blackberries stand out as n Continue reading >>

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Figuring out the best foods to eat when you have diabetes can be tough. The main goal is to keep blood sugar levels well-controlled. However, it's also important to eat foods that help prevent diabetes complications like heart disease. Here are the 16 best foods for diabetics, both type 1 and type 2. Fatty fish is one of the healthiest foods on the planet. Salmon, sardines, herring, anchovies and mackerel are great sources of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, which have major benefits for heart health. Getting enough of these fats on a regular basis is especially important for diabetics, who have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke (1). DHA and EPA protect the cells that line your blood vessels, reduce markers of inflammation and improve the way your arteries function after eating (2, 3, 4, 5). A number of observational studies suggest that people who eat fatty fish regularly have a lower risk of heart failure and are less likely to die from heart disease (6, 7). In studies, older men and women who consumed fatty fish 5–7 days per week for 8 weeks had significant reductions in triglycerides and inflammatory markers (8, 9). Fish is also a great source of high-quality protein, which helps you feel full and increases your metabolic rate (10). Fatty fish contain omega-3 fats that reduce inflammation and other risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Leafy green vegetables are extremely nutritious and low in calories. They're also very low in digestible carbs, which raise your blood sugar levels. Spinach, kale and other leafy greens are good sources of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C. In one study, increasing vitamin C intake reduced inflammatory markers and fasting blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

15 Of The Best Foods For Diabetics, According To Science

15 Of The Best Foods For Diabetics, According To Science

High in soluble fiber, oats are slower to digest than processed carbs. Eat them and you’ll release glucose into the bloodstream more slowly, which will prevent spikes in your blood-sugar levels. In a 2012 study from Sweden’s Karolinska University, researchers found that eating four servings of whole grains daily reduced the risk for developing prediabetes by 30 percent. Other research shows that if you eat whole grains you experience less inflammation, which could lower the odds of your developing insulin resistance, heart disease, and high blood pressure. These science-backed strategies can work to reverse diabetes. This sweet seasoning contains a compound called hydroxychalcone, which may stimulate insulin receptors on cells and, in turn, improve your body’s ability to absorb blood sugar. Researchers from the University of California-Davis recently reviewed eight different studies on cinnamon and reported that about half to one teaspoon a day lowered fasting blood sugar levels by an average of nine points among people with diabetes. Sprinkle the fragrant spice onto oatmeal or add a dash to a cup of coffee. These myths about diabetes could be damaging your health. From Merrill Lynch Eating more whole fruits, particularly grapes, blueberries, and apples, was significantly associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a Harvard study published in the British Medical Journal in 2013. People who ate at least two servings each week of certain whole fruits reduced their risk for type 2 diabetes by as much as 23 percent when compared to those who ate less than one serving per month. Eating the whole fruit seems to be key, though; researchers found that fruit juice drinkers faced as much as a 21 percent increased risk of developing diabetes. Make sure to Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet