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Foods To Lower Blood Sugar

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

We wrote an article a while ago why sugar is bad for our health (here). But HFR is now taking it a step further and bringing you a list of foods that lower blood sugar and regulate your insulin levels! Sugar is bad for you not only because it is high in calories, but also because it spikes your blood sugar and your triglycerides, which is a risk factor for heart disease. Lima Beans: Are high in soluble fiber which slows digestion and prevents blood sugar from rising too quickly after you eat. Just don’t eat them raw because they are toxic uncooked. Oatmeal: is another super source of soluble fiber, which keeps blood sugar on an even keel and may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. Bitter Melon: This vegetable looks like a cucumber with warts, and it’s an Indian folk remedy for diabetes. As the name implies, bitter melon has a taste that’s a long way from sweet but it can be cooked or added to other dishes. In one study, supplements of bitter melon juice improved the glucose tolerance of 73% of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Peanuts: eat a handful of peanuts or a Peanut butter because the fat, fiber and protein in these nuts can stave off blood sugar spikes. A study found that women who ate peanut butter (or an ounce of nuts) five or more times a week lowered their risk of type 2 diabetes by nearly 30%. Just be mindful of portion control because peanuts are high in calories. Cabbage: is low in calories and high in fiber, with a glycemic index rating of near zero, meaning that it converts to sugar very slowly in the body. Vinegar: vinegar has long been used to cure a wide range of ailments. The acetic acid in vinegar (the compound that’s responsible for its tart taste and smell) helps stabilize blood sugar levels after eating. So pick salad dressings that have a v Continue reading >>

Exactly What I Ate To Get My Blood Sugar Under Control For Good

Exactly What I Ate To Get My Blood Sugar Under Control For Good

When Thomas Rupp was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, he was stunned. Despite having a challenging career (he was working in corporate finance and for FEMA), he managed to exercise regularly, and he rarely ate fast food or sweets. Sure, he weighed 245 pounds, but at 6 feet tall that didn't seem so terrible. He didn't consider that his weight pushed his BMI into the obese category—and he didn't realize that many of the "healthy" foods he was eating were actually loaded with tons of sugar and calories. Rupp's doctor started him on four different medications. The side effects were bothersome, but what really kicked him into gear was learning that he'd need to start injecting himself with insulin nightly. Instead, he turned to the Diabetes Reversal Program at Tufts Medical Center, where he met with the founding director, Michael Dansinger, MD. They worked together to closely examine Rupp's diet and uncover pitfalls that Rupp had trouble spotting on his own. (You can control your blood sugar with food and without insulin by making healthy lifestyle changes. Try the easy plan in The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes.) For instance, while adding some cream and sugar to a cup of coffee might not be a big deal for some people, Rupp often downed 10 cups of coffee a day to power himself through long days in the office. (Here are 8 physical signs you drink way too much coffee.) And he was putting cream and sugar in each cup. "That's 10 containers of cream and 10 teaspoons of sugar a day I was adding to my diet," he says. And even though he worked out, "I was drinking green juices at the gym, or protein smoothies with mango, once again without realizing the sugar content." Other seemingly healthy choices—like salads—also concealed stealth sugar bombs. "I would add vinaigrette dressi Continue reading >>

15 Easy Ways To Lower Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

15 Easy Ways To Lower Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

High blood sugar occurs when your body can't effectively transport sugar from blood into cells. When left unchecked, this can lead to diabetes. One study from 2012 reported that 12–14% of US adults had type 2 diabetes, while 37–38% were classified as pre-diabetic (1). This means that 50% of all US adults have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Here are 15 easy ways to lower blood sugar levels naturally: Regular exercise can help you lose weight and increase insulin sensitivity. Increased insulin sensitivity means your cells are better able to use the available sugar in your bloodstream. Exercise also helps your muscles use blood sugar for energy and muscle contraction. If you have problems with blood sugar control, you should routinely check your levels. This will help you learn how you respond to different activities and keep your blood sugar levels from getting either too high or too low (2). Good forms of exercise include weight lifting, brisk walking, running, biking, dancing, hiking, swimming and more. Exercise increases insulin sensitivity and helps your muscles pick up sugars from the blood. This can lead to reduced blood sugar levels. Your body breaks carbs down into sugars (mostly glucose), and then insulin moves the sugars into cells. When you eat too many carbs or have problems with insulin function, this process fails and blood glucose levels rise. However, there are several things you can do about this. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends controlling carb intake by counting carbs or using a food exchange system (3). Some studies find that these methods can also help you plan your meals appropriately, which may further improve blood sugar control (4, 5). Many studies also show that a low-carb diet helps reduce blood sugar levels and prevent blood s Continue reading >>

20 Foods That Lower Blood Pressure

20 Foods That Lower Blood Pressure

From long hours at the office to those little annoyances like traffic jams and the fact that The Chainsmokers won a Grammy, day-to-day life provides us a seemingly endless supply of little stresses. While those itty-bitty amounts of stress may seem like no big deal at first, over time, they can send your blood pressure skyrocketing, taking your health along for the ride. According to the CDC, a whopping 75 million Americans—that’s nearly 1/3 of the adult population—are struggling with high blood pressure, increasing their risk of heart attack, stroke, and other life-altering health consequences along the way. Skipping the salt and squeezing in some regular workouts can help keep your blood pressure from reaching dangerous levels, but it takes a more proactive approach to keep your blood pressure under control in the long run. While the words “blood pressure-lowering diet” may conjure images of unseasoned egg whites and limp steamed veggies, getting your blood pressure into a healthy range is more than just doable —it can be downright delicious. Start by adding the Eat This, Not That! approved list of blood pressure-lowering foods into your regular routine and watch your numbers go from scary to stellar in no time. And when you’re ready to lose weight and feel better, make the 30 Best Anti-Inflammatory Foods part of your better health arsenal! Don’t deprive yourself of your favorite sweet treats just because you’re trying to lower your blood pressure. Mangoes are a great source of both fiber and beta-carotene, both of which have been deemed effective at lowering blood pressure. In fact, research published in Hypertension Research suggests that adding beta-carotene-rich foods to your diet may be an effective way to lower blood pressure in no time. Not a Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Foods For Lowering Blood Sugar?

What Are The Best Foods For Lowering Blood Sugar?

Having a well-balanced diet including whole, less-processed foods with fiber is a good idea, says Holly Anderson, Outpatient Diabetes Coordinator at Reston Hospital Center. Watch this video to find out more. There aren't foods that directly lower blood sugar, but there are foods that prevent sharp rises in blood sugar, which can be dangerous. Watch endocrinologist Reza Yavari, MD, discuss the foods to avoid, and what to eat to keep blood sugars level. Low-carb foods can help keep blood sugar from rising. In this video, Ronald Tamler, MD, clinical director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes Center, explains that patients with diabetes should develop a diet plan with a nutritionist. No one food will help lower blood sugar readings. Foods that contain carbohydrate like fruits, starchy vegetables, grains, milk and yogurt will raise blood sugar readings. Carbohydrate containing foods that are higher in fiber or complex carbohydrate will slow down the absorption of carbohydrate into the blood stream; whereas simple carbohydrates like regular soda, sugar, honey, candy and syrup will raise blood sugar readings fairly quickly. Pass the peas, please. In a study, a diet high in lentils, nuts, peas, and other legumes seemed to be more helpful than a diet high in wheat fiber when it came to tamping down blood sugar. And, lucky for lovers of legumes, beans tend to have a low glycemic index -- meaning they are digested slowly by the body and have a stabilizing effect on blood sugar. So much so that when people with type 2 diabetes were told to emphasize legumes in their diet as part of a study, their average blood sugar over time was lower than that of the group who'd been directed to eat more whole grains. The difference was modest for the two study groups but was still significant enough t Continue reading >>

6 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar Naturally

6 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar Naturally

Blood sugar balance is an important aspect of your health, especially for people with diabetes, or a weight loss goal. If one of your goals is to maintain balanced blood sugar levels throughout the day, you also want to know which foods you can eat that can help prevent insulin, and blood sugar spikes. Even if you don’t have a weight loss goal, or a health complication like diabetes, you can still improve the overall function of all your body systems, for increased energy levels, and a feeling of vitality by avoiding blood sugar spikes during the day. When you allow your blood sugar to reach dizzying highs, and lows all day long, what happens (short-term) is that you notice more food cravings, inability to control your appetite, and usually lethargy, or a loss of both mental, and physical energy. The long-term effects of allowing yourself to experience bouts of ultra-high blood sugar, and then low’s is that you may develop lasting health problems like insulin sensitivity, leptin resistance, and even diabetes. Further, when you have a blood sugar spike, the elevated glucose content of your blood can cause your blood vessels to narrow, and over time, even harden which can increase your risk of a cardiovascular event. Here are 6 foods that can help to lower blood sugar, and cut your risk of health problems: 1. Fatty Fish This is one of the leanest meats you can find, so it is ideal as a menu item for those with weight loss goals. Additionally, fatty fish like salmon, sardines, herring, anchovies, and mackerel also contain omega-3 long-chain essential fatty acids including EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). These essential fatty acids have been shown to have numerous benefits to the body including lower inflammation, blood vessel protection, an Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: 7 Foods That Can Help Control Your Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

Diabetes Diet: 7 Foods That Can Help Control Your Blood Sugar Levels Naturally

Your diet plays an important role in managing diabetes. In fact, your diet and lifestyle are important aspects of diabetes management and treatment. One reason is that the food you eat on a day to day basis has a direct impact on your blood sugar levels. For instance, high carb foods raise your blood sugar levels. The digestive system breaks down the digestible ones into sugar, which enters the blood. But then again, not all carbohydrates are bad. Complex carbohydrates like whole grains take longer to digest while simple carbs like white flour and refined sugar may cause sudden spikes in your blood sugar levels. Diabetics tend to have high blood sugar levels due to the inefficiency of insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas, to control them. Here are six foods that can help in controlling your blood sugar levels naturally. 1. Barley A study done by Lund University in Sweden states that eating a special mixture of dietary fibres found in barley can help reduce your appetite as well as high blood sugar levels. "Whole grains like oats, brown rice or millets like jowar and ragi contain both soluble and insoluble fibre that helps with sugar control," shares Consultant Nutritionist Dr. Rupali Datta. The dietary fibers in whole grains can help control blood sugar. Photo Credit: Istock 2. Bananas Accordingly to a study done by the University College Dublin in Ireland, resistant starch found in foods such as bananas, potatoes, grains and legumes, may benefit your health by aiding blood sugar control, supporting gut health and enhancing satiety. This is a form of starch that is not digested in the small intestine and is, therefore, considered a type of dietary fiber. (Also read: Have You Been Eating Bananas With Milk?) Bananas contain resistant starch. Photo Credit: Istock 3. Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your A1c Levels: A Healthful Guide

How To Lower Your A1c Levels: A Healthful Guide

An A1C blood test measures average blood sugar levels over the past 2 to 3 months. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend the use of A1C tests to help diagnose cases of prediabetes, type 1, and type 2 diabetes. A1C tests are also used to monitor diabetes treatment plans. What is an A1C test? An A1C test measures how well the body is maintaining blood glucose levels. To do this, an A1C test averages the percentage of sugar-bound hemoglobin in a blood sample. When glucose enters the blood, it binds to a red blood cell protein called hemoglobin. The higher blood glucose levels are, the more hemoglobin is bound. Red blood cells live for around 4 months, so A1C results reflect long-term blood glucose levels. A1C tests are done using blood obtained by a finger prick or blood draw. Physicians will usually repeat A1C tests before diagnosing diabetes. Initial A1C tests help physicians work out an individual's baseline A1C level for later comparison. How often A1C tests are required after diagnosis varies depending on the type of diabetes and management factors. Lowering A1C levels Many studies have shown that lowering A1C levels can help reduce the risk or intensity of diabetes complications. With type 1 diabetes, more controlled blood glucose levels are associated with reduced rates of disease progression. With type 2 diabetes, more controlled A1C levels have also been shown to reduce symptoms affecting the small arteries and nerves in the body. This influences eyesight and pain while decreasing complications. Long-term studies have also shown that early and intensive blood glucose control can reduce cardiovascular complications in people with type 1 or 2 diabetes. Even small changes in A1C levels can have big effects. The ADA recommend that maintaining fair control Continue reading >>

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

If you get a high reading when checking your blood sugar, is there a way to get the number down quickly? Continue reading >>

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

For people with diabetes, balanced blood sugar levels are the holy grail. When blood sugar levels spike, diabetics need to lower their blood sugar. Certain foods and spices are known for their blood sugar balancing properties, and can be used to prevent raised blood sugar and to lower blood sugar.The good news is that it is simple to find these foods and simple to use them. Significance For diabetics, consuming the right kinds of food is critical to good health. Often, the need to maintain balanced blood sugar levels means that the person must make lifestyle changes. Food is at the center of these lifestyle changes. person with diabetes needs to avoid foods that are high in glucose or sugars, or foods that quickly convert to glucose, which obviously will raise blood sugar. Blood sugar control is a primary way to live a longer, healthier life. Function Foods that lower blood sugar levels should be integrated into a healthy diet as well as kept handy for times when blood sugar elevates. Most foods that lower blood sugar have fat content. According to WebMD, good fats lower insulin resistance. When cells are more sensitive to insulin, blood sugar levels drop. Certain nuts and avocados, by virtue of their fat content, make good snacks and the fat keeps hunger at bay. Other foods, such as sweet potatoes, cinnamon, onions and garlic are either high in fiber, high in antioxidants, or have properties that regulate healthy cholesterol. Healthy cholesterol is an element in diabetic health. Features Generally, it is advised to eat a high-fiber diet. Eat raw vegetables and fruits as well as fresh fruit and vegetable juices. Lemons are a healthy addition to meals. Lemons are rich in Vitamin C and their acidity helps to lower other foods' glycemic indexes. Oat and rice bran crackers Continue reading >>

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

Cut your risk of developing prediabetes by adding these delicious foods to your diet. Lima Beans Also known as butter beans because of their creamy texture, lima beans are high in soluble fiber. “Soluble fiber slows digestion and prevents blood sugar from rising too quickly after you eat,” says Angela Ginn-Meadow, R.D., a diabetes educator and spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. Best bet: Never eat raw lima beans—they contain a cyanide-like toxin that can make you sick. Other beans with lots of soluble fiber: Kidney, navy, black, pinto Try this: Choose fresh lima beans over frozen when you can, suggests Carol Hildebrand, coauthor of 500 Three-Ingredient Recipes. “Shell the beans, simmer them for about 25 minutes and drain. Then saute with chopped ham, diced red onion and a dash of red pepper or vinegar.” Oatmeal This chewy breakfast staple is another super source of soluble fiber, which keeps blood sugar on an even keel and may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes.Best bet: Make your oatmeal the old-fashioned way, using rolled or steel-cut oats. Instant oatmeal tends to be lower in fiber and flavored versions are high in sugar, says Ginn-Meadow. Other sources of soluble fiber: Ground psyllium seeds, Brussels sprouts, pears, oranges, grapefruit Try this: Add sauteed apples to your oatmeal, suggest Andrew Dornenburg and Karen Page, authors of The Flavor Bible. “Heat a little apple juice in a pan, add thinly sliced or diced peeled apples and cook on medium-high heat until soft.” Sprinkle with cinnamon and stir them into your oatmeal. Peanuts and Peanut Butter Whether you eat a handful of peanuts or a PBJ, the fat, fiber and protein in these nuts can stave off blood sugar spikes. And that’s not all—a study found that women who ate peanut butt Continue reading >>

These Foods Can Help Lower Blood Sugar

These Foods Can Help Lower Blood Sugar

Diet is an important part of diabetes therapy. In fact, dietary changes are usually among the first recommendations that doctors give newly diagnosed diabetics. This article discusses the most healthful foods for diabetics and also how these foods can help lower blood sugar levels and reduce the risk of diabetes complications. The right diet for diabetics must be rich in fruits, nuts, whole grains and vegetables. A diabetes diet or MNT (medical nutrition therapy) for diabetes should also be low in fats and calories even as it packs natural nutrients. The chief aim of a diabetes diet is to help control blood sugar levels. This is done to prevent large fluctuations in blood sugar levels and also to manage body weight more effectively. Therefore, the right diabetes diet should significantly lower blood sugar and reduce the risks of cardiovascular, kidney and related diseases associated with diabetes. A diabetes diet is not a restrictive diet. Rather, it is simply a selection of healthful foods that can help lower blood sugar levels and improve insulin sensitivity. This means that the foods that make up a diabetes diet are highly recommended for diabetics and non-diabetics alike. Nuts Nuts are excellent sources of essential nutrients like magnesium, potassium, phosphorus, copper, selenium, folate, vitamin E and vitamin B2. They are also rich in proteins, fibers and natural antioxidants. Antioxidants like vitamin E and selenium can protect the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas from oxidative destruction. However, the most important reason for including nuts in a diabetes diet is their low glycemic index. With their high-fiber content and low glycemic index, nuts can reduce insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes patients. In addition, nuts contain unsaturated fats, Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Can Help With Blood Sugar Control

10 Foods That Can Help With Blood Sugar Control

1 / 11 Your Diabetes Diet: What Foods Can Help Control Blood Sugar? While medication, sleep, stress, and time of day can all play a role in diabetes management, experts agree that diet is one of the most important factors to keep in mind. That’s because specific food choices can have a direct effect on your blood sugar levels, says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, the coauthor of Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies and the founder of Diabetes EveryDay, of Hilton Head, South Carolina. Inattention to what you decide to nourish yourself with can lead to serious consequences, like an increased risk of vision problems, nerve damage, amputations, and even death. "Managing blood glucose levels is key to preventing future complications," Smithson says. The reason why people with diabetes develop excess amounts of sugar in their blood is insulin resistance, the hallmark of the disease. Insulin resistance is the inability of the hormone insulin to effectively transport glucose, or blood sugar, to the body’s cells to be used for energy or stored as fuel for future use. When sugar can’t reach the body’s cells it accumulates in the blood, potentially leading to the aforementioned complications. Regularly checking your blood sugar is one of the best ways to ensure it stays controlled, according to the Mayo Clinic. You can use a glucose meter to self-monitor your levels and observe what impact different factors — like exercise, stress, and food choices — may have. To figure out when and how often to check your blood sugar, consult your primary care provider, because these recommendations tend to vary based on the type of diabetes you have and your individual health profile. While everybody’s goal may be different, there are certain kinds of foods experts agree are g Continue reading >>

The Top 20 Foods For Beating Diabetes

The Top 20 Foods For Beating Diabetes

Every time you roll your shopping cart into the supermarket, you’re making a decision that goes far beyond whether you’re going to have pork or pierogies for dinner. You’re actually choosing between being a victim and a victor. What you put in your cart goes a long way toward determining whether you’ll be compromised by diabetes or start controlling and eventually even beating it. That’s why we’ve assembled the following list of the 20 best foods for fighting diabetes. Every time you go to the store from now on, take this list with you and check off each item. In fact, if your favourite store has a delivery service, sign up for it so your supplies are automatically replenished every few weeks. Research proves that making a few key changes to your diet such as eating more produce, fewer refined carbohydrates, plenty of lean protein, and more ‘good’ fat’helps improve blood-sugar control and cuts the risk of diabetes-related complications. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that one or two or even five foods on this list will transform you. You need most of them, yes, even the flaxseed, because together they represent a new approach to eating, a lifestyle rather than just a diet. 1. Apples Because they offer so many health advantages, put these at the core of your diet. Apples are naturally low in calories, yet their high fibre content (4 grams) fills you up, battles bad cholesterol, and blunts blood-sugar swings. Red Delicious and Granny Smith are also among the top 10 fruits with the most disease-fighting antioxidants. Eat them whole and unpeeled for the greatest benefit, or make a quick ‘baked’ apple. After washing and chopping one apple, put it in a bowl with a dusting of cinnamon and microwave until soft (about 4 minutes). Enjoy with yogourt an Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

While a low carb diet appears to be useful on the whole, there are also many foods shown to help. Either by lowering blood sugars and/or improving insulin sensitivity. This articles looks at 10 of the best foods and supplements for lowering blood sugars, based on current research. Just know they should never be used in place of your diabetes medication, but rather alongside. 1. Resistant Starch Lowers Sugars After Meals Starches are long chains of glucose (sugar) found in oats, grains, bananas, potatoes and various other foods. Some varieties pass through digestion unchanged and are not absorbed as sugar into the blood. These are known as resistant starch. Many studies show resistant starch can greatly improve insulin sensitivity. That is, how well the body can move sugar out of the blood and into cells for energy. This is why it’s so useful for lowering blood sugar levels after meals (1, 2). The effect is so great that having resistant starch at lunch will reduce blood sugar spikes at dinner, known as the “second meal effect” (3). Problem is many foods high in resistant starch, such as potatoes, are also high in digestible carbs that can spike blood sugar. Therefore resistant starch in supplement form – without the extra carbs – is recommended. Summary: Supplemental resistant starch is a fantastic option for those struggling to control sugars or have hit a plateau. 2. Ceylon Cinnamon Several cinnamon compounds appear to prevent the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream, minimising blood sugar spikes. It may also dramatically improve insulin sensitivity (4, 5). In a recent clinical trial, 25 poorly-controlled type 2 diabetics received either 1 gram per day of cinnamon or placebo (dummy supplement) for 12 weeks. Fasting blood sugar levels in the cinnamon gro Continue reading >>

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