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Foods To Eat When Taking Metformin For Weight Loss

Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic Syndrome

What is metabolic syndrome? This pattern, sometimes called syndrome X, metabolic disease, insulin resistance syndrome or dysmetabolic syndrome, is a collection of conditions that when taken together dramatically increases the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. A diagnosis of metabolic syndrome is made if a person has any three of the following risk factors: Waist circumference: at least 35 inches for women and at least 40 inches for men. Fasting blood glucose at least 100 mg/dL Serum triglycerides at least 150 mg/dL Blood pressure at least 135/85mmHg HDL (“good”) cholesterol lower than 40 mg/dL for men or 50 mg/dL for women Metabolic Syndrome appears to affect between 25 and 30 percent of the U.S. population according to various national health surveys. In fact, the number of people with metabolic syndrome seems to increase as we get older, affecting four in 10 Americans as they reach their 60s and 70s. What are the symptoms of metabolic syndrome? Usually, there are no immediate physical symptoms of metabolic syndrome. People with metabolic syndrome do have a tendency to be overweight, especially around the abdomen – having an “apple shape.” Moreover, since this condition is associated with insulin resistance, individuals with metabolic syndrome may display some of the clinical features associated with an increase in the production of insulin. For instance, women may experience cysts on their ovaries (metabolic syndrome is associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome) and irregular periods. Individuals can have an increased incidence of skin tags, benign raised growths of skin that usually appear increases on the neck and back. In addition, they can exhibit acanthosis nigricans – a pigmentation of the skin, which appears discolored or dirty over the Continue reading >>

Can You Take Metformin For Weight Loss? A Look At The Numbers

Can You Take Metformin For Weight Loss? A Look At The Numbers

Metformin is a medication said to cause weight loss, but is it true? Should you be worried if you are underweight, or should you use it if you want a slimmer waistline? This article takes a looks at the current evidence and if you can take metformin for weight loss. What is Metformin? Metformin belongs to the class of medications called “oral hypoglycemics.” This means it’s taken by mouth to help reduce blood sugar (glucose) levels. For this reason, metformin is commonly used for the management of type 2 diabetes. How Does Metformin Work? The way metformin works isn’t fully understood yet. However, what is known is that it reduces the production of sugar by liver cells (1). Metformin also improves insulin sensitivity and influences the bacterial community in the gut. It may have anti-inflammatory effects that could be beneficial for metabolic health too (2, 3). Metformin may also cause weight loss by reducing food intake and blocking gastrointestinal absorption of glucose, at least in theory (4). Summary: Commonly prescribed for type 2 diabetes, metformin is a medication that influences the metabolism and absorption of sugar. What is Metformin Used For? Metformin has been approved for treating type 2 diabetes. This medication is also sometimes prescribed for the following: Research continues on other uses for metformin including: Anti-aging or anti-cancer effects (8) Helping manage type 1 diabetes (9) Reducing the risk of heart disease (10). Summary: Metformin has been approved for the management of type 2 diabetes. It is sometimes prescribed for other conditions that involve abnormal blood sugar, such as diabetes during pregnancy. Can You Take Metformin For Weight Loss? Metformin helps manage type 2 diabetes, a health condition associated with being overweight. Continue reading >>

Metformin And Type 1 Diabetes – An Experiment

Metformin And Type 1 Diabetes – An Experiment

Metformin is not usually prescribed for Type 1 diabetes, but over the past couple years, inspired in part by Mike’s experience on it (see here, here, here and here), I’ve become interested in trying it. Not only has it been in widespread use as a treatment for Type 2 diabetes since its approval in 1994, but it’s currently being investigated for potential cognitive and anti-cancer benefits as well. As Mike has asked, “Could metformin be the new aspirin?” The typical explanation for why metformin is not prescribed to people with Type 1 diabetes is that metformin increases your insulin sensitivity — and given that, by definition, people with Type 1 don’t make any insulin, it won’t help them. But I see two obvious holes in that logic. First, people with Type 1 diabetes do have insulin in their bodies; it’s just administered in a different way (i.e. injected subcutaneously, rather than secreted by the pancreas). And as anyone who’s struggled with the dawn phenomenon knows, people with Type 1 diabetes experience insulin resistance, too. And second, metformin does more than just affect insulin sensitivity. It also appears to regulate the genes responsible for causing the liver to release glucose into your blood. As you may know, your pancreas and your liver work closely together to maintain a proper level of glucose in the blood. When you’ve got a lot of glucose in your blood, your pancreas secretes insulin to remove it (provided you don’t have Type 1 diabetes!). And when you don’t have sufficient external glucose – like when you’re sleeping — your liver releases some stored glucose so that your blood sugar does not drop too low. To put this a different way, insulin is what keeps a non-diabetic person’s blood glucose from getting too high; the Continue reading >>

Metformin And Low Carb Diet Information

Metformin And Low Carb Diet Information

Thing, prevents trips to the emergency room for evaluation and treatment by a qualified medical practitioner if in doubt we would suggest you to consult. Water metformin and low carb diet right before or any heart disease risk factors like high blood. Pregnancy breast, feeding, pictures of metformin do not use panax ginseng if you are undergoing. Members business if training day with recommended low can be difficult, especially metformin and low carb diet for those who really do want to be lose 45. Instructions raspberry ketone pills and have decided to get off your doing the little things that will cause a false. Absence vitamin b12 deficiency, especially if they are diabetic. Years lifestyle and undergo regular exercise and a calorie deficient diet and can be a good. Japonica, kombu is rich in omega, fatty acid metformin and victoza products that come from fruits and vegetables that you make at home and once. Healthy tasty recipes best fat burners. Dosage depend on factors like diet, exercise and reducing your calories intake can have a favourable effect on metformin, induced lactic acidosis, especially in people. Widespread effective supplement at the retail stores and online shops and choose the metformin side effects pcos weight loss best. Burma, malaysia, thailand and other countries. Eating finally found doctor who had history of gestational diabetes mellitus, and a number of herbs and nutrients that support the findings of this study. Cross, comparative bioavailability is metformin safe while breastfeeding times daily and glipizide 27 mg last week, but i got really fed up overweight and want. Users achieve better results by using apple cider metformin doses vinegar. National garcinia cambogia extract and also changed my diet to make sure that you are prescribed. Continue reading >>

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

As a type 2 diabetic, you've probably heard of Metformin, or you might even be taking it yourself. Metformin (brand name “Glucophage” aka “glucose-eater”) is the most commonly prescribed medication for type 2 diabetes worldwide…and for good reason. It is one of the safest, most effective, least costly medication available with minimal, if any, side effects. There are always lots of questions around Metformin – how does metformin lower blood sugar, does metformin promote weight loss or weight gain, will it give me side effects – and lots more. Today we'll hopefully answer some of those questions. How Metformin Works Metformin belongs to a class of medications known as “Biguanides,” which lower blood glucose by decreasing the amount of sugar put out by the liver. The liver normally produces glucose throughout the day in conjunction with the pancreas’ production of insulin to maintain stable blood sugar. In many people with diabetes, both mechanisms are altered in that the pancreas puts out less insulin while the liver is unable to shut down production of excess glucose. This means your body is putting out as much as 3 times as much sugar than that of nondiabetic individuals, resulting in high levels of glucose in the bloodstream. Metformin effectively shuts down this excess production resulting in less insulin required. As a result, less sugar is available for absorption by the muscles and conversion to fat. Additionally, a lower need for insulin slows the progression of insulin resistance and keeps cells sensitive to endogenous insulin (that made by the body). Since metformin doesn’t cause the body to generate more insulin, it does not cause hypoglycemia unless combined with a sulfonylurea or insulin injection. Metformin is one of the few oral diabe Continue reading >>

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Your Game Plan To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes prevention is proven, possible, and powerful. Taking small steps, such as eating less and moving more to lose weight, can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and related health problems. The information below is based on the NIH-sponsored Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) research study, which showed that people could prevent or delay type 2 diabetes even if they were at high risk for the disease. Follow these steps to get started on your game plan. If you are overweight, set a weight-loss goal that you can reach. Try to lose at least 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, a 10-percent weight-loss goal means that you will try to lose 20 pounds. Research shows that you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being more active each day. Find ways to be active every day. Start slowly and add more activity until you get to at least 30 minutes of physical activity, like a brisk walk, 5 days a week. Keep track of your progress to help you reach your goals. Use your phone, a printed log, online tracker, app, or other device to record your weight, what you eat and drink, and how long you are active. Ask your health care team about steps you can take to prevent type 2 diabetes. Learn about other ways to help reach your goal, such as taking the medicine metformin. Also, ask if your health insurance covers services for weight loss or physical activity. It’s not easy to make and stick to lifelong changes in what you eat and how often you are active. Get your friends and family involved by asking them to support your changes. You can also join a diabetes prevention program to meet other people who are making similar changes. Set a weight-loss goal If you are ov Continue reading >>

Metformin Decreases Food Consumption And Induces Weight Loss In Subjects With Obesity With Type Ii Non-insulin-dependent Diabetes.

Metformin Decreases Food Consumption And Induces Weight Loss In Subjects With Obesity With Type Ii Non-insulin-dependent Diabetes.

Abstract Metformin often promotes weight loss in patients with obesity with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The mechanism may be attributed to decreased food intake. This study has tested the effect of metformin on satiety and its efficacy in inducing weight loss. Twelve diet-treated NIDDM women with obesity were randomly given two dose levels (850 mg or 1700 mg) of metformin or placebo at 0800 for three consecutive days followed by a meal test on the third day on three occasions using a 3x3 Latin square design. The number of sandwich canapes eaten in three consecutive 10-minute periods beginning at 1400 hours was used to quantitate food intake, and the level of subjective hunger was rated just before the sandwich meal with a linear analogue hunger rating scale at 1400 after a 6-hour fast. The prior administration of metformin produced a reduction in calorie intake after each of the two doses of metformin treatment. The 1700-mg metformin dose had the most marked appetite suppressant action. Similarly, hunger ratings were significantly lowered after metformin, and the effect was most pronounced after the administration of 1700 mg of metformin. To assess the efficacy of metformin in reducing bodyweight, 48 diet-treated NIDDM women with obesity who had failed to lose weight by diet therapy were first placed on a 1200-kcal ADA (American Diabetes Association) diet before being randomized to receive either metformin (850 mg) or placebo twice daily in a double-blind fashion for 24 weeks. A 4-week single-blind placebo lead-in period preceded and a 6-week single-blind placebo period followed the 24-week double-blind treatment period. Subjects treated with metformin continued to lose weight throughout 24 weeks of treatment; their mean maximum weight loss was 8 kg Continue reading >>

Timing Your Metformin Dose

Timing Your Metformin Dose

The biggest problem many people have with Metformin is that it causes such misery when it hits their stomachs that they can't keep taking it even though they know it is the safest and most effective of all the oral diabetes drugs. In many cases all that is needed is some patience. After a rocky first few days many people's bodies calm down and metformin becomes quite tolerable. If you are taking the regular form of Metformin with meals and still having serious stomach issues after a week of taking metformin, ask your doctor to prescribe the extended release form--metformin ER or Glucophage XR. The extended release form is much gentler in its action. If that still doesn't solve your problem, there is one last strategy that quite a few of us have found helpful. It is to take your metformin later in the day, after you have eaten a meal or two. My experience with metformin--and this has been confirmed by other people--is that it can irritate an empty stomach, but if you take it when the stomach contains food it will behave. There are some drugs where it matters greatly what time of day you take the drug. Metformin in its extended release form is not one of them. As the name suggests, the ER version of the pill slowly releases the drug into your body over a period that, from my observations, appears to last 8 to 12 hours. Though it is supposed to release over a full 24 hours, this does not appear to be the case, at least not with the generic forms my insurer will pay for. Because there seems to be a span of hours when these extended release forms of metformin release the most drug into your blood stream, when you take your dose may affect how much impact the drug has on your blood sugars after meals or when you wake up. For example, the version I take, made by Teva, releases Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Common questions about type 2 diabetes: How do you treat type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, you first need to eat a healthy diet, stay physically active and lose any extra weight. If these lifestyle changes cannot control your blood sugar, you also may need to take pills and other injected medication, including insulin. Eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing any extra weight is the first line of therapy. “Diet and exercise“ is the foundation of all diabetes management because it makes your body’s cells respond better to insulin (in other words, it decreases insulin resistance) and lowers blood sugar levels. If you cannot normalize or control the blood sugars with diet, weight loss and exercise, the next treatment phase is taking medicine either orally or by injection. Diabetes pills work in different ways – some lower insulin resistance, others slow the digestion of food or increase insulin levels in the blood stream. The non-insulin injected medications for type 2 diabetes have a complicated action but basically lower blood glucose after eating. Insulin therapy simply increases insulin in the circulation. Don’t be surprised if you have to use multiple medications to control the blood sugar. Multiple medications, also known as combination therapy is common in the treatment of diabetes! If one medication is not enough, you medical provider may give you two or three or more different types of pills. Insulin or other injected medications also may be prescribed. Or, depending on your medical condition, you may be treated only with insulin or injected medication therapy. Many people with type 2 diabetes have elevated blood fats (high triglycerides and cholesterol) and blood pressure, so you may be given medications for these problem Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Diet For Pcos?

What Is The Best Diet For Pcos?

There is a lot of confusing and complicated information on the internet about PCOS diets. I spent the weekend writing this huge blog post to answer the most common Polycystic Ovary Syndrome nutrition questions in plain language. If you are looking for a way to start changing your nutrition now, sign up here to get my PCOS Plate sent to your inbox. The PCOS Plate is my simple guide to eating a nutritious PCOS diet, one meal at a time. Ok, so I think when most of you ask this question, you’re looking for a one-word answer like Paleo, Atkins, Ketogenic or ‘count calories.’ I’m not going to give you that type of answer! When it comes to PCOS diets, I’m agnostic. I notice that people tend to cling to trendy nutrition fads like they’ve just joined a cult. They find the typically incomplete logic of the new plan flawless and are instantly devoted to its tenets. The problem with this strict adherence is that you eventually burn out or become disillusioned when you do not see the promised results — and you quit. The End of Dieting Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome need to move away from the diet mentality and start heading toward a lifestyle. You need to gradually start eating in a way that improves your health and never stop doing so. “Yeah, ok Erika, but what’s healthy for women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome?” Science has not provided us with the perfect PCOS diet that will solve all of our problems, but we do know a few things for sure. Women living with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome become healthier when: They eat enough protein to promote muscle growth and repair. They meet their vitamin and mineral needs by eating plenty of whole, unrefined ingredients. They eat a lower calorie diet when they need to lose weight. They reduce their intake of refined, hig Continue reading >>

What Should I Eat If I Have Diabetes?

What Should I Eat If I Have Diabetes?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Friday, it's Dr. Melina Jampolis, a physician nutrition specialist. Question asked by Barbara Ray of Las Vegas, Nevada I am type 2 diabetic trying to create a daily diet, and snacks, food program that I can use to prevent getting the terrible sick feeling that comes when my sugar goes too low. I would like to store these foods and snacks in my home so that I can reach them when necessary. Please name the foods, and snacks, as well as the proper times to consume them. Also when is the time to take Metformin even if your readings are regular and you feel OK? Thank you for your answer to these questions. Expert answer Hi, Barbara. To prevent hypoglycemia and to minimize the complications associated with diabetes including heart disease, kidney disease, eye problems and infection, it is important to keep blood sugar levels as steady as possible throughout the day. To accomplish this, I recommend trying to combine some type of lean protein (skinless chicken, fish, turkey, lean ground beef, beans, egg whites, low-fat cottage cheese or yogurt) or healthy fat (olive oil, canola oil, nuts, seeds, avocado) with a healthy carbohydrate with each meal or snack. Make sure to choose healthy, low-sugar, antioxidant-rich carbohydrates like whole grains (brown rice, whole-wheat pasta, whole-grain bread, cereal, crackers, quinoa, barley), whole fruit (not juice or dried fruit) and vegetables. These types of carbohydrates are generally low-glycemic, which means they increase blood sugar less rapidly than highly processed, refined, sugar-filled carbohydrates. Naturally high-fiber foods are always a good choice as they slow the emptying of food from your stomach, which helps improve blood sugar control. By preventing spik Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Can Metformin Help With Weight Loss?

Metformin is a drug prescribed to manage blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. You may have heard that metformin can also help you lose weight. But is it true? The answer is a resounding maybe. Here’s what you should know about what metformin can do for weight loss, as well as why your doctor may prescribe it for you. According to research, metformin can help some people lose weight. However, it’s not clear why metformin may cause weight loss. One theory is that it may prompt you to eat less by reducing your appetite. It may also change the way your body uses and stores fat. Although studies have shown that metformin may help with weight loss, the drug is not a quick-fix solution. According to one long-term study, the weight loss from metformin tends to occur gradually over one to two years. The amount of weight lost also varies from person to person. In the study, the average amount of weight lost after two or more years was four to seven pounds. Taking the drug without following other healthy habits may not lead to weight loss. Individuals who follow a healthy diet and exercise while taking metformin tend to lose the most weight. This may be because metformin is thought to boost how many calories you burn during exercise. If you don’t exercise, you likely won’t have this benefit. In addition, any weight loss you have may only last as long as you take the medication. That means if you stop taking metformin, there’s a good chance you will return to your original weight. And even while you’re still taking the drug, you may slowly gain back any weight you’ve lost. In other words, metformin may not be the magic diet pill some people have been waiting for. It has been shown to reduce weight in some, but not others. One of the benefits of metformin Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight With Pcos: 21 Proven Weight Loss Tips

How To Lose Weight With Pcos: 21 Proven Weight Loss Tips

How to lose weight with PCOS? This is a common question for women with PCOS. If you struggle with your weight, you are not alone; 60% of American women are either overweight or obese. However, losing weight can be especially difficult for women with polycystic ovarian syndrome, or PCOS. Why Is It So Hard to Lose Weight with PCOS? Women with PCOS usually have two major issues that make it hard to lose weight: abnormally high levels of androgens, or male hormones, and insulin resistance. However, it is very important for women with this syndrome to achieve a healthy weight, as this reduces the severity of PCOS symptoms. In addition, women with PCOS are at higher risk of developing serious health problems that are exacerbated by extra pounds, such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes. While losing weight is difficult for women with this syndrome, it is very important to lifelong health and improvement of fertility issues. How to Lose Weight with PCOS Losing weight with PCOS requires a multi-pronged approach. Not only do women need to eat fewer calories and exercise more often, they also need to control insulin and blood sugar levels while maintaining healthy hormone levels. These goals can be achieved with the following 21 tips. 1. Decide on an appropriate calorie goal and stick to it. Depending on your weight and activity level, you will need to eat 1200-2000 calories a day to lose weight. You may want to discuss your calorie goal with your physician, as it is not healthy to eat too few calories. Once you have set your goal, begin tracking your calories. Many people unknowingly eat many more calories than they realize. A food journal will help you to understand and overcome your weaknesses. Write down everything that you eat or drink along with their calorie content. This Continue reading >>

Help Patients Lose Weight

Help Patients Lose Weight

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 16 No. 8 P. 14 Making adjustments to medications in accordance with eating and exercise habits is key. Jack, a middle-aged man with type 1 diabetes, started a low-carbohydrate diet to lose weight. In the first few days of his new diet, he experienced the shaking, sweating, and mild confusion that frequently accompanies hypoglycemia, which is typically defined as blood glucose levels less than 70 mg/dL. Jack didn’t know that by consuming less carbohydrate than usual, he’d need to take less insulin. Maura, a woman in her early 30s with type 2 diabetes, takes glyburide to control her blood glucose levels. She began an exercise program to lose weight in preparation for her sister’s wedding. Three weeks into the program, she started experiencing hypoglycemia. To avoid this, she began eating a carbohydrate-containing snack before and after each workout. The calories from her snacks, however, exceeded the calories burned during exercise, so her weight slowly increased. She considered giving up exercise. Maura’s friend Lisa also has type 2 diabetes but controls her blood glucose with metformin. Maura advised Lisa to eat a large carbohydrate-containing snack before exercise, so she did. Weight-Loss Concerns Losing weight and keeping it off is difficult for most people, but those with diabetes of any type have additional challenges. They need to consider how changing their eating and activity habits may affect their blood glucose levels, explains Patti Urbanski, MEd, RD, LD, CDE, one of the authors of the recent American Diabetes Association nutrition position statement and a diabetes educator on the Fond du Lac Reservation in Cloquet, Minnesota. Insulin and medications that increase insulin levels in the blood raise the risk of hypoglycemia (see Continue reading >>

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