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Foods To Avoid With Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Easy Ways To Lower Cholesterol And Reduce Blood Pressure

Easy Ways To Lower Cholesterol And Reduce Blood Pressure

6 tips for getting your heart in shape from an NFL nutritionist. You might think you don’t have much in common with professional football players, but it when it comes keeping your heart healthy, you’d be smart to follow the same advice that Leslie Bonci, R.D., nutritionist for the Pittsburgh Steelers, gives the team. These heart-healthy “plays” can help you lower your cholesterol, reduce your blood pressure and improve your overall health. 1. Get Trim Steelers backup quarterback Charlie Batch dropped 12 pounds and reduced his total cholesterol about 20 percent between the end of one season and the start of the next. (Major diet changes: making better choices when eating out; swapping wine in place of apple martinis, sugar free Jell-O for gummy worms and popcorn for Doritos.) Losing as little as 5 to 10 percent of your body weight can result in better blood pressure, lower risk for diabetes and improved cholesterol levels, according to various research studies. When Pittsburgh Steeler Casey Hampton (a.k.a. “Big Snack”) arrived at training camp a few years ago too heavy to play, team nutritionist Leslie Bonci worked with the team’s chef to create meals designed to slash Hampton’s intake of calories and saturated fats, which can elevate “bad” LDL cholesterol, leading to plaque buildup in arteries. In place of fried chicken wings, Bonci gave Hampton grilled chicken strips with low-fat dipping sauces. Other ways to reduce saturated fat: replace butter with olive and canola oils, which contain good amounts of heart healthy monounsaturated fats; choose lean meats, poultry, fish and beans instead of higher fat meats; select nonfat or low-fat milk and yogurt in place of whole-milk versions; eat full-fat cheeses sparingly. Avoid trans fats, which also increas Continue reading >>

28 Foods That Help Lower Blood Pressure To Normal Levels

28 Foods That Help Lower Blood Pressure To Normal Levels

There are certain foods that lower blood pressure to help you reduce how much medication you’re taking, or perhaps allow you to wean yourself off of it entirely. If you’re just trying to prevent your blood pressure from reaching a dangerous high, you can start incorporating more of these foods into your diet starting today. Some of them are pretty common, while others might require seeking them out and adding them to your cart the next time you’re out shopping. These should be consumed as part of a comprehensive approach including increased exercise and other lifestyle changes. Peas – More peas please! They can help you stave off high blood pressure due to the vegetable protein they contain, as well as other vitamins and folic acid for overall cardiovascular support to your system. The best part is they taste amazing, especially if you buy fresh, organic peas. You can also find organic frozen varieties, and these typically only cost a bit more than the conventional kind. The flavor difference is noticeable, as conventional peas tend to absorb plenty of chemicals. Baked Potato – Those on a low-carb diet are probably avoiding potatoes, and they’ve had trouble losing their starchy food image, but more and more evidence is pointing to them actually being good for you, in reasonable amounts. One of the benefits they may provide is through the kukoamine they contain. It’s not clear whether a single serving of it provides enough to lower your blood pressure, but adding these spuds to your plate seems to be worth it. You can also cook them in other ways too and still enjoy the benefits. Celery – Celery helps your heart and your veins function better, which has the trickle down effect of keep your blood pressure levels in check. It is thought that by helping to b Continue reading >>

Shopping List For Diabetics

Shopping List For Diabetics

Control Type 2 Diabetes, Shed Fat Our Shopping List for Diabetics is based on the Pritikin Eating Plan, regarded worldwide as among the healthiest diets on earth. The Pritikin Program has been documented in more than 100 studies in peer-reviewed medical journals to prevent and control many of our nation’s leading killers – heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and obesity as well as type 2 diabetes. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, pay special attention. Research on newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics coming to the Pritikin Longevity Center illustrate how profoundly beneficial early intervention can be. Scientists from UCLA followed 243 people in the early stages of diabetes (not yet on medications). Within three weeks of coming to Pritikin, their fasting blood sugar (glucose) plummeted on average from 160 to 124. Research has also found that the Pritikin Program reduces fasting insulin by 25 to 40%. Shopping List for Diabetics – More Features Here’s another big plus to our Shopping List for Diabetics. In addition to icons that are diabetes-focused like “sugar free,” this list uses icons like “low cholesterol” and “low sodium” because many people with diabetes are working to control not just diabetes but related conditions like high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. This list can help you identify those foods most advantageous in helping you reach your personal health goals. Diabetic Food Taboos? Not Anymore! Have you been told you have to give up juicy watermelon or sweet grapes? What if we told you those foods really aren’t taboo? Watch the Video Our Healthy Shopping List for Diabetics also lists the top 10 things to put back on the shelf if you’re trying to: Lose Weight Lower Blood Pres Continue reading >>

8 Foods That Help Lower High Blood Pressure

8 Foods That Help Lower High Blood Pressure

These tasty spuds are rich in magnesium and potassium, two nutrients that are an important part of the DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, or high blood pressure). A potassium-rich diet helps the body become more efficient at flushing out excess sodium, which can raise blood pressure; and magnesium helps promote healthy blood flow, according to nutritionist Joy Bauer. Skim Milk A cold glass of milk offers a solid serving of both calcium and vitamin D, nutrients that work as a team to help lower blood pressure by 3 to 10 percent, according to Bauer’s website. Those numbers may not sound impressive, but they could translate to a 15 percent reduction in heart disease risk, she added. Other research suggests that people with low levels of calcium are at greater risk of high blood pressure. Livingly Eggs If you think eggs are not heart healthy, you should know that past studies have shown that yolks don’t raise heart disease risk; now recent research has found that egg whites can help dial down blood pressure, according to a study presented earlier this year at a meeting of the American Chemical Society. As MensHealth.com reported, when rats with high blood pressure were fed a protein found in egg whites, they experienced a drop in blood pressure that was comparable to a low dose of Captopril, a blood-pressure-lowering medication. Although more research is needed, eggs are a solid source of protein, vitamin D, and other healthy nutrients. Broccoli iStockphoto/Thinkstock This cruciferous veggie is a good source of the blood pressure-regulating minerals magnesium, calcium, and potassium. Previous research in animals has found that a diet high in broccoli sprouts may help reduce blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and stroke. Broccoli sprouts are high in Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Blood Pressure

How To Lower Your Blood Pressure

Healthy eating, physical activity, managing weight and stress, and taking your medications as prescribed can all help you to control your blood pressure. Healthy eating Healthy eating plays an important role in managing blood pressure. It is important to reduce your salt intake. Try these healthy eating tips: Choose vegetables and fruits more often (fresh or frozen without added salt). Choose low-fat (one per cent or skim) dairy products. Choose legumes (dried beans, peas and lentils) more often. Rinse canned beans with water. Choose whole grains such as whole wheat breads, cereal, pasta and brown rice. Eat fish at least twice a week (fresh, frozen or canned without added salt). Choose lean meats and poultry without added salt. Limit processed, smoked and cured foods. Look for unsalted or ‘no added salt’ items (e.g. crackers, nuts). Avoid using salt at the table and in cooking. Avoid seasonings that contain the word ‘salt’ or ‘sodium’, such as garlic salt, celery salt, Kosher salt, sea salt or monosodium glutamate (MSG). Flavour your foods with herbs, spices, fresh garlic, garlic powder, onion powder, lemon or vinegars. Limit frozen convenience foods and fast food restaurant meals. With time, your taste buds will adjust to the natural flavours of food without added salt. Talk to a registered dietitian to learn more about healthy eating. Physical activity Build physical activity into your day. Regular physical activity can improve blood pressure and heart health. Check with your health-care team about the exercise routine that is suitable for you. Both aerobic and resistance exercises are recommended for people with diabetes. Be a non-smoker Smoking affects blood pressure in two ways: Nicotine in cigarette smoke causes blood vessels to narrow, which increases Continue reading >>

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, you’ve probably already started counting carbs and exercising more to keep your blood sugar stable. But you may be neglecting another, often silent problem that can go hand-in-hand with diabetes: high blood pressure. Also known as hypertension, the condition occurs in as many as two-thirds of people with diabetes. If you have both conditions and either is out of control, your risk of blood vessel damage increases, heightening the likelihood of complications like heart attack, stroke or kidney failure. If both conditions are unmanaged, the risk is even greater. Here are six suggestions to help keep your blood pressure in check. RELATED: Have Diabetes? Why You Need to Know Your Blood Pressure Numbers 1. Get up and move Exercise is an important part of any healthy lifestyle. It strengthens the heart and makes it pump more efficiently, so it is particularly critical if you have hypertension. To improve cardiovascular health and maintain your weight, try to get 150 minutes each week of aerobic activity. You want to spread this over at least three days, with no more than two consecutive days without exercise. This can include walking, cycling and swimming. 2. Eat fresh, natural foods If you find yourself struggling to figure out which foods in the grocery aisles have too much sodium, here’s a good tip to follow: Food in its natural state is best. Skip over processed foods and opt for fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and lean meats. 3. Reduce salt If you are planning to start a low-sodium diet (no more than 1,500 mg per day), the first step is to get rid of the salt shaker. In its place, use salt-free herbs, spices and other seasonings. It’s also important to watch for hidden sodium in the foods you eat. The following items are typically hi Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetic Foods To Avoid

Top 10 Diabetic Foods To Avoid

If you can work on removing these ‘foods to avoid' out of your diabetic diet, you will find that great things will happen to your blood sugar, A1C, and overall health, too! 1. Soda Soda, also known as sugar sweetened beverages, has been a topic of debate for some time now. Researchers and health experts alike questioning: do they contribute to obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other metabolic problems? The answer is a clear YES. Sodas contain copious amounts of sugar and fructose. Studies show that fructose/sugar is one of the main drivers of type 2 diabetes and it's horrible complications. The World Health Organization now recommends that added sugar be limited to just 6 teaspoons per day, or 25 g. A typical soda such as Coca Cola contains 39 g of pure sugar/fructose in a 12 fl oz. / 354 ml can. So just one can of Coke is immediately pushing you way over the recommended sugar intake! Researchers have found that sodas are linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a condition that affects around 30% of US adults. NAFLD is thought to be directly linked to type 2 diabetes. When we get more fat storing up in the liver, this promotes insulin resistance, high cholesterol, more fat storage in other areas of the body, which means weight gain and various other issues. Sodas increase risk of type 2 diabetes and diabetic complications (in this study and this study), and they increase insulin resistance (study). Hypertension or high blood pressure is another metabolic problem that is linked to drinking soda, this includes both sugar-filled sodas and artificially sweetened ones – meaning those diet sodas are really no better. That may come as a shock, but researchers have found that diet sodas promote weight gain, not weight loss as might be expected. Other studies show d Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes is a condition in which the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood is too high because your body cannot use it properly. This happens because your body either cannot use or make a hormone called insulin, which is responsible for turning sugar into food for your body's cells. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1, where your body is unable to produce any insulin Type 2, where your body either does not produce enough insulin, or cannot use it. Symptoms of diabetes The main symptoms of diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequently needing to go to the toilet, especially at night Extreme tiredness Weight loss Blurred vision Genital itching Thrush If diabetes is not controlled, it can cause serious damage to your kidneys, eyes, nervous system, heart and blood vessels. Treatment for diabetes aims to avoid this by keeping blood sugar levels as near to normal as possible. Type 1 diabetes is usually treated by insulin injections, as well as healthy eating and being active. Type 2 diabetes is usually treated by healthy eating and being active alone, but sometimes tablets or insulin injections are also needed. Diabetes and high blood pressure About 25% of people with Type 1 diabetes and 80% of people with Type 2 diabetes have high blood pressure. Having diabetes raises your risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and other health problems. Having high blood pressure also raises this risk. If you have diabetes and high blood pressure together, this raises your risk of health problems even more. If you have diabetes, your doctor will want to be sure that your blood pressure is very well controlled. This means that they will probably want your blood pressure to be below 130 over 80. People with diabetes and high blood pressure are sometimes given the blood pressure Continue reading >>

Foods To Eat With High Blood Pressure & Diabetes

Foods To Eat With High Blood Pressure & Diabetes

High blood pressure increases your risk for heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular disease. Blood pressure management is critical if you have diabetes since it also increases your risk for diabetes complications. In addition to maintaining a healthy weight and limiting alcohol intake, a healthy diet can improve your blood pressure levels and your overall health, according to the American Heart Association. For best results, seek specified guidance from a qualified health care professional. Video of the Day Fruits and vegetables provide rich amounts of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fiber. Fruits and vegetables also have a mellowing effect on blood sugar levels and can help lower blood pressure, according to the Harvard School of Public Health. Consume a variety of fresh, colorful fruits and vegetable regularly for broadest dietary benefits. Since fruit and starchy vegetables contain carbohydrates, consume appropriate portion sizes and daily amounts, as recommended by your doctor or diabetes specialist. Examples of nutrient-rich fruits and vegetables include citrus fruits, berries, apples, pears, plums, kiwi, cantaloupe, tomatoes, avocado, spinach, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, red and green bell peppers, carrots and peas. Nutritious starchy vegetables include squash, sweet potatoes, baked potatoes and pumpkin. Whole grains also provide rich amounts of nutrients and fiber. As low-glycemic carbohydrate sources, whole grains can support healthy blood sugar levels and keep you fuller longer between meals. Consume a variety of whole grain foods as part of a balanced, healthy diet for best results. Foods rich in whole grain nutrition include whole grain breads, tortillas, pasta and cereals, brown rice, quinoa, wild rice, air-popped popcorn and Continue reading >>

Top 10 Natural Foods To Control High Blood Pressure

Top 10 Natural Foods To Control High Blood Pressure

17th May is globally celebrated as World Hypertension Day. Its a day dedicated towards understanding this silent killer better. High BP is one of the biggest health risks that faces the global population today. Some would say it's almost an epidemic. High blood pressure can cause countless problems like diabetes, stroke, heart disease, kidney failure and even death! Hypertension is an unusual condition which has almost no symptoms. The only way to catch it is to get your blood pressure checked regularly. If studies are to be believed, only one-third of all people know they suffer from high blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured in 'millimetres of mercury' (mm Hg) and is written as two separate numbers. The first number or the systolic number measures the pressure inside the arteries when heart muscles contract. The second number measures the pressure in the arteries when the muscle is resting between heartbeats. How high should your blood pressure be? According to the American Heart Association, 120/80 is considered to be the normal limit. The range between 120/80 - 140/90 is referred to as 'pre-hypertension' and anything over 140/90 should be addressed. It's important to note that one reading does not indicate that you suffer from high blood pressure. The numbers need to be steady overtime. Possible Causes for High Blood Pressure While the exact cause of hypertension remains unknown, a few facts have been identified by health experts are: excess consumption of salt, lack of exercise, an unhealthy diet and genetic predisposition. Other factors that increase the odds are: cigarette smoking, binge drinking, obesity and stress. A recent study pointed out that processed or canned food and drinks might also be contributing to this increase. How to Control High Blood Pres Continue reading >>

Dash Diet: Healthy Eating To Lower Your Blood Pressure

Dash Diet: Healthy Eating To Lower Your Blood Pressure

The DASH diet emphasizes portion size, eating a variety of foods and getting the right amount of nutrients. Discover how DASH can improve your health and lower your blood pressure. DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The DASH diet is a lifelong approach to healthy eating that's designed to help treat or prevent high blood pressure (hypertension). The DASH diet encourages you to reduce the sodium in your diet and eat a variety of foods rich in nutrients that help lower blood pressure, such as potassium, calcium and magnesium. By following the DASH diet, you may be able to reduce your blood pressure by a few points in just two weeks. Over time, your systolic blood pressure could drop by eight to 14 points, which can make a significant difference in your health risks. Because the DASH diet is a healthy way of eating, it offers health benefits besides just lowering blood pressure. The DASH diet is also in line with dietary recommendations to prevent osteoporosis, cancer, heart disease, stroke and diabetes. DASH diet: Sodium levels The DASH diet emphasizes vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy foods — and moderate amounts of whole grains, fish, poultry and nuts. In addition to the standard DASH diet, there is also a lower sodium version of the diet. You can choose the version of the diet that meets your health needs: Standard DASH diet. You can consume up to 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day. Lower sodium DASH diet. You can consume up to 1,500 mg of sodium a day. Both versions of the DASH diet aim to reduce the amount of sodium in your diet compared with what you might get in a typical American diet, which can amount to a whopping 3,400 mg of sodium a day or more. The standard DASH diet meets the recommendation from the Dietary Guidelines for Americ Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure Diet: What You Should Be Eating To Lower Reading In Two Weeks

High Blood Pressure Diet: What You Should Be Eating To Lower Reading In Two Weeks

However, diet is a key way people can make changes to their health. The DASH diet, which stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, is said to be able to lower their blood pressure reading in two weeks, experts have claimed, but yields better results in the long term. The DASH diet includes vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy products and vegetable oil. It also consists of wholegrains, fish, poultry, nuts and beans. People on the diet should be limiting food high in saturated fat, full fat dairy products and tropical oils including coconut oil and palm oil, and stopping eating sugar-sweetened food and drinks. The DASH eating plan includes: Six to eight daily servings of grains a day One service is includes 1oz of dry cereal, or half a cup of cooked rice or pasta Six servings or less of meat, poultry or fish a day One serving equates to roughly 1oz cooked meat or one egg Between four and five serving of vegetables a day A serving is one cup of leafy vegetables or half a cup of cooked vegetables Between four and five servings of fruit a day One serving is one medium fruit or 1/4 cup of dried fruit Two to three Low fat or fat-free dairy products a day A serving includes one cup of milk or yoghurt Two to three daily servings of fats and oils One serving equates to one tablespoon mayonnaise or a teaspoon of vegetable oil Eating seeds, nuts, dry beans and peas four to five times a week One serving equates to 1/3 cup of nuts Thu, June 8, 2017 High blood pressure: Here are the risk factors you should be aware of. On average, adults in the UK eat about 8.1g of salt (3.2g sodium) a day. To reduce the risk of high blood pressure, it is recommended that adults should not be eating more than 6g of salt - the equivalent of 2.4g sodium a day. The plan, which is recommended b Continue reading >>

Microsoft Word - Dysglycemic Diet.doc

Microsoft Word - Dysglycemic Diet.doc

Best Foods for Diabetes, High Cholesterol, High Blood Pressure, and Weight All these conditions involve a genetic sensitivity to refined carbohydrates. In many people, refined carbohydrates leads to abnormally high and low blood sugar levels, a condition called dysglycemia. This information sheet helps you reduce this abnormal response. Did you know that what you eat is a critical determinant of how much you eat? Whether you want to lose weight, or want to maintain your present healthy weight, choosing the right kinds of foods will help you achieve your goals. Let's leave calorie counting to the mathematicians. If you are overweight, you know what happens when you ask your doctor for help. The usual response is "follow this diet and get more exercise.†That doesn't work all by itself, does it? That is because it is based on a partial truth - that the reason people gain weight is that they eat too much and exercise too little. Let's look at the facts. The fact my overweight patients have been telling me for years is "Doc, it's my metabolism." Let’s see how and why your food choices influence that metabolism, so that you can know what to eat, and what not to eat, to improve your health and lose weight. First, I suggest you watch our videotape on weight gain. You can borrow it from our receptionist. Here is part of the script for that videotape… �������� � ������ ������������������������������������������ “To help you understand what to do about this kind of metabolism, Continue reading >>

10 Foods To Avoid With High Blood Pressure

10 Foods To Avoid With High Blood Pressure

Approximately half of the individuals living with high blood pressure do not have the condition under control despite modifiable diet and lifestyle changes. Break the statistics and limit these foods that raise blood pressure! Hypertension increases the risk for heart disease and stroke, both leading causes of death in the United States and costing the nation close to $50 billion each year! According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 75 million American adults are diagnosed with hypertension - that translates to 32 percent or 1 in 3 adults! Additionally, 1 in 3 adults have prehypertension, a condition in which blood pressure numbers are higher than normal but not high enough to receive a hypertension diagnosis. Approximately half of the individuals living with high blood pressure do not have the condition under control despite modifiable diet and lifestyle changes. Break the statistics and limit these foods that raises blood pressure! 10 Foods to Avoid with High Blood Pressure Sodium and Salt As a general rule, sodium intake is recommended to less than 2,300 milligrams per day. On the Nutrition Facts label, look at the Percent Daily Value (%DV) - 5% DV or less of sodium per serving is low while 20% DV is considered high. Limit the salt shaker and these high sodium foods that increase blood pressure: 1. Canned Beans Canned beans can be loaded with sodium for preservation purposes. If purchasing canned beans, rinsing the beans with a colander and water can help wash away most of the salt. 2. Premade Soups Despite the promotion of nutritious veggies, soups can be loaded with salt and sodium. And unlike canned beans, soups cannot be rinsed to reduce salt content. When choosing soups, try to find "low in sodium" or "reduced salt" products Continue reading >>

Heal Yourself With Food: Recipes

Heal Yourself With Food: Recipes

Take control of your health! Try these recipes from the eating plans mentioned in Heal Yourself With Food, and get on the road to a healthy recovery. Pritikin Diet to fight diabetes When combined with exercise, the Pritikin Diet can improve heart-disease risk factors; prevent and control Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and several cancers; promote weight loss. It's low in fat and sodium and rich in natural unrefined carbs, vitamins, minerals, beneficial phytochemicals, antioxidants and dietary fiber with adequate amounts of protein and essential fatty acids. Pritikin Diet Recipes: Also try Prevention's New 30-Day Diabetes Diet to help manage your condition. Portfolio Diet to lower high cholesterol Relying on four categories of foods known to help prevent heart disease--soy, nuts, plant sterols, and foods high in sticky fiber--and restricting meat, fish, and dairy (high cholesterol foods) the Portfolio Diet produces fast results and works about as well as statins in people with moderately high cholesterol. Portfolio Diet Recipes: DASH Diet to lower high blood pressure The DASH eating plan, which can prevent and control high blood pressure when used along with lifestyle changes such as exercise, calls for a certain number of daily servings of grains, vegetables, fruits, fat-free dairy, lean meats, and nuts. DASH Diet Recipes: [pagebreak] Recipes for diabetes from the Pritikin Eating Plan Ingredients: 2 ½ lb. portabello mushrooms, stems removed & washed 1 cup red peppers, de-seeded and diced ½ c yellow pepper, de-seeded and diced 3 tablespoons basil leaves, chiffonaide 3 tablespoons fresh thyme, picked & chopped 1 teaspoon oregano, dry ½ cup garlic, chopped ½ cup red onion, peeled and diced 1 teaspoon black peppercorns, ground 1 cup eggplant, peeled and diced ½ Continue reading >>

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