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Foods That Keep Your Blood Sugar Stable

12 Simple Tips To Prevent Blood Sugar Spikes

12 Simple Tips To Prevent Blood Sugar Spikes

Blood sugar spikes occur when your blood sugar rises and then falls sharply after you eat. In the short term, they can cause lethargy and hunger. Over time, your body may not be able to lower blood sugar effectively, which can lead to type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is a rising health problem. In fact, 29 million Americans have diabetes, and 25% of them don't even know they have it (1). Blood sugar spikes can also cause your blood vessels to harden and narrow, which can lead to a heart attack or stroke. This article looks at 12 simple things you can do to prevent blood sugar spikes. Carbohydrates (carbs) are what cause blood sugar to rise. When you eat carbs, they are broken down into simple sugars. Those sugars then enter the bloodstream. As your blood sugar levels rise, your pancreas releases a hormone called insulin, which prompts your cells to absorb sugar from the blood. This causes your blood sugar levels to drop. Many studies have shown that consuming a low-carb diet can help prevent blood sugar spikes (2, 3, 4, 5). Low-carb diets also have the added benefit of aiding weight loss, which can also reduce blood sugar spikes (6, 7, 8, 9). There are lots of ways to reduce your carb intake, including counting carbs. Here's a guide on how to do it. A low-carb diet can help prevent blood sugar spikes and aid weight loss. Counting carbs can also help. Refined carbs, otherwise known as processed carbs, are sugars or refined grains. Some common sources of refined carbs are table sugar, white bread, white rice, soda, candy, breakfast cereals and desserts. Refined carbs have been stripped of almost all nutrients, vitamins, minerals and fiber. Refined carbs are said to have a high glycemic index because they are very easily and quickly digested by the body. This leads to blood sugar Continue reading >>

Try These 8 Best Snacks For Blood Sugar Control

Try These 8 Best Snacks For Blood Sugar Control

1 / 9 Snack the Smart Way to Help Keep Your Blood Sugar in Check If you have type 2 diabetes, smart snacking can be an important part of your healthy eating plan. Hunger can lead to dips and spikes in blood sugar that can cause dizziness, irritability, and weakness — and it can increase your risk for a host of other diabetes-related problems as well. One of the best ways to avoid the roller coaster? Eat nutritious snacks at regular intervals throughout the day, even if you're on the go. New types of insulin are better at matching the insulin your body needs at specific times, which has made snacking to prevent a blood sugar drop less necessary for some. But whether you still have to snack to keep your blood sugar levels steady, or just plain want to snack, it’s necessary to make healthy choices. That means that simple carbohydrates, which are digested quickly and turned into sugar that elevates your blood glucose levels, should be avoided. But there are other ways to satisfy those mid-afternoon or mid-morning cravings than a trip to the vending machine. It might take a little more advance preparation and a little more slicing and dicing than it does to rip open a bag of potato chips. But the snacks shown here, suggested by Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, an Everyday Health contributor, are quick, simple, made with ingredients that are either easily portable or easily kept in an office kitchen, and finished with dashes of flavor from ingredients you probably already have on hand, like lime, olive oil, and cinnamon. And when you control your ingredients, which you can’t do when you’re reaching for a processed food, it’s easier to control your condition, which can be empowering when you’re trying to manage this disease. So what makes a high-quality, high-satisfact Continue reading >>

The Blood Sugar Roller Coaster

The Blood Sugar Roller Coaster

Most roller coasters are fun. Your stomach full of butterflies. Anticipating the unknown. The gigantic ups and downs. The delightful dizziness in your head. Most roller coaster rides last two to three minutes. Now, imagine riding a roller coaster all day long...no thanks! While its fun for a few minutes at an amusement park, when it comes to everyday living, riding the blood sugar roller coaster day in and day out is exhausting. It depletes you of energy, focus, and sets you up for weight gain. Its no way to live. You know youve been for a ride when youre constantly fighting sugar cravings, having trouble focusing, struggling to fall and/or staying asleep, experiencing mood swings, staving off low energy levels and battling with undesired weight gain or having trouble losing weight. Sound familiar? Let's get off that roller coaster. But first, we need to knowwho's to blame for the ride. Carbs. Carbohydrates are one of the three macronutrients (fat and protein are the other two). All carbohydrates are metabolized as sugar in your body. That means when you eat a carbohydrate, regardless of the source (bread, pasta, rice, cookies, candy, soda and even vegetables and fruits), it turns into sugar the moment it hits your bloodstream. Your blood sugar levels spike, which is alarming to your body, so it triggers your pancreas to quickly secrete yourfat-storing hormone called insulin. Insulins job is to unlock the door to your cells, allowing sugar to get into the cell and out of your bloodstream, in turn driving blood sugar levels back down to normal. Ultimately, your bodys goal is to bring you down from the top of that roller coaster! Now, you can use that sugar in your bloodstream for energy. If youre active shortly after consuming it, youll burn it off. The problem is so of Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Balance Your Blood Sugar Naturally

8 Ways To Balance Your Blood Sugar Naturally

When you master your blood sugar, you'll feel full of energy, cravings will subside, your weight will be controlled, your mood will stabilize, your memory will be better and you will balance your hormones. Also, when you learn to balance your blood sugar you minimize your risk of blood sugar-related diseases, metabolic syndrome, diabetes and heart disease. Eating foods that release energy quickly can cause feelings of fatigue, hunger and irritation. Processed foods and those full of refined sugar cause a spike in your blood sugars — they release their glucose in a sudden rush. Blood sugar spikes rapidly, but it quickly crashes back to earth! We have a lovely hormone that comes to the rescue: insulin. Insulin helps the body absorb and process sugar effectively, but the excess is stored as fat! When this cycle happens over and over again, our cells become tired and stop listening to insulin, which leads to insulin resistance, an early warning sign of diabetes. So if you're moody, irritable, hungry, have cravings, experience poor concentration or gain weight? You need to balance your blood sugar! Below are a few natural, diet-based methods to do just that: 1. Eat foods low on the glycemic index. These foods release energy SLOWLY into the bloodstream. You can probably guess what they may be: vegetables, legumes, some fruits (berries and stone fruits are best), whole grains, nuts and seeds. 2. Include a snack in between main meals. This will allow you to stay nice and stable throughout the day. I always encourage a protein-rich snack. 3. Eat protein with each meal. This is especially important to do when you eat carbohydrates, in order to slow down the release of energy. Protein is the most satiating macronutrient, meaning it releases energy slowly, which helps signal to t Continue reading >>

What To Eat To Keep Your Blood Sugar In Check

What To Eat To Keep Your Blood Sugar In Check

You need to eat wisely to keep your diabetes in check. The key is to choose healthy foods and portion sizes so that you can control both your weight and blood sugar levels. The first step: Learn what’s good for you, says diabetes educator Emmy Suhl, RD, CDE, of Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. “There’s no such thing as a diabetes diet,” Suhl says. “The best diet for someone with diabetes is your basic, healthy diet.” Every diet should include some carbs, which provide energy to help power your body. But look for healthy carbs that won’t cause your blood sugar to spike. “A lot of carbohydrates are very healthy, such as fruits, vegetables, milk, yogurt, and legumes,” Suhl says. “Try to avoid as much as possible refined and/or heavily processed carbohydrates.” Suhl’s quick tips: Eat whole grains like barley and brown rice rather than white rice and white-flour pasta. Look for packages that say 100% whole grain. Eat fruits rather than drink fruit juice, even if it’s 100% juice. Your body needs protein to build and maintain bone, muscles, and skin, and to perform a host of other functions. As with carbs, make a point to choose healthy sources of protein. “Your best choices are lean meats like chicken, low-fat dairy, and fish and shellfish,” Suhl says. “All are much healthier than proteins from four-legged animals.” Skip steaks and other meats you can eat rare -- they have more fat than other meat. Salmon’s a great choice, but all fish pack protein. Milk, cheese, yogurt, and other dairy products provide protein, calcium, and other nutrients, but they can also have a lot of fat. “I would recommend 1%,” Suhl says. “You want some fat in your diet, but you don’t want dairy fat. You want fat from healthier sources.” Greek yogurt has m Continue reading >>

How To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

How To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

If you are one of the millions of people who has prediabetes, diabetes, metabolic syndrome or any other form of “insulin resistance,” maintaining normal blood sugar levels can be challenging. Over the past several decades, these chronic disorders have swept through the U.S. and many other nations, reaching epidemic proportions and causing serious, but often preventable, side effects like nerve damage, fatigue, loss of vision, arterial damage and weight gain. Elevated blood sugar levels maintained for an extended period of time can push someone who is “prediabetic” into having full-blown diabetes (which now affects about one in every three adults in the U.S.). (1) Even for people who aren’t necessarily at a high risk for developing diabetes or heart complications, poorly managed blood sugar can lead to common complications, including fatigue, weight gain and sugar cravings. In extreme cases, elevated blood sugar can even contribute to strokes, amputations, coma and death in people with a history of insulin resistance. Blood sugar is raised by glucose, which is the sugar we get from eating many different types of foods that contain carbohydrates. Although we usually think of normal blood sugar as being strictly reliant upon how many carbohydrates and added sugar someone eats, other factors also play a role. For example, stress can elevate cortisol levels, which interferes with how insulin is used, and the timing of meals can also affect how the body manages blood sugar. (2) What can you do to help avoid dangerous blood sugar swings and lower diabetes symptoms? As you’ll learn, normal blood sugar levels are sustained through a combination of eating a balanced, low-processed diet, getting regular exercise and managing the body’s most important hormones in othe Continue reading >>

7 Healthy Snacks To Manage Blood Sugar

7 Healthy Snacks To Manage Blood Sugar

High blood sugar levels are bad news for your body. So you have to choose carefully when it comes to choosing snacks. You want to keep hunger and hypoglycemia at bay without increasing your blood sugar. High-fiber, slowly digested, healthy snacks will curb your hunger while producing a steady release of blood sugar to help control diabetes. Just remember to balance those… more from this guide Continue reading >>

Food Combinations To Steady Blood Sugar & Raise Metabolism

Food Combinations To Steady Blood Sugar & Raise Metabolism

Keeping your blood sugar levels steady can not only help you prevent type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases, it can also help you have more even energy levels and feel more satiated between meals. A diet that allows you to maintain stable blood sugar levels will also help you feel less hungry and reduce your cravings for unhealthy foods. You can also improve your metabolism with the foods you choose to eat, which is key to making weight loss and maintenance easier. Your total carbohydrate intake at a meal is the main factor influencing your blood sugar levels, independently of the foods you combine your carbs with. If you want to stabilize your blood sugar levels, avoid choosing foods that are high in carbohydrates, or limit your serving size of high-carb foods. Be careful with foods that contain flour or sugar, such as breads, rice, pasta, soft drinks and desserts because of their high carbohydrate content. Both the starches and sugars found in these foods are converted into glucose, the main sugar circulating in your blood, during the digestion process. Low-Glycemic Carbohydrates The carbohydrates that you include at each of your meals and snacks should be low-glycemic carbohydrates. Carbohydrate foods that have a low glycemic index take more time to metabolize, which helps to keep your blood sugar levels steady for hours after your meal. Choose non-starchy vegetables, such as leafy greens, cauliflower and red bell peppers; fruits; nuts; sweet potato; quinoa; steel-cut oats; and sourdough bread to combine with protein and fat at each meal. Avoid high-glycemic carbohydrates, such as white potatoes, white and whole-wheat breads, corn flakes and puffed rice breakfast cereals, granola bars and baked goods, all of which can make your blood sugar levels increase rapidly Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Diet: 7 Foods That Control Blood Sugar

Diabetes & Diet: 7 Foods That Control Blood Sugar

When you have type 2 diabetes, what you eat can help you control your blood sugar, stave off hunger, and feel full longer. “Diabetes is when your blood sugar or glucose levels are higher than normal. It’s carbohydrate foods like breads, cereals, rice, pasta, fruits, milk, and desserts that can cause this rise," says Maggie Powers, PhD, president-elect of Health Care & Education at the American Diabetes Association. Your eating plan should focus on the amount and type of carbs you put on your plate throughout the day, Powers says. But it’s also important to have foods you enjoy. You want to eat enough so you feel satisfied and avoid overeating and poor choices. Here are seven foods that Powers says can help keep your blood sugar in check and make you happy and healthy to boot. These add color, flavor, and texture to a meal. Choose tasty, low-carb veggies, like mushrooms, onions, eggplant, tomatoes, Brussels sprouts, and low-carb squashes, like zucchini. Try them with dips such as low-fat dressings, hummus, guacamole, and salsa, or roasted with different seasonings such as rosemary, cayenne pepper, or garlic. Go beyond your regular salad and try kale, spinach, and chard. They’re healthy, delicious, and low-carb, Powers says. Roast kale leaves in the oven with olive oil for quick, crunchy chips. You can also mix greens in with roasted veggies to add texture and a different flavor, or serve them with a little protein, like salmon. Plain water is always good, but water infused with fruits and vegetables is more interesting. Cut up a lemon or cucumber and put it in your water, or make ice cubes with some flavoring in them. If you’re not a hot tea drinker, try cold tea with lemon or a cinnamon stick. “Not only are these beverages low-carb, they can also help fill y Continue reading >>

8 Steps To Balancing Blood Sugar

8 Steps To Balancing Blood Sugar

By now it's safe to say we all know that sugar is bad for us. When we were children, our parents told us it was bad for our teeth. But what about the rest of the body? What exactly happens when sugar is consumed and how does the body compensate for such high concentrations of sugar? You may have heard how important blood sugar balance is in the body, but why? What is ‘low glycemic', and how is weight gain associated with sugar? This blog is Sugar Basics 101 and includes foods and lifestyle suggestions that might be helpful when it comes to this balancing act. Did you know that having steady blood sugar levels is the one thing that every person who lives over 100 (centurion) has in common? Research shows that the best foods for enjoying good weight are those that don't cause a sharp rise in blood sugar levels. Balanced blood sugar is associated with physical and emotional health, as well as, and of course, longevity. If you are having problems losing weight, feeling moody, or feel the need for caffeine, you may have a problem balancing your blood sugar. Fortunately, not all blood sugar imbalances require drug treatments, and by taking control of your sugar consumption, you can greatly improve the way you feel. Blood sugar refers to glucose carried in the blood stream. Glucose is the immediate source of energy for all of the body's cells. The levels of glucose in the blood are monitored by the pancreas and are tightly regulated by several hormones. The body has the ability to store glucose in the form of glycogen in the muscles and the liver. When sugar or refined carbs are digested, they are initially absorbed in the small intestine. However, they do not enter the blood circulation directly and have to go to the liver first. Under hormone control, the liver will releas Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar Naturally

10 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar Naturally

Blood Sugar Balance in Plain English Before we get started with tips to balance your blood sugar, I want to cover some basic blood sugar terms that I will be using in this discussion. Blood sugar/blood glucose – Glucose is the form of sugar that is in our bloodstream. Glucose is the body’s preferred source of fuel. Insulin – the pancreas secretes insulin, a hormone that shuttles glucose from the blood into body cells. It knocks on the cell and says, “Open up, I’ve got some glucose that I need to get out of the bloodstream so take it and use it for energy.” Insulin resistance – When we consume a large amount of refined carbs with very little fat and protein, our blood sugar spikes very high and the pancreas frantically overcompensates with insulin release. This overcompensation of insulin eventually causes insulin resistance, which leads to Type 2 Diabetes if poor dietary practices are continued. The good news, however, is that it can an be reversed through a healthy diet that balances your blood sugar. Glycogen – Glucose that doesn’t enter body cells is taken to the liver where it is converted to glycogen. This is a form of stored sugar that is broken down to stabilize low blood sugar levels between meals and during the night. It is healthful for the body store of glycogen, but stress and hormone dysfunction deplete our ability to store glycogen and this can contribute to blood sugar imbalance. Hyperglycemia – Hyperglycemia is another term for high blood sugar. It is normal to have a spike in blood sugar after a meal, but chronically high blood sugar causes severe health issues. Hypoglycemia – Hypoglycemia is low blood sugar. Glycogen, the sugar stored in the liver, is responsible for raising blood sugar in-between meals and should prevent hypoglyc Continue reading >>

How To Keep Your Blood Sugar Stable

How To Keep Your Blood Sugar Stable

Oh, the words “blood sugar.” Does it conjure up visions of restrictive eating, diabetes medications, or insulin injections? Blood sugar is the measure of the amount of sugar in your blood. You need the right balance of sugar in your blood to fuel your brain and muscles. The thing is, it can fluctuate. A lot. This fluctuation is the natural balance between things that increase it; and things that decrease it. When you eat food with sugars or starches (“carbs”), then your digestive system absorbs sugar into your blood. When carbs are ingested and broken down into simple sugars, your body keeps blood sugar levels stable by secreting insulin. Insulin allows excess sugar to get it out of your bloodstream and into your muscle cells and other tissues for energy Why keep my blood sugar stable? Your body wants your blood sugar to be at an optimal level. It should be high enough, so you’re not light-headed, fatigued, and irritable. It should be low enough that your body isn’t scrambling to remove excess from the blood. When blood sugar is too low, this is referred to as “hypoglycemia.” When blood sugar is too high, it is referred to as hyperglycemia. Prolonged periods of elevated blood sugar levels (chronic hyperglycemia) can lead to “insulin resistance.” Insulin resistance is when your cells are just so bored of the excess insulin that they start ignoring (resisting) it, and that keeps your blood sugar levels too high. Insulin resistance and chronic hyperglycemia can eventually lead to diabetes. So let’s look at how you can optimize your food and lifestyle to keep your blood sugar stable. Food for stable blood sugar The simplest thing to do to balance your blood sugar is to reduce the number of refined sugars and starches you eat. To do this, you can start Continue reading >>

12 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar, A Holistic Nutritionist Explains

12 Ways To Balance Blood Sugar, A Holistic Nutritionist Explains

Do you regularly experience food cravings, mood swings, irritability or fatigue? If so, you may have a blood sugar imbalance. According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1/3 of Americans are at imminent risk of becoming diabetic, and 90% of those at risk don’t even know it! Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is crucial for optimal health and minimizes your risk of chronic conditions such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, Alzheimer’s and heart disease. Understanding Blood Sugar When you eat sugars and simple carbohydrates, these foods release glucose into the bloodstream very quickly, spiking your blood sugar. This spike forces the pancreas to produce excess insulin, which escorts the sugars out of the bloodstream and into the cells. Over time, when insulin levels are driven up over and over several times a day (due to too much sugar in the blood), the pancreas gets worn out and cells become resistant to accepting any more sugar. This excess sugar in the blood keeps blood sugar levels unnaturally high and insulin ends up storing it as fat. This can lead to visceral (abdominal) fat, weight gain and unhealthy cholesterol. As you can see, it’s not a good situation! And if left unchecked, a situation that can put you in the danger zone for diabetes and associated degenerative health concerns. But the good news is that it can be reversed through a healthy diet and lifestyle that balances your blood sugar. Below are some strategies to help you do just that! 12 Ways to Balance Blood Sugar 1. Learn about the glycemic index Foods low on the glycemic index release energy slowly into the bloodstream and cause only minor changes in blood sugar levels. These include animal protein, nuts and seeds, oils and fats, beans and lentils, whole g Continue reading >>

Food That Will Keep Your Blood Sugar Up & Help You Lose Weight

Food That Will Keep Your Blood Sugar Up & Help You Lose Weight

Stabilizing the blood sugar through proper diet can lead to increased energy, weight loss and a sense of control over daily choices. Food should be taken in every 3 to 4 hours to stabilize glucose levels. Concentrate on macronutrients, protein, carbohydrates, and fat. Revolution Health explains that to keep your blood glucose levels near normal, you need to balance your food intake, insulin level and physical activity. Video of the Day Oats and oatmeal are full of fiber and low in calories. According to the American Dietetic Association fiber can lead to weight loss and health benefits because it allows you to feel fuller longer, and reduces the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. "Diabetic Living" magazine explains that in addition to being heart healthy, oats can stabilize blood glucose levels. Look for oats that are whole grain with three or more grams of soluble fiber per serving. Lean meat and low-fat dairy is a form of protein that can help with blood sugar and weight loss. Revolution Health states that protein serves as a blood sugar stabilizer. The best combination for weight loss and glucose control is to pair protein with other foods. This will leave you feeling full and prevent your blood sugar levels from rising too high or falling too low. For example, try an apple with yogurt, or a banana with string cheese. Fruits and vegetables are full of soluble fiber. According to Life Clinic, soluble fiber is especially good for people trying to control their blood sugar, because it helps to slow down or reduce the absorption of glucose from the intestines. Fruits and vegetables are also low in calories and mostly water based resulting in one of the top choices for weight loss. Try to add both fruits and vegetables daily with meals, snacks and recipes. Whole g Continue reading >>

Diet To Keep Sugar Levels Stable

Diet To Keep Sugar Levels Stable

Carbohydrates are sugars, starches and fibers that are in foods such as beans, milk products, cookies and rice. Carbohydrates break down into glucose, a sugar that fuels your body’s day-to-day functions. Some carbohydrates break down into glucose faster than others do. Eating too many of these carbohydrates can lead to blood sugar instability – dips and spikes – which can cause short-term problems such as mood swings and long-term problems such as Type 2 diabetes, according to MayoClinic.com. Video of the Day A classification called the glycemic index ranks carbohydrates on a scale of 0 to 100 based on how fast and high they cause your blood sugar to rise in comparison with pure glucose, according to the Harvard School of Public Health. Foods on the high end of the scale – 70 and higher – are foods that cause a high and rapid spike in your blood sugar, and foods on the low end are foods that cause your blood sugar to increase less and at a more gradual pace. Examples of foods in the low 55 and under range are raw carrots, raw apples and kidney beans, according to MayoClinic.com. To keep your blood sugar levels stable, increase your intake of foods on the low end of the scale. Limit your intake of foods that are in the 70 and up range of the glycemic index. Examples of these foods are white rice, plain white bread and watermelon. Foods such as cookies, candy, soft drinks, ice cream and cakes are the highest on the scale as they tend to be made with pure glucose or another fast sugar such as high-fructose corn syrup. Strictly limit your intake of these foods and find foods sweetened with a sugar alternative whenever possible, recommends the Jackson Siegelbaum Gastroenterology website. Foods in the medium 56 to 69 range, such as bananas and sweet corn, are best e Continue reading >>

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