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Foods Good For Low Blood Sugar

Healthy Eating For Blood Sugar Control

Healthy Eating For Blood Sugar Control

If you have diabetes, a healthy eating plan for you is not that different from a healthy eating planfor people withoutdiabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) echoes the dietary guidelines recommended for the general public — that is, a diet centered on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes (peas and beans), and low-fat dairy products. However, you'll want to pay special attention to your carbohydrate intake. Vegetables, fruits, and whole grains provide more nutrition per calorie than refined carbohydrates and tend to be rich in fiber. Your body digests high-fiber foods more slowly — which means a more moderate rise in blood sugar. For most people with diabetes, carbohydrates should account for about 45% to 55% of the total calories you eat each day. Choose your carbohydrates wisely — ideally, from vegetables, whole grains, and fruits. Avoid highly refined carbohydrates such as white bread, pasta, and rice, as well as candy, sugary soft drinks, and sweets. Refined carbohydrates tend to cause sharp spikes in blood sugar, and can even boost triglycerides and lower helpful HDL cholesterol. Fiber comes in two forms: insoluble fiber, the kind found in whole grains, and soluble fiber, found in beans, dried peas, oats, and fruits. Soluble fiber in particular appears to lower blood sugar levels by improving insulin sensitivity, which may mean you need less diabetes medicine. And a number of studies suggest that eating plenty of fiber reduces the chances of developing heart disease — and people with diabetes need to do all they can to lower their risk. For more on healthy diet essentials, plus information on managing (and avoiding) type 2 diabetes, buy Healthy Eating for Type 2 Diabetes from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

9 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

9 Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

High blood sugar and insulin resistance are linked with inflammation, heart disease, kidney disease, and diabetes. Protect yourself with these nine blood-sugar-balancing foods: 1. Cinnamon Contains compounds that reduce blood sugar and improve insulin sensitivity, and cinnamon may also lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels—risk factors in diabetes. Don’t overdo it: Studies have found results with only ¼–1/2 teaspoon per day, and cinnamon contains coumarin, which may cause problems at higher doses. Try this: Stir cinnamon and currants into oatmeal; add a cinnamon stick to your morning coffee; toss steamed sweet potatoes with cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and coconut oil. Did You Know? Studies show that eating as little as 1/4 tsp. of cinnamon per day can improve insulin sensitivity and may also lower cholesterol. 2. Vinegar Contains acetic acid, which improves insulin sensitivity and can lower blood sugar by as much as 20 percent when consumed before or with meals containing carbs. Try this: Simmer balsamic vinegar until reduced to a thick, syrupy glaze, and drizzle on strawberries; combine apple cider vinegar with honey, lemon juice, and cayenne pepper for a breakfast tonic; whisk together red wine vinegar, shallots, mustard, thyme, and olive oil for an easy vinaigrette. 3. Broccoli sprouts Are high in a compound called sulforaphane that can improve insulin resistance and protect against diabetes. Broccoli sprouts also help lower LDL cholesterol, triglyceride levels, and inflammation in people with diabetes. You can find broccoli sprouts in most natural food stores, or look for broccoli sprout powder. Try this: Combine broccoli sprouts, grated carrot, and thinly sliced red onion in a pita; toss broccoli sprouts with shredded spinach, grated beets, and avocado, an Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

While a low carb diet appears to be useful on the whole, there are also many foods shown to help. Either by lowering blood sugars and/or improving insulin sensitivity. This articles looks at 10 of the best foods and supplements for lowering blood sugars, based on current research. Just know they should never be used in place of your diabetes medication, but rather alongside. 1. Resistant Starch Lowers Sugars After Meals Starches are long chains of glucose (sugar) found in oats, grains, bananas, potatoes and various other foods. Some varieties pass through digestion unchanged and are not absorbed as sugar into the blood. These are known as resistant starch. Many studies show resistant starch can greatly improve insulin sensitivity. That is, how well the body can move sugar out of the blood and into cells for energy. This is why it’s so useful for lowering blood sugar levels after meals (1, 2). The effect is so great that having resistant starch at lunch will reduce blood sugar spikes at dinner, known as the “second meal effect” (3). Problem is many foods high in resistant starch, such as potatoes, are also high in digestible carbs that can spike blood sugar. Therefore resistant starch in supplement form – without the extra carbs – is recommended. Summary: Supplemental resistant starch is a fantastic option for those struggling to control sugars or have hit a plateau. 2. Ceylon Cinnamon Several cinnamon compounds appear to prevent the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream, minimising blood sugar spikes. It may also dramatically improve insulin sensitivity (4, 5). In a recent clinical trial, 25 poorly-controlled type 2 diabetics received either 1 gram per day of cinnamon or placebo (dummy supplement) for 12 weeks. Fasting blood sugar levels in the cinnamon gro Continue reading >>

Best Bites To Boost Low Blood Sugar

Best Bites To Boost Low Blood Sugar

Picture this: You're in the mall, shopping with friends, chatting and having a great time when suddenly you start to feel a bit strange. You might become irritated or nervous, your skin may feel clammy or sweaty — and your vision may even seem blurred. If you have diabetes, you'll recognize these as the warning signs of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. “Hypoglycemia occurs when blood sugar levels in the body drop too low,” says Kelly O'Connor, RD, a dietitian and certified diabetes educator at LifeBridge Health's Northwest Hospital in Baltimore. “Glucose [sugar] is your brain’s main energy or fuel source. If the level of glucose in the body is too low, it can begin to affect your brain’s functioning. The resulting symptoms are more or less your body’s warning system that you need to take quick action in order to correct the problem.” Recognizing the Signs of Hypoglycemia O’Connor says there are a number of warning signs that indicate you might have low blood sugar. “The symptoms can range from very mild — shakiness, clamminess, feeling irritable or jittery, and having temporarily blurred vision — to much more severe, such as [experiencing] seizures and loss of consciousness or passing out, although these are less common,” she says. These symptoms can occur because of many other circumstances, so if you are diabetic and are having symptoms that could be due to low blood sugar, check your sugar levels to see what’s going on, she adds. Certain things can also put you at higher risk of hypoglycemia, especially if you skip or put off a meal or snack, take too much insulin, don't eat enough carbohydrates, exercise more than you regularly do, or drink alcohol. In addition, people with type 1 diabetes experience hypoglycemia more often than those wi Continue reading >>

Treating Low Blood Sugar

Treating Low Blood Sugar

You are at risk of having a low blood sugar reaction if you: Skip or delay a meal or snack Take too much insulin or eat too few carbohydrates Exercise Drink alcohol, especially without eating carbohydrates Check your blood sugar if you have any of these symptoms: Weakness and/or fatigue Headache Sweating Anxiety Dizziness Shaking Increased heartbeat If your blood sugar is less than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl): Eat 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrate (sample foods listed below) Wait 15 minutes and then recheck your blood sugar If your blood sugar is still less than 100 mg/dl, take another 15 grams of carbohydrate and retest your blood sugar in another 15 minutes. Repeat if necessary. Important: If you have frequent low blood sugars speak to your doctor. You may need changes in your medication and/or meal plan. Quick Carbohydrate Guide for Treating Low Blood Sugars If your blood sugar is less than 70 mg/dl, you need 15 to 30 grams of a quickly absorbed carbohydrate, like the ones listed below. Each of the following servings provides 15 grams of carbohydrate. Candies and Other Sweets 5 small gum drops 12 gummy bears 6 large jelly beans 5 Life Savers 15 Skittles 1 Tablespoon honey, jam or jelly 1 Tablespoon sugar in water 4 Starburst Beverages 1/2 cup apple juice 1/2 cup orange or grapefruit juice 1/2 cup pineapple juice 1/2 cup regular soda (not diet) 1/3 cup grape juice 1/3 cup cranberry juice 1/3 cup prune juice 1 cup fat free milk Fruits 1/2 banana 1 small apple 1 small orange 1/2 cup applesauce 2 tablespoons of raisins 15 grapes Other 3 to 4 glucose tablets 1 tube glucose gel Note: The foods listed above are easily absorbed and will raise blood sugar levels quickly. Foods that contain protein or fat — such as chocolate, candy bars, ice cream, cookies, crackers and Continue reading >>

I Have Low Blood Sugar - What Should I Eat?

I Have Low Blood Sugar - What Should I Eat?

The question: I have been diagnosed with low blood sugar. Is there a special diet I should follow? The answer: There isn't a specific diet for low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, but there are dietary modifications that can help prevent reactions altogether. I have developed meal plans for many clients with hypoglycemia who now experience no symptoms at all. Hypoglycemia can be a concern for people with diabetes taking certain blood sugar-lowering medications, but it can also affect people who don't have diabetes. Symptoms can include headache, shakiness, weakness, rapid heartbeat, anxiety, confusion and blurred vision. Diet isn't the underlying cause of hypoglycemia, but altering what you eat – and when you eat – can prevent your blood sugar from dropping too low if you're susceptible to the condition. My goal with clients is to prevent hypoglycemia from happening in the first place. And to do that, it's important to ensure glucose enters your bloodstream at a steady, even pace throughout the day. It's critical to eat every two to three hours to prevent your blood glucose from falling too low. Don't skip meals and include a snack midmorning and midafternoon. Be sure to carry snacks with you to prevent a hypoglycemic episode when you are away from home. Meals and snacks should also include carbohydrate-rich foods with a low glycemic index (GI), which means they're digested slowly and, as a result, converted to blood glucose gradually. Low GI foods include bran cereals, large flake and steel cut oatmeal, stone ground whole wheat, pasta, milk, yogurt, soy beverages, apples, pears, oranges, dried apricots, nuts and seeds, and legumes. Your meals and snacks should also include a source of protein to moderate swings in blood glucose. Lean meat, poultry, fish, low fat chees Continue reading >>

The Best Foods To Increase Low Blood Sugar

The Best Foods To Increase Low Blood Sugar

Ever feel shaky, sweaty, nauseous, or even anxious and unsure of why? You may feel one or more of these symptoms when you have low blood sugar. People with diabetes who are on certain types of medications or insulin are more likely to experience these symptoms. Low blood sugar is less than 70 milligrams per deciliter. If left untreated, low blood sugar can lead to coma or death. An effective way to bring up low blood glucose levels is to consume foods that absorb into the bloodstream quickly. Video of the Day Regular sodas and fruit juices that are not labeled diet or zero-calorie are excellent sources of rapidly absorbed carbohydrate. The fact that they contain mostly carbohydrates and no other nutrients means that these beverages get into the bloodstream quickly. Four ounces or 1/2 cup of a sugary beverage of your choice is all you need. One 4-ounce serving is equivalent to about 15 grams of carbohydrate, which is the amount you need to bring blood sugar up to normal range. Candy Is Convenient Hard candies will work well to raise blood sugar. Candies such as peppermints and fruit-flavored discs are great foods for bringing up glucose levels. They are mainly made of sugar with little if any protein or fat, and therefore they absorb quickly into the bloodstream. Jellybeans and gumdrops are also great options. It is best to read the nutrition facts to determine how many candies are needed; remember that 15 grams of carbohydrates is what you should aim for. Most people have sugar, honey or syrup stocked in their kitchens at all times. These are great sources of fast-absorbing carbohydrate, and it only takes 1 tablespoon of your choice to make up 15 grams' worth. Because these are simple forms of carbohydrate, they will increase blood sugar very quickly. Be careful not to Continue reading >>

Why Chocolate Isn’t Good For Low Blood Sugars

Why Chocolate Isn’t Good For Low Blood Sugars

Treating your low blood sugars with chocolate bars? Hypoglycemia is a tricky thing: our brain is desperately begging us for food, sugar to be exact, and it can make our appetite go hog wild! But treating our low blood sugars with something that is also high in fat will drastically slow down the absorption of the glucose in that food, which means you’ll be lower for longer and you’ll feel lower for longer! One of the biggest challenges with treating low blood sugars is finding the willpower to not over treat our low blood sugars through bingeing and eating everything in sight. Ideally, in a perfect world, we’d be able to ignore that desperate craving for every bite of food we can find and treat our blood sugars with 7 to 15 grams of fast-acting glucose. You can read a list of the fastest and slowest absorbed carbohydrates at this link, but for now here are a few of the best choices: juice glucose tabs/gels (made of dextrose: the fastest absorbed form of glucose) pixie sticks or smarties soda dried fruit Why should we care if we treat our blood sugar with 7 or 15 grams of carbs? Sometimes simply consuming 8 or so fewer grams of carbohydrates when treating a low can actually prevent your blood sugar from rebounding back up over 160 mg/dL. By treating mild lows (above 55 mg/dL) with 8 grams instead of 15, you can bring your blood sugar just barely over 90 or 100 mg/dL, the ideal range. For lows below 55 mg/dL, or lows that you know are related to a significant over-dose of insulin, more carbohydrates can be essential, but it’s good to start with 15 grams, then wait 15 minutes to see if you feel better, then test your blood sugar. If you’re still below 80 mg/dL within 15 minutes after eating then you may need to consume another 8 to 15 grams of carbohydrates. In th Continue reading >>

The 4 Foods That Will Steady Your Blood Sugar

The 4 Foods That Will Steady Your Blood Sugar

Wondering what blood sugar has to do with you, if you don’t have diabetes? Keeping your blood sugar levels as steady as possiblenow may help you avoid getting diabetes later. “As you get older, your risk for type 2 diabetes goes up,” says Alissa Rumsey, Registered Dietitian and Spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Since you can’t modify your age, it is important to take other steps to lower your risk, including maintaining a healthy weight, getting enough exercise, and balancing your diet to prevent spikes in blood sugar.” Controlling your blood sugar will also just make you feel better. “It’s best to control blood sugar—it keeps your energy stable,” says Leann Olansky, M.D., an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic. “If your blood sugar doesn’t vary that much before and after a meal, that’s a healthier way to be.” Unrelated to diabetes, symptoms of occasional high blood sugar aren’t life-threatening, but rather unpleasant and only potentially dangerous if you suffer from other health problems. “When your blood sugar is too high, it can make you feel sluggish,” says Dr. Olansky. “When it’s higher still, it can lead to dehydration and make your blood pressure unstable, and cause you to urinate more often, especially at night.” But when your blood sugar remains chronically high, insulin, a hormone that’s supposed to help your body store sugar as energy, stops working as it should. “Prolonged high blood sugar levels can lead to insulin resistance, meaning your body isn’t able to use insulin properly,” says Rumsey. “Over time this insulin resistance can develop into diabetes, when insulin isn’t able to keep your blood sugar within normal levels.” Current research reveals an association between spik Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Diet

Hypoglycemia Diet

The Importance of Individualizing your Hypoglycemia Diet – an excerpt from The Do’s and Don’ts of Hypoglycemia: An Everyday Guide to Low Blood Sugar by Roberta Ruggiero There are many books on hypoglycemia diet. If you’ve read some of them, by now you’re aware that many disagree on what type of diet to follow. It’s indeed confusing if you read one book and it tells you to eat a high protein/low carbohydrate diet, while another book says to consume low protein/high carbohydrate foods. Where does that leave you, the confused and bewildered hypoglycemic? First of all, I am sure that each author has enough confirmation and evidence that his or her diet is successful. Most likely, they all are. This is probably due to the fact that the big offenders (sugar, white flour, alcohol, caffeine and tobacco) are eliminated and six small meals are consumed instead. But the key to a successful hypoglycemia diet lies in its “individualization.” Each one of us is different. Each one of us is biochemically unique. Therefore, every diet must be tailor-made to meet our individual nutritional requirements. The list of foods your physician gives you or the list you may read in your favorite book on hypoglycemia, even the suggested food list in the back of this book, are basic guidelines. Variations come with time and patience, trial and error. Don’t be afraid to listen to your body. It will send you signals when it cannot tolerate a food. So basically, stick to the suggestions in the following do’s and don’ts, and hopefully, with just a few adjustments during your course of treatment, a new and healthier you will gradually appear. DO… DO — Keep a daily account of everything you eat for one week to ten days. In one column, list every bit of food, drink and medication Continue reading >>

Managing Low Blood Sugar Or Hypoglycemia

Managing Low Blood Sugar Or Hypoglycemia

These Foods Will Assist You in Handling Low Blood Sugar Or Hypoglycemia These food products offer downright miraculous health benefits, specifically if you’re suffering with low blood sugar or hypoglycemic symptoms. What to Eat… Following, in alphabetical order, are seven foods that will make your life better: # 1: Berries Fruits generally contain high sugar (fructose), so if this is the beginning of your hypoglycemic diet, you might want to restrict what fruit you consume– bananas should be avoided, for example. Berries are the most beneficial fruit for somebody handling low blood sugar, hypoglycemia, even hyperglycemia. They’re low in calories and sugar, moreso than a good number of other fruits, and they’re loaded with nutrients. Blueberries are a good example. They are credited with lots of health benefits, and they’re also an excellent source of vitamin C, dietary fiber, manganese, antioxidants and vitamin E. Wild blueberries contain more antioxidants than blueberries cultivated for sale, so get them fresh when you can. Try blueberries in your yogurt, cereal, or mix some with a protein shake. #2: Eggplant Consume veggies for great health! We do not all enjoy eggplant, but as reflected in current research studies, we should give it a try. The eggplant is an excellent source of phenols, a nutrient that assists with the efficient processing of sugars. Phenols have likewise been discovered to be helpful in defending against high blood pressure, and supply antioxidants. Try eggplant in a tasty Greek Moussaka dip, or try Eggplant Lasagna! # 3: Fiber Low blood sugar levels and hypoglycemia professionals advise you consume nine portions of veggies and fruit, and an oz.of nuts each day. Confine yourself to whole grain cereals and breads. These are foods all allo Continue reading >>

The 7 Best Snacks For Hypoglycemics

The 7 Best Snacks For Hypoglycemics

Low blood sugar isn’t just an issue for diabetics. Hypoglycemia is a common side effect of certain medication as well as a symptom associated with eating disorders, pregnancy and any disorder affecting the liver, heart or kidneys. If you don’t physically need an insulin pump or shots, the best way to keep your blood sugar in check is through your diet. When your blood sugar dips, you feel weak and nauseated. You may even become dizzy or irrationally angry. Snacking on something sugary, however, is just as scary, a different culprit wielding the same symptoms. Most of the food available out in the open is too simple. The solution, then, is to always have snacks on hand. Depending on what you eat, your pancreas releases various amounts of insulin. The best foods to combat a blood sugar dip (while preventing a spike) are complex carbohydrates, produce and protein. Additionally, make sure you’re drinking water with your snack—it’s an easy way to stabilize your sugar levels, especially if you’re eating something sweeter like a fruit. 1. Nuts Nuts are easy to carry and an excellent source of protein, fiber and omega-3 fatty acids, so unless you’re allergic, they’re one of the best things you can put in your body. If you’re prediabetic, eating certain nuts, like almonds, cashews or a handful of pistachios, daily can lower your risk of developing type 2. 2. Cheese Cheese may be fatty (remember, not all fat is bad), but it has relatively low sugar levels. A serving of cheese (one string cheese, or a scoop of cottage cheese) contains enough protein and fat to combat weakness and keep you going. 3. Fibrous Fruit Not all fruits are created equally, and some of them, such as grapes and bananas, are more sugar than substance. Fruits like apples, pears and mangoes ar Continue reading >>

Treating Low Blood Sugars Quickly

Treating Low Blood Sugars Quickly

Unless you are eating a meal right away, the best treatment for lows is a combination of simple and complex carbohydrates plus some protein. Quickly treating lows lessens stress hormone release and lowers the chance of the blood sugar going high after a reaction. You'll feel better if the body is quickly resupplied with the fuel it needs. Your brain, muscles and other cells will thank you for not prolonging their misery. Treatment Plant For Hypoglycemia Eat 15 to 20 grams of fast acting carbohydrates immediately. Consider how much unused bolus insulin may still be active. Decide whether complex carbohydrates and/or protein are needed to keep you stable until you eat your next meal. Test your blood sugar 30 minutes later to make sure it has risen. Repeat step 1 if necessary. After a moderate or severe low blood sugar, wait 30 to 45 minutes before driving or operating machinery. A return to normal coordination and thinking is slower than the return to a normal blood sugar. You may need to eat more than 20 grams for a low: when you took a carb bolus for a meal but never ate it. when it has been only an hour or two since your last injection of rapid insulin. when you have been more physically active. Glucose is the "sugar" in blood sugar and may also be referred to as dextrose on labels. It comes in tablets, such as Dex4 or BD Glucose tablets, and in certain candies like Sweet Tarts. Glucose breaks down quickly and reaches the blood as 100 percent glucose, which makes it the best choice for raising the blood sugar quickly. Another good product for raising your glucose is Glucolift Glucose Tablets. Table sugar consists of one glucose molecule and one fructose molecule, so when it breaks down in the stomach, only half is immediately available as glucose. Fruit juices, like or Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Hypoglycemia For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Hypoglycemia is a condition you definitely have to pay attention to, but once you get in the habit of choosing healthy foods and avoiding processed foods that can wreak havoc with your blood sugar levels, you can enjoy a healthy lifestyle without too much thought. Making the transition can lead to cravings for the “old, bad” foods, but you can come up with strategies to deal with those and find that the cravings weaken over time. Foods to Choose if You’re Hypoglycemic You can help manage your hypoglycemia, often referred to as low blood sugar, by choosing foods that improve your condition. You can enjoy a variety of foods, and the foods in the following list are tasty and healthy: Organic meats (grass-fed, if possible), vegetables, and fruits whenever you can High-quality protein (fish, poultry, lean meat, free-range eggs) Fresh fruits, preferably with a meal or half an hour before. Eat blueberries and raspberries often; stone fruits, such as peaches and nectarines, are also good. You may not be able to tolerate fruit initially. If that’s the case, wait several months before trying again. Fresh vegetables, especially dark, leafy greens, lightly cooked or, as much as possible, raw Raw, unsalted, unseasoned nuts and seeds Alternative sweeteners, such as stevia Foods to Avoid if You’re Hypoglycemic Controlling low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is easier if you just say no to foods that can throw your blood glucose levels out of whack. The following list of foods and food groups are those to avoid: Processed foods Fried foods MSG (monosodium glutamate) All soft drinks Artificial sweeteners such as aspartame (NutraSweet), sucralose (Splenda), and saccharine (Sweet’n Low) Hot dogs, sausages, and deli meats Having arguments or debates or discussing unpleasant topic Continue reading >>

Diets And Treatments For Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Diets And Treatments For Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Dear Alice, I need general information on hypoglycemia and about diets and treatments. Sincerely, Not So Sweet Dear Not So Sweet, You're probably sweeter than you think! Hypoglycemia is the medical name for an unusually low blood sugar (a.k.a., glucose) level. Excess insulin, along with glucose deficiency, usually causes hypoglycemia. Glucose is vital for health because it provides energy for the brain, central nervous system, and all of the body's cells. If a person is unable to maintain adequate blood glucose levels, major organs such, as the brain, are deprived of the fuel they need. When someone has low blood sugar, they may experience: Heart palpitations Fatigue Pale skin Shakiness Anxiety Sweating Hunger Irritability Tingling sensation around the mouth Crying out during sleep Over time, it’s possible to experience more severe symptoms as hypoglycemia worsens. Symptoms could include: Confusion, abnormal behavior or both, such as the inability to complete routine tasks Visual disturbances, such as blurred vision Seizures Loss of consciousness Hypoglycemia may be caused by several factors. One cause is type I diabetes. Type I diabetes is a chronic disease that impairs a person's ability to produce an adequate amount of insulin to control glucose levels. Insulin must be injected and hypoglycemic drugs can be taken in order to lower the glucose level in the body. Other causes include certain medications, excessive alcohol consumption, illnesses affecting the liver (such as hepatitis), an overproduction of insulin, and hormone deficiencies. Treatment of hypoglycemia may involve treating any underlying causes, monitoring blood sugar levels, and consuming glucose tablets or simple carbohydrates to manage immediate symptoms. Determining how much food is needed to raise b Continue reading >>

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