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Food List For Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Dash Diet: Healthy Eating To Lower Your Blood Pressure

Dash Diet: Healthy Eating To Lower Your Blood Pressure

The DASH diet emphasizes portion size, eating a variety of foods and getting the right amount of nutrients. Discover how DASH can improve your health and lower your blood pressure. DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The DASH diet is a lifelong approach to healthy eating that's designed to help treat or prevent high blood pressure (hypertension). The DASH diet encourages you to reduce the sodium in your diet and eat a variety of foods rich in nutrients that help lower blood pressure, such as potassium, calcium and magnesium. By following the DASH diet, you may be able to reduce your blood pressure by a few points in just two weeks. Over time, your systolic blood pressure could drop by eight to 14 points, which can make a significant difference in your health risks. Because the DASH diet is a healthy way of eating, it offers health benefits besides just lowering blood pressure. The DASH diet is also in line with dietary recommendations to prevent osteoporosis, cancer, heart disease, stroke and diabetes. DASH diet: Sodium levels The DASH diet emphasizes vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy foods — and moderate amounts of whole grains, fish, poultry and nuts. In addition to the standard DASH diet, there is also a lower sodium version of the diet. You can choose the version of the diet that meets your health needs: Standard DASH diet. You can consume up to 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day. Lower sodium DASH diet. You can consume up to 1,500 mg of sodium a day. Both versions of the DASH diet aim to reduce the amount of sodium in your diet compared with what you might get in a typical American diet, which can amount to a whopping 3,400 mg of sodium a day or more. The standard DASH diet meets the recommendation from the Dietary Guidelines for Americ Continue reading >>

28 Foods That Help Lower Blood Pressure To Normal Levels

28 Foods That Help Lower Blood Pressure To Normal Levels

There are certain foods that lower blood pressure to help you reduce how much medication you’re taking, or perhaps allow you to wean yourself off of it entirely. If you’re just trying to prevent your blood pressure from reaching a dangerous high, you can start incorporating more of these foods into your diet starting today. Some of them are pretty common, while others might require seeking them out and adding them to your cart the next time you’re out shopping. These should be consumed as part of a comprehensive approach including increased exercise and other lifestyle changes. Peas – More peas please! They can help you stave off high blood pressure due to the vegetable protein they contain, as well as other vitamins and folic acid for overall cardiovascular support to your system. The best part is they taste amazing, especially if you buy fresh, organic peas. You can also find organic frozen varieties, and these typically only cost a bit more than the conventional kind. The flavor difference is noticeable, as conventional peas tend to absorb plenty of chemicals. Baked Potato – Those on a low-carb diet are probably avoiding potatoes, and they’ve had trouble losing their starchy food image, but more and more evidence is pointing to them actually being good for you, in reasonable amounts. One of the benefits they may provide is through the kukoamine they contain. It’s not clear whether a single serving of it provides enough to lower your blood pressure, but adding these spuds to your plate seems to be worth it. You can also cook them in other ways too and still enjoy the benefits. Celery – Celery helps your heart and your veins function better, which has the trickle down effect of keep your blood pressure levels in check. It is thought that by helping to b Continue reading >>

15 Of The Best Foods For Diabetics, According To Science

15 Of The Best Foods For Diabetics, According To Science

High in soluble fiber, oats are slower to digest than processed carbs. Eat them and you’ll release glucose into the bloodstream more slowly, which will prevent spikes in your blood-sugar levels. In a 2012 study from Sweden’s Karolinska University, researchers found that eating four servings of whole grains daily reduced the risk for developing prediabetes by 30 percent. Other research shows that if you eat whole grains you experience less inflammation, which could lower the odds of your developing insulin resistance, heart disease, and high blood pressure. These science-backed strategies can work to reverse diabetes. This sweet seasoning contains a compound called hydroxychalcone, which may stimulate insulin receptors on cells and, in turn, improve your body’s ability to absorb blood sugar. Researchers from the University of California-Davis recently reviewed eight different studies on cinnamon and reported that about half to one teaspoon a day lowered fasting blood sugar levels by an average of nine points among people with diabetes. Sprinkle the fragrant spice onto oatmeal or add a dash to a cup of coffee. These myths about diabetes could be damaging your health. From Merrill Lynch Eating more whole fruits, particularly grapes, blueberries, and apples, was significantly associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a Harvard study published in the British Medical Journal in 2013. People who ate at least two servings each week of certain whole fruits reduced their risk for type 2 diabetes by as much as 23 percent when compared to those who ate less than one serving per month. Eating the whole fruit seems to be key, though; researchers found that fruit juice drinkers faced as much as a 21 percent increased risk of developing diabetes. Make sure to Continue reading >>

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, you’ve probably already started counting carbs and exercising more to keep your blood sugar stable. But you may be neglecting another, often silent problem that can go hand-in-hand with diabetes: high blood pressure. Also known as hypertension, the condition occurs in as many as two-thirds of people with diabetes. If you have both conditions and either is out of control, your risk of blood vessel damage increases, heightening the likelihood of complications like heart attack, stroke or kidney failure. If both conditions are unmanaged, the risk is even greater. Here are six suggestions to help keep your blood pressure in check. RELATED: Have Diabetes? Why You Need to Know Your Blood Pressure Numbers 1. Get up and move Exercise is an important part of any healthy lifestyle. It strengthens the heart and makes it pump more efficiently, so it is particularly critical if you have hypertension. To improve cardiovascular health and maintain your weight, try to get 150 minutes each week of aerobic activity. You want to spread this over at least three days, with no more than two consecutive days without exercise. This can include walking, cycling and swimming. 2. Eat fresh, natural foods If you find yourself struggling to figure out which foods in the grocery aisles have too much sodium, here’s a good tip to follow: Food in its natural state is best. Skip over processed foods and opt for fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and lean meats. 3. Reduce salt If you are planning to start a low-sodium diet (no more than 1,500 mg per day), the first step is to get rid of the salt shaker. In its place, use salt-free herbs, spices and other seasonings. It’s also important to watch for hidden sodium in the foods you eat. The following items are typically hi Continue reading >>

Easy Ways To Lower Cholesterol And Reduce Blood Pressure

Easy Ways To Lower Cholesterol And Reduce Blood Pressure

6 tips for getting your heart in shape from an NFL nutritionist. You might think you don’t have much in common with professional football players, but it when it comes keeping your heart healthy, you’d be smart to follow the same advice that Leslie Bonci, R.D., nutritionist for the Pittsburgh Steelers, gives the team. These heart-healthy “plays” can help you lower your cholesterol, reduce your blood pressure and improve your overall health. 1. Get Trim Steelers backup quarterback Charlie Batch dropped 12 pounds and reduced his total cholesterol about 20 percent between the end of one season and the start of the next. (Major diet changes: making better choices when eating out; swapping wine in place of apple martinis, sugar free Jell-O for gummy worms and popcorn for Doritos.) Losing as little as 5 to 10 percent of your body weight can result in better blood pressure, lower risk for diabetes and improved cholesterol levels, according to various research studies. When Pittsburgh Steeler Casey Hampton (a.k.a. “Big Snack”) arrived at training camp a few years ago too heavy to play, team nutritionist Leslie Bonci worked with the team’s chef to create meals designed to slash Hampton’s intake of calories and saturated fats, which can elevate “bad” LDL cholesterol, leading to plaque buildup in arteries. In place of fried chicken wings, Bonci gave Hampton grilled chicken strips with low-fat dipping sauces. Other ways to reduce saturated fat: replace butter with olive and canola oils, which contain good amounts of heart healthy monounsaturated fats; choose lean meats, poultry, fish and beans instead of higher fat meats; select nonfat or low-fat milk and yogurt in place of whole-milk versions; eat full-fat cheeses sparingly. Avoid trans fats, which also increas Continue reading >>

Shopping List For Diabetics

Shopping List For Diabetics

Control Type 2 Diabetes, Shed Fat Our Shopping List for Diabetics is based on the Pritikin Eating Plan, regarded worldwide as among the healthiest diets on earth. The Pritikin Program has been documented in more than 100 studies in peer-reviewed medical journals to prevent and control many of our nation’s leading killers – heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and obesity as well as type 2 diabetes. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, pay special attention. Research on newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics coming to the Pritikin Longevity Center illustrate how profoundly beneficial early intervention can be. Scientists from UCLA followed 243 people in the early stages of diabetes (not yet on medications). Within three weeks of coming to Pritikin, their fasting blood sugar (glucose) plummeted on average from 160 to 124. Research has also found that the Pritikin Program reduces fasting insulin by 25 to 40%. Shopping List for Diabetics – More Features Here’s another big plus to our Shopping List for Diabetics. In addition to icons that are diabetes-focused like “sugar free,” this list uses icons like “low cholesterol” and “low sodium” because many people with diabetes are working to control not just diabetes but related conditions like high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure. This list can help you identify those foods most advantageous in helping you reach your personal health goals. Diabetic Food Taboos? Not Anymore! Have you been told you have to give up juicy watermelon or sweet grapes? What if we told you those foods really aren’t taboo? Watch the Video Our Healthy Shopping List for Diabetics also lists the top 10 things to put back on the shelf if you’re trying to: Lose Weight Lower Blood Pres Continue reading >>

Grocery Lists For Type 2 Diabetes: What To Buy And What To Avoid

Grocery Lists For Type 2 Diabetes: What To Buy And What To Avoid

Diabetes is best managed by being mindful of carbohydrate intake, eating smaller meals regularly, and choosing nutrient dense, healthful options. Knowing what food to eat can make a huge difference to controlling, and, potentially, reversing type 2 diabetes. Making informed food choices can be helped by writing out a grocery list of foods that improve overall health, and benefit someone who has type 2 diabetes. Contents of this article: Lists of good foods A person who has type 2 diabetes can make it easier to avoid buying unhealthful foods by going to the grocery store armed with a list. Choosing healthful, satisfying foods that meet individual nutrition requirements can help people with type 2 diabetes manage their condition. By making smart food choices and buying the right foods, a person can ensure they have enough diabetic-friendly ingredients on hand to take them from breakfast through to the last meal, or snack, of the day. Vegetables Vegetables are the base of a healthy diet. Not only do they offer excellent sources of vitamins and minerals, but they are fibrous, too, and help the body feel full and satisfied. This in turn can deter overeating, which may cause blood sugar issues. Some vegetables to add to the shopping list include: salad greens broccoli cauliflower squash green beans asparagus Brussel sprouts red, green, orange, or yellow peppers Beans and legumes Beans are an excellent source of dietary fiber and protein. They can often be used in place of a portion of the protein that is needed in a diet. Here are some examples of what beans to pick up in either their canned or dried forms: black beans lentils white beans chickpeas kidney beans pinto beans Fruits Despite their high sugar content, fresh or frozen fruits pack a powerful nutritional punch with t Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For Diabetics With High Blood Pressure

Diet Tips For Diabetics With High Blood Pressure

Diabetes is closely linked to high blood pressure due to its effects on vessels and circulatory system. This close relation makes a diabetic more prone to get an abnormally high blood pressure. In both disorders, diet has a pivotal role in relieving or exacerbating the intensity of disease. In diabetes, foods high in sugars directly affect the glucose levels within a few minutes of intake. In hypertension same goes for sodium and salts, which further increase blood pressure. Hence, it’s important to follow an optimized diet according to your body and health needs. Such diet plan must be designed in such a way that it reduces both the aggravating factors of diabetes and hypertension. 1600-2000 calories are recommended in a day for such patients. Whatever you eat, always remember to restrict your salt content to 1500 milligrams or less to control your hypertension. Following is a brief description of useful diets to control both the diabetes and hypertension: Diet tips for diabetes and high blood pressure Stop eating Pickles: Pickles are loaded with Salt and Oil, Hence it is wiser to avoid them Avoid ready made Soups : Ready Made soups also pack in lot of sodium, So it is important to do this. Are you a coffee lover ? limit yourself to only two cups a day because coffee contains cafestol which may increase your cholestrol. Add Rice Bran oil to your diet , Rice bran might help lower cholesterol because it contains the right amount of oryzanol which is an antioxidant. there are many more benefits of using rice bran oil Try to consume foods rich in pottasium, magnesium and calcium like Almonds, pistachio nuts, soy beans, peanuts, rice bran oil, apples, oranges, sesame, brinjal etc, banana is also rich in pottasium but it spikes your blood sugar instantaneously. Monitor you Continue reading >>

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Many people think that diabetics have to avoid many foods, including different fruits. However, there are super healthy fruits for diabetics because they provide important minerals, vitamins, phytochemicals and fiber. Some low-carb fruits are also good for diabetics. People who have this disease should care about the ratings of the glycemic index to measure the carbohydrates which are converted to the blood Gl. Scientifically, the suitable glycemic index for diabetics is below 50. The following are the top 19 good fruits for diabetics and high blood pressure. Let’s check out these fruits to control your blood sugar and cure diabetes naturally. 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure Revealed! 1. Apples (Gl: 38, Gl/a fresh apple: 150g:7) Apples are very high in vitamin C, antioxidants and fiber. Apple pulp and peel contain pectin which helps to detoxify your body and remove harmful waste from the body. Pectin also is high in galacturonic acid that can help diabetics lower their insulin requirements up to 30%. You can eat a fresh apple or toss some slices of apples into a cup of tea and enjoy your breakfast. A medium apple contains about 12 g of carbohydrates and 54 calories. You can eat fresh apples without peeling them because apple peel includes a good source of anti-oxidants that good for digestion. Furthermore, apples are available throughout any seasons of the year. For containing a large amount of the soluble fiber, apples are fruit good for diabetics. Apples help diabetes patients reduce cholesterol, normalize their blood sugar level and improve their bowel function. Apple is also good at eliminating inflammation in the body and help diabetics beat infections effectively. Besides, apple is rich in anti-oxidants that help boost immunity. Apple also h Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat In A Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Following a type 2 diabetes diet doesn’t mean you have to give up all the things you love — you can still enjoy a wide range of foods and, in some cases, even help reverse type 2 diabetes. Indeed, creating a diet for diabetes is a balancing act: It includes a variety of healthy carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. The trick is ultimately choosing the right combination of foods that will help keep your blood sugar level in your target range and avoid big swings that can cause diabetes symptoms — from the frequent urination and thirst of high blood sugar to the fatigue, dizziness, headaches, and mood changes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). The Basics of the Type 2 Diabetes Diet: What Should You Eat? To follow a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, you must first understand how different foods affect your blood sugar. Carbohydrates, which are found to the largest degree in grains, bread, pasta, milk, sweets, fruit, and starchy vegetables, are broken down into glucose in the blood faster than other types of food, which raises blood sugar, potentially leading to hyperglycemia. Protein and fats do not directly impact blood sugar, but both should be consumed in moderation to keep calories down and weight in a healthy range. To hit your blood sugar level target, eat a variety of foods but monitor portions for foods with a high carbohydrate content, says Alison Massey, RD, CDE, the director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. “[Foods high in carbohydrates] have the most impact on blood sugar level. This is why some people with diabetes count their carbohydrates at meals and snacks,” she says. How Many Carbs Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), you can calculate Continue reading >>

Top 10 Natural Foods To Control High Blood Pressure

Top 10 Natural Foods To Control High Blood Pressure

17th May is globally celebrated as World Hypertension Day. Its a day dedicated towards understanding this silent killer better. High BP is one of the biggest health risks that faces the global population today. Some would say it's almost an epidemic. High blood pressure can cause countless problems like diabetes, stroke, heart disease, kidney failure and even death! Hypertension is an unusual condition which has almost no symptoms. The only way to catch it is to get your blood pressure checked regularly. If studies are to be believed, only one-third of all people know they suffer from high blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured in 'millimetres of mercury' (mm Hg) and is written as two separate numbers. The first number or the systolic number measures the pressure inside the arteries when heart muscles contract. The second number measures the pressure in the arteries when the muscle is resting between heartbeats. How high should your blood pressure be? According to the American Heart Association, 120/80 is considered to be the normal limit. The range between 120/80 - 140/90 is referred to as 'pre-hypertension' and anything over 140/90 should be addressed. It's important to note that one reading does not indicate that you suffer from high blood pressure. The numbers need to be steady overtime. Possible Causes for High Blood Pressure While the exact cause of hypertension remains unknown, a few facts have been identified by health experts are: excess consumption of salt, lack of exercise, an unhealthy diet and genetic predisposition. Other factors that increase the odds are: cigarette smoking, binge drinking, obesity and stress. A recent study pointed out that processed or canned food and drinks might also be contributing to this increase. How to Control High Blood Pres Continue reading >>

7-day Diet Plan For High Blood Pressure (dietitian-made)

7-day Diet Plan For High Blood Pressure (dietitian-made)

Looking for a sample meal plan to follow… one that you can follow right now? The 7-Day Diet Plan For High Blood Pressure is a Dietitian-made plan to help make life easier (and more delicious) when learning what you should and should not eat with hypertension. It’s designed to be: Simple to follow for busy people with many mouths to feed, as long as you prepare in advance Realistic, with recipes that are not too complex Low in salt (no bread, minimal use of sauces and condiments). Salt restrictions seem unnecessary for healthy individuals, but is hugely beneficial for those with existing high blood pressure (1). Rich in nutrients that may influence blood pressure, including potassium and magnesium. Budget-friendly (except for one salmon dish, and two with quinoa). Favourable for those who love peanut butter and sweet potatoes. I have a huge bias towards those foods because they are delightful (not together though!). You can follow the entire plan, but perhaps it’s better to choose your favourite recipes and include them one at a time. Almost all recipes are from qualified Dietitians that I encourage you to follow. The 7-Day Diet Plan For High Blood Pressure Must-Read Starting Notes: Consult with your personal doctor or Dietitian first: While I am a qualified Dietitian, I’m not familiar with your personal medical history, your current medications or additional factors that need to be considered when altering your diet. Choose water as your drink: The meal plan does not include drinks, but keep a bottle of water with you at all times and drink up. Herbal tea (especially Hibiscus), regular tea and coffee should be fine, except for those who are sensitive to caffeine. Flexibility is key: Of course this plan cannot meet all your individual needs, so if there is an ing Continue reading >>

Add These 20 Foods To Your Diet To Lower Blood Pressure

Add These 20 Foods To Your Diet To Lower Blood Pressure

New CDC guidelines will add millions of men and women to the ranks of those with high blood pressure. While 140/80 was once considered the high blood pressure threshold, 130/80 millileters of mercury has taken its place as the magic number. While a staggering 75 million Americans — that’s nearly one third of the adult population — were already struggling with high blood pressure, this new calibration will add an additional 4.2 million people to this unlucky club, indicating an increased risk of heart attack, stroke, and other life-altering health consequences along the way. Skipping the salt and squeezing in some regular workouts can help keep your blood pressure from reaching dangerous levels, but it takes a more proactive approach to keep your blood pressure under control in the long run. Consider a blood pressure-lowering diet. While that phrase may conjure images of unseasoned egg whites and limp steamed veggies, getting your blood pressure into a healthy range is more than just doable — it can be a downright delight. Start by adding the Eat This, Not That! approved list of blood pressure-lowering foods into your regular routine and watch your numbers go from scary to stellar in no time. 1. Mangoes Don’t deprive yourself of your favorite sweet treats just because you’re trying to lower your blood pressure. Mangoes are a great source of both fiber and beta-carotene, both of which have been deemed effective at lowering blood pressure. In fact, research published in Hypertension Research suggests that adding beta-carotene-rich foods to your diet may be an effective way to lower blood pressure in no time. 2. Salmon While fatty foods may seem like they have no place in a high blood pressure-fighting meal plan, fatty fish like salmon are a major exception to t Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetic Diet: Foods That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

There is no single diabetes diet, meal plan, or diet that is diabetes-friendly that can serve as a correct meal plan for all patients with diabetes (type 2, gestational, or type 1 diabetes). Glycemic index, carbohydrate counting, the MyPlate method, and the TLC diet plan are all methods for determining healthy eating habits for diabetes management. The exact type and times of meals on a diabetic meal plan depend upon a person's age and gender, how much exercise you get and your activity level, and the need to gain, lose, or maintain optimal weight. Most diabetic meal plans allow the person with diabetes to eat the same foods as the rest of the family, with attention to portion size and timing of meals and snacks. Eating a high-fiber diet can help improve blood cholesterol and blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Glycemic index is a way to classify carbohydrates in terms of the amount that they raise blood sugar. High glycemic index foods raise blood sugar more than lower index foods. Some patients with type 2 use supplements as complementary medicine to treat their disease. However, there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of supplements in treating the disease. A diabetes meal plan (diabetes diet) is a nutritional guide for people with diabetes that helps them decide when to consume meals and snacks as well as what type of foods to eat. There is no one predetermined diabetes diet that works for all people with diabetes. The goal of any diabetic meal plan is to achieve and maintain good control over the disease, including control of blood glucose and blood lipid levels as well as to maintaining a healthy weight and good nutrition. Health care professionals and nutritionists can offer advice to help you create the best meal plan to manage your diabe Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure: What Can You Eat?

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure: What Can You Eat?

Many people suffer from these two diseases and might think it’s too hard to follow a diet that excludes salt and sugar. It is possible to carry out a healthy diet that meets the needs of both conditions, however. In today’s article we want to share with you what you can eat if you suffer from diabetes and high blood pressure. Tips for diabetics and people with high blood pressure It’s very important that you respect the recommendations of your doctor concerning what you can and cannot eat, or what foods are better reduced and avoided. Aside from what you eat, there are certain habits that can make the difference between leading a healthy life or one where your diabetes and high blood pressure symptoms don’t allow you to perform your daily activities. Here are some recommendations you should remember: Avoid bad lifestyle habits, like being sedentary and smoking. Don’t drink alcohol because of its high sugar content. Don’t consume processed foods, those soaked in brine, or smoked meats. Reduce the amount of salt in your meals and avoid putting salt on the table. Instead use herbs like oregano and rosemary to season your dishes. Drink 10 glasses of water during a day (have the first five in the morning). Develop a meal plan with a specialist. Slowly chew each bite of food and give yourself 30 minutes to finish eating. Consume three meals a day, one every six hours, with small snacks between meals. Measure the proportions and amounts that you eat on a daily basis. Be disciplined in your routine and lifestyle. Take a notebook to log your meals and any moods or symptoms. Measure your glucose and blood pressure at the same time every day (for example, after breakfast, before lunch, or after a nap). What should the diabetes and high blood pressure diet contain? Beca Continue reading >>

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