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Eating Too Much Sugar On Metformin

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Sugar is irresistible to most people. So irresistible, in fact, that sugar cravings might be rooted in evolution. Craving sugary foods, or so the theory goes, could help prevent starvation. In a modern world, however, where food is often plentiful, sugar consumption is linked to diabetes, obesity, and other health problems. Research into the connection between sugar consumption and diabetes is ongoing. Most doctors argue that sugar alone does not trigger diabetes. But some emerging research suggests a closer link between sugar consumption and diabetes than was previously thought. Can people get diabetes from eating too much sugar? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect the body's ability to regulate blood glucose levels. But eating sugar will not cause type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which causes the body to attack cells that produce insulin. Damage to these cells undermines the body's ability to manage blood glucose. Type 2 diabetes is more complex. Sugar consumption will not directly cause diabetes. However, excess sugar consumption can cause weight gain. Obesity increases the risk of diabetes. Once a person has diabetes, eating too much sugar can make symptoms worse, since diabetes makes it more difficult for the body to manage blood sugar levels. Understanding the link between sugar and diabetes Although eating sugar is not directly linked to developing diabetes, some evidence suggests that increased overall availability of sugar makes diabetes more common. A 2013 study that looked at 175 different countries found that more sugar in the food supply increased diabetes rates. Specifically, for every additional 150 calories of sugar available per day per person, diabetes levels rose 1 percent. This change continued even when researchers con Continue reading >>

Stomach Aches...would They Happen Because Of Too Much Sugar Ingested?

Stomach Aches...would They Happen Because Of Too Much Sugar Ingested?

stomach aches...would they happen because of too much sugar ingested? Friend Diagnosed with type two on July 5th, 2006 stomach aches...would they happen because of too much sugar ingested? I have to admit, that while I do eat foods, I also ingest junk foods, such as cookies, and m&m's and so forth...I have been "bad' lately...off and on, but, I am wondering if eating these sugars can cause a queasiness in the stomach area? Is it that my body isn't making enough insulin? or what is happening here? also, long term effects , since I still love the junk food(but, I DO eat regular foods, as well, what are we talking about here..could I be in serious trouble here?) Friend Diabetes suks - 2 kids with type 1 - I have type 2 If you are taking metformin, it can certainly cause yo stomach trouble as a side effect - cramps, nausea and diarhea. I used to love the junk food, and eating it will increase your cravings for it. It is called junk food for a reason, perhaps a better name would be killer food. Junk food by itself won't cause you to feel queasy. Regardless of how unhealthy it may be for you, it is still food and if you're body couldn't handle food we'd all be dead a long time ago. What can make you feel bad is having too much junk food, or regular food for that matter. Your body can only handle so much any anything, good or bad, and if you're eating a lot you won't feel well. It turns out you have to eat a lot less junk food than regular food to feel bad because junk food is often jam packed with calories whereas regular foods not so much. So, it may sound like redundant, but watch how much you're eating of any kind of food. Insulin (avg): 19.8 U (35% bolus); CHO (avg): 87g; BG (avg): 97 mg/dl; SD: 31 Tests (avg): 5.1; High: 168; Low: 51; highs>140: 3; lows<70: 10 Friend Di Continue reading >>

Metformin – What Every Diabetic Should Know

Metformin – What Every Diabetic Should Know

Diabetes affects millions of people throughout the world and for all the ones who know that they have it and are doing something to control it there will be just as many who do not know they have it. It is caused by the pancreas not creating enough insulin and this leaves you with too much sugar in the blood as your body can not process it properly. Metformin is a drug that is used to treat diabetes. Its main role is in regulating the amount of sugar in the body and this alone will help the diabetic. It only treats type 2 diabetes and there are other medicines available for those suffering from type 1. It is a member of a group of drugs known as biguanides and they have been used effectively for some time. How Does It Work? Metformin manages to control the amount of sugar in the blood in three distinct ways. Firstly it works on the food that you eat. Most foods have some degree of sugar in them and too much can cause the diabetes to become worse. The amount that the body absorbs is important and Metformin makes sure that not too much gets through. If too much does get through the body cannot deal with it and it is then that you become ill. Secondly it keeps down the amount of sugar that is produced by the liver. If this can be slowed down, there will be less sugar travelling around the body and the outcome will be that you are less likely to be ill. Its final function is to make sure that insulin is regulated. It works on both injected insulin and that produced naturally by the body. As a result of this some people who already have to inject may find that they no longer have to do this, or at least cut down the amount of times they have to do it. It will be important how much Metformin that you take and the amount will be prescribed by your doctor. This will be an exact Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

I’d be willing to bet that most everyone has been told—and therefore believes—that people with diabetes cannot have any sugar and are resigned to living without dessert for the rest of their lives. Well, as a Certified Diabetes Educator, I'm here to tell you that this is a myth. People with diabetes can eat sugar, desserts, and almost any food that contains caloric sweeteners (molasses, honey, maple syrup, and more). Why? Because people with diabetes can eat foods that contain carbohydrates, whether those carbohydrates come from starchy foods like potatoes or sugary foods such as candy. It’s best to save sweets and desserts for special occasions so you don’t miss out on the more nutritious foods your body needs. However, when you do decide to include a sweet treat, make sure you keep portions small and use your carbohydrate counting plan. No sugar ever again? No way! The idea that people with diabetes should avoid sugar is decades old. Logically, it makes sense. Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar. Sugary foods cause blood sugar levels to increase. Therefore people with diabetes should avoid sugary foods in order to prevent hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and keep their diabetes under control. However, simply avoiding sugary foods does not go very far in terms of controlling blood sugar. Here's why. After you eat, your blood sugar level (aka postprandial blood glucose level) is largely determined by the total amount of carbohydrate you ate, not the source of the carbohydrates eaten. There are two types of carbohydrates that elevate your blood sugar levels: sugar and starch. Both will elevate your blood glucose to roughly the same level (assuming you ate the same amount of each). For example, if you were to eat a ½ cup of regular ice cream (1 Continue reading >>

How Dangerous Is A Sugar Binge?

How Dangerous Is A Sugar Binge?

I am a type 2 diabetic on medication — metformin and Glucobay. If I go on an occasional sugar binge, will I suffer from any serious immediate side effects, e.g., a stroke or a heart attack? And will there be any long-term damage? — Gerald, Malaysia The seriousness of the damage depends on how frequently you go on a sugar binge, the quality and quantity of the sugar-containing foods, how much you eat, and what you do to compensate for this dietary indiscretion. If the sugar is a once-a-year affair and you exercise to burn the excess calories, check your sugar levels, and medicate appropriately, you might be able to minimize the potential complications. If you have sugar binges on a regular basis, regardless of your activity level, the high sugar levels will contribute to dangerous complications. Excessive levels of sugar, even transiently, are toxic to the body, including the cells that line the blood vessels and the pancreas. The dysfunction of these cells is one of the immediate effects of high sugar levels, leading to an increase in insulin resistance and worsening of your diabetes. The long-term effect, as you have guessed, includes strokes and heart attacks. This effect is accelerated by the usual culprits in sweets. As you know, most sugar products such as candy bars, cakes, cookies, and ice cream are also high in fat, the very root cause of clogged and inflamed blood vessels. They are also dense in calories. The excess calories turn into fat, and excess fat leads to obesity and furthers insulin resistance. Despite taking metformin and Glucobay, sugar binges raise the glucose and fat level in your bloodstream. This, in the short and long term, can lead to a stroke and heart attack; at a minimum it leads towards the continued formation of plaques in your blood v Continue reading >>

Can I Take An Extra Metformin

Can I Take An Extra Metformin

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Currently on 2000mg of Metformin in total, 500mg twice in the morning and twice in the evening with dinner. Would it be ok to take an extra 1 just as i go to sleep ? (In the hopes of lower levels in the morning ?) Currently on 2000mg of Metformin in total, 500mg twice in the morning and twice in the evening with dinner. Would it be ok to take an extra 1 just as i go to sleep ? (In the hopes of lower levels in the morning ?) I would say that you should never exceed your prescribed dose. If you feel that your blood glucose levels are too high on your current dose, then discuss it with your doctor or nurse. Also, if you feel your blood glucose levels are too high in the mornings, then there are quite a few things you can do before resorting to increased medication. Have a google for Dawn Phenomenon, which may explain what is happening. And many of us have experimented with different quantities and timing of food and snacks which (for some people) have a great effect on their morning readings. Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member The maximum dose of Metformin is 4 tablets, so the short answer would be no. I never saw any difference when I stopped taking it, so I doubt it will have the effect you desire. It isn't anything fast acting, so it doesn't have an immediate effect anyway. Ok thank you. This morning it was quite a bit lower at 8.3, throughout the day it's around 7 still. Ok thank you. This morning it was quite a bit lower at 8.3, throughout the day it's around 7 still. you do count your grams of carbs dont you ? that is essential to gain control I believe yes 2000mg is the maximal dose of recomended metformin, I only get 1700mg a day a Continue reading >>

Type 2 - Metformin Increasing Blood Sugars | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 2 - Metformin Increasing Blood Sugars | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi hubby has recently started on Metaformin as been diagnosed as T2. His sugar levels were about 7 when he started on these pill. Now that he is up to two pills a day he is steadily high first in the morning between 12 to 15 & its starting in afternoon as well. Coupled with blinding headaches he is starting to think he is better off without these pills. Can anyone give me a clue as to why his sugar levels are rising on these pills but if he stops taking them for a couple days then his sugar levels reduce right down? ButtterflyLady Type 2 Well-Known Member I have never heard of Metformin increasing blood glucose. Maybe he should go back to his doctor and ask about it? Hi hubby has recently started on Metaformin as been diagnosed as T2. His sugar levels were about 7 when he started on these pill. Now that he is up to two pills a day he is steadily high first in the morning between 12 to 15 & its starting in afternoon as well. Coupled with blinding headaches he is starting to think he is better off without these pills. Can anyone give me a clue as to why his sugar levels are rising on these pills but if he stops taking them for a couple days then his sugar levels reduce right down? Did your husband adjust his diet at all when he started on Metformin? Did he receive any dietary advice from whoever wrote the prescription? He should use his meter to discover why his levels are going up. Test before a meal and again 2hr later any rise should Idealy be below 2mmol/l . anything above indicates that his meal contained far too many carbohydrates. Metformin won't cause a rise in glucose levels but by using my meter I have found that bread(any sort), pasta, rice, Continue reading >>

Metformin (oral Route)

Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur with lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise or diet. Counseling on birth control and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in pregnancy for patients with diabetes. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would norm Continue reading >>

My Hubby Is Losing Too Much Weight

My Hubby Is Losing Too Much Weight

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hello everyone, I am new here and I hope everyone is well. I have a query about my hubby who is diabetic type 2 and is losing so much weight. He is constantly hungry and is always eating. He has a strenous job and sometimes feels weak at work. What can he do??? Is there something he is doing wrong. Bonny. Hello everyone, I am new here and I hope everyone is well. I have a query about my hubby who is diabetic type 2 and is losing so much weight. He is constantly hungry and is always eating. He has a strenous job and sometimes feels weak at work. What can he do??? Is there something he is doing wrong. Bonny. Hello Bonny welcome to the forum. Is your husband low carbing? My feeling is he isn't if he is feeling hungry. Could you give us and idea of his daily food intake, and what medicines he is on, we should be able to help more and properly if we have all the information. For now, don't worry, what ever the problem is with hubby, someone on here will have been through it and know what to do. soups or sandwich mostly cheese for lunch home cooked meal of chicken with either pasta or rice. For snacks he has nuts and raisins, fruit. He has the ocassional cake or biscuit but mostly Jacobs Crackers. soups or sandwich mostly cheese for lunch home cooked meal of chicken with either pasta or rice. For snacks he has nuts and raisins, fruit. He has the ocassional cake or biscuit but mostly Jacobs Crackers. The eggs for breakfast are fine, tell him to add bacon and mushrooms as well, that will help fill him, the cereal is not good, and needs to go. The sandwiches for lunch, hmm, that will depend on the bread, but I will lay odds if you look at the nutritional infor Continue reading >>

What Happens If I Eat Chocolates, Cakes, And Sugar When Im On Metformin For Pcos? | Yahoo Answers

What Happens If I Eat Chocolates, Cakes, And Sugar When Im On Metformin For Pcos? | Yahoo Answers

What happens if i eat chocolates, cakes, and sugar when im on metformin for PCOS? I'm on Metformin 500 mg x 2 a day... i'm wondering how bad i should feel about having this heavenly piece of chocolate mouse cake that i just did. Im sure there are alot of you girls out there who do cheat,once in a blue moon. But What Happens when we eat sweets while taking Metformin/ Glucophage??? Im... show more I'm on Metformin 500 mg x 2 a day... i'm wondering how bad i should feel about having this heavenly piece of chocolate mouse cake that i just did. Im sure there are alot of you girls out there who do cheat,once in a blue moon. But What Happens when we eat sweets while taking Metformin/ Glucophage??? Im not diabetic,.Plz helpp!!! Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: No, you aren't diabetic . . . yet! You are like most other PCOS people and Insulin Resistant which is diabetes if not treated. Ok, Metformin is a systemic drug and takes about 3 weeks or more to become fully effective. It does not have anything to do with the amount of goodies we eat. It works more on the liver preventing it from dumping a bunch of stored glucose on the system and it makes the body use the available insulin more effectively, but does not lower glucose levels at all. It works on all the endocrine system hormone levels which is where PCOS comes in. NOTHING! Nothing happens when we take metformin and goodies! And YES! My endocrinologist recommended an occasional serving of pure sin!! He said it makes life a lot more tolerable on a restricted carbohydrate food plan. He was specifically refering to the lovely chocolate cakes! He said a "cheat treat" is totally necessary in our lifestyle food plans but to be sure to have only one serving or better yet half a serving occasionally! And t Continue reading >>

I Take Metformin 500 Three Times A Day, Yet My Blood Sugar Is High?

I Take Metformin 500 Three Times A Day, Yet My Blood Sugar Is High?

Q: I take metformin 500 three times a day, and I eat less carbs and I exercise, yet my blood sugar levels remain high—up to 171 this morning. I'm sorry to hear that your blood glucose levels remain elevated despite taking metformin, watching your carbs, and exercising. Are you getting enough high-quality sleep on a regular basis? Inadequate sleep can cause high blood sugar readings in the morning even in people who eat right, exercise, and take medication as directed. Your elevated fasting blood blood sugar may also be due to the Dawn Phenomenon, in which increased production of growth hormone and other hormones overnight cause your liver to release stored sugar. Sometimes having a small protein snack—like a handful of nuts or a hard-boiled egg—before bed can help lower morning blood sugar. In fact, some people find that adding some carbs, like a half cup of berries, to the protein snack actually helps bring down their morning blood sugar even more. However, this is very individual, so it's a good idea to experiment with different snacks and amounts of food to see how your own blood sugar responds. Finally, consistency with diet, exercise, and medication is important, and it may take some time for blood sugar to normalize. If the measures above and keeping carb intake down, speak with your endocrinologist or other diabetes specialist. Answered By dLife Expert: Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian living in Southern California. Disclaimer The content of this website, such as text, graphics, images, and other material on the site (collectively, “Content”) are for informational purposes only. The Content is not intended to be a substitute for, and dLife does not provide, professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatm Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Metformin is often one of the first medications prescribed to people with diabetes, according to the Canadian Diabetes Association (see reference 2 under Highlights of Revisions). It helps lower your blood sugar levels by decreasing the amount of glucose, or sugar, produced by your liver. It also helps your insulin, the hormone that gets the sugar out of your blood and into your cell, work better. (see reference 1 pg 1 under Clinical Pharmacology under Mechanism of Action para 1). While you do not need to avoid any foods when taking metformin, you may need to limit or avoid alcohol (see reference 1 pg 8 under alcohol intake.). Metformin and Alcohol If your doctor has prescribed metformin to help you get better control over your blood sugar, you should not drink an excessive amount of alcohol, including beer, wine or hard liquor (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). Too much alcohol causes metformin to breakdown too much lactate, which is a by-product of glucose and amino acids, and may lead to lactic acidosis (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). If you drink alcohol, it's OK to have moderate amounts while on metformin, which means up to 1 drink a day for women and 2 drinks a day for men (see reference 3 pg x). But everyone is different, so be sure to talk to your doctor first to a safe amount of alcohol for you. Lactic acidosis is actually not very common when taking metformin, but it can be dangerous, and even deadly, according to the Food and Drug Administration (see reference 1 pg 15). Symptoms that warrant an immediate call to your doctor include difficulty breathing, stomach pain, diarrhea, muscle cramps, unusual sleepiness or weakness or an all-around achiness. Continue reading >>

What Does Metformin Do For Eating To Many Carbs Or Sugar

What Does Metformin Do For Eating To Many Carbs Or Sugar

what does metformin do for eating to many carbs or sugar If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. what does metformin do for eating to many carbs or sugar Does anyone know what exactly metformin does for you if you eat to much sugars or carbs. iam horrible with my diet and was wondering if metformin would even out all the sugars and carbs I eat. Thanks... Well, from my personal standpoint, Met has greatly reduced my cravings for sugar. I guess since it's balancing out my body's insulin levels, my body's not having those terrible urges for sugar. I used to just eat sugary things all the time, and if I didn't have anything sweet, then I would HAVE to have a Coke. Now, with my sweet cravings normal, the physical side effect I have if I over indulge in sweets, carbs, or greasy food is diarhea. Yep, it's gross. I think of it as my body's way of saying, "You idiot! Krispy Kreme is not your friend!" On the upside, with the lowered sweet intake and the -ahem- immediate flushing of "naughty" food, I've lost 10lbs in 4 months. I was only about 15lbs overweight to start, so I'm on a good path. I believe that I shall look upon the goodness of the LORD in the land of the living! be strong, and let your heart take courage; I totally noticed a difference in my body's needs for sugar. Used to be I was terrified of my parents brining cookies and cakes into the house because I just knew I wouldn't be able to control myself and eat them all and then my sister would get mad at me and I would feel bad... Now a box of cookies that would last the weekends (if that) last th Continue reading >>

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin

September 30, 2015 by Dr. Brooke in Be Better , Eat Better , pcos 3 Things You Need To Know About Metformin Metformin is recommended by doctors for women with PCOS that want to loose weight or otherwise manage their PCOS and insulin resistance. But there are 3 very important things that you need to know about it including the fact that it's not the only option! Let me first say, I dont hate Metformin for women with PCOS . For some women it really does help spur ovulation, control blood sugar and help with some weight management but.its not without its share of issues. And its definitely not the magic bullet for weight loss although its usually presented that way. How Metformin (or its generic form: Glucophage) Works Metformin is typically given with meals throughout the day, or more commonly now the extended release version is given once with dinner or at bedtime. While only having to pop a pill one time per day is always appealing, this once a day dosing (especially at bedtime) is where I see the most problems with my patients. It lowers both fasting and post meal glucose levels by decreasing the glucose absorption in your intestines after a meal; as well as decreasing the amount of glucose your liver makes for later use. It also does help improve insulin sensitivity by increasing glucose movement into a cell. All sounds good so far right? Not so fast, here are the most common issues I see in women using Metformin: Metformin is notorious for causing sometimes severe digestive issues including stomach pain or upset, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and even a sense of body weakness or metallic taste in the mouth in some. And it is touted as not causing low blood sugar as many older blood sugar lowering drugs did, however I see it every day in my practice that Metformin can m Continue reading >>

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