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Homemade Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Homemade Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Ruby became sick in August of 2008. He was urinating a lot, had increased water consumption, and looked thinner than normal. He ended up in a veterinary hospital where he was diagnosed with diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, and pancreatitis. Ketoacidosis can be a life-threatening complication for those suffering from diabetes. It occurs due to a lack of insulin which the body responds to by burning fat for fuel and producing ketones. High levels of ketones can poison the body. Simply put, Ruby was quite ill. In an attempt to comfort Ruby, I would crawl into his hospital kennel, hold him, and sing to him. ‘You Are My Sunshine’ was on regular rotation. Perhaps I did less singing and more pleading and praying. Either way, after a week in the hospital I was able to take my sunshine home. It was a challenge to convince Ruby that getting two insulin shots a day was actually a good thing. I had success after following some great advice: use his food as a reward for receiving the shot. I started by putting his full food bowl on the counter while prepping his shot. Like any food-motivated dog, movement of his food bowl commands his attention. But then the approaching needle would make him run away. After he ran away, I would put his food bowl in the cupboard. That movement of his bowl would bring him back again. Round and round we went until he realized the simple equation of food bowl on counter + shot in dog = food bowl on floor + full dog belly. See, Ruby, insulin shots are a great thing! Now he rushes each injection along so he can eat. The hospital sent us home with a few samples of diabetic dog food. I sought advice from Ruby’s vet on both packaged and homemade diabetic dog food. Dr. Old Vet was quite ambivalent and offered little to no opinion or advice. His disinter Continue reading >>

Finding Foods That Provide More Fiber For Your Canine

Finding Foods That Provide More Fiber For Your Canine

Most dog foods contain 2%-5% Fiber. That is more than enough for your pet to stay healthy and happy. In most cases. However, there are times when you need to increase the fiber in your pet’s diet. Sometimes your vet will recommend it. Or, you may be here because you pet is suffering from irregular bowels or straining and you want to go ahead and try food with more fiber. Probably the most important reason is that a dog with a healthy digestive system is going to have a stronger immune system. Dogs that do not have regular bowel movements are going to deal with constipation, bloating and fat gain — all three being very real problems that can be costly to treat. Finally, dogs with a poor diet may have impacted and smelly anal glands. Plenty of fiber can help with that. A High-Quality Food May Bypass These Problems Many dog foods use wheat and corn as filling agents. While dogs are meant to be omnivores, they are not expected to digest as much grain as we give them. In some cases, feeding your dog cheap food has the same effect as feeding your child white flour all the time. You may not need a “high-fiber” food, just a higher-quality brand that uses fewer of these “fillers”. How To Add Fiber Into Your Dog’s Diet If you’re already feeding your dog a High-quality grain-free food you can sometimes introduce fiber in their diet without changing their dog food. Here are some easy ways to add more fiber into your dog’s diet. Canned Pumpkin or Sweet Potato Especially around the holidays, this is an easy solution. Just keep a can of pumpkin (not pie filling!) around in the fridge. You add a little bit to their food. It makes the food more moist, and is an easy way for them to get a little more fiber in their diet. Fiber Tablets For this I would recommend Glandex. Continue reading >>

Best Diabetic Dog Food

Best Diabetic Dog Food

When a human is diagnosed with diabetes, the doctor gives an extensive list of foods that can be consumed and foods that cannot be consumed. The same is the case with dogs, since the basic nature of the disease remains the same. Requirements of dogs are different from our own. They have a certain set of foods that they can safely consume, while there are other foodstuffs that are harmful for them. The point of saying this is to tell you that it is very important to take sensible and logical decisions if you have a diabetic dog, and that going with your gut instinct (while it may work sometimes for some people) is best avoided. Consult the vet to find out how your pet's current diet can be modified or changed to suit, and gradually improve, his current health condition. It is important that you do not blindly follow a human diabetic diet plan for your dog. There have been cases where this has led to undesirable results. So, let us start by figuring out what a dog needs which his sugar levels have risen above normal... Carbohydrates (Starch and Fibers) Fats (Trans fats, Cholesterol, Saturated fats) Calcium and Vitamins (A, C and E) Proteins, Magnesium and Iron Carbohydrates (Sugars) Fats (Polyunsaturated and Monounsaturated) Sodium Potassium If you are well versed with the routine of making homemade dog food, then you will find no difficulty in preparing dog food with healthy choices. If you are not, then there are a few dos and don'ts that you need to keep in mind. The biggest advantage of preparing homemade food for your diabetic dog is that you will be feeding him/her healthy and unprocessed food. You may also consider a raw diet after consulting with your vet. While preparing homemade dog food recipes, healthy and low fat meat sources, like skinless and reduced fat tu Continue reading >>

Top 5 Best Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

Top 5 Best Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

Depending on your dog's breed, there are a number of unique health concerns to be wary of. One often overlooked condition that can plague dogs of any size is canine diabetes. It's very similar to the human counterpart and affects 1 out of every 200 dogs. Essentially, the condition affects the pancreas. As a result, your dog can't produce enough insulin to keep up with the amount of glucose in the body. This can lead to hyperglycemia, or excess glucose. Canine diabetes can affect your dog for a number of reasons. It's more prominent in certain breeds and age groups. Some dogs are even predisposed to the condition due to genetics. It can also be caused by a poor diet. If left untreated, diabetes can lead to a host of further complications, so it's important that you be proactive with your dog's health. As an owner, it's your responsibility to supply your canine companion with a proper diet. Diabetes is not a death sentence. Dogs can live a completely healthy life as long as they have the support and nutrition they need. Here are some of the best foods for diabetic dogs. 5 Recommended Dog Foods for Diabetic Dogs 1. Wellness CORE Natural Grain Free Dry Dog Food This dog food from Wellness Core is designed to provide your dog with plenty of protein. It contains healthy amounts of turkey and chicken to give your dog fuel to thrive. What makes the food great for diabetic dogs is its absence of unhealthy fillers. There are no harmful carbohydrates like corn or soy. It's also free of artificial additives and questionable meat byproducts. Instead, the kibble is chock full of antioxidants, nutrients, and probiotics. The inclusion of spinach, kale, sweet potatoes, and other forms of fiber help to keep glucose levels in check. 2. Orijen Original Dry Dog Food This food from Orijen is Continue reading >>

Best Dog Food For Diabetic Dog: Reviews & Top Picks!

Best Dog Food For Diabetic Dog: Reviews & Top Picks!

Dogs can suffer from diabetes just like humans. Your dog may develop hyperglycemia, or excess glucose in the body, if his body can’t process insulin correctly. If your dog is diabetic, the best food for diabetic dog companions can help regulate his diet and improve his health. Also like humans, diabetic dogs can benefit from a change in their diets, which can significantly improve their health and body functions. Keeping your dog at a healthy weight is of the utmost importance, and this begins with his food. It is important to use portion control, avoid sugary foods, and lower the number of treats you feed your diabetic dog each day. Additionally, it is important to be aware of the ingredients in his food. Wholesome, real ingredients should take preference over fillers and ingredients that are difficult to digest. VCA Animal Hospital created a helpful video that answers several important questions about dog diabetes: Reviews of Best Dog Food for Diabetic Dogs Continue reading >>

Do I Need A Prescription Dog Diabetes Diet?

Do I Need A Prescription Dog Diabetes Diet?

If your dog is diagnosed with diabetes, a stringent new diet will be a critical part of your pet's treatment plan. For some dogs, a prescription diet may be necessary in order to keep your pet's glucose levels stabilized. Find out more here. If your dog has been diagnosed with diabetes, you are most likely aware of the important role diet plays in your dog’s treatment plan. Along with regularly administered insulin, a consistent diet helps to keep your dog’s glucose levels stable, and while not all dogs require a prescription dog diabetes diet, some most definitely will. Diet and Feeding for a Diabetic Dog Diabetes can cause your dog to lose weight, so they may need to put on a few pounds. After diagnosis, the first dietary step is to make sure your pet is at a healthy weight. More likely, however, your dog will need to lose some weight. Obesity can be problematic for dogs with diabetes, since extra fat creates a resistance to the insulin your dog needs. Fiber-rich diets can be helpful, since they will keep your dog feeling full. Once your dog’s weight is stabilized, you should feed them a balanced diet that covers all their nutritional needs. This will help them to maintain their weight. In general, the most important aspect of a diabetic dog’s diet is consistency -- it’s vital to feed your dog at the same time each day. Ideally, your dog will have two evenly spaced out meals every day. This prevents glucose levels from spiking or falling throughout the day. A diet that’s high in fiber and carbohydrates is generally recommended, since that helps maintain stable glucose levels. Sometimes even with a careful and consistent diet, your dog will still experience hyperglycemia, and in that situation, a prescription diet may be necessary in order to keep your pet Continue reading >>

Dogs With Diabetes: Looking For Low-glycemic Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

Dogs With Diabetes: Looking For Low-glycemic Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

I just finished a nutrition consultation for a prospective customer who has a diabetic dog. What do you feed a diabetic dog? What is the percentage of carbohydrates in your foods? Do you have any foods with a low-glycemic index? What’s so great about grain-free foods? All of these were GREAT questions and required me to do a little research. I am a big fan of DogFoodAdvisor.com, so I have decided to post links to the content that helped me write this article, at the bottom of this blog. If you have a diabetic pet, make sure to work closely with your veterinarian to determine which foods will work best for your dog. Diabetes is serious. Sometimes canned foods are the best option, as they contain less carbs than kibble, thereby having a lower glycemic index. For comparison’s sake, and to be fair, Orijen was awarded a Low Glycemic Award by the Glycemic Research Institute. The chart below shows a good basis for comparison. Nature’s Select Comparison Chart for Diabetic Dogs As compared on a Dry Matter Basis Brand/Recipe Protein Fat Fiber Ash (est) % Carbs Nature’s Select Grain Free 36.3% 17.6% 4.4% 8.6% 33.2% Nature’s Select High Pro 33.0% 18.7% 4.4% 8.8% 35.2% Evangers Canned Foods: Beef Dinner 41.0% 18.2% 6.8% 14.8% 19.2% Origen Adult Dog Food -certified low glycemic 42.2% 20.0% 5.6% 8.9% 23.3% Benefits of Grain-Free foods: Originally designed for highly-allergic pets and pets with special dietary concerns, grain-free foods generally contain less carbohydrates than other grain-based foods. Some grain-free advocates will argue that grain-free foods are more biologically appropriate for dogs, using terms like “ancestral diet” and comparing grain-free recipes to that of wild wolves, etc. While I think that the term “grain-free” has been subject to marketing Continue reading >>

Best Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Best Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Receiving a diagnosis that your dog is diabetic can feel overwhelming for many dog lovers. While diabetes is not curable, it is treatable. With proper diagnosis and treatment, diabetic dogs can have lifespans similar to those of non-diabetic dogs. The time of greatest risk is during the first six months of treatment, when insulin therapy is introduced and the dog’s glucose levels are being regulated. Diabetic dogs do have a higher risk of death from concurrent diseases such as kidney disease, liver and/or pancreatic disorders, or infections. However, once a diabetic dog’s condition becomes stabilized, there is no reason why the dog cannot live a long, healthy and happy life while eating a diabetic dog food. (For a full discussion of diabetes in dogs, complications, and related health disorders, we recommend reading “Managing Diabetes in Dogs,” by CJ Puotinen and Mary Straus [updated February 19, 2016]. We also recommend this glossary with terms associated with diabetes mellitus.) Background for diabetes mellitus in dogs Diabetes is common in dogs and it’s increasing. It’s currently estimated to affect 1 in 160 dogs. (Another source estimates 1 in 200 dogs.) The medical term for diabetes is diabetes mellitus . It is caused by either a decreased production of insulin or decreased functioning of the insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps glucose move from the blood stream into the cells of the body where it can be used for energy. There are several different types of diabetes. In Type 1, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin (or produce enough insulin). Type 2 is often linked to diet and obesity. Type 2 is the form that is most common in humans. This is also the form most often seen in cats. The third kind of diabetes is gestation Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dog Food

Diabetic Dog Food

A Guide to Diabetic Dog Food When your dog is diagnosed with diabetes, it can be a worrying time and often it’s difficult to know what to do. However, diabetes in dogs is something that is manageable with proper diet and care. We can’t stress enough that your vet’s advice is vital when caring for a diabetic dog. Always consult them when making changes to your diabetic dog’s diet or lifestyle. What are the Symptoms of Diabetes in a Dog? Early indicators that your dog may be suffering from diabetes include: Change in appetite Dehydration or increased thirst Weight loss Unusually sweet-smelling or fruity breath Lack of energy or lethargy Urinary tract infections or increased urination Vomiting Change in mood / depressed attitude Advanced symptoms of diabetes in dogs include: Cataract formation that can lead to blindness Seizures Kidney failure Chronic skin infections If you start to notice any of these symptoms in your dog then it’s best to take them into the vet with your concerns as soon as possible. What Do You Feed a Diabetic Dog? The first step when looking for a food for your diabetic dog should always be to consult with your vet. There are a few types of food that most veterinarians will recommend for diabetic dogs. They will suggest dog foods that are lower in calories and lower in fat and often foods with higher fibre content. If you’ve read our guide to dog food you’ll hopefully know all about the importance of protein in a dogs diet. Protein is just as important, if not more important, for dogs with diabetes. The danger in looking for low calorie dog food is that the protein content is sometimes reduced in order to cut down on calories. This is not good for your dog so strive to find foods that are low in calories but still contain plenty of qualit Continue reading >>

Medication, Insulin & The Best Diabetic Dog Foods?

Medication, Insulin & The Best Diabetic Dog Foods?

This week I received a question for a reader asking what medications can affect insulin and glucose regulation. Heaven knows I harp at you all about avoiding steroids in diabetic pets often enough, but are there other medications that can derail a diabetic? Nothing came to mind, but I figured I’d investigate. So, I cracked open my favorite veterinary pharmacology book and found that there are indeed some drug interactions with insulin. Some medications can potentiate (increase) the effects of insulin, some medications can cause insulin resistance, and there are some medications that can affect insulin effects variably. This is not to say that any of the medications on the list will definitely affect glucose levels nor effects of insulin for a particular pet. Additionally, this does not mean we should avoid certain medications absolutely if a pet is diabetic. Well, that’s not quite true: most vets need their backs to a wall before administering a steroid to a diabetic pet! If I had the choice between giving steroids to a diabetic patient or going into a den of snakes, I’d have to think a good long time. So what drugs are on the list? Corticosteroids are the big drug to avoid, but also on the list that can affect insulin are several heart medications, diuretics, thyroid supplements, sulfonamide a, Prozac, aspirin and a few more. This does not mean a diabetic cannot be concurrently treated with other medications, but a diabetic pet owner should double check with the veterinarian if any new medication could affect glucose regulation. In reality, whenever a new medication is added to a diabetic pet’s treatment plan, I like pet owners to monitor the blood glucose especially well and adjust the insulin dose accordingly – if needed. What is the best diabetic dog food? Continue reading >>

What Could Be Sweeter Then A Pet With Diabetes!

What Could Be Sweeter Then A Pet With Diabetes!

What could be sweeter then a pet with diabetes! This information is for general comparison purposes only, to demonstrate the differences between three dry dog foods. Your vet is most qualified to determine the appropriate food for your pet. Your veterinarian might prescribe one of the following foods for your diabetic dog. Here is a list of ingredients found in three of the most prescribed diabetic dog foods. PRODUCT DESCRIPTION: ROYAL CANIN Veterinary DietTM/MC canine Diabetic HF 18TM/MC (dry) is a complete, balanced food suitable for adult dogs. The product contains high levels of dietary fiber, is free of simple sugars, and has a restricted fat content. The formulation of this diet targets a ratio of soluble to insoluble fiber of 1:4. Calorie Content This product contains 3012 kilocalories/kilogram or 186 kilocalories per cup ME (metabolizable energy) on an as fed basis (calculated). Ingredients: Rice, ground corn, chicken meal, cellulose powder, corn gluten meal, ground wheat, chicken fat, natural flavors, rice hulls, dicalcium phosphate, potassium chloride, vegetable oil, guar gum, choline chloride, monosodium phosphate, salt, taurine, vitamins [DL-alpha-tocopherol acetate (source of vitamin E), biotin, D-calcium pantothenate, niacin, pyridoxine hydrochloride (vitamin B6), vitamin A acetate, vitamin D3 supplement, thiamine mononitrate (vitamin B1), vitamin B12 supplement, riboflavin (vitaminB2), folic acid], trace minerals zinc oxide, ferrous sulfate, copper sulfate, manganous oxide, sodium selenite, calcium iodate], preserved with natural mixed tocopherols, rosemary extract, and citric acid. GUARANTEED ANALYSIS: Crude Protein, Min: 18% Crude Fat, Min: 7% Crude Fiber, Max: 13% Moisture, Max: 10.5% METABOLIZABLE ENERGY: From Protein: 23.2% From Fat: 25.4% From Carbo Continue reading >>

The 24 Best Dog Food Brands Of 2015

The 24 Best Dog Food Brands Of 2015

Many factors -- such as the age, weight and breed of your dog -- go into choosing the best dog food for your furry companion. But not all brands are created equal. Pet experts stress there are definitely some ingredients you'll want to steer clear of and others you'll want to include in your dog's diet. "The phrase 'healthy dog food' means different things to different people," says dog trainer and behavior specialist Tonya Wilhelm of Toledo Dog Training. "Dry dog food is by far the most common and easiest to use, but also the most processed and carbohydrate-heavy food you can find," she notes. She strongly recommends that pet owners who choose to feed a pre-made dog food -- whether dry, canned or dehydrated -- first read all the dog food ingredients carefully. "Yes, the actual ingredient list -- not just the front of the package," she stresses. Overall, the best dog food has familiar ingredients, high levels of protein and antioxidents and should not have artificial colors or flavors, high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup or cane sugar or animal by-products. You will want to read all the ingredients, paying close attention to the first five on the list. What to Look for in a Dog Food The best dog foods have a simple ingredient list with familiar food sources you can recognize. Basically, if you don't want it in your food, you probably shouldn't want it for your dog. Look for foods that have a named meat ingredient as the first ingredient (like chicken or turkey or beef), not just "meat" since that is mystery meat. It's okay if it's a meal instead of a whole meat," says Dr. Judy Morgan, a veterinarian with more than 30 years of experience helping dogs and their owners. "Some companies use a whole meat, which includes moisture, so the protein contribution actually ends up Continue reading >>

Best Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

Best Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

A diabetes diagnosis can be a terrifying thing for a dog owner. You may feel overwhelmed with worry and guilt, and may not know what to do. Luckily there is a lot you can do to ensure that your diabetic dog has a high quality of life. You can start by understanding diabetes, knowing how to manage the illness, and most importantly how to pick the right food to help your dog stay healthy and happy. What Is Dog Diabetes? Diabetes is an illness that creates an imbalance of sugar levels, leading to hyperglycemia. It is caused either by a lack of insulin or the inability to process insulin. Without insulin, a dog’s body cannot break down glucose. This leads to a myriad of health problems like loss of appetite and vomiting, excessive thirst and increased urination, urinary tract infections, infections, blindness, and paralysis. Luckily diabetes is a manageable illness that can be treated with medicine and changes in diet and exercise. What Causes Diabetes In Dogs? The cause of diabetes in dogs is still a mystery. However, there are many factors that can lead your dog to getting diabetes. The most common factor is obesity. However, there are illnesses such a autoimmune diseases and pancreatitis that can cause diabetes. Not to mention, there are also several genetic factors that can lead a dog to developing the disease. Female dogs are more likely to develop diabetes late in life than male dogs. Certain breeds such as schnauzers, dachshunds, poodles, keeshonds, golden retrievers, samoyeds, and australian terriers have a higher risk for developing diabetes. How Is Diabetes Treated? Diabetes treatments are determined by the severity of the symptoms. Dogs who have severe diabetes may be hospitalized so they can regulate their blood sugar to a safe level. However dogs with mild or Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For A Diabetic Dog

Diet Tips For A Diabetic Dog

Once a dog is diagnosed with diabetes they usually remain diabetic. While there are feeding and dietary strategies that can help keep their glucose levels low and well-controlled, they will usually require insulin injections lifelong. An excellent diet choice for a diabetic dog is a meat-based high protein food that is moderately fat and carbohydrate restricted. Carbohydrates, if included, should be low glycemic (for example, barley or sorghum). Ideally, at least 30 to 40% of the calories in your diabetic dog's food would come from protein and less than 30% of calories would come from fat and carbohydrates each. Further dietary fat restriction may be necessary if your diabetic dog has pancreatitis or blood fat elevations. Options to consider include Nature's Variety Instinct, Wysong, and Halo. Several studies indicate that high or moderately high–fiber diets may help some diabetics by minimizing their post–eating blood sugar fluctuations. While this is true for SOME dogs, a clear clinical benefit has not been shown for the majority of diabetic dogs. Sometimes high fiber diets will cause inappropriate weight loss (in a thin diabetic) and should be avoided. High fiber diets may also be associated with undesirable intestinal side effects such as decreased appetite (due to poor palatability), flatulence and diarrhea or constipation. If your dog is very overweight or obese and in need of weight loss, you might consider a diet with higher fiber to aid in weight loss. Instead of changing to a high fiber diet formulation (which often contains inferior ingredients), you can also consider adding supplemental fiber to your dog's regular diabetic food in order to increase the overall fiber content while still maintaining a high quality food. To best control your diabetic dog's Continue reading >>

5 Best Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

5 Best Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

Unfortunately, dogs can suffer from a number of the same health problems that people do. One of the most common and serious examples is canine diabetes — a disease characterized by improper pancreas function. Without a healthy pancreas, your dog will have trouble regulating his blood sugar levels. Left untreated, diabetes can cause very serious complications and even death. So, you’ll always want to work with your vet to keep your dog as healthy as possible and feed him a food that provides the kind of nutrition a diabetic dog needs. Quick Picks: Best Diabetic Dog Food Our Rating Price Orijen Regional Red $$$$$ Merrick Grain-Free Dog Food $$$ Solid Gold High Protein Recipe $$$ Nutrisca Chicken and Chickpea Recipe $$$$ Wellness CORE Grain Free $$$$ Continue reading for more in-depth reviews What Is Doggie Diabetes? For the most part, diabetes affects dogs and humans in similar ways. When food is eaten, it is broken down by the body into its constituent parts — primarily fats, proteins and sugars (glucose). A little while later, the pancreas releases a hormone called insulin; insulin helps the body process the glucose. However, sometimes the pancreas stops producing insulin or the body’s cells fail to respond to it in the proper way. The former problem is referred to as Type I diabetes, while the latter is known as Type II diabetes. Both types are very serious and ultimately manifest in a relatively similar way: The body cannot process glucose properly. Type I diabetes — the most common form to occur in dogs – is thought to occur when an autoimmune disease attacks the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. No one knows exactly why this occurs, although there does appear to be a strong genetic link. Type II diabetes, on the other hand, is often associated wit Continue reading >>

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