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Best Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

Best Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

A diabetes diagnosis can be a terrifying thing for a dog owner. You may feel overwhelmed with worry and guilt, and may not know what to do. Luckily there is a lot you can do to ensure that your diabetic dog has a high quality of life. You can start by understanding diabetes, knowing how to manage the illness, and most importantly how to pick the right food to help your dog stay healthy and happy. What Is Dog Diabetes? Diabetes is an illness that creates an imbalance of sugar levels, leading to hyperglycemia. It is caused either by a lack of insulin or the inability to process insulin. Without insulin, a dog’s body cannot break down glucose. This leads to a myriad of health problems like loss of appetite and vomiting, excessive thirst and increased urination, urinary tract infections, infections, blindness, and paralysis. Luckily diabetes is a manageable illness that can be treated with medicine and changes in diet and exercise. What Causes Diabetes In Dogs? The cause of diabetes in dogs is still a mystery. However, there are many factors that can lead your dog to getting diabetes. The most common factor is obesity. However, there are illnesses such a autoimmune diseases and pancreatitis that can cause diabetes. Not to mention, there are also several genetic factors that can lead a dog to developing the disease. Female dogs are more likely to develop diabetes late in life than male dogs. Certain breeds such as schnauzers, dachshunds, poodles, keeshonds, golden retrievers, samoyeds, and australian terriers have a higher risk for developing diabetes. How Is Diabetes Treated? Diabetes treatments are determined by the severity of the symptoms. Dogs who have severe diabetes may be hospitalized so they can regulate their blood sugar to a safe level. However dogs with mild or Continue reading >>

Dogs With Diabetes: Looking For Low-glycemic Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

Dogs With Diabetes: Looking For Low-glycemic Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

I just finished a nutrition consultation for a prospective customer who has a diabetic dog. What do you feed a diabetic dog? What is the percentage of carbohydrates in your foods? Do you have any foods with a low-glycemic index? What’s so great about grain-free foods? All of these were GREAT questions and required me to do a little research. I am a big fan of DogFoodAdvisor.com, so I have decided to post links to the content that helped me write this article, at the bottom of this blog. If you have a diabetic pet, make sure to work closely with your veterinarian to determine which foods will work best for your dog. Diabetes is serious. Sometimes canned foods are the best option, as they contain less carbs than kibble, thereby having a lower glycemic index. For comparison’s sake, and to be fair, Orijen was awarded a Low Glycemic Award by the Glycemic Research Institute. The chart below shows a good basis for comparison. Nature’s Select Comparison Chart for Diabetic Dogs As compared on a Dry Matter Basis Brand/Recipe Protein Fat Fiber Ash (est) % Carbs Nature’s Select Grain Free 36.3% 17.6% 4.4% 8.6% 33.2% Nature’s Select High Pro 33.0% 18.7% 4.4% 8.8% 35.2% Evangers Canned Foods: Beef Dinner 41.0% 18.2% 6.8% 14.8% 19.2% Origen Adult Dog Food -certified low glycemic 42.2% 20.0% 5.6% 8.9% 23.3% Benefits of Grain-Free foods: Originally designed for highly-allergic pets and pets with special dietary concerns, grain-free foods generally contain less carbohydrates than other grain-based foods. Some grain-free advocates will argue that grain-free foods are more biologically appropriate for dogs, using terms like “ancestral diet” and comparing grain-free recipes to that of wild wolves, etc. While I think that the term “grain-free” has been subject to marketing Continue reading >>

Do I Need A Prescription Dog Diabetes Diet?

Do I Need A Prescription Dog Diabetes Diet?

If your dog is diagnosed with diabetes, a stringent new diet will be a critical part of your pet's treatment plan. For some dogs, a prescription diet may be necessary in order to keep your pet's glucose levels stabilized. Find out more here. If your dog has been diagnosed with diabetes, you are most likely aware of the important role diet plays in your dog’s treatment plan. Along with regularly administered insulin, a consistent diet helps to keep your dog’s glucose levels stable, and while not all dogs require a prescription dog diabetes diet, some most definitely will. Diet and Feeding for a Diabetic Dog Diabetes can cause your dog to lose weight, so they may need to put on a few pounds. After diagnosis, the first dietary step is to make sure your pet is at a healthy weight. More likely, however, your dog will need to lose some weight. Obesity can be problematic for dogs with diabetes, since extra fat creates a resistance to the insulin your dog needs. Fiber-rich diets can be helpful, since they will keep your dog feeling full. Once your dog’s weight is stabilized, you should feed them a balanced diet that covers all their nutritional needs. This will help them to maintain their weight. In general, the most important aspect of a diabetic dog’s diet is consistency -- it’s vital to feed your dog at the same time each day. Ideally, your dog will have two evenly spaced out meals every day. This prevents glucose levels from spiking or falling throughout the day. A diet that’s high in fiber and carbohydrates is generally recommended, since that helps maintain stable glucose levels. Sometimes even with a careful and consistent diet, your dog will still experience hyperglycemia, and in that situation, a prescription diet may be necessary in order to keep your pet Continue reading >>

Diet Tips For A Diabetic Dog

Diet Tips For A Diabetic Dog

Once a dog is diagnosed with diabetes they usually remain diabetic. While there are feeding and dietary strategies that can help keep their glucose levels low and well-controlled, they will usually require insulin injections lifelong. An excellent diet choice for a diabetic dog is a meat-based high protein food that is moderately fat and carbohydrate restricted. Carbohydrates, if included, should be low glycemic (for example, barley or sorghum). Ideally, at least 30 to 40% of the calories in your diabetic dog's food would come from protein and less than 30% of calories would come from fat and carbohydrates each. Further dietary fat restriction may be necessary if your diabetic dog has pancreatitis or blood fat elevations. Options to consider include Nature's Variety Instinct, Wysong, and Halo. Several studies indicate that high or moderately high–fiber diets may help some diabetics by minimizing their post–eating blood sugar fluctuations. While this is true for SOME dogs, a clear clinical benefit has not been shown for the majority of diabetic dogs. Sometimes high fiber diets will cause inappropriate weight loss (in a thin diabetic) and should be avoided. High fiber diets may also be associated with undesirable intestinal side effects such as decreased appetite (due to poor palatability), flatulence and diarrhea or constipation. If your dog is very overweight or obese and in need of weight loss, you might consider a diet with higher fiber to aid in weight loss. Instead of changing to a high fiber diet formulation (which often contains inferior ingredients), you can also consider adding supplemental fiber to your dog's regular diabetic food in order to increase the overall fiber content while still maintaining a high quality food. To best control your diabetic dog's Continue reading >>

What Could Be Sweeter Then A Pet With Diabetes!

What Could Be Sweeter Then A Pet With Diabetes!

What could be sweeter then a pet with diabetes! This information is for general comparison purposes only, to demonstrate the differences between three dry dog foods. Your vet is most qualified to determine the appropriate food for your pet. Your veterinarian might prescribe one of the following foods for your diabetic dog. Here is a list of ingredients found in three of the most prescribed diabetic dog foods. PRODUCT DESCRIPTION: ROYAL CANIN Veterinary DietTM/MC canine Diabetic HF 18TM/MC (dry) is a complete, balanced food suitable for adult dogs. The product contains high levels of dietary fiber, is free of simple sugars, and has a restricted fat content. The formulation of this diet targets a ratio of soluble to insoluble fiber of 1:4. Calorie Content This product contains 3012 kilocalories/kilogram or 186 kilocalories per cup ME (metabolizable energy) on an as fed basis (calculated). Ingredients: Rice, ground corn, chicken meal, cellulose powder, corn gluten meal, ground wheat, chicken fat, natural flavors, rice hulls, dicalcium phosphate, potassium chloride, vegetable oil, guar gum, choline chloride, monosodium phosphate, salt, taurine, vitamins [DL-alpha-tocopherol acetate (source of vitamin E), biotin, D-calcium pantothenate, niacin, pyridoxine hydrochloride (vitamin B6), vitamin A acetate, vitamin D3 supplement, thiamine mononitrate (vitamin B1), vitamin B12 supplement, riboflavin (vitaminB2), folic acid], trace minerals zinc oxide, ferrous sulfate, copper sulfate, manganous oxide, sodium selenite, calcium iodate], preserved with natural mixed tocopherols, rosemary extract, and citric acid. GUARANTEED ANALYSIS: Crude Protein, Min: 18% Crude Fat, Min: 7% Crude Fiber, Max: 13% Moisture, Max: 10.5% METABOLIZABLE ENERGY: From Protein: 23.2% From Fat: 25.4% From Carbo Continue reading >>

Best Dog Foods: Our Complete Guide For 2017

Best Dog Foods: Our Complete Guide For 2017

When it comes to your four-legged friend, you obviously want to ensure he has the best nutrition possible. But, choosing the perfect brand and formula out of the thousands on the market is far from easy. Still, your dog depends on you to make a sound decision based on what you know about dog food. Just how much do you know about the formulas in each dog food brand? What makes some dog foods better than others? How can you tell good ingredients and nutrition from bad additions to dog food? It’s important information to know, but it’s easy to feel overwhelmed with all the information circling the internet. So, we’re here to guide you through the various dog food brands and formulas on the market. Throughout this guide, you’ll find helpful information about healthy ingredients and nutrition for your dog’s food, what to do about recalls, and what your dog needs from his food. We’ll also recommend the best dog food for your dog’s specific dietary needs based on reviews and nutritional analysis. Whatever you wanted to know about dog food will be in this ultimate guide, so let’s get started! There’s much more that goes into the science behind dog food than fats, proteins, and carbs. There are also minerals and vitamins to consider. Many of the best brands ensure that they include healthy ingredients that provide your dog with vitamins and minerals naturally. Here are a few important ones to look for in dog food: Calcium: Calcium helps form strong bones and protect your dog against bone deformities. Calcium can also grow muscles and regulate the nervous system. Calcium comes from dairy products, raw bones, and some fish and vegetables. Magnesium: Magnesium helps the body absorb calcium and even has its own bone-strengthening properties. Several vegetables and Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dog Food

Diabetic Dog Food

A Guide to Diabetic Dog Food When your dog is diagnosed with diabetes, it can be a worrying time and often it’s difficult to know what to do. However, diabetes in dogs is something that is manageable with proper diet and care. We can’t stress enough that your vet’s advice is vital when caring for a diabetic dog. Always consult them when making changes to your diabetic dog’s diet or lifestyle. What are the Symptoms of Diabetes in a Dog? Early indicators that your dog may be suffering from diabetes include: Change in appetite Dehydration or increased thirst Weight loss Unusually sweet-smelling or fruity breath Lack of energy or lethargy Urinary tract infections or increased urination Vomiting Change in mood / depressed attitude Advanced symptoms of diabetes in dogs include: Cataract formation that can lead to blindness Seizures Kidney failure Chronic skin infections If you start to notice any of these symptoms in your dog then it’s best to take them into the vet with your concerns as soon as possible. What Do You Feed a Diabetic Dog? The first step when looking for a food for your diabetic dog should always be to consult with your vet. There are a few types of food that most veterinarians will recommend for diabetic dogs. They will suggest dog foods that are lower in calories and lower in fat and often foods with higher fibre content. If you’ve read our guide to dog food you’ll hopefully know all about the importance of protein in a dogs diet. Protein is just as important, if not more important, for dogs with diabetes. The danger in looking for low calorie dog food is that the protein content is sometimes reduced in order to cut down on calories. This is not good for your dog so strive to find foods that are low in calories but still contain plenty of qualit Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dog Food

Diabetic Dog Food

Diabetes isn’t just something that affects humans. It can also affect animals. Diabetes is basically a condition that makes the body unable to regulate the blood glucose levels. This can either be due to a lack of insulin, or an inability to process the insulin. Once food is eaten, it starts to break down into glucose that is absorbed into the body through the bloodstream. Insulin is then required to take the sugar to the cells to be turned into energy. Without this, the body can begin to shut down, causing a lot of problems in pets. If your pet has been diagnosed with diabetes, you may need to consider a lifestyle change and switch to a diabetic dog food. There are two types of diabetes in pets, just as there are in us humans. They include Type 1 diabetes, where the body doesn’t make enough insulin, and Type 2 diabetes, where the body doesn’t respond to the insulin properly. Type 1 diabetes is more common in dogs. Type 2, however, is most common in humans and felines. Tips for Feeding Your Diabetic Dog When you are looking for a diabetic dog food, it is a good idea to look for a food that is meat based and high in protein, with moderate fat and carbohydrate percentages. When looking at the food label, it is best to choose low glycemic carbohydrates, such as sorghum or barley. A good ration is around 30-40% protein, and less than 30% carbohydrates and fats. What About Fiber? The amount of fiber in your dog’s diet should also be regulated. Some people assume that high fiber diets are good when it comes to regulating blood sugar fluctuations after meals, but the truth is that for a diabetic dog this isn’t always the case. In fact, it can have adverse effects on them. It may cause them to lose too much weight. It may also cause intestinal problems, decreased appe Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dog: Tips To Manage His Diet

Diabetic Dog: Tips To Manage His Diet

So, your dog has diabetes. Take a deep breath. With good care, your companion can lead a long, healthy life. Like humans, when dogs have diabetes, staying trim is key. If your dog is overweight, losing some pounds can help his cells better use insulin, a hormone that keeps blood sugar levels in check. That makes it easier for his body to turn food into fuel. The goal for any pooch with diabetes is to keep blood sugar (or glucose) levels as close to normal as possible. This helps your dog feel good and makes it less likely he'll get diabetes-related complications, such as vision-clouding cataracts and urinary tract infections. Your veterinarian will determine how many calories your dog needs every day, based on his weight and activity level. Once you know that number, it's important to keep a close eye on what he eats and how much. Researchers are still exploring what diet is best for dogs with diabetes. Most vets recommend a high-fiber, low-fat diet. Fiber slows the entrance of glucose into the bloodstream and helps your dog feel full. Low-fat foods have fewer calories. Together, the diet can help your dog eat less and lose weight. But make sure your pooch drinks plenty of water. Fiber takes water from the body, and that can cause constipation and other problems. Most dogs do fine with food you can buy at the store. But your vet may recommend prescription dog food or a homemade diet developed by a veterinary nutritionist. Your vet can tell you the best way to go about changing your dog's food. Even the best diet won’t help if your dog doesn’t eat it, though -- and you can't give insulin to a dog on an empty stomach. It can make him very sick. If your dog isn't eating as much, it could be because he doesn't like the food. It could also mean he has another problem, or Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dogs | The Best Diabetic Dog Foods

Diabetic Dogs | The Best Diabetic Dog Foods

Diabetic dogs, what foods can they eat? The title says a lot. It speaks of maintaining a dog’s health and controlling weight and sugar levels…with food. And as the owner of diabetic dogs, it is best that dog owners understand the diabetic process. Without a proper diet, the non-diabetic dog is prone to various diseases…such as dog diabetes. If your dog has been diagnosed with diabetes, sometimes it is a good idea to get a second diagnosis from another vet. It does not mean you do not like or trust your family vet. Second opinions just mean you are being careful and you love your dog. Dogs who have diabetes will require a good diabetic diet with the best diabetic dog food. However, the diagnosis of dog diabetes is not something to go plumb out of your wits. A dog with diabetes can still live a long life as long as you pay close attention to the diet with correct nutrition. Diabetic dogs need the correct amount of diabetic dog food to maintain its weight and correct sugar levels. There are a lot of similarities between human diabetes and canine diabetes. With the right diet and adequate weight control, it would be easy for either to live a normal life. Remember—just because your dog has diabetes does not mean his or her life is over. Diabetes is basically a chronic disease of high blood sugar. A disease that is common in both humans and dogs, it is estimated that about 1 in 200 dogs have diabetes. Although diabetes cannot be cured, owning a diabetic dog requires enough changes to promote your dog’s health. Among the biggest adjustments that you have to do is to change your dog’s diet. A diabetic dog needs to maintain sugar levels and you will always need to find the magic number for that. What happens when you discover you have a diabetic dog? One of the first Continue reading >>

Does Your Dog Need Diabetic Dog Food?

Does Your Dog Need Diabetic Dog Food?

How do we keep this site running? This post may contain affiliate links — the cost is the same to you, but we get a referral fee. Compensation does not affect rankings. Thanks! Diabetes is a well-known illness in humans, but it is also found in dogs. One out of every two hundred dogs will be diagnosed with canine diabetes at some point. But don’t treat your dog like you would a human because they have a different version of the illness that shares some similarities with human diabetes, but works differently. Dogs that have diabetes have problems producing the right amount of insulin for their body. A dog’s body burns sugar for energy. When it does not have the right amount of sugar, it might start burning fat so that it can maintain the energy level. This can cause the release of too many ketones (by-products of metabolized fats). These ketones can lead to serious incidents of hypoglycemia and even death. Causes of Diabetes in Dogs There are numerous things that can cause diabetes in dogs. Factors such as age, gender, breed and diet may increase the risk of diabetes. However, even if a dog does not fall into any of the categories that are well-known for putting a dog at risk for diabetes, please keep in mind that there may be unknown factors at play. So, dogs that don’t fall into the category that would generally be considered to be to be at risk for diabetes should not be assumed to be impossible to end up with the disease. Breed Though mixed breed dogs commonly have canine diabetes more frequently than pure bred dogs, there are some specific pure bred breeds that are known for having diabetes. These breeds include, but are not limited to golden retrievers, German shepherds, miniature schnauzers, Keeshonds and poodles. Age Though it is unclear when dogs specifi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dog Food Brands – What’s Best?

Diabetic Dog Food Brands – What’s Best?

I am a diabetic but I do not own a diabetic pet. My friend owns a diabetic dog and I have spoken with him and also researched the best diabetic dog food brands to present to my readers. I will also be posting some reviews on these products on this website very soon. In terms of diabetic dog food brands there are numerous out there in the market place. A few well-known names include Eukanuba diet food, Hills prescription weight loss food and Royal Canin. The best course of action to prevent diabetic dog complications is to go to your local vet to seek advice on diabetic dog food brands. The good news is with some care and love your dog should lead a normal, healthy life. Most diabetic dogs will not need special prescription food from the vet. As its owner you will have to monitor your dogs intake of food and his/ her activity levels. The main and most important point of controlling your dog’s blood sugar levels, especially if he/ she is a type 1 diabetes dog is feeding him/ her consistently at the same time every day. The amount of food you feed your diabetic dog should also be consistent. Like a human diabetic you need to feed your dog the right amount of protein, carbs and fat. You should also consider a meal which contains fibre and is low GI. That is where the specialised diabetic dog food brands come in. Your diabetic dog’s diet should consist of meat as opposed to kibble as kibble contains more carbohydrates than canned meat. The meat that your dog eats should be low in fat so as to manage his/ her weight. Diabetic dog snacks are ok to give your best friend. Just watch for the ones that have high sugar content or ingredients such as fructose, dextrose, molasses or maltose. It is important to monitor your dogs exercise on a daily basis. This will be crucial when Continue reading >>

Dog Food For Dogs With Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Dog Food For Dogs With Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Canine diabetes is a serious lifelong condition in dogs, thus it must be well managed by pet parents who wish to keep their dogs happy and healthy for as long as possible. Although nobody can guarantee that our dogs won’t develop diabetes, there’s a certain dog food for dogs with diabetes that can help with the condition. There is no one ideal diet plan for diabetic dogs and each individual canine’s needs and health have to be taken into consideration. When it comes to dogs with diabetes, some things to consider are: the weight of your dog the severity of the condition choice of dog food for diabetic dogs EXTENSIVE BREAKDOWN: What is the Best Holistic Dog Food Brand? Dog Food for Dogs with Diabetes: What You Need to Know The main thing is to keep your diabetic dog’s blood sugar levels even throughout the day; consistency is key in managing diabetes in dogs. There’s no point getting expensive prescription dog food for dogs with diabetes if they turn their noses up at it. However, if you feed your pet commercial dog food you may have to consider introducing a higher quality brand to help manage your canine’s diabetes condition more efficiently. With high quality dog food brands, it’s easier to distinguish and find better quality ingredients, and these brands are usually made in the USA and can be more trusted. We’ve previously written about overweight dogs, and have an eBook on that as well (which you can download by subscribing below), but there is no single dog food or diet plan for a diabetic dog that will suit all pets. The first few months after your dog has been diagnosed with diabetes will involve lots of trial and error to get the right diet and feeding schedule. The most important thing is that your dog eats something, so shop around and find the Continue reading >>

5 Best Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

5 Best Dog Foods For Diabetic Dogs

Unfortunately, dogs can suffer from a number of the same health problems that people do. One of the most common and serious examples is canine diabetes — a disease characterized by improper pancreas function. Without a healthy pancreas, your dog will have trouble regulating his blood sugar levels. Left untreated, diabetes can cause very serious complications and even death. So, you’ll always want to work with your vet to keep your dog as healthy as possible and feed him a food that provides the kind of nutrition a diabetic dog needs. Quick Picks: Best Diabetic Dog Food Our Rating Price Orijen Regional Red $$$$$ Merrick Grain-Free Dog Food $$$ Solid Gold High Protein Recipe $$$ Nutrisca Chicken and Chickpea Recipe $$$$ Wellness CORE Grain Free $$$$ Continue reading for more in-depth reviews What Is Doggie Diabetes? For the most part, diabetes affects dogs and humans in similar ways. When food is eaten, it is broken down by the body into its constituent parts — primarily fats, proteins and sugars (glucose). A little while later, the pancreas releases a hormone called insulin; insulin helps the body process the glucose. However, sometimes the pancreas stops producing insulin or the body’s cells fail to respond to it in the proper way. The former problem is referred to as Type I diabetes, while the latter is known as Type II diabetes. Both types are very serious and ultimately manifest in a relatively similar way: The body cannot process glucose properly. Type I diabetes — the most common form to occur in dogs – is thought to occur when an autoimmune disease attacks the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. No one knows exactly why this occurs, although there does appear to be a strong genetic link. Type II diabetes, on the other hand, is often associated wit Continue reading >>

Homemade Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Homemade Dog Food For Diabetic Dogs

Ruby became sick in August of 2008. He was urinating a lot, had increased water consumption, and looked thinner than normal. He ended up in a veterinary hospital where he was diagnosed with diabetes, diabetic ketoacidosis, and pancreatitis. Ketoacidosis can be a life-threatening complication for those suffering from diabetes. It occurs due to a lack of insulin which the body responds to by burning fat for fuel and producing ketones. High levels of ketones can poison the body. Simply put, Ruby was quite ill. In an attempt to comfort Ruby, I would crawl into his hospital kennel, hold him, and sing to him. ‘You Are My Sunshine’ was on regular rotation. Perhaps I did less singing and more pleading and praying. Either way, after a week in the hospital I was able to take my sunshine home. It was a challenge to convince Ruby that getting two insulin shots a day was actually a good thing. I had success after following some great advice: use his food as a reward for receiving the shot. I started by putting his full food bowl on the counter while prepping his shot. Like any food-motivated dog, movement of his food bowl commands his attention. But then the approaching needle would make him run away. After he ran away, I would put his food bowl in the cupboard. That movement of his bowl would bring him back again. Round and round we went until he realized the simple equation of food bowl on counter + shot in dog = food bowl on floor + full dog belly. See, Ruby, insulin shots are a great thing! Now he rushes each injection along so he can eat. The hospital sent us home with a few samples of diabetic dog food. I sought advice from Ruby’s vet on both packaged and homemade diabetic dog food. Dr. Old Vet was quite ambivalent and offered little to no opinion or advice. His disinter Continue reading >>

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