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Does Whey Protein Spike Blood Sugar

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease where the body cannot maintain normal levels of blood sugar, and blood sugar levels go too high. Blood sugars that are too high can cause symptoms such as dry mouth, increased thirst, frequent urination, tiredness, and increased urination at night. High blood sugar levels over time can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels. What people eat has a huge impact on their blood sugars. Carbohydrates found in foods cause blood sugar to go up. Foods that digest slower cause a slower rise in blood sugar, which is helpful for those with diabetes. But what about protein shakes? What is protein? The three essential macronutrients found in food are protein, carbohydrates, and fat. Protein helps to maintain, rebuild, and repair muscle. Protein is also a building block for the skin, nails, bones, and even blood. It makes up hormones, enzymes, and antibodies. Protein in foods has staying power because it digests slower than carbohydrate. Proteins do not raise blood sugar. Periods of growth, such as during infancy and pregnancy, need more protein. Protein needs are also raised for people with injuries, those who have had surgery, or active people. Most people, including those with diabetes, are looking for healthy options to grab on the go like protein shakes or bars. While it is important to rely on packaged food products as little as possible, it is smart to have some healthier options in mind when needed. The problem with protein shakes is that they often have lots of artificial ingredients and can have as much sugar as soda. Protein requirements The total amount of protein consumed in a day is important, but so is how that intake is spread out over the day. Many people will consume a small amount at breakfast, a moderate amount at lunch, and a lar Continue reading >>

Effect Of Whey On Blood Glucose And Insulin Responses To Composite Breakfast And Lunch Meals In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

Effect Of Whey On Blood Glucose And Insulin Responses To Composite Breakfast And Lunch Meals In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

Effect of whey on blood glucose and insulin responses to composite breakfast and lunch meals in type 2 diabetic subjects From the Clinic of Endocrinology, University Hospital MAS, Malm, Sweden (AHF); the Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden (MN and IMEB); and the Department of Medical Physiology, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark (JJH) Search for other works by this author on: From the Clinic of Endocrinology, University Hospital MAS, Malm, Sweden (AHF); the Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden (MN and IMEB); and the Department of Medical Physiology, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark (JJH) Reprints not available. Address correspondence to M Nilsson, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, PO Box 124, 221 00 Lund, Sweden. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: From the Clinic of Endocrinology, University Hospital MAS, Malm, Sweden (AHF); the Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden (MN and IMEB); and the Department of Medical Physiology, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark (JJH) Search for other works by this author on: From the Clinic of Endocrinology, University Hospital MAS, Malm, Sweden (AHF); the Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden (MN and IMEB); and the Department of Medical Physiology, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark (JJH) Search for other works by this author on: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 82, Issue 1, 1 July 2005, Pages 6975, Anders H Frid, Mikael Nilsson, Jens Juul H Continue reading >>

Whey Protein: The “whey” Forward For Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Whey Protein: The “whey” Forward For Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Go to: Abstract A cost-effective nutritional approach to improve postprandial glycaemia is attractive considering the rising burden of diabetes throughout the world. Whey protein, a by-product of the cheese-making process, can be used to manipulate gut function in order to slow gastric emptying and stimulate incretin hormone secretion, thereby attenuating postprandial glycaemic excursions. The function of the gastrointestinal tract plays a pivotal role in glucose homeostasis, particularly during the postprandial period, and this review will discuss the mechanisms by which whey protein slows gastric emptying and stimulates release of gut peptides, including the incretins. Whey protein is also a rich source of amino acids, and these can directly stimulate beta cells to secrete insulin, which contributes to the reduction in postprandial glycaemia. Appetite is suppressed with consumption of whey, due to its effects on the gut-brain axis and the hypothalamus. These properties of whey protein suggest its potential in the management of type 2 diabetes. However, the optimal dose and timing of whey protein ingestion are yet to be defined, and studies are required to examine the long-term benefits of whey consumption for overall glycaemic control. Keywords: Whey protein, Postprandial glycaemia, Type 2 diabetes, Dietary intervention, Preload, Gastric emptying, Incretins, Gut hormones, Appetite, Amino acids Core tip: Whey protein, a by-product of cheese-manufacture, shows promise in the dietary management of diabetes. Whey can slow gastric emptying, stimulate insulin and gut hormones including the incretins, and thereby reduce postprandial blood glucose, especially when consumed some minutes before a meal. Whey may also suppress appetite and reduce food intake. This review will sum Continue reading >>

Whey Protein And Glucose Spikes - _

Whey Protein And Glucose Spikes - _

The Hartwigs in "It Starts With Food" suggest that whey protein spikes blood glucose levels and that casein contains similar opiod-producing molecules as, say, gluten, especially in ciliacs. So, which is it? I realize there are always going to be conflicting viewpoints in the nutrition arena. Is the Ultra Whey an exception, in that the lactose is removed? @Nicky820 I suspect the only way to get an answer that is correct for you is to check your glucose levels after you have eaten it. I think that different people are affected differently. I don't seem to have a problem, although I admit that I have not done a blood glucose check. I wonder if Jimmy Moore has done whey, he has done more than a few n=1 experiments with different foods and his blood glucose. I have also seen a diabetes site in which the woman did a similar thing, but I can't find it right now, I will post it if I do. Whey protein -probably not as "non-aggressive" in terms of insulin secretion as some other proteins But clinically that actually probably doesn't mean anything. For example, a Swedish study (Am J Clin Nutr.2004;80:1246-1253) looked at insulin levels after whey protein vs. bread, and found that whey protein stimulates insulin secretion more than does white bread. Another study (Am J Clin Nutr.2005 Jul;82(1):69-75.) measured blood sugar after a high glycemic index meal with and without whey protein supplementation. They found that whey protein stimulated insulin release and significantly DECREASED blood sugar spike after a non-SANE meal. So, all that would make you think, "Gee whiz! Do I really want to stimulate my insulin with a whey protein shake for breakfast?" Hmmmm.... Dietary whey protein lessens several risk factors for metabolic diseases: a review. Sousa GT,Lira FS,Rosa JC,de Oliveira EP Continue reading >>

Lesson 9: Avoid Massive Insulin Spikes From Your Whey

Lesson 9: Avoid Massive Insulin Spikes From Your Whey

Did you know that 100% whey protein can cause massive insulin spikes? Many don’t! In fact, those on ketogenic diets are told to avoid 100% whey protein drinks because they can throw you out of ketosis. Research shows that while whey protein causes an increase in serum levels of leucine, isoleucine, and valine, it also causes an increase in the hormone glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). The most interesting finding in this study is that not only did whey protein caused an increase in serum insulin levels, it caused an increase of insulin, GIP. GLP-1 greater than carbohydrates from white bread (1). This study found that after ingestion of whey (grey bars), white bread (the carb group, white bars), and glucose alone (reference, black bar), whey protein caused the biggest spike in insulin (figure 1). These findings of this study was backed by further research, thus confirming that simply supplementing 100% whey protein causes significant insulin spikes (2). By incorporating a slower digesting protein with your whey, like casein protein, you will lower the overall insulin response. This is exactly what milk protein isolate is; a combination of whey and casein. Milk protein isolate is also the first ingredient in Select Protein. Research shows that although casein and whey have the same rate of muscle protein synthesis overall, casein has a much lower insulin response (3-4). Once again, the whey+casein blends have taken the lead. As you can tell, casein does not cause the same massive spike in insulin that whey does (refer to figure 1). References: Salehi, A., Gunnerud, U., Muhammed, S., et al. (2012). The insulinogenic effect of whey protein is partially mediated by a direct effect of amino acids and GIP on β-cells. Nut Continue reading >>

Whey Protein To Prevent After-meal Blood Sugar Spikes?

Whey Protein To Prevent After-meal Blood Sugar Spikes?

Controlling after-meal blood sugar levels is a continuing battle for many people with diabetes. Now, a small new study from Israel indicates that eating whey protein prior to a meal improves the body’s insulin response and helps control glucose levels after the meal. Along with casein, whey is one of the two main proteins found in milk. Eating protein is known to stimulate the production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a hormone that triggers the production of insulin. To determine whether consuming whey protein before a meal would improve blood glucose control after the meal, researchers recruited 15 people with well-controlled Type 2 diabetes who were taking only metformin or a sulfonylurea drug. The participants were randomly assigned to receive either 50 grams of whey protein in 250 milliliters of water or a placebo (inactive treatment — in this case, 250 milliliters of water) followed, 30 minutes later, by a standard high-glycemic-index breakfast composed of three slices of white bread and sugar-containing jelly. (The glycemic index measures how much a food affects blood glucose levels.) Blood samples were taken at 30 minutes prior to the meal, when the meal was served, and at 15, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 minutes after the meal. Two weeks after their initial study visit, the participants were assigned to repeat the trial using the alternate treatment (either the whey protein or the placebo). Because of this crossover design, the study was statistically powerful in spite of the small number of subjects. The researchers found that, over the course of the entire 180-minute after-meal period, blood glucose levels were 28% lower in those who had received whey protein compared to those who had received placebo. Levels of insulin and c-peptide (a by-product o Continue reading >>

Extraordinary Reasons Why Whey Protein Is Good For Diabetes

Extraordinary Reasons Why Whey Protein Is Good For Diabetes

Whey protein is one of the two major proteins found in milk and dairy products. The other major protein in dairy products is casein—many people have sensitivities to casein, but few people seem to have any sensitivity to whey protein. When rennin, a protein that curdles milk, is added to milk and other dairy products, the curds (casein) and whey separate, just as they did in the old nursery rhyme. Whey protein is used for a number of purposes—it is used to maintain daily protein intakes, to build muscle mass, and to increase fat loss. Whey isn’t the only protein to increase fat loss—most proteins do, but most proteins aren’t available in an easily dissolved powder as whey is. Whey Protein, Insulin and Blood Sugar There are a number of properties of whey protein that appear to be useful in diabetes. [1] Whey protein is a good source of the amino acid L-cysteine. L-cysteine is used to synthesize glutathione, one of the body’s most important antioxidant. Oxidative stress—the buildup of damaging free radicals—is thought to be one of the underlying causes of insulin resistance and to be responsible for some of the complications of diabetes such as peripheral neuropathy, retinopathy and kidney damage. Whey protein, when added to a meal, also appears to increase insulin secretion and to decrease blood sugar after a meal. (Post-prandial blood glucose)[2] Whey protein can also decrease triglyceride levels in diabetics after meals. In a recent study, blood sugar levels were 28% lower in those who had whey protein along with their meal. Insulin levels were increased (doubled) and, importantly, the insulin response lasted longer. The study was small, only examining the responses of 15 individuals, but the design of the study made the results significant.[3] Whey has Continue reading >>

Protein Controversies In Diabetes

Protein Controversies In Diabetes

Diabetes SpectrumVolume 13 Number 3, 2000, Page 132 Marion J. Franz, MS, RD, LD, CDE In Brief People with diabetes are frequently given advice about protein that has no scientific basis. In addition, although weight is lost when individuals follow a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet, there is no evidence that such diets are followed long-term or that there is less recidivism than with other low-calorie diets. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who are in poor metabolic control may have increased protein requirements. However, the usual amount of protein consumed by people with diabetes adequately compensates for the increased protein catabolism. People with diabetes need adequate and accurate information about protein on which to base their food decisions. In the United States, ~16% of the average adult consumption of calories is from protein, and this has varied little from 1909 to the present.1 Protein intake is also fairly consistent across all ages from infancy to older age. A daily intake of 2,500 calories contributes ~100 g of protein—about twice what is needed to replace protein lost on a daily basis. Excess amino acids must be converted into other storage products or oxidized as fuel. Therefore, in theory, the excess ingested protein could, through the process of gluconeogenesis, produce glucose. This would mean that 100 g of protein could produce ~50 g of glucose. This has been the basis of the statement that if about half of ingested protein is converted to glucose, protein will have one-half the effect of carbohydrate on blood glucose levels. However, this belief has been challenged.2-4 Protein controversies exist either because research has not provided conclusive answers or because professionals are not aware of the research. This article will review Continue reading >>

Whey May Curb Effect Of Carbs On Blood Sugar

Whey May Curb Effect Of Carbs On Blood Sugar

July 29, 2005 -- Whey may be good for more than just Little Miss Muffet. A new study shows adding whey to a high-carbohydrate meal may help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels under control. Researchers found drinking a whey supplement mixed with water along with a high glycemic index (GI) meal, like mashed potatoes with meatballs, prevented the dramatic spikes in blood sugar that normally occur in people with type 2 diabetes. Whey is a protein found in milk and is also available as a nutritional supplement. Researchers say the results suggest that whey aids in blood sugar regulation by stimulating the production of the hormone insulin in the pancreas. Insulin helps the body regulate blood sugar naturally. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas either does not produce enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels at healthy levels or the body has become resistant to insulin. Therefore, people with type 2 diabetes are advised to modify their diet to avoid foods with a high glycemic index that are digested rapidly and can cause dangerous spikes in blood sugar. Foods that have a high glycemic index -- and thus the strongest and most immediate impact on blood sugar -- include refined grains, potatoes, and sweets. In the study, researchers compared the effects of eating a high glycemic index meal with or without whey supplementation on blood sugar levels after the meal. The results appear in the current issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. For two days, 14 people with diet-treated type 2 diabetes ate a high-GI breakfast of white bread followed by a high-GI lunch of mashed potatoes and meatballs. A whey supplement of 27.6 grams of whey powder mixed in water was added to both meals on one day. On another day, they ate the same meals with lean ham and lacto Continue reading >>

Whey Protein's Impact On Insulin Resistance & Blood Glucose

Whey Protein's Impact On Insulin Resistance & Blood Glucose

If you've been in the lifting game for a semi-significant period of time, you've heard the Joe Gym-bro mantra that consuming whey protein and simple carbohydrates like dextrose immediately post-workout is crucial to "spike" insulin levels and maximize muscle protein synthesis (MPS). Since the early days of weight training, lifters have been employing this practice to increase muscle mass during a bulking phase and preserve lean mass during a cutting phase. A few years ago there was a shift in recommendations within the fitness community. Simple carbohydrates are no longer "required" to spike insulin levels because whey protein appeared to sufficiently spike insulin levels by itself. Related: Finding the Perfect Post-Workout Carb to Protein Ratio A recent study published in the scientific journal, Diabetes, suggested that protein, specifically prolonged consumption of whey protein, may spike insulin to dangerous levels. This implied that whey protein could lead to insulin resistance, a common predecessor of type 2 diabetes. [1] [imagemap id="12836"] MTS Whey from Marc Lobliner comes in 10 amazing flavors. Click here to stock up on your protein gains now. Insulin Resistance Battle: Whey Protein vs. Leucine A recent study entitled "Protein Ingestion Induces Muscle Insulin Resistance Independent of Leucine-Mediated mTOR Activation" by Gordon Smith, et al. was published in the May 2015 edition of Diabetes, a journal of the American Diabetes Association. In this article the authors administered either whey protein dosed at 0.6g/kg of fat free mass or the amount of free form L-leucine found in the equivalent dose of whey protein. [1] Each group consisted of 11 women, classified as sedentary, weight-stable, and between the ages of 50 and 65. [2] Researchers found that both leuc Continue reading >>

No Whey: Why You Should Skip This Popular Protein

No Whey: Why You Should Skip This Popular Protein

Among the wide array of protein powders, whey is perhaps most ubiquitous and popular. I’ve long opted for non-soy plant-based proteins because they don’t create potential reactions. With its blend of chlorella, pea, and chia, The Virgin Diet All-in-One Shake helps balance blood sugar to keep you full, focused, and burning fat for hours. Why not whey? After all, with a biological value of 104[1] – higher than even egg whites – whey has long been the gold standard in protein powders. That’s where its problems begin. Because whey remains a staple among bodybuilders and other athletic folks, manufacturers often mass-produce it cheaply with added preservatives, sweeteners, and artificial flavors. Even high-quality whey isn’t the panacea you might think. One study found whey creates an insulinogenic effect similar to white bread. In other words, whey protein can elevate blood sugar (and subsequently, insulin) levels similarly to a high-carbohydrate food like bread. While elevated insulin might be ideal after a rigorous workout, most folks aren’t using whey as a post-workout glycogen-storing fuel. You’re more likely using it as a meal replacement powder, where whey can become a serious disadvantage. “It just doesn’t keep me full very long,” people often tell me about whey-based meal replacement drinks. Now you know why: Compared with other protein powders, whey absorbs very quickly. Great after a workout, but not so great as a meal-replacement powder where you want a slow-releasing protein to keep you full for hours. Sports nutritionist John Berardi, PhD, notes several other problems with whey. Even though whey is mostly lactose free, even high-quality whey protein can contain traces of this sugar. Dried whey, a common food additive, contains almost 77% l Continue reading >>

On Whey Protein, Insulin Spikes And Losing Fat

On Whey Protein, Insulin Spikes And Losing Fat

Some argue against the use of whey protein when you’re trying to lose fat, mainly on the basis that it raises insulin levels. “Whey is a fast protein that spikes insulin,” they say. “Every time you chug down a whey protein shake, there’s a big insulin response, and fat burning is stopped dead in its tracks. If you want to lose fat, stop using whey.” It’s true that whey is a highly insulinogenic food, which means that it triggers a large release of insulin after you eat it. In fact, whey has a much bigger impact on insulin levels than even pure glucose. But this has little to do with changes in blood sugar levels. Rather, the amino acids in whey trigger insulin secretion directly in pancreatic beta cells. The branched-chain amino acids, leucine in particular, appear to be the most potent insulin secretagogues. Whey also stimulates the release of a couple of gastrointestinal hormones known as GIP and GLP-1, both of which have the effect of raising insulin levels. Should you stop using whey if you want to lose fat? Whey comes from milk. Around 20 percent of milk protein is whey, with the remaining 80 percent coming from casein. So if the “whey prevents fat loss” claim was true, you’d expect to see a slower rate of fat loss in people eating large amounts of dairy produce like milk and yogurt. In one study, researchers compared low (0–1 serving of dairy per day), medium (3–4 servings of dairy per day) and high (6–7 servings of dairy per day) dairy diets. All three diets were set up so that the women taking part consumed around 500 calories less than they needed to maintain their weight. After 16 weeks of diet and exercise, all three groups lost weight. If whey or dairy had a negative impact on weight loss, then you’d expect it to show up in this s Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Use Whey Protein Shakes?

Can Diabetics Use Whey Protein Shakes?

Whey protein will help you curb hunger, recover quickly from exercise and lose fat while maintaining muscle, according to the National Dairy Council. Whey is the liquid fraction of protein that is left when removing the curds, or the solids, from dairy. You can use whey protein if you have diabetes. In fact, it may help you gain better control over your blood sugar levels. Talk to your doctor before taking whey protein shakes, though, especially if you have diabetes, and don't stop taking medication that has been prescribed. Video of the Day Whey With Your Meal Test subjects with Type 2 diabetes showed a higher insulin response after eating a carbohydrate-containing meal that included whey protein powder than a similar meal without whey. Researchers mixed the powder into mashed potatoes. The increased insulin response was accompanied by lower post-meal blood sugar levels. This effect has the potential to delay the need for diabetes medications and has not been shown to cause hypoglycemia, reported the researchers in a 2005 issue of the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition." Researchers who published a study in 2014 in "Diabetologia" found similar results. Participants had 28 percent lower blood sugar levels and 96 percent higher insulin levels after a high-carbohydrate meal when they drank a whey protein shake beforehand. Look for a whey protein concentrate powder that contains no added sugars. Continue reading >>

Whey Protein And Diabetes – Control Blood Sugar Spikes

Whey Protein And Diabetes – Control Blood Sugar Spikes

Diabetes has become one of the most serious health risks in the world today! According to the CDC, it's estimated that 29.1 million people in the U.S. suffer from diabetes. That's nearly 10% of the U.S. population! Roughly 1 in 3 adults (86 million people) suffers from pre-diabetes, and anywhere from 15 to 30% of those adults will develop full-on diabetes within 5 years. The mortality rate among diabetic adults is 50% higher than non-diabetics. The health complications of diabetes can be pretty terrifying to consider: heart disease, loss of limbs, strokes, kidney failure, and blindness. If you want to reduce your risk of diabetes, there are three things that will work: 1. Lose weight -- Obesity increases your risk of diabetes, as the excess body fat reduces your body's sensitivity to insulin. This causes your blood sugar levels to spike out of control. If the high blood sugar levels persist, over time it can lead to diabetes. By losing weight, you essentially increase insulin sensitivity, making it easier for your body to control blood sugar levels. 2. Do exercise -- Exercise helps to promote weight loss, but it also uses up the glucose (sugar in your blood). This helps to keep your blood sugar levels under control, preventing excessively high blood sugar that causes diabetes. Even just 30 minutes of moderate exercise per day is enough to drastically reduce your risk of diabetes. 3. Change your diet -- This is one of the most important lifestyle changes, and one of the easiest. A healthy morning breakfast diet includes a balance between fats, carbs, and protein, a reduction in sugar and salt intake, and plenty of raw foods. Almost any balanced, calorie-controlled diet will work wonders to control your blood sugar level and reduce your risk of diabetes. As you change up Continue reading >>

Whey Good News For Diabetics

Whey Good News For Diabetics

Bodybuilders ingest buckets of whey protein powder to bulk up their muscle mass. But researchers from Israel have found a new blood-smart reason to eat like a “hulk” before meals. A new study by Israeli and Swedish researchers has found that a plain whey protein drink one half hour before breakfast could help diabetics, or those on the verge of diabetes, prevent blood-sugar spikes and better manage the disease. Researchers Prof. Daniela Jakubowicz and Dr. Julio Wainstein at Wolfson Medical Center in Holon; Prof. Oren Froy of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; and Prof. Bo Ahrén of Lund University and their colleagues studied a group of people who consumed whey protein before eating a high-glucose meal. When compared to a control group that did not ingest the whey, the results were astonishing, according to a summary of the research published in July in the journal Diabetologia of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. Lower blood-glucose levels It is common knowledge that eating protein stimulates GLP-1, a hormone in the gut, to produce insulin. If so, researchers hypothesized, GLP-1 should be able to help the body control blood sugar after eating a meal. In the study, the researchers examined 15 people who had type 2 diabetes and were managing their symptoms without medication. These people were offered a protein drink in a hospital setting –– 50 milligrams of whey protein in one cup of water –– and then one half hour later were given a meal with a high glycemic index. The breakfast included three pieces of white bread and jelly made with sugar. Over the course of two weeks, each person in the group received the whey drink or a placebo of water before the meal. Blood was sampled in all groups 30 minutes before the meal and then at 15, 30, 60, Continue reading >>

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