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Does Whey Protein Spike Blood Sugar

Whey Good News For Diabetics

Whey Good News For Diabetics

Bodybuilders ingest buckets of whey protein powder to bulk up their muscle mass. But researchers from Israel have found a new blood-smart reason to eat like a “hulk” before meals. A new study by Israeli and Swedish researchers has found that a plain whey protein drink one half hour before breakfast could help diabetics, or those on the verge of diabetes, prevent blood-sugar spikes and better manage the disease. Researchers Prof. Daniela Jakubowicz and Dr. Julio Wainstein at Wolfson Medical Center in Holon; Prof. Oren Froy of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; and Prof. Bo Ahrén of Lund University and their colleagues studied a group of people who consumed whey protein before eating a high-glucose meal. When compared to a control group that did not ingest the whey, the results were astonishing, according to a summary of the research published in July in the journal Diabetologia of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. Lower blood-glucose levels It is common knowledge that eating protein stimulates GLP-1, a hormone in the gut, to produce insulin. If so, researchers hypothesized, GLP-1 should be able to help the body control blood sugar after eating a meal. In the study, the researchers examined 15 people who had type 2 diabetes and were managing their symptoms without medication. These people were offered a protein drink in a hospital setting –– 50 milligrams of whey protein in one cup of water –– and then one half hour later were given a meal with a high glycemic index. The breakfast included three pieces of white bread and jelly made with sugar. Over the course of two weeks, each person in the group received the whey drink or a placebo of water before the meal. Blood was sampled in all groups 30 minutes before the meal and then at 15, 30, 60, Continue reading >>

Insulin Response: It Comes From Eating Protein Too

Insulin Response: It Comes From Eating Protein Too

It’s pretty well known that eating carbs causes an insulin release. But what many people don’t realize is protein causes a similar response. What is an insulin response? When we eat a meal, our digestive system breaks down food into nutrients that are absorbed into the bloodstream. Carbohydrates are broken down into sugars, which lead to an increase in blood sugar after consuming them. It’s this rise in blood sugar that triggers the release of the blood-sugar-lowering hormone, insulin. This process is known as an insulin response. This process is crucial because of the delicate balancing act we call blood sugar. The body likes to keep a tight reign on blood sugar as too low or too high can have deleterious effects. We often hear insulin and think "bad" when in fact it is absolutely essential for optimal health and function. Proteins are broken down into amino acids, which also stimulate an insulin response. However, the type of insulin response varies depending on the protein food source. Benefits and dangers of an insulin response The rise in insulin after eating helps move sugar into body tissues, and therefore keeps your blood sugar from getting too high. Note from Luke: Think of insulin as a traffic cop. It tells the blood sugar(glucose) where to go. In normal and healthy individuals the glucose fuels your nervous system, red blood cells, brain and muscle tissue. With optimal amounts and good insulin sensitivity, glucose fuels your nervous system and is burned off as energy. With too much or poor insulin sensitivity your muscle don't readily grab the glucose and it goes to where it's always welcome: fat stores. But the release of insulin can have negative effects. Too much insulin, for instance, can stress the pancreatic cells that secrete insulin. And this ad Continue reading >>

Can Whey Protein Control Blood Sugar?

Can Whey Protein Control Blood Sugar?

Researchers from Israel believe people with diabetes could benefit from this protein-rich beverage. You have seen the advertisements—overly muscular body builders tauting the health benefits of one or more high-protein drinks. Although you may not be in training for the Mr. or Mrs. America contest, whey-protein drinks have been found to be helpful for people with type 2 diabetes. When consumed before breakfast, whey protein shakes can help prevent the blood sugar fluctuations that are common after meals, says Israeli researchers from Tel Aviv University. If left unchecked (continuous and long-term), these erratic variations in blood sugar can cause serious issues over time—worsening diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and damaging the retina of the eye. In fact, people with diabetes who drank the whey protein drink before breakfast saw a 28% drop in after-meal glucose scores, reported the authors of the study published in Diabetologia.1 The researchers evaluated the effectiveness of whey protein, a nutrient-rich byproduct from cheese production, against a mock product on 15 patients with well-controlled Type 2 diabetes. Some of the patients drank a protein drink containing 50 grams of whey protein, mixed with 250 milliliters of water, while the other patients consumed a placebo. They then ate a standard, high-glycemic-index breakfast as researchers monitored their glucose, insulin, and incretin levels over an entire 3-hour post-meal period. The patients were only taking a sulfonylurea, which increase insulin production from the pancreas, or metformin, which suppresses the liver from producing too much glucose. Interestingly, the glucose levels weren't the only signs of improvement; Insulin response more than doubled (105%) while C-peptide responses spiked by 43%, note Continue reading >>

Effect Of Whey On Blood Glucose And Insulin Responses To Composite Breakfast And Lunch Meals In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

Effect Of Whey On Blood Glucose And Insulin Responses To Composite Breakfast And Lunch Meals In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

Effect of whey on blood glucose and insulin responses to composite breakfast and lunch meals in type 2 diabetic subjects From the Clinic of Endocrinology, University Hospital MAS, Malm, Sweden (AHF); the Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden (MN and IMEB); and the Department of Medical Physiology, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark (JJH) Search for other works by this author on: From the Clinic of Endocrinology, University Hospital MAS, Malm, Sweden (AHF); the Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden (MN and IMEB); and the Department of Medical Physiology, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark (JJH) Reprints not available. Address correspondence to M Nilsson, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, PO Box 124, 221 00 Lund, Sweden. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: From the Clinic of Endocrinology, University Hospital MAS, Malm, Sweden (AHF); the Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden (MN and IMEB); and the Department of Medical Physiology, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark (JJH) Search for other works by this author on: From the Clinic of Endocrinology, University Hospital MAS, Malm, Sweden (AHF); the Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden (MN and IMEB); and the Department of Medical Physiology, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark (JJH) Search for other works by this author on: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 82, Issue 1, 1 July 2005, Pages 6975, Anders H Frid, Mikael Nilsson, Jens Juul H Continue reading >>

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Are Protein Shakes Ok For People With Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease where the body cannot maintain normal levels of blood sugar, and blood sugar levels go too high. Blood sugars that are too high can cause symptoms such as dry mouth, increased thirst, frequent urination, tiredness, and increased urination at night. High blood sugar levels over time can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels. What people eat has a huge impact on their blood sugars. Carbohydrates found in foods cause blood sugar to go up. Foods that digest slower cause a slower rise in blood sugar, which is helpful for those with diabetes. But what about protein shakes? What is protein? The three essential macronutrients found in food are protein, carbohydrates, and fat. Protein helps to maintain, rebuild, and repair muscle. Protein is also a building block for the skin, nails, bones, and even blood. It makes up hormones, enzymes, and antibodies. Protein in foods has staying power because it digests slower than carbohydrate. Proteins do not raise blood sugar. Periods of growth, such as during infancy and pregnancy, need more protein. Protein needs are also raised for people with injuries, those who have had surgery, or active people. Most people, including those with diabetes, are looking for healthy options to grab on the go like protein shakes or bars. While it is important to rely on packaged food products as little as possible, it is smart to have some healthier options in mind when needed. The problem with protein shakes is that they often have lots of artificial ingredients and can have as much sugar as soda. Protein requirements The total amount of protein consumed in a day is important, but so is how that intake is spread out over the day. Many people will consume a small amount at breakfast, a moderate amount at lunch, and a lar Continue reading >>

Whey May Curb Effect Of Carbs On Blood Sugar

Whey May Curb Effect Of Carbs On Blood Sugar

July 29, 2005 -- Whey may be good for more than just Little Miss Muffet. A new study shows adding whey to a high-carbohydrate meal may help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels under control. Researchers found drinking a whey supplement mixed with water along with a high glycemic index (GI) meal, like mashed potatoes with meatballs, prevented the dramatic spikes in blood sugar that normally occur in people with type 2 diabetes. Whey is a protein found in milk and is also available as a nutritional supplement. Researchers say the results suggest that whey aids in blood sugar regulation by stimulating the production of the hormone insulin in the pancreas. Insulin helps the body regulate blood sugar naturally. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas either does not produce enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels at healthy levels or the body has become resistant to insulin. Therefore, people with type 2 diabetes are advised to modify their diet to avoid foods with a high glycemic index that are digested rapidly and can cause dangerous spikes in blood sugar. Foods that have a high glycemic index -- and thus the strongest and most immediate impact on blood sugar -- include refined grains, potatoes, and sweets. In the study, researchers compared the effects of eating a high glycemic index meal with or without whey supplementation on blood sugar levels after the meal. The results appear in the current issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. For two days, 14 people with diet-treated type 2 diabetes ate a high-GI breakfast of white bread followed by a high-GI lunch of mashed potatoes and meatballs. A whey supplement of 27.6 grams of whey powder mixed in water was added to both meals on one day. On another day, they ate the same meals with lean ham and lacto Continue reading >>

Protein And Blood Sugar

Protein And Blood Sugar

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community When I consume a protein shake first thing in the morning (1 scoop protein with water only) I always get a fast and radical spike in my sugar level. I use pea protein powder that purports to contain only 3.2g CHO per scoop, so it's hardly the carb content that's responsible. I can have a fasting glucose of 4mmol and see it shoot up to 14 or 15 after the shake unless I have a bolus of about 3 units. I've read quite a bit about the body being able to convert protein to glucose and though my dietitian's opinion is that it's unlikely that this is what's happening, I'm inclined to think otherwise. My diabetic specialist reckons it's down to the surge of morning stress hormones and that the protein shake is a red herring. I've tested his theory by omitting the shake altogether (no breakfast either) and have not seen any significant change in my glucose levels during the morning. Anybody else have any experience with this phenomenon? Shooting up to 14/15 isn't good news so I would be ditching the shake, why don't you just have some scrambled eggs or an omelette instead? I find if I eat protein based meals that I need nearly as much insulin as I do for one that is carb based, typical example is eggs as above where I would need 4 units of QA insulin compared to 5 units for a bowl of porridge. Sorry Noblehead, I should have pointed out that I'm vegan, so eggs are out for me. As for your suggestion, Frankie, that the protein powder has some hidden extras, I really don't think that is the case as it a UK-made product and the manufacturer's own website provides comprehensive nutritional data about it. As I mentioned, I can avoid the spike with a small bolus, so I Continue reading >>

Whey Protein And Glucose Spikes - _

Whey Protein And Glucose Spikes - _

The Hartwigs in "It Starts With Food" suggest that whey protein spikes blood glucose levels and that casein contains similar opiod-producing molecules as, say, gluten, especially in ciliacs. So, which is it? I realize there are always going to be conflicting viewpoints in the nutrition arena. Is the Ultra Whey an exception, in that the lactose is removed? @Nicky820 I suspect the only way to get an answer that is correct for you is to check your glucose levels after you have eaten it. I think that different people are affected differently. I don't seem to have a problem, although I admit that I have not done a blood glucose check. I wonder if Jimmy Moore has done whey, he has done more than a few n=1 experiments with different foods and his blood glucose. I have also seen a diabetes site in which the woman did a similar thing, but I can't find it right now, I will post it if I do. Whey protein -probably not as "non-aggressive" in terms of insulin secretion as some other proteins But clinically that actually probably doesn't mean anything. For example, a Swedish study (Am J Clin Nutr.2004;80:1246-1253) looked at insulin levels after whey protein vs. bread, and found that whey protein stimulates insulin secretion more than does white bread. Another study (Am J Clin Nutr.2005 Jul;82(1):69-75.) measured blood sugar after a high glycemic index meal with and without whey protein supplementation. They found that whey protein stimulated insulin release and significantly DECREASED blood sugar spike after a non-SANE meal. So, all that would make you think, "Gee whiz! Do I really want to stimulate my insulin with a whey protein shake for breakfast?" Hmmmm.... Dietary whey protein lessens several risk factors for metabolic diseases: a review. Sousa GT,Lira FS,Rosa JC,de Oliveira EP Continue reading >>

On Whey Protein, Insulin Spikes And Losing Fat

On Whey Protein, Insulin Spikes And Losing Fat

Some argue against the use of whey protein when you’re trying to lose fat, mainly on the basis that it raises insulin levels. “Whey is a fast protein that spikes insulin,” they say. “Every time you chug down a whey protein shake, there’s a big insulin response, and fat burning is stopped dead in its tracks. If you want to lose fat, stop using whey.” It’s true that whey is a highly insulinogenic food, which means that it triggers a large release of insulin after you eat it. In fact, whey has a much bigger impact on insulin levels than even pure glucose. But this has little to do with changes in blood sugar levels. Rather, the amino acids in whey trigger insulin secretion directly in pancreatic beta cells. The branched-chain amino acids, leucine in particular, appear to be the most potent insulin secretagogues. Whey also stimulates the release of a couple of gastrointestinal hormones known as GIP and GLP-1, both of which have the effect of raising insulin levels. Should you stop using whey if you want to lose fat? Whey comes from milk. Around 20 percent of milk protein is whey, with the remaining 80 percent coming from casein. So if the “whey prevents fat loss” claim was true, you’d expect to see a slower rate of fat loss in people eating large amounts of dairy produce like milk and yogurt. In one study, researchers compared low (0–1 serving of dairy per day), medium (3–4 servings of dairy per day) and high (6–7 servings of dairy per day) dairy diets. All three diets were set up so that the women taking part consumed around 500 calories less than they needed to maintain their weight. After 16 weeks of diet and exercise, all three groups lost weight. If whey or dairy had a negative impact on weight loss, then you’d expect it to show up in this s Continue reading >>

Effect Of Whey On Blood Glucose And Insulin Responses To Composite Breakfast And Lunch Meals In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects.

Effect Of Whey On Blood Glucose And Insulin Responses To Composite Breakfast And Lunch Meals In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects.

Effect of whey on blood glucose and insulin responses to composite breakfast and lunch meals in type 2 diabetic subjects. Clinic of Endocrinology, University Hospital MAS, Malm, Sweden. Whey proteins have insulinotropic effects and reduce the postprandial glycemia in healthy subjects. The mechanism is not known, but insulinogenic amino acids and the incretin hormones seem to be involved. The aim was to evaluate whether supplementation of meals with a high glycemic index (GI) with whey proteins may increase insulin secretion and improve blood glucose control in type 2 diabetic subjects. Fourteen diet-treated subjects with type 2 diabetes were served a high-GI breakfast (white bread) and subsequent high-GI lunch (mashed potatoes with meatballs). The breakfast and lunch meals were supplemented with whey on one day; whey was exchanged for lean ham and lactose on another day. Venous blood samples were drawn before and during 4 h after breakfast and 3 h after lunch for the measurement of blood glucose, serum insulin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). The insulin responses were higher after both breakfast (31%) and lunch (57%) when whey was included in the meal than when whey was not included. After lunch, the blood glucose response was significantly reduced [-21%; 120 min area under the curve (AUC)] after whey ingestion. Postprandial GIP responses were higher after whey ingestion, whereas no differences were found in GLP-1 between the reference and test meals. It can be concluded that the addition of whey to meals with rapidly digested and absorbed carbohydrates stimulates insulin release and reduces postprandial blood glucose excursion after a lunch meal consisting of mashed potatoes and meatballs in type 2 diabetic sub Continue reading >>

Effect Of Whey On Blood Glucose And Insulin Responses To Composite Breakfast And Lunch Meals In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

Effect Of Whey On Blood Glucose And Insulin Responses To Composite Breakfast And Lunch Meals In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

Effect of whey on blood glucose and insulin responses to composite breakfast and lunch meals in type 2 diabetic subjects From the Clinic of Endocrinology, University Hospital MAS, Malm, Sweden (AHF); the Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden (MN and IMEB); and the Department of Medical Physiology, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark (JJH) Search for other works by this author on: From the Clinic of Endocrinology, University Hospital MAS, Malm, Sweden (AHF); the Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden (MN and IMEB); and the Department of Medical Physiology, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark (JJH) Reprints not available. Address correspondence to M Nilsson, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, PO Box 124, 221 00 Lund, Sweden. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: From the Clinic of Endocrinology, University Hospital MAS, Malm, Sweden (AHF); the Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden (MN and IMEB); and the Department of Medical Physiology, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark (JJH) Search for other works by this author on: From the Clinic of Endocrinology, University Hospital MAS, Malm, Sweden (AHF); the Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden (MN and IMEB); and the Department of Medical Physiology, The Panum Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark (JJH) Search for other works by this author on: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 82, Issue 1, 1 July 2005, Pages 6975, Anders H Frid, Mikael Nilsson, Jens Juul H Continue reading >>

Whey Protein's Impact On Insulin Resistance & Blood Glucose

Whey Protein's Impact On Insulin Resistance & Blood Glucose

If you've been in the lifting game for a semi-significant period of time, you've heard the Joe Gym-bro mantra that consuming whey protein and simple carbohydrates like dextrose immediately post-workout is crucial to "spike" insulin levels and maximize muscle protein synthesis (MPS). Since the early days of weight training, lifters have been employing this practice to increase muscle mass during a bulking phase and preserve lean mass during a cutting phase. A few years ago there was a shift in recommendations within the fitness community. Simple carbohydrates are no longer "required" to spike insulin levels because whey protein appeared to sufficiently spike insulin levels by itself. Related: Finding the Perfect Post-Workout Carb to Protein Ratio A recent study published in the scientific journal, Diabetes, suggested that protein, specifically prolonged consumption of whey protein, may spike insulin to dangerous levels. This implied that whey protein could lead to insulin resistance, a common predecessor of type 2 diabetes. [1] [imagemap id="12836"] MTS Whey from Marc Lobliner comes in 10 amazing flavors. Click here to stock up on your protein gains now. Insulin Resistance Battle: Whey Protein vs. Leucine A recent study entitled "Protein Ingestion Induces Muscle Insulin Resistance Independent of Leucine-Mediated mTOR Activation" by Gordon Smith, et al. was published in the May 2015 edition of Diabetes, a journal of the American Diabetes Association. In this article the authors administered either whey protein dosed at 0.6g/kg of fat free mass or the amount of free form L-leucine found in the equivalent dose of whey protein. [1] Each group consisted of 11 women, classified as sedentary, weight-stable, and between the ages of 50 and 65. [2] Researchers found that both leuc Continue reading >>

Whey Protein And Diabetes – Control Blood Sugar Spikes

Whey Protein And Diabetes – Control Blood Sugar Spikes

Diabetes has become one of the most serious health risks in the world today! According to the CDC, it's estimated that 29.1 million people in the U.S. suffer from diabetes. That's nearly 10% of the U.S. population! Roughly 1 in 3 adults (86 million people) suffers from pre-diabetes, and anywhere from 15 to 30% of those adults will develop full-on diabetes within 5 years. The mortality rate among diabetic adults is 50% higher than non-diabetics. The health complications of diabetes can be pretty terrifying to consider: heart disease, loss of limbs, strokes, kidney failure, and blindness. If you want to reduce your risk of diabetes, there are three things that will work: 1. Lose weight -- Obesity increases your risk of diabetes, as the excess body fat reduces your body's sensitivity to insulin. This causes your blood sugar levels to spike out of control. If the high blood sugar levels persist, over time it can lead to diabetes. By losing weight, you essentially increase insulin sensitivity, making it easier for your body to control blood sugar levels. 2. Do exercise -- Exercise helps to promote weight loss, but it also uses up the glucose (sugar in your blood). This helps to keep your blood sugar levels under control, preventing excessively high blood sugar that causes diabetes. Even just 30 minutes of moderate exercise per day is enough to drastically reduce your risk of diabetes. 3. Change your diet -- This is one of the most important lifestyle changes, and one of the easiest. A healthy morning breakfast diet includes a balance between fats, carbs, and protein, a reduction in sugar and salt intake, and plenty of raw foods. Almost any balanced, calorie-controlled diet will work wonders to control your blood sugar level and reduce your risk of diabetes. As you change up Continue reading >>

Lesson 9: Avoid Massive Insulin Spikes From Your Whey

Lesson 9: Avoid Massive Insulin Spikes From Your Whey

Did you know that 100% whey protein can cause massive insulin spikes? Many don’t! In fact, those on ketogenic diets are told to avoid 100% whey protein drinks because they can throw you out of ketosis. Research shows that while whey protein causes an increase in serum levels of leucine, isoleucine, and valine, it also causes an increase in the hormone glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1). The most interesting finding in this study is that not only did whey protein caused an increase in serum insulin levels, it caused an increase of insulin, GIP. GLP-1 greater than carbohydrates from white bread (1). This study found that after ingestion of whey (grey bars), white bread (the carb group, white bars), and glucose alone (reference, black bar), whey protein caused the biggest spike in insulin (figure 1). These findings of this study was backed by further research, thus confirming that simply supplementing 100% whey protein causes significant insulin spikes (2). By incorporating a slower digesting protein with your whey, like casein protein, you will lower the overall insulin response. This is exactly what milk protein isolate is; a combination of whey and casein. Milk protein isolate is also the first ingredient in Select Protein. Research shows that although casein and whey have the same rate of muscle protein synthesis overall, casein has a much lower insulin response (3-4). Once again, the whey+casein blends have taken the lead. As you can tell, casein does not cause the same massive spike in insulin that whey does (refer to figure 1). References: Salehi, A., Gunnerud, U., Muhammed, S., et al. (2012). The insulinogenic effect of whey protein is partially mediated by a direct effect of amino acids and GIP on β-cells. Nut Continue reading >>

Whey Protein: The “whey” Forward For Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Whey Protein: The “whey” Forward For Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Go to: Abstract A cost-effective nutritional approach to improve postprandial glycaemia is attractive considering the rising burden of diabetes throughout the world. Whey protein, a by-product of the cheese-making process, can be used to manipulate gut function in order to slow gastric emptying and stimulate incretin hormone secretion, thereby attenuating postprandial glycaemic excursions. The function of the gastrointestinal tract plays a pivotal role in glucose homeostasis, particularly during the postprandial period, and this review will discuss the mechanisms by which whey protein slows gastric emptying and stimulates release of gut peptides, including the incretins. Whey protein is also a rich source of amino acids, and these can directly stimulate beta cells to secrete insulin, which contributes to the reduction in postprandial glycaemia. Appetite is suppressed with consumption of whey, due to its effects on the gut-brain axis and the hypothalamus. These properties of whey protein suggest its potential in the management of type 2 diabetes. However, the optimal dose and timing of whey protein ingestion are yet to be defined, and studies are required to examine the long-term benefits of whey consumption for overall glycaemic control. Keywords: Whey protein, Postprandial glycaemia, Type 2 diabetes, Dietary intervention, Preload, Gastric emptying, Incretins, Gut hormones, Appetite, Amino acids Core tip: Whey protein, a by-product of cheese-manufacture, shows promise in the dietary management of diabetes. Whey can slow gastric emptying, stimulate insulin and gut hormones including the incretins, and thereby reduce postprandial blood glucose, especially when consumed some minutes before a meal. Whey may also suppress appetite and reduce food intake. This review will sum Continue reading >>

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