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Does Half And Half Spike Insulin

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is cow’s milk good food for people, especially people with diabetes? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) say yes. Given how I feel about ADA and USDA’s record on nutrition advice, I think we should check for ourselves. ADA recommends two to three servings of low-fat milk (or other low-fat dairy food such as cheese and yogurt) each day. “Including sources of dairy products in your diet is an easy way to get calcium and high-quality protein,” according to their nutrition page. USDA says three cups a day for people age nine and up. But what do independent experts say? And what does the data say? Many disagree about milk’s being healthy. Dr. Mark Hyman, author of The Blood Sugar Solution, wrote, “I typically advise most of my patients to avoid dairy products completely… From an evolutionary point of view, milk is a strange food for humans. Until 10,000 years ago we didn’t domesticate animals and weren’t able to drink milk… The majority of humans naturally stop producing significant amounts of lactase — the enzyme needed to [deal with] lactose, the sugar in milk — sometime between the ages of two and five.” OK. So some experts disagree with the government. But we have to start at the beginning. What is milk anyway? What milk is made of Milk is food produced by mammal mothers to feed their young. Mammal milks are all similar, but they have important differences in the specific proteins. It may be that cow’s milk is not a good match for most human populations. Milk has significant amounts of fat, protein, and carbohydrate in one package. Normal cow’s milk contains 30–35 grams of protein per liter, mostly in the form of casein. It also contains dozens of other proteins in small amounts, various mi Continue reading >>

How The World's Top Health Experts Take Their Coffee

How The World's Top Health Experts Take Their Coffee

How the World's Top Health Experts Take Their Coffee Written by Maria Hart on September 4, 2014 We often think of health experts as being superhuman with chiseled abs or crazy scientific dietary knowledge. (Conjugated linoleic acid? Is that Dothraki ?) But they start their day the same way most of us do: with a cup of coffee. Seeing the way someone prepares their morning mug becomes shorthand for their nutritional philosophy. Is dairy a do or a dont? What about sweeteners? And butter? Coconut oil ? Do these belong in coffeeor coffee cake? Health experts are humanthey put on their pants one leg at a time and grind their coffee beans in a grinder (not pulverized by a series of kettlebell swings)but theyve given a lot of thought to what goes into their bodies, coffee included, and used their vast knowledge to create the optimal cup. Thats why we asked 19 experts to share their ideal way to kick-start the day. Read on for their (often surprising) java testimonials and details on what motivates them to add (or not) certain ingredients. 1. Brian St. Pierre, Sports Nutritionist at Precision Nutrition Sixty-five percent of Americans put cream and sugar in their coffee, but I tend to take mine black because I prefer to get my calories from food. (The research on the benefits of coffee is mostly on [black, conventional drip-brewer style], since its the most common.) Its important to keep the big picture in mind. If youre only consuming one coffee per day, a little cream and sugar is unlikely to be a problem. But since the average American consumes three cups per day , that can start adding up quickly. Were all allowed some discretionary calories, just dont use them all up in your three daily cups. A few teaspoons of sugar and a few tablespoons of your creamer of choice are proba Continue reading >>

Why Is

Why Is "non-black" Coffee A No-no?

This topic contains 44 replies, has 39 voices, and was last updated by Chopdog 1 month ago . Viewing 46 posts - 1 through 46 (of 46 total) Just finished the book next week will be my first 5:2 week. I have some experience with fasting for religious reasons, and I know that coffee is very helpful for me in suppressing appetite. So I think it would be a good tool for me on fast days. But I cant stand black coffee. I usually take both low-fat milk and sugar (I dont do artificial sweeteners in anything). I could curb both the milk and sugar to the point that the total calorie count for an 8 oz cup of coffee would be less than 30 calories and I only drink one cup a day. So heres the question: in the book Mimi and Michael suggest drinking a cup of low calorie hot chocolate as a treat if you get hungry. According to the calorie counter in the back, this would add up to over 40 calories. Yet they always stress that if you drink coffee, it must be black. Is there something Im missing here? Is there some reason I cant have the coffee as described above, as long as I limit the rest of my calories to 470? And would it make a difference when I drink it during the day? I have been doing 5:2 for about 5 months. I always use H&H in my coffee. A teaspoon of H&H is about 5-6 calories. Since generally I only drink 2 cups of coffee a day 10 to 12 calories are not enough to make me drink coffee without H&H. To me all of this talk about no milk in coffee is a diversion that has nothing to do with the effectiveness of the diet. It seems to me to be something everybody can latch onto and feel good about themselves if they drink black coffee. I guess if you are drinking 10 to 12 cups of coffee a day, it might make a difference. Otherwise, the most important thing is for each of use to find a w Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Killers

Common Ketosis Killers

“I’ve tried your low-carb diet, Dr. Nally, and it didn’t work.” “Hmm . . . really?” If your mumbling this to yourself, or you’ve said it to me in my office, then lets have a little talk. I’ve heard this statement before. It’s not a new statement, but it’s a statement that tells me we need to address a number of items. If you’ve failed a low carbohydrate diet, I’d suspect you are pretty severely insulin resistant or hyperinsulinemic. You probably never really reached true ketosis. I’d want to have you checked out by your doctor to rule out underlying disease like hypothyroidism, diabetes, other hormone imbalance, etc. Next, switching to a low-carbohydrate lifestyle is literally a “lifestyle change.” It requires that you understand a few basic ketosis principles. And, it takes the average person 3-6 months to really wrap their head around what this lifestyle means . . . and, some people, up to a year before they are really comfortable with how to eat and function in any situation. I assume, if you are reading this article, that you’ve already read about ketosis and understand the science behind it. If not, please start your reading with my article The Principle Based Ketogenic Lifestyle – Part I and Ketogenic Principles – Part II. If this is the case, then please proceed forward, “full steam ahead!” There are usually a few areas that are inadvertently inhibiting your body transformation, so let’s get a little personal. First, this is a low carbohydrate diet. For weight loss, I usually ask people to lower their carbohydrate intake to less than 2o grams per day. How do you do that? (A copy of my diet is accessible through my membership site HERE.) You’ve got to begin by restricting all carbohydrates to less than 20 grams per day. Continue reading >>

Does High Fat Dairy Raise Insulin Levels?

Does High Fat Dairy Raise Insulin Levels?

High insulin levels are usually the result of an excessive carbohydrate intake from pasta, breads, sweetened beverages or desserts. The glycemic index of foods, which measures their ability to raise your blood sugar levels, is usually proportional to their insulin index, or their ability to make your pancreas secrete insulin. Although the glycemic index of dairy products is low compared to other carbohydrate-containing foods, it has a disproportionately high insulin index, according to a study published in 2005 in the "British Journal of Nutrition." The protein content of dairy, more than its fat content, seems to influence how much your insulin levels will raise after eating. Whole Milk Vs. Skim Milk In a controlled study, researchers gave volunteers either a glass of skim milk or whole milk on different occasions and measured the increase in their blood sugar and blood insulin levels, as published in 2005 in the "British Journal of Nutrition." The results show that both skim and full-fat milk elicited similar responses in the blood sugar and insulin levels of healthy participants. Although a glass of milk, independently of its fat content, contains an average of 12 grams of carbohydrates, while a slice of white bread has about 15 grams of carbohydrates, the insulin index of skim and full-fat milk is just as high as that of white bread. Milk Protein Researchers studying the high insulin index of milk believe that the types of protein found in milk, either casein, whey or both, stimulate the production of insulin from the pancreas. The protein content of both skim and full-fat milk is similar, which explains why they both have the same ability to raise your insulin levels. Although more studies are needed, this theory suggests that other protein-containing dairy product Continue reading >>

How Does Fat Affect Insulin Resistance And Diabetes?

How Does Fat Affect Insulin Resistance And Diabetes?

According to the Centers for Disease Control, 29 million people in America have diabetes and 86 million have prediabetes. Insulin resistance is recognized as a predictor of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. But what causes insulin resistance? In this NutritionFacts.org video, Dr. Michael Greger talks about how fat affects insulin resistance, and about how the most effective way to reduce insulin sensitivity is to reduce fat intake. We’ve also provided a summary of Dr. Greger’s main points below. Insulin Resistance of People on High-Fat Diets vs. High-Carb Diets In studies performed as early as the 1930s, scientists have noted a connection between diet and insulin intolerance. In one study, healthy young men were split into two groups. Half of the participants were put on a fat-rich diet, and the other half were put on a carb-rich diet. The high-fat group ate olive oil, butter, mayonnaise, and cream. The high-carb group ate pastries, sugar, candy, bread, baked potatoes, syrup, rice, and oatmeal. Within two days, tests showed that the glucose intolerance had skyrocketed in the group eating the high-fat diet. This group had twice the blood sugar levels than the high-carb group. The test results showed that the higher the fat content of the diet, the higher the blood sugar levels would be. What Is Insulin Resistance? It turns out that as the amount of fat in the diet goes up, so does one’s blood sugar spikes. Athletes frequently carb-load before a race because they’re trying to build up fuel in their muscles. We break down starch into glucose in our digestive tract; it circulates as blood glucose (blood sugar); and it is then used by our muscle cells as fuel. Blood sugar, though, is like a vampire. It needs an invitation to enter our cells. And that invit Continue reading >>

Coffee And Insulin – How Caffeine Intake Affects Weight Loss

Coffee And Insulin – How Caffeine Intake Affects Weight Loss

How do you start your morning off? Mine begins with a steaming hot cup of my favorite coffee. The black nectar also accompanies my workouts, my busy evenings when I have to work late, my headache treatments, and even my post-workout recovery shakes. I know I am not alone in my love for coffee. In the past 6 decades, researchers have conducted more than 21,000 studies on coffee’s signature stimulant, caffeine. That’s an average of one new study a day! If there is a disease then chances are that someone has already tried to link the effects of caffeine to it. Cancers, heart disease, infertility, brain malfunction, asthma, migraines, gallbladder disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, high and low blood pressure, diabetes and obesity have all been on the list. You have probably been warned to stay away from drinking too much coffee and given tips on how to gradually get off the java, but is it worth the effort to cut back and even quit? Hold onto your mug and keep reading! Calorie-Free Insulin SurgesThe problems regarding coffee’s impact on blood sugar and insulin levels have been brewing for a while and the arguments are steaming on both sides. Short-term metabolic studies have shown that caffeine intake can acutely lower insulin sensitivity and sometimes even raise blood sugar levels. One study published in “Diabetes Care” found that consuming 70 grams of coffee grounds for 4 weeks increased fasting insulin concentrations in 40 healthy volunteers without substantially affecting fasting glucose concentrations. The researchers suggested that such results reflect decreased insulin sensitivity from high caffeine intake. What’s worse is that after just 5 days of regular supplementation, the body’s blood glucose control system may become tolerant to th Continue reading >>

Will Bulletproof Coffee Break Your Fast?

Will Bulletproof Coffee Break Your Fast?

Dr. Sara Solomon April 30, 2015 Nutrition Blog 6 Comments I'm not a fan of adding oil to coffee. Here's why: Will it break my fast if I add cream to my coffee? What if I add coconut oil to my coffee? What about Bulletproof coffee? 1 tbsp. of half-and-half cream: 20 calories, 1.7 g fat, 0.6 g carbs, and 0.4 g protein 1 tbsp. of coconut oil: 120 calories and 14 grams of fat Even if you put a splash of cream in your coffee you will still be okay. Fasting works because it keeps your insulin levels low enough to allow fat burning (oxidation) to occur. Coconut oil will not cause your insulin levels to rise. So technically, yes, you can have the coconut oil during your fast and it wont elevate your insulin levels. If you start eating spoonfuls from the jar of coconut oil, it is unlikely you will be in caloric deficit by the time you finish your fasting and feeding period and therefore, you will not lose fat! Also, you must not forget to count this coconut oil toward your total calories and your fat macros for the day. Heres the problem. Are you tracking these calories and macros? When you break your fast, you must be prepared to eat 120 fewer calories and 12g less fat. If you arent taking these calories into consideration, it may explain why you are not losing fat with the intermittent fasting system. I've noticed that the people following my Fat Loss Fast System who gain fat instead of losing fat are always the ones who dump coconut oil into their coffee and into their skillets at every meal. Be careful, dietary fat packs 5more calories per gram than carbs and protein... so take my advice and use dietary fat as your caloric buffer if you want to get results and stop usingthe "eat fat to lose fat" mentality as an excuse to over-consume dietary fat. Quite frankly, Id rather no Continue reading >>

The Mystery Of Coffee And Diabetes

The Mystery Of Coffee And Diabetes

Is coffee good or bad for diabetes? Some studies show that coffee is protective, while others say it’s harmful. Some say decaf is better; others say it’s worse. Let’s try to sort this out. For years, various studies have reported that coffee drinkers are less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. A recent UCLA study found that “women who drink at least four cups of coffee a day are less than half as likely to develop diabetes as non-coffee drinkers.” Lead scientist Simin Liu said that coffee may improve the body’s tolerance to glucose by increasing metabolism or lowering insulin resistance. In 2008, Diabetes Self-Management blogger Amy Campbell reported on several other studies showing benefits for coffee. A study published in Diabetes Care in 2006 followed about 900 adults, roughly 300 of whom had prediabetes, for eight years. The people who drank caffeinated coffee had a 60% lower risk of getting diabetes than those who didn’t drink coffee. Another Diabetes Care study published the same year looked at more than 88,000 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II. It found that women who drank two or more cups of coffee daily had a lower risk (slightly more than half the risk) of getting diabetes than those who drank just one cup of coffee daily, or no coffee at all. And it didn’t matter whether the coffee was regular or decaf. So right there you have a disagreement about caffeine. Meanwhile, other studies have shown that coffee, or the caffeine in coffee, raises after-meal (postprandial) blood glucose levels up to 20% in people with diabetes. These studies have not been large but have received a lot of attention. In the most-reported study, from Duke University, ten subjects, all with diabetes, were tested — given either caffeine capsules or a placebo (inacti Continue reading >>

Paradise Waters And Everafters

Paradise Waters And Everafters

Most of us who follow the paleo lifestyle or do a combo of paleo and primal know that dairy is not necessarily acceptable. It's taken me a while to limit or remove dairy from my diet but I still do indulge in borderline good sources of dairy. One in particular is heavy cream. I've contemplated giving it up and dabbled in other sources to see if it could suit me. Coconut milk is okay but doesn't taste as well with my coffee or have the same consistency. I've attempted to just drink black coffee but that doesn't do it for me either. So after playing around with half and half and heavy cream, the winner is heavy cream. So what's the difference between heavy cream and 1/2 & 1/2?? Heavy cream is full fat cream at approximately 36% of fat, if you can buy it organic yay! Half & Half is 1/2 full milk and half cream. Half & Half is lower in fat but higher in carbs because of the milk. Depending on your insulin response and lactose response half & half can have a negative response in your body versus heavy cream. Robb Wolf and Mark Sisson use heavy cream in their morning coffee so why not me??!! The primary reasons why I use heavy cream vs. half & half is because I need the fat in my diet in the morning and if I am going to have some carbs I know that milk's response to my body causes a higher insulin response then will some veggies I mix with my eggs in the morning. I used to be to be a flavored creamer junkie but now I can't even stomach them. Heavy cream is rich makes my coffee taste amazing and doesn't have any added oils or fake sugars! No insulin response for me! Just pure caffeine! Now lets talk sugar alternatives!!! Splenda, Sweet-n-low, Equal are all bad for you we know this!! I've actually done a science project for school to see how sugar, splenda, sweet-n-low, equal Continue reading >>

Powdered Coffee Creamer, Anyone?

Powdered Coffee Creamer, Anyone?

Everyone has seen the powdered coffee creamer in those plastic bottles. They are everywhere. Specially in office buildings. Right next to the coffee maker and maybe a box of fresh donuts. Coffee-Mate I believe is the leading brand. I say that because that is the creamer I see most often in public places. Years ago it used to be Cremora. But I haven't seen them in a long time. I travel on business quite frequently. On most major airlines I ask for milk with my tea. And I generally carry my own Equal tablets in their dispenser. So there is no problem with sweetening my tea. I use as little milk as possible in my tea when I am flying because it is most commonly either skim milk or the 2 per cent kind ....yes, the kind that is higher in carb content. On shorter flights, when United or American Airlines uses sub-contractors, like Colgan Air or Shuttle America, there is never any milk on board. Those are the times I have my tea black or I don't have any tea at all. Its tough because I take very early flights quite a lot and tea is the best waker upper for me. So what is my beef with Coffee-Mate powdered creamer or for that matter, any other kind of coffee creamers? Here is a list of ingredients for Coffee-mate Powder, Hazelnut, Sugar-Free. I took it from the Amazon website. Vegetable Oil (Partially Hydrogenated Coconut or Palm Kernel and Canola, Hydrogenated Palm, Soybean, Cottonseed and/or Safflower), Corn Syrup Solids, Sodium Caseinate (A Milk Derivative), Dipotassium Phosphate (Moderates Coffee Acidity), Natural and Artificial Flavors, Monoglycerides (Prevents Oil Separation), Salt, Sodium Aluminosilicate, Sucralose, Datem, Acesulfame Potassium (Non-nutritive Sweetener), Yeast. Pretty much the entire list has objectionable items for us diabetics. But the worst offender is Continue reading >>

Fasting And The Fifty Percent Insulin Problem

Fasting And The Fifty Percent Insulin Problem

Only HALF the insulin your body makes each day is made because of the food you eat. What about the other 50%? You’ve changed the food, but you’re not seeing the results you hoped for. If that’s you, then let me tell you about The Fifty Percent Insulin Problem and what you can do about it. I want to talk to you about how HALF the insulin your body makes, and yes I said HALF the insulin, fifty percent of the daily insulin your body produces has nothing to do with the food you eat. I call this The Fifty Percent Insulin Problem. Everyone in the low carb community understands if you eat a high carb meal, or a snack cake, or even worse, one of those big belly washing soft drinks, your insulin will go WAY UP fast. The message seems so simple. Carbs drive insulin and insulin drives obesity. Cut the carbs, reduce the insulin and lose the weight. Such a simple message, but is that the whole story? The idea that carbs increase insulin is true, and for some simply cutting the carbs they eat is enough to solve their problem. But for others, maybe even for you, this might not be enough, because HALF your insulin problem is not an eating problem. So changing what you eat alone, might not be enough to reverse it. You might need to an add another strategy. In this article, I want you to see a side of this insulin problem that isn’t very well known. I call this the Fifty Percent Insulin Problem I want to very quickly, show you a study that will explain what this problem is. Twenty-Four-Hour Profiles and Pulsatile Patterns of Insulin Secretion in Normal and Obese Subjects In this study they looked at insulin levels throughout the day in a group of people, half the people were fat, the other half thin. They tested these people’s insulin after 10 hours of sleeping and not eating a Continue reading >>

How Does Dairy Foods Ie Milk Half And Half No Su... | Diabetic Connect

How Does Dairy Foods Ie Milk Half And Half No Su... | Diabetic Connect

Milk products have varying amounts of lactose, a naturally occurring sugar/carbohydrate. One cup of 2% milk has around 13 grams of carb. As diabetics, carbs are what cause our BG levels to rise. Different cheeses will have varying amounts of carbohydrate. Get into the habit of reading food labels and checking out the carb content of foods as well the serving sizes noted. You'll be surprisedfor example, most fish has no carbsexcept for the imitation crab and lobster meat. One 3 oz serving of the imitation crabmeat has 20 grams of carbmust be what they put into it when processing! Sheesh! You need to read the labels. Carbs spike blood sugar. Especially starchy carbs. I have found that most cheese is low carb. Heavy & light cream is low carb in small amounts. I had to stop using heavy cream because it raised my cholesterol. Saturated fat is high. I found eating lots of saturated fat will spike my cholesterol. Half and half is low carb. I now use half & half when I need to add milk to a recipe. Milk is a high carb food. If you read the label there is lots of sugar in regular milk. Whole milk, 2%, 1% and skim milk all have lots of carbs. If you can afford it, half and half is lower in carbs and saturated fat is lower than the creams. I found that if I drink a few ounces of milk with a meal low in carbs along with some protein and fat it doesnt raise my blood sugar too much. Sugar free ice cream can still have lots of carbs. I have found that a spoonful will be ok to eat. But its hard to eat just a spoonful. I bought some once and had to throw out half of it so I dont buy it anymore. For low carb ice cream I make my own. I bought one of those ice cream machines you freeze the bowl in the freezer. Then I mix in a blender 1-cup plain Greek yogurt with 2 cups of half and half a Continue reading >>

What Dairy Products Cause Insulin Secretion?

What Dairy Products Cause Insulin Secretion?

The casein, being a protein will be somewhat insulinemic, but the real worry on that front is the whey, which is substantially more insulinemic. The lactose, being a sugar, is obviously also a worry. Milk (the lower fat the worse), whey protein or whey products (like ricotta) would be the worse. Fermented milk like yoghurt is better because the lactose is broken down. Cheese would have the lactose and whey removed so that would be better. Butter and cream have the lactose, whey and (most of the) casein removed so they'll be about as non-insulinemic a calorie source as you can get. Greek yoghurt (such as Fage) has the whey strained off, so that will be better than standard yoghurt. Butter/cream and insulin specifically have been discussed recently by Dr Davis. While his line of reasoning certainly applies to dairy in general, I don't think the study he cites bears out the argument that there's anything especially harmful in cream or butter, since the increase in insulin, compared to olive oil is miniscule (and it's far, far less than for casein). If one weren't trying to find a reason to explain why butter/atkins = suboptimal, I don't think any-one would be moved by the slightly more insulinemic nature of butter shown. Peter at hyperlip gives a good breakdown: long story short, butter is far less insulinemic than dairy protein and superior even to other fats. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coffee Creamers, Best Coffee Creamer For Diabetics

Diabetic Coffee Creamers, Best Coffee Creamer For Diabetics

There is a lot of debate lately about whether coffee and coffee creamer tends to increase or decrease the blood glucose levels of diabetics. There is evidence to support both sides of the argument at this time, and there is just no clear cut answer. It doesn’t affect every person in the same way, either, which adds to the confusion. Some studies suggest that only black coffee reduces your risk for developing diabetes, and that coffee taken with creamer does not have the same beneficial effects. But that hypothesis is up for debate too. I happen to prefer my coffee with cream, mainly because it blunts the high acidity level of the coffee and makes it taste better. With cream, the taste is softened and much of the bitterness seems to be removed from my taste buds. If you’re diabetic, please be vigilant with blood sugar monitoring when testing out coffee creamers. Because even creamers that are labeled “sugar-free” tend to raise blood glucose levels much higher than expected. I believe the reason is because many of the chemicals and artificial flavors these creamers substitute for sugar. Avoid artificial, chemical-laden coffee creamers The artificial creamers may have an advantage in the convenience department and the fact that they have a shelf life of close to eternity, but there are too many health drawbacks to those products to make them worthwhile. Have you ever looked at the ingredients label of an artificial coffee creamer? The are so many chemicals used to create those products that it would take a chemist to understand what kind of effect they have on our body. Many of them contain artificial sweeteners with chemical compounds that mimic the effect of sugar on our taste buds. This may give the product an artificially sweetened taste, but their effects on o Continue reading >>

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