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Does Diabetes Cause Weight Gain Or Weight Loss

How Anxiety May Cause Weight Loss

How Anxiety May Cause Weight Loss

It's well known that weight and overall health can contribute to anxiety. In fact, inactivity is one of the most common mistakes for those living with anxiety symptoms. Exercise reduces muscle tension, releases neurotransmitters that boost mood, burn away stress hormone, and help your body function properly - all of which are important for living with anxiety. Those that don't exercise become more prone to developing anxiety, which is why many with anxiety have weight management issues. What you may not realize is that many of those living with anxiety also appear to have weight loss. Weight loss isn't necessarily an "anxiety symptom," but there does appear to be a significant number of people that lose weight with anxiety. Is Your Weight Loss Anxiety? Unexplained weight loss is something that always deserves a doctor's visit. Thyroid disorders, HIV, some cancers, and diabetes are all potential causes of weight loss. But weight loss may also be the result of anxiety. Find out if you may be struggling with anxiety, as well as your anxiety severity score and treatment options with our free 7-minute anxiety test. Being Safe With Weight Loss Weight loss is generally seen as a good thing, but it's important that you lose weight safely. If you're losing weight without a healthy diet or exercise, then you're putting your body through a great deal of stress. It may also indicate a health issue or an anxiety problem. So play it safe when it comes to your health. Make sure you know what caused your weight loss. Click here to take my anxiety test, and talk to your doctor about potential reasons that you may have lost weight that may not be caused by (or may relate to) anxiety. Why You Lose Weight Stress and anxiety are commonly associated with weight gain, and for a good reason - Continue reading >>

Food And Diet

Food And Diet

Beyond Willpower: Diet Quality and Quantity Matter It’s no secret that the amount of calories people eat and drink has a direct impact on their weight: Consume the same number of calories that the body burns over time, and weight stays stable. Consume more than the body burns, weight goes up. Less, weight goes down. But what about the type of calories: Does it matter whether they come from specific nutrients-fat, protein, or carbohydrate? Specific foods-whole grains or potato chips? Specific diets-the Mediterranean diet or the “Twinkie” diet? And what about when or where people consume their calories: Does eating breakfast make it easier to control weight? Does eating at fast-food restaurants make it harder? There’s ample research on foods and diet patterns that protect against heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and other chronic conditions. The good news is that many of the foods that help prevent disease also seem to help with weight control-foods like whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and nuts. And many of the foods that increase disease risk-chief among them, refined grains and sugary drinks-are also factors in weight gain.Conventional wisdom says that since a calorie is a calorie, regardless of its source, the best advice for weight control is simply to eat less and exercise more. Yet emerging research suggests that some foods and eating patterns may make it easier to keep calories in check, while others may make people more likely to overeat. This article briefly reviews the research on dietary intake and weight control, highlighting diet strategies that also help prevent chronic disease. Macronutrients and Weight: Do Carbs, Protein, or Fat Matter? When people eat controlled diets in laboratory studies, the percentage of calories from fat, protein, and carbo Continue reading >>

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin Weight Loss – Does It Work?

Metformin weight loss claims are something that are often talked about by health professionals to be one of the benefits of commencing metformin therapy, but are they true? At myheart.net we’ve helped millions of people through our articles and answers. Now our authors are keeping readers up to date with cutting edge heart disease information through twitter. Follow Dr Ahmed on Twitter @MustafaAhmedMD Metformin is possibly one of the most important treatments in Type II Diabetes, so the question of metformin weight loss is of the utmost importance, as if true it could provide a means to lose weight as well as control high sugar levels found in diabetes. What is Metformin? Metformin is an oral hypoglycemic medication – meaning it reduces levels of sugar, or more specifically glucose in the blood. It is so effective that the American Diabetes Association says that unless there is a strong reason not to, metformin should be commenced at the onset of Type II Diabetes. Metformin comes in tablet form and the dose is gradually increased until the maximum dose required is achieved. How Does Metformin Work & Why Would it Cause Weight Loss? Metformin works by three major mechanisms – each of which could explain the “metformin weight loss” claims. These are: Decrease sugar production by the liver – the liver can actually make sugars from other substances, but metformin inhibits an enzyme in the pathway resulting in less sugar being released into the blood. Increase in the amount of sugar utilization in the muscles and the liver – Given that the muscles are a major “sink” for excess sugar, by driving sugar into them metformin is able to reduce the amount of sugar in the blood. Preventing the breakdown of fats (lipolysis) – this in turn reduces the amount of fatt Continue reading >>

Does Your Medicine Make You Gain Weight?

Does Your Medicine Make You Gain Weight?

Diabetes medications are effective at lowering blood glucose, but they also can cause you to gain weight. "Weight gain is a frequent yet unrevealed side effect of insulin and a few other categories of blood glucose lowering medicines," says Marty Irons, R.Ph., CDE, a clinical community pharmacist in Vermont and member of the Diabetic Living editorial advisory board. Irons says weight gain doesn't have to be permanent, and your health-care provider should help you balance blood glucose control with your weight. Avoid extra pounds caused by medication with these easy-to-follow tips: How to Prevent Medication-Related Weight Gain If you're prescribed a diabetes medication that may cause weight gain, here's how to avoid this unwanted side effect: Speak up and ask questions. Ask your health-care provider why you need a particular medication that may cause you to gain weight instead of one that may promote weight loss. "Primary-care providers can be slow to adopt newer medications and often rely on tried-and-true fixes," says Marty Irons, R.Ph., CDE. Ask for help and a plan. "Work with an educator to develop a plan to nip weight gain in the bud and get the support you need along the way," says Jennifer Okemah, R.D., BC-ADM. Reduce calorie intake. Avoid weight gain by making small changes. Use measuring tools to get the right portion sizes, and lighten up on salad dressing, mayonnaise, and margarine to save calories. Adjust calorie intake as needed. Burn more calories. Increase physical activity to help burn more calories. Create a calorie deficit of at least 500 calories per day, suggests Anne Daly, R.D., BC-ADM, CDE. Get moving at least 30 minutes on most days. Don't overtreat lows. Eating too much to treat hypoglycemia can raise blood glucose too high and add excess calories Continue reading >>

Does The Insulin Pump Cause Weight Gain?

Does The Insulin Pump Cause Weight Gain?

Question: Dear CDE, I have been a Type 1 for 19 years now and have been on a pump for about a year. My A1C used to be horrible (13%) and I weighed a normal weight. When I finally got my A1C down to around 7% I put on about 75 pounds in 2 years. I was just wondering if anyone has lost weight while using a pump. If so, what did you do, what do you usually eat everyday, exercise, etc. Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated... Ally Answer: Dear Ally, Before I address the specific question, I want to educate you about basic physiology regarding glucose (sugar) utilization by our bodies. In someone without diabetes, after eating a meal or snack, the food gets converted to glucose and the brain sends a message to the pancreas requesting insulin to escort the glucose into the cells to be used for energy. The pancreas responds and secretes the appropriate amount of insulin for the food eaten. If this person eats more calories than they burn, they will gain weight. In type 1 diabetes, after eating a meal or snack, the food gets converted to glucose and the brain sends a message to the pancreas requesting insulin to escort the food into the cell. The difference is that in type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not do its job so instead of the glucose getting put in the cells; it hangs out in the blood and eventually gets sent over to our kidneys which in turn makes us urinate. Each molecule of glucose that we are flushing down our toilets has calories which we are losing through our urine. When people with diabetes begin taking insulin to match their food intake they are holding on to those calories and using them for energy. That is why most people lose weight before being diagnosed with diabetes. Once insulin therapy begins, they can gain that weight back. Insulin itse Continue reading >>

Is Aspartame Safe?

Is Aspartame Safe?

The scientific evidence overwhelmingly supports the safety of aspartame even in amounts far greater than people typically consume. With over 200 studies attesting to its safety, aspartame is one of the most researched food ingredients/additives in the world and has a long history of safe use. Millions of people around the world enjoy aspartame in a variety of good-tasting, low-calorie foods and beverages including carbonated soft drinks, powdered beverages, chewing gum, frozen desserts, yogurt, tabletop sweeteners, vitamins and sugar-free cough drops. Aspartame provides a sweet taste, can help control calorie intake while still eating sweet-tasting foods and it does not contribute to dental cavities. Although none have been substantiated, an array of symptoms has been attributed to aspartame over the years. Aspartame is one of the most thoroughly studied food ingredients ever, with more than 200 scientific studies supporting its safety. In addition to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) of the World Health Organization and Food and Agriculture Organization, the Scientific Committee on Food of the European Union (SCF), and regulatory agencies in more than 100 countries have reviewed aspartame and found it to be safe for use. Learn more MYTH: Even though aspartame is a low-calorie sweetener, claims abound that it stimulates appetite, hunger and sweet cravings leading to increased food intake and weight gain. These assertions are often based on personal testimonials and misinterpretation of observational studies that don’t show cause and effect between weight gain and aspartame. For example, simply observing overweight individuals consuming diet soda does not explain why they are consuming them and if intake causes Continue reading >>

5 Ways Saxenda Helps With Weight Loss & How To Use It Safely

5 Ways Saxenda Helps With Weight Loss & How To Use It Safely

Saxenda might be one of the best weight loss medications that exists on the market right now. But just because it might work doesn't mean it's necessarily right for your body. Saxenda works because it alters many hormone systems in your body that tend to interfere with your appetite, metabolism and even other hormones. In this post I will walk you through how Saxenda helps with weight loss and who should consider using this new medication. Let's jump in: ​ What is Saxenda & Does it Work? First let's start off by establishing that Saxenda does indeed work for weight loss. Many studies have shown that patients using Saxenda lose significant amounts of weight over several weeks (usually around 10% body fat). ​ That means that using this medication might help you lose up to 20 pounds if you weighed 200 pounds. At first that doesn't sound very good, but it's actually quite impressive if you consider that this weight loss is achieved generally without any other therapies added. And that's where things get interesting. If you have an understanding of weight loss and how hormones influence your weight, you can benefit even more from using this medication. Why? Because it can safely be combined with other therapies that ALSO increase your weight loss efforts and together this can result in dramatic weight loss. ​ We will talk about those therapies in just a minute but for now let's discuss why Saxenda actually works... 5 Ways Saxenda Helps Boost Weight Loss ​Saxenda is a medication that falls into the GLP-1 agonist class of drugs. GLP-1 stands for Glucagon like peptide 1 and that's where Saxenda has its primary action. Saxenda (or Liraglutide which is another name for this medication) sits on this receptor and causes changes to very important hormones involved in regulat Continue reading >>

When Your Weight Gain Is Caused By Medicine

When Your Weight Gain Is Caused By Medicine

Some medicines can cause certain people to put on weight. This can be a good thing if you are underweight to begin with. If you are at a normal weight, then gaining a few pounds also might not be a big deal. But, if you are already overweight, this weight gain might be more of a problem. Your weight gain, if any, will depend on a number of factors. These include your specific medicine, your age, and other medical conditions you have. You might only gain a few pounds over a year. But some people gain more weight, like 10 or 20 pounds in a few months. If you need to take the drug for months or years, you might gain a lot of weight. Medicine-related weight gain is not uncommon, especially for certain types of drugs. For example, many steroid drugs can cause weight gain. So can drugs that treat mental illnesses, such as depression and schizophrenia. Men and women of all ages can have medicine-related weight gain. What causes medicine-related weight gain? Medicine-related weight gain can have many causes. Some drugs might stimulate your appetite. This causes you to eat more and gain extra weight. Some drugs might affect your body’s metabolism. This causes your body to burn calories at a slower rate. Other drugs might affect how your body stores and absorbs sugars and other nutrients. If a drug causes you shortness of breath, you might be less likely to exercise. This can cause you to gain weight. Other drugs might cause you to retain water. This makes you weigh more even if you don’t put on extra fat. For certain drugs, researchers aren’t exactly sure what triggers the weight gain. Drugs that may cause medicine-related weight gain include: Drugs for diabetes, such as insulin, thiazolidinediones, and sulfonylureas Antipsychotic drugs such as haloperidol, clozapine, and Continue reading >>

Weight Gain: Symptoms & Signs

Weight Gain: Symptoms & Signs

Weight gain can result from an increase in body fluid, muscle mass, or fat. An increase in body fluid can come from medications, fluid and salt retention, intravenous fluid infusion, kidney or heart failure. An increase in muscle mass is commonly seen with exercising. An increase in body fat is commonly seen as a result of diet or lack of exercise as the body converts muscle to fat. An excessive weight gain is referred to as obesity. Obesity is a function of environmental (diet, exercise, lifestyle, etc.), hormonal, and inherited (genetic) factors in varying degrees. Weight gain is a normal part of pregnancy. REFERENCE: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Continue reading >>

Why Do I Find It So Hard To Lose Weight?

Why Do I Find It So Hard To Lose Weight?

There are lots of myths about weight gain, weight loss and dieting, but the most damaging is that it’s all about willpower. “If only I had a stronger willpower”, people say to themselves, “I would eat more healthily and become slim again”. If you believe that then you will also believe that if you are fat then it is all your own fault. So, you go on a diet and when it fails (which many do) then naturally you blame yourself. You get depressed, gorge on carbs and give up. The fact is that experts who work in weight loss management are well aware that weight loss is about far more than simply trying to eat fewer calories. Most overweight people have a metabolic problem, one that makes them hungry all the time. The normal feedback mechanisms that tell you that you are full no longer work. Willpower fails because you are up against one of the most basic drives we have, hunger. This metabolic problem will not only stop you losing weight, it will also lead to serious health problems such as high blood pressure, heart disease and diabetes. Unless you do something about it this is a problem that will get worse over time. Once you solve the metabolic problem (and the good news is that it can be solved) your appetite will shrink and you will find it not only easier to lose weight but to keep it off. It starts with developing Insulin resistance At the heart of weight gain is the hormone, insulin. One of the main reasons why so many people struggle to lose weight is not because they are idle or greedy but because their muscles have become resistant to insulin. Insulin is a hormone produced by your pancreas. It controls your blood sugar levels, but it does far more than that. It also controls fat storage. When you eat a meal, particularly one that is rich in sugary carbs, y Continue reading >>

5 Ways Pcos Might Be Secretly Messing With Your Weight

5 Ways Pcos Might Be Secretly Messing With Your Weight

If you’ve been diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome, or PCOS, it may feel like the numbers on the scale tick up no matter what you do—and that is hella frustrating. “Women with PCOS often say they can’t lose weight,” says Daniel Dumesic, M.D., ob-gyn, a PCOS specialist, professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and division chief of reproductive endocrinology and infertility at UCLA. Though doctors aren't sure about exactly what causes PCOS, symptoms like weight gain and acne are caused by increased testosterone produced by the ovaries. Roughly 10 percent of women between the ages of 18 and 44 have this condition, according to the National Institute of Health. Here, five ways PCOS an cause weight gain and what you can do about it. Excess testosterone is linked to higher rates of insulin resistance, which can cause you to store more fat, especially around the abdomen, says Dumesic. And when you start gaining weight, that further increases your insulin resistance, which promotes the production of testosterone and so on, he says. It's a vicious cycle that could lead to diabetes if you're not careful. Strike back: To keep insulin resistance on the DL, you should get your glucose levels checked by a doctor regularly and start working a little cinnamon into your diet, says Dumesic. A couple of small studies have shown that the spice may balance blood sugar in women with pre-diabetes. Your doctor may also consider the dietary supplement inositol, which is similar to a B vitamin, in pill or powder form, says Lori B. Sweeney, M.D., endocrinologist and associate professor of medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University Health System. Studies have shown that four grams per day can help lower testosterone levels as well as insulin resistance, resulting in weight loss fo Continue reading >>

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Cliff Scherb Editor’s Note: Cliff Scherb, Founder of Glucose Advisors and TriStar Athletes LLC, is a nutrition and fitness expert. He consults through virtually teaching his decision support system – Engine1 the app and its methodologies to aspiring T1 individuals and athletes. Cliff also creates custom training programs and insulin plans for endurance athletes, using Training Stress Modeling and real-time coaching. To inquire about coaching openings, FB LIVE sessions, and general questions please email [email protected] Losing weight can be difficult — add Type 1 diabetes to the mix with its daily management demands — and it’s even more of a challenge. I know, because I’ve been a Type 1 diabetic for 29 years and I’m also an endurance athlete. The internet is saturated in advice on how to lose weight with or without Type 1, so it’s hard to know what is worth while and what will just waste your time — or worse, can negatively impact your health. I’m not going to declare all out war on carbohydrates, or tell you can or can’t drink your calories in the form of olive oil, or feast and fast with cayenne peppers and maple syrup. No, the real distilled learning from my years of consulting and data analysis shows that a balanced, low-insulin diet with nutrient timing and activity is the best way to lose weight with Type 1 diabetes. It also helps you maintain brain and body function as well as energy levels. If you are reading this you’ve probably already given this some thought and know why it’s important to lose weight and/or lean out, but I maintain it’s all about performance! Performing means living a longer or healthier life or if you’re an athlete, it can also translate to beating out your competition. Things that Impact w Continue reading >>

My Diabetes Is Controlled — But Why Am I Gaining Weight?

My Diabetes Is Controlled — But Why Am I Gaining Weight?

Exercise, eat right, and stay at a healthy weight. These goals are at the core of every type 2 diabetes treatment plan. And, for some people, that’s enough. When it’s not, insulin therapy is one treatment option that can help patients, but one possible side effect is weight gain. This can become a cycle for patients who need to control both diabetes and their weight. It’s frustrating when you feel the treatment is part of the problem. With diabetes, however, you have to get the blood sugar under control first. Insulin is used because it works. The cost of insulin can vary, but lower-cost insulin is associated with more weight gain. RELATED: Take Control of Your Diabetes How to break the cycle In a way, weight gain is a sign that the insulin is working — your body is more effectively utilizing sugar, fat and protein. Your body also has the ability to store them, which means if you don’t adjust your food intake, more of those calories turn to fat. Also, insulin is not necessarily the only factor. When you’re managing your diabetes, your body has a better chance to rehydrate, which also can cause weight gain. Of course, dehydration is a greater risk if you have diabetes, with frequent urination and thirst as two common signs of the condition. Drugs you take for other conditions also sometimes cause weight gain. So, what are your options if weight gain and insulin are an issue? Try these three tips: 1. Up the ante on diet and exercise The simplest answer is to adjust your diet and exercise. Talk to your doctor and to a nutrition specialist about a food plan that takes the insulin effects into account. Work a bit more activity or exercise into each day. Don’t self-adjust the dosage or timing of your insulin in order to accommodate eating more calories. You can Continue reading >>

Weight Gain: 5 Hidden Reasons You're Putting On Pounds

Weight Gain: 5 Hidden Reasons You're Putting On Pounds

If you're doing everything right but still experiencing weight gain, a medical problem could be to blame. Here, five frequently missed causes of excess pounds. By the editors of Shape.com If the needle on your bathroom scale starts creeping upward, or refuses to head downward, you'll probably suspect the cause of this random weight gain is too many doughnuts, not diseases or drugs. But while the usual culprits—too much food, too little exercise—do account for most excess poundage, there are some surprisingly common medical conditions and widely used prescriptions that can add anywhere from a little to a lot—a whole lot—of excess weight. Here's a checklist of what to watch for if you inexplicably find weight either packing on or unwilling to pack up and go. 1. Hormonal Havoc You'd think 40 or more extra pounds would be a clue that something's amiss. Yet many of the 7-10 percent of premenopausal women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) often go for years unaware that their weight gain is in part due to this underdiagnosed condition, in which the ovaries and sometimes the adrenal glands, for unknown reasons, pump out too much testosterone, according to Andrea Dunaif, M.D., chief of endocrinology at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and professor of metabolism and molecular medicine at Northwestern University Medical School. Because the pounds typically pile on gradually beginning around puberty, or sometimes don't surface until post-pregnancy weight refuses to budge, it's frequently not obvious to PCOS sufferers, or their doctors, that there's a medical trigger. Possible tip-offs of PCOS include thinning hair, excess facial hair, severe acne, irregular periods, impaired fertility—all hallmarks of a hormal imbalance. It's not the extra testosterone that triggers t Continue reading >>

10 Popular Diabetes Weight Loss Questions

10 Popular Diabetes Weight Loss Questions

Weight loss and diabetes go hand in hand for many people. Here's some stats we've collected from our subscribers who've taken our new reader survey: As you can see, lots of people need (and want) to lose weight – of varying amounts. Not one of our subscribers yet? CLICK HERE to receive our weekly updates. Here, we've gathered 10 of the most common diabetes weight loss questions. Hope you find some answers to help. If not, leave your comments at the end of the post and I'll be happy to answer them. #1: Can weight loss cure diabetes? While there is no “cure” for diabetes, weight loss is one of the most effective outcomes we’ve seen in reducing insulin resistance, curbing metabolic syndrome, preventing onset of type 2 diabetes, and improving overall health in those who are overweight or obese. Check out this article for a more detailed description of who weight loss can help in those who have diabetes. And read this great info about how effective lifestyle intervention is. #2: Is weight loss difficult with diabetes? Um. YEAH! Weight loss is a challenge for most people. Let's face it, we are fighting a culture norm that highly values convenience, taste, personal preference and instant gratification. Not to mention liberal access to all of those things along with social acceptability of indulging in them! It is especially more difficult for those who have carried excessive weight for longer periods of time, as there seems to be a metabolic/ biological shift by way of calorie extrusion. Additionally, the longer a person engages in certain bad habits, the more difficult they can be to break. Finally, those in the obese and diabetic population often produce greater amounts of ghrelin (hunger hormone) and less leptin (satiety/ fullness hormone). This renders it even more Continue reading >>

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