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Does Diabetes Cause Weight Gain Or Weight Loss

Weight Gain: 5 Hidden Reasons You're Putting On Pounds

Weight Gain: 5 Hidden Reasons You're Putting On Pounds

If you're doing everything right but still experiencing weight gain, a medical problem could be to blame. Here, five frequently missed causes of excess pounds. By the editors of Shape.com If the needle on your bathroom scale starts creeping upward, or refuses to head downward, you'll probably suspect the cause of this random weight gain is too many doughnuts, not diseases or drugs. But while the usual culprits—too much food, too little exercise—do account for most excess poundage, there are some surprisingly common medical conditions and widely used prescriptions that can add anywhere from a little to a lot—a whole lot—of excess weight. Here's a checklist of what to watch for if you inexplicably find weight either packing on or unwilling to pack up and go. 1. Hormonal Havoc You'd think 40 or more extra pounds would be a clue that something's amiss. Yet many of the 7-10 percent of premenopausal women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) often go for years unaware that their weight gain is in part due to this underdiagnosed condition, in which the ovaries and sometimes the adrenal glands, for unknown reasons, pump out too much testosterone, according to Andrea Dunaif, M.D., chief of endocrinology at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and professor of metabolism and molecular medicine at Northwestern University Medical School. Because the pounds typically pile on gradually beginning around puberty, or sometimes don't surface until post-pregnancy weight refuses to budge, it's frequently not obvious to PCOS sufferers, or their doctors, that there's a medical trigger. Possible tip-offs of PCOS include thinning hair, excess facial hair, severe acne, irregular periods, impaired fertility—all hallmarks of a hormal imbalance. It's not the extra testosterone that triggers t Continue reading >>

Weight Gain: Symptoms & Signs

Weight Gain: Symptoms & Signs

Weight gain can result from an increase in body fluid, muscle mass, or fat. An increase in body fluid can come from medications, fluid and salt retention, intravenous fluid infusion, kidney or heart failure. An increase in muscle mass is commonly seen with exercising. An increase in body fat is commonly seen as a result of diet or lack of exercise as the body converts muscle to fat. An excessive weight gain is referred to as obesity. Obesity is a function of environmental (diet, exercise, lifestyle, etc.), hormonal, and inherited (genetic) factors in varying degrees. Weight gain is a normal part of pregnancy. REFERENCE: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Weight Gain

Diabetes And Weight Gain

Diabetes can be both the cause of weight gain and the result of weight gain. People with diabetes have an increased tendency to gain weight and those who are overweight have an increased chance of developing diabetes. Insulin is a natural, protein-based hormone produced by the pancreas in normal people. Its function is to promote the absorption of glucose into the cells to be used for cellular fuel. It also manages the absorption and storage of amino acids and fat by cells of the body that are sensitive to insulin (which are mainly the fat and muscle cells). Insulin has the above effects on the body, whether the pancreas releases it naturally or given as exogenous insulin to insulin-dependent diabetes. Diabetics who go on insulin therapy seem to have an increased tendency to gain weight. This is true of both type 1 diabetics and type 2 diabetics. Some of the gain is weight is due to the fact that, when insulin is in the bloodstream, it takes the glucose absorbed by the GI tract and puts in in storage rather than have the glucose be excreted by the kidneys. This causes a natural gain in weight. Some diabetics recognize the connection between insulin and weight gain. In order to lose weight, they often skip doses of insulin so that the blood sugar they take in is not stored but instead is flushed out by the kidneys. They don’t realize that this could be dangerous and can result in life-threatening side effects, such as diabetic ketoacidosis. The most effective way to strike a balance between insulin use and body weight is to take the insulin as directed and also to step up the amount of physical activity you engage in. This keeps the levels of insulin lower and you will lose weight. When you take less insulin and burn calories through exercise, your weight will naturall Continue reading >>

Why Did I Gain Weight When I Started Taking Insulin?

Why Did I Gain Weight When I Started Taking Insulin?

There are several factors at work to lead you to believe that insulin is "to blame" for your weight gain. People who have poorly controlled diabetes also sometimes experience weight loss because their bodies are unable to properly convert food into energy. This is because they either are not producing enough insulin or their bodies are unable to use the insulin they produce properly. This food winds up as excess glucose circulating in the blood (resulting in high blood glucose!). Ultimately the body can't use all that extra glucose circulating in the blood and so it is eliminated in the urine. When your blood glucose runs high, you can become dehydrated as your body works to clear itself of all that excess glucose — which makes you think you've lost weight, but you've only lost water. Then, when you start taking insulin and get your blood glucose under better control, you start over-retaining fluids initially to make up for your dehydration, which makes you think you've rapidly gained a lot of weight. You associate it with taking insulin, but really what is happening is taking your insulin properly is just enabling your body to better use food and maintain a proper water balance. Also, once you start taking insulin injections and start getting your blood glucose under control, you now have enough insulin circulating in your blood to help the glucose get into the body's cells where it can be used as energy. So the glucose produced by the food you eat is no longer spending time in your bloodstream and being excreted out as urine. You gain weight. Your high blood glucose may have also made you feel more hungry because not all the food you were eating was able to get into the cells as energy to nourish the cells. Then, you started taking insulin — and continued to eat t Continue reading >>

5 Ways Saxenda Helps With Weight Loss & How To Use It Safely

5 Ways Saxenda Helps With Weight Loss & How To Use It Safely

Saxenda might be one of the best weight loss medications that exists on the market right now. But just because it might work doesn't mean it's necessarily right for your body. Saxenda works because it alters many hormone systems in your body that tend to interfere with your appetite, metabolism and even other hormones. In this post I will walk you through how Saxenda helps with weight loss and who should consider using this new medication. Let's jump in: ​ What is Saxenda & Does it Work? First let's start off by establishing that Saxenda does indeed work for weight loss. Many studies have shown that patients using Saxenda lose significant amounts of weight over several weeks (usually around 10% body fat). ​ That means that using this medication might help you lose up to 20 pounds if you weighed 200 pounds. At first that doesn't sound very good, but it's actually quite impressive if you consider that this weight loss is achieved generally without any other therapies added. And that's where things get interesting. If you have an understanding of weight loss and how hormones influence your weight, you can benefit even more from using this medication. Why? Because it can safely be combined with other therapies that ALSO increase your weight loss efforts and together this can result in dramatic weight loss. ​ We will talk about those therapies in just a minute but for now let's discuss why Saxenda actually works... 5 Ways Saxenda Helps Boost Weight Loss ​Saxenda is a medication that falls into the GLP-1 agonist class of drugs. GLP-1 stands for Glucagon like peptide 1 and that's where Saxenda has its primary action. Saxenda (or Liraglutide which is another name for this medication) sits on this receptor and causes changes to very important hormones involved in regulat Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance May Be Making You Fat

Insulin Resistance May Be Making You Fat

Insulin resistance is a hormonal issue and may be the reason the scales aren't shifting. For many years, scientists and nutritionists have preached that weight loss comes down to a simple equation: kilojoules in versus kilojoules out. While this principle is true to an extent, there are a number of increasingly common hormonal shifts that can alter this relationship. Insulin resistance, the clinical condition that precedes type 2 diabetes, is one such diagnosis. Individuals with insulin resistance will struggle to lose weight via traditional weight loss prescriptions simply because their body is not burning fuel the way it should be. Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas and used to digest carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are found in plant-based foods including bread, rice, breakfast cereal, pasta, fruits and sugars. When carbohydrate-rich foods are consumed, insulin is secreted by the pancreas to take glucose from the food to the muscles for energy. For a number of reasons, over time insulin may fail to work as well as it should. Weight gain, where fat clogs the cells, is one reason, as is a lack of physical activity. Genes can also predispose a person to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The highly processed nature of our daily carbohydrate food choices, including breads, breakfast cereal and snack foods, which require much higher amounts of insulin than less processed, low-GI carbohydrates, is also thought to be a significant contributing factor to the increased incidence of insulin resistance. Resistance to insulin builds up over time, with the body gradually producing more and more insulin in an attempt to get it to work better at taking glucose to the body's cells for energy. As insulin is also a fat-storing hormone, the more of it that circulates in th Continue reading >>

Can High Blood Pressure Make You Fat? Does Insulin Cause Weight Gain?

Can High Blood Pressure Make You Fat? Does Insulin Cause Weight Gain?

Is high blood pressure linked to not being able to lose weight? Does insulin cause weight gain? Yes, researchers say that lowering blood pressure can help you lose weight successfully. Certainly, hypertension is one of the symptoms of insulin resistance, causing insulin weight gain! But before you go to your doctor for some pills.... You will, instead, want to know about supplements and foods that lower blood pressure to help get rid of belly fat. Why? High blood pressure increases the chances of a heart attack and especially of a stroke, so your doctor will want you to lose weight and be on the meds. But there's a catch... Researchers have NOT been able to show that taking drugs for hypertension prevents heart failure: "Despite reductions in heart attacks and improved control of blood pressure, the prevalence of heart failure does not seem to be falling and may be rising." (British Medical Journal, The Lancet) To avoid serious side effects of high blood pressure medication, it is best to solve hypertension naturally. Here we've posted research to help you out with foods and supplements -- how to lower blood pressure AND lose weight naturally! We have posted lots of diet changes for the long run! And if in the short run need extra help.... For lower blood pressure and reducing the causes of insulin weight gain, consider a supplement based on a Nobel Prize winning discovery. Meet the health guardian, Dr. Harry Elwardt, whose mission is to end heart disease, stroke! His formula can help naturally bring down blood pressure by relaxing the blood vessels: See Dr. Harry's Formula: l arginine supplement with minerals & vitamins for high blood pressure Why Not Just Meds for High Blood Pressure? Nutrition experts Nikki and David Goldbeck point to a reason why reducing blood pres Continue reading >>

How Excess Weight Affects Your Health

How Excess Weight Affects Your Health

Understanding the Increased Risks to Your Health Excess pounds do more than increase your weight—they increase your risk of major health problems. People who are overweight or obese are more likely to have heart disease, strokes, diabetes, cancer, and depression. Fortunately, losing weight can reduce your risk of developing some of these problems. Weight and your health If you’re carrying many extra pounds, you face a higher-than-average risk of a whopping 50 different health problems. These health conditions include the nation’s leading causes of death—heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and certain cancers—as well as less common ailments such as gout and gallstones. Perhaps even more compelling is the strong link between excess weight and depression, because this common mood disorder can have a profound, negative impact on your daily life. A Harvard study that combined data from more than 50,000 men (participants in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study) and more than 120,000 women (from the Nurses’ Health Study) revealed some sobering statistics about weight and health. The volunteers provided their height and weight, as well as details on their diets, health habits, and medical histories. Researchers tracked the volunteers over more than 10 years. They noted the occurrence of illnesses and compared those developments with each subject’s body mass index (BMI)—an estimate of an individual’s relative body fat calculated from his or her height and weight). Obesity increased the risk of diabetes 20 times and substantially boosted the risk of developing high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and gallstones. Among people who were overweight or obese, there was a direct relationship between BMI and risk: the higher the BMI, the higher the likelihood o Continue reading >>

Diet Drinks And Food Actually Trigger Weight Gain And Diabetes, Says New Study

Diet Drinks And Food Actually Trigger Weight Gain And Diabetes, Says New Study

Diet drinks or foods may actually promote weight gain and trigger diabetes because the brain misreads the number of calories present and reduces metabolism, a new study suggests. Researchers at Yale University in the US discovered that the body stops burning energy from food if there is a ‘mismatch’ between food sweetness and calories. In nature, sweetness signals energy and the greater the sweetness the more calories are available, so the brain has evolved to expect the two to come together. When they do not, the brain can become confused, thinking there are fewer calories to burn. This research should be enough to convince you that artificial ingredients, whether they be in food or drink, can screw up your systemTam Fry, National Obesity Forum The scientists say it could help explain previous studies that have suggested that artificial sweeteners can increase blood sugar levels and possibly trigger diabetes. “A calorie is not a calorie,” said senior author Dana Small, Professor of Psychiatry at Yale University School of Medicine. “The assumption that more calories trigger greater metabolic and brain response is wrong. Calories are only half of the equation; sweet taste perception is the other half. “Our bodies evolved to efficiently use the energy sources available in nature. Our modern food environment is characterized by energy sources our bodies have never seen before. “When sweet taste and energy are not matched less energy is metabolized and weaker, or inaccurate, signals are sent to the brain. Either one of these effects may affect metabolic health.” For the new study, scientists scanned the brains of 15 people when they were drinking diet drinks, and compared them to regular beverages. They also monitored how much energy was burned by the body. Continue reading >>

All About Weight Gain In Older Dogs

All About Weight Gain In Older Dogs

Weight gain in dogs is a huge problem today, and the number of obese dogs is on the increase. According to a recent study conducted by the Association For Pet Obesity Prevention, 53% of dogs are overweight to some degree. This is really worrying because weight gain is a double-whammy for your dog because it can be caused by poor diet or disease.... ... and that extra weight can also cause more health issues to develop. Sudden weight gain in an older dog is something that you always need to take seriously. 1 3 Foods to Stay Away From Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com 2 Zesty Paws Turmeric Curcumin Bites... $4.50 Zesty Paws Turmeric Curcumin Bites Joint & Immune Support with BioPerine Chews... Chewy.com Common Causes Of Rapid Weight Gain In Senior Dogs Older dogs have an above-average tendency to gain too much weight, and in seniors this is more likely to be caused by an illness or health problem, than it is in younger dogs. Even when the cause of the weight gain is benign, being too heavy puts a lot of extra strain on their already tired bodies and that's why it's something to keep an eye on. If your older dog suddenly seems to have gained a lot of weight, there could be caused by a lot of different things. Some of them simple, others more serious. Here are the most common causes of weight gain in older dogs.... Poor Diet The type of weight gain in dogs that's caused by poor diet tends to appear slowly over time. When you look at your dog every day it's easy to miss this gradual change. But your senior dog's metabolism isn't as fast as it used to be, and as his ability to use up the calories he's eating slows down, the weight gain can speed up. When I say 'poor diet', that doesn't necessarily mean that you're feeding your senior a s Continue reading >>

6 Autoimmune Diseases That Mess With Your Weight

6 Autoimmune Diseases That Mess With Your Weight

Autoimmune diseases happen when your body's immune system starts attacking its own organs, tissues, and cells. Although they're on the rise, they're also tricky to diagnose. Symptoms can creep up slowly, and many of them—like achy joints, fatigue, and tummy troubles—overlap with other disorders. But there's one symptom that many autoimmune diseases share: weight changes. "Almost everyone with an autoimmune disorder has it affect their weight one way or the other," says Mark Engelman, MD, a clinical consultant for Cyrex Laboratories, a clinical lab specializing in functional immunology. So if the number on the scale suddenly goes up or down with no good explanation, take stock of whether you've experienced any other weird, nagging symptoms, and talk to your doctor if you think an autoimmune disease could be to blame. (Check out these 5 surprising conditions that cause weight gain.) While Engelman notes that just about any autoimmune disease can affect your weight to some extent, here are a few of the most common culprits. Of the 29 million Americans who have diabetes, only around 1.25 million have type 1, which occurs when the immune system attacks the cells that produce insulin in the pancreas. (Type 2 diabetes, the more common form, is not considered an autoimmune illness.) Because insulin plays a key role in how your body uses and stores glucose for energy, many people with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes experience unexplained weight loss. If you're having any other symptoms—like excessive thirst, frequent urination, fatigue, or blurred vision—talk with a doctor. Weight gain isn't technically a symptom of rheumatoid arthritis, but it's common for people with RA to see the number on the scale start creeping upward. The steroids commonly used to reduce inflammation Continue reading >>

10 Reasons Unexpected Weight Loss Could Be A Serious Problem

10 Reasons Unexpected Weight Loss Could Be A Serious Problem

iStock/silviajansen When most people hear the word "malnutrition," they tend to think of starving children in developing countries. However, malnutrition, or the lack of getting proper nutrients in the right amounts, exists in every part of the world and can affect people of all ages. In fact, a whopping 50 percent of patients in hospitals worldwide aren't adequately nourished or are at risk of malnutrition. "Hospitalization can lead to malnutrition because, while in hospital care, patients may not get the right nutrients to live a healthful life," says Abby Sauer, a registered dietitian specializing in adult nutrition for Abbott. If malnutrition happens long enough, it can have a significant impact on a person's health—including unexplained weight loss. While older adults are at risk because of medications or natural appetite loss, a nutritionally imbalanced diet can contribute to malnutrition in younger, presumably healthy people. (Here are signs you could have a nutrient deficiency.) The best way to treat malnutrition is to prevent it before it becomes serious. "Make sure you're eating balanced meals that include the right mix of protein, fat, and carbohydrates," says Sauer. If you become hospitalized, keep nutrition top of mind and talk with hospital professionals to ensure you're well nourished during and after your stay. (Don't miss these 50 secrets hospitals won't tell you.) Muscle loss (sarcopenia) iStock/tetmc Research shows that ignoring muscle health is one reason why about 45 percent of older U.S. adults experience muscle loss as they age. "The technical term for this muscle atrophy is sarcopenia, which can begin as early as your 40s and cause unexplained weight loss and reduced strength, energy, and mobility," Sauer says. While hormonal changes can contri Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) For Weight Loss

Metformin (glucophage) For Weight Loss

After you eat, sugar goes from your intestines into your bloodstream, and then immediately into your liver. Then your liver releases sugar back into your bloodstream to cause your blood sugar level to rise. To keep blood sugar levels from rising too high, your pancreas release insulin into your bloodstream. Insulin makes you hungry all the time and causes your liver to convert extra calories to fat and it constricts arteries to cause heart attacks. You need insulin to keep blood sugar levels from rising too high to cause diabetes, nerve damage, heart attacks, strokes and kidney damage. Glucophage reduces sugar release from your liver to prevents blood sugar levels from rising too high, so your body doesn't need to produce as much insulin that makes you hungry and causes your liver to make fat (3,13,14). Glucophage lowers insulin levels (4), prevents many of the side effects of diabetes and can be used by people who want to lose weight. However, Glucophage is not effective when your blood is acidic from excess lactic acid and recent research shows that exercise, which raises lactic acid, does not cause blood acid levels to rise enough to reduce Glucophage's benefits (5). Glucophage, itself, does not raise blood lactate levels and is therefore considerably safer than doctors originally thought. Since Glucophage lowers insulin, diabetics should be placed on Glucophage to lower their requirements for all other medications used to treat diabetes (6). A common cause of obesity in women is called polycystic ovary syndrome, which is caused by having high blood levels of insulin. Glucophage helps these women to lose weight (7-12). See the report on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) in the Women's Health section. Glucophage is a safe medication that prevents blood sugar levels fro Continue reading >>

Q & A: Carbs And Weight Loss

Q & A: Carbs And Weight Loss

Paleo cuts out the major carbohydrate sources in the typical American diet, so it’s easy to assume that it’s designed to be a low-carb diet. But in fact, that’s not true: non-toxic carbohydrate sources (like potatoes and sweet potatoes) are perfectly healthy from a Paleo perspective. But what about weight loss? Do you need to cut carbs to lose weight? Many people still believe that carbs are OK if you’re lean and active, but you should avoid them for weight loss. This isn’t quite as cut-and-dry as it appears, though. Take a look at some common questions, comments, and concerns about carbs, and whether or not they actually hold water (click on the links below to go to each question, or read straight through to see them all): Do carbs cause weight gain? Do you need to cut carbs for weight loss? Don’t carbs send you on a blood sugar rollercoaster? Don’t carbs spike your insulin and cause you to gain fat? Does it matter whether or not you eat carbs with fat? Does carbohydrate timing (morning vs. evening) matter? What was carb intake like in the Paleolithic? Do Carbs Cause Weight Gain? The short answer: no. Carbs do not cause weight gain. An inability to metabolize carbs causes weight gain. In your body, carbohydrates have three potential uses: they can be used for energy immediately, sent to your muscles and stored as glycogen (energy for later), or sent to your adipose tissue and stored as fat. The hormone in charge of this is insulin. Insulin is released in response to high blood sugar, because high blood sugar is actually quite dangerous; insulin’s job is basically to get glucose out of your blood and put it somewhere more useful. The first destination choice for that glucose is the brain (where it’s used as energy) or the muscle tissue and the liver (w Continue reading >>

Thyroid And Weight Loss Or Weight Gain | Empoweryourhealth.org

Thyroid And Weight Loss Or Weight Gain | Empoweryourhealth.org

Many people fight a long battle against being overweight, from early adulthood, or pregnancy, or even starting in childhood. Sometimes people are surprised to see a pattern of weight gain begin to level off, or even reverse, such that weight control or weight loss may occur without any obvious additional effort on their part. If unexplained weight loss occurs, especially with a good appetite, it might be because of overactive thyroid, also called hyperthyroidism [hie-per-THIGHroid- is-m] or thyrotoxicosis [thigh-ro-tox-i-KO-sis]. With hyperthyroidism, the body burns up extra food without using it for anything but for producing heat. People who may have been gaining weight before the onset of hyperthyroidism eventually begin to experience symptoms or problems that are less welcome than the loss of weight. If your doctor diagnoses you with overactive thyroid, the first step is to learn whether it might be a temporary case, and whether it is mild. The next step is to talk with your doctor about what treatment is best. Sometimes it is best to wait it out to see whether the thyroid will return to normal on its own. The thyroid may even become underactive, after having been overactive. However, untreated hyperthyroidism often will fail to resolve on its own. Thinning of the bones may occur if it is severe and untreated for a long time. Irregular heart rhythm, heart failure, or even death can result from a severely overactive thyroid. Sometimes people are treated with pills, especially for types of hyperthyroidism that are severe but possibly capable of future self-correction. At other times, the treatment consists of swallowing a pill of radioactive [ray-dee-o-AK-tiv] iodine. However, radioactive iodine for overactive thyroid is one of the most common causes of underactive th Continue reading >>

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