diabetestalk.net

Does A Ketogenic Diet Cause Insulin Resistance

The Basics Of Insulin Sensitivity

The Basics Of Insulin Sensitivity

Insulin is perhaps the most talked about hormone in our industry. Many vilify it as the number one cause of obesity. On the other hand, many bodybuilders take insulin in hopes of it adding ridiculously crazy amounts of muscle onto their physiques. How can we have such wide discrepancies? The answer is that insulin itself has several roles. These include driving glucose into cells (primarily muscle and liver), stimulating the formation of glycogen, increasing the use of carbs as fuel, increases satiety, increasing the formation of fat and decreasing the use of fat as fuel. Given all of these factors the goal for those looking to optimize their physiques would be to enhance the anabolic effects in muscle, while inhibiting the anabolic effects in fat mass. The general regulator of this process appears to be Insulin Sensitivity. This article will discuss insulin sensitivity and what factors influence it. Insulin sensitivity refers to the ability of insulin to “talk” to tissue. We are of course primarily interested in liver and muscle insulin sensitivity. If insulin sensitivity is high in these tissues then you need very little insulin to increase glucose uptake, glycogen storage, and the converting of glucose into rapid useable energy (Gulli et al., 1992). On the other hand, if you are insulin resistant the opposite occurs in that you need a lot of insulin to do the same job! Generally speaking when insulin is drastically high then the use of fat as fuel is drastically impaired. In addition, insulin drives blood towards muscle giving a full, nutrient rich, round look. Genetics and Insulin Sensitivity As we all know, blood is most definitely thicker than water. Many people think that obesity is the true cause to insulin resistance. However, genetics are certainly an unde Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

Dr Jason Fung – A New Paradigm Of Insulin Resistance

Dr Jason Fung – A New Paradigm Of Insulin Resistance

Dr. Jason Fung looks at how to reverse Type 2 Diabetes using a Low Carb Diet in conjunction with Intermittent Fasting. Here’s the latest release from Low Carb Breckenridge 2017 conference. Presentation slides are available here to download in PDF format Dr. Jason Fung completed medical school and internal medicine at the University of Toronto before finishing his nephrology fellowship at the University of California, Los Angeles at the Cedars-Sinai hospital. He now has a practice in Ontario, Canada where he uses his Intensive Dietary Management program to help all sorts of patients, but especially those suffering from the two big epidemics of modern times: obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Dr. Fung uses innovative solutions to these problems, realizing that conventional treatments are not that effective in helping people. Please subscribe to Denver’s Diet Doctor: Join our Low Carb Conferences FB group: All the Low Carb Breckenridge 2017 conference related posts can be found here: Continue reading >>

The Biggest Weight Loss Myth: Low Carb Diets Are The Best Diets

The Biggest Weight Loss Myth: Low Carb Diets Are The Best Diets

There are many variations of the low-carb diet. While some gurus advocate higher healthy fat, others push for high protein in place of carbohydrates (carbs). In general, the higher healthy fat approach to the low-carb diet can be ideal for people who suffer from a metabolic illness such as obesity, insulin resistance, and Type II diabetes. (High protein diets lack healthy fats and can potentially yield higher blood sugar levels leading to weight gain and inflammation, comparatively.) But either way, low-carb diets are not the best diets because healthy individuals and especially athletes would face more risk than benefit when lowering carbohydrate intake to less than 50% – assuming they choose the right carbs. The low-carb diet began in 1797 courtesy of Dr. John Rollo who treated his diabetic patients by removing carbohydrates from their meals. The medical community followed his lead and today, most people know the diet via the late Dr. Atkins, who advocated replacing carbohydrate intake with fats and a bit of protein for his obese, Type II diabetic patients. More recently, the low carb craze is purported to lend a “metabolic advantage” to those who overeat while pursuing low-carb and high protein. But it’s baloney because overeating will always cause an energy imbalance leading to fat storage – overeating is overeating, whether its seeds, nuts or cotton candy, though the hormonal effects will be different, weight gain still ensues either way. A carbohydrate comes from foods like grains, dairy products, fruits, vegetables and legumes (beans and peas). Biochemically, they’re known as saccharides or more commonly, a molecular chain of sugar. Once consumed, the body chops them into individual sugar units, and your blood sugar rises to various degrees depending Continue reading >>

You Might Also Like

You Might Also Like

No two individuals are alike, and at Arivale, we analyze important data sets from your DNA, biomarkers, and lifestyle to identify a dietary plan that will best serve you and your goals. One of the dietary strategies an Arivale Coach might recommend is a low-fat, or perhaps specifically a low-saturated-fat, diet. Our members are sometimes surprised about this, saying, “Why would you recommend a low-fat diet? That doesn’t sound very cutting edge.” Low-fat diets—typically considered to be less than 30 percent of calories from fat—have diminished in popularity over the last 20 years, but there may be good scientific reason to question this trend. What the research says. Many decades of research studies—ranging from population studies to clinical trials—have shown that reducing dietary fat, particularly saturated fat, can help reduce risk for cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance, inflammation, obesity, and a number of other conditions. For example, studies show individuals who adopt a low-fat diet for only a few weeks significantly improve insulin resistance, a risk factor for Type 2 diabetes.1,2 Another study of a population with one of the highest diabetes risks in the world—Pima Indians—found those living in Arizona eating a high-fat, low-fiber diet had much higher diabetes rates than genetically identical Pima populations living in the Mexican desert eating a high-carbohydrate, high-fiber diet.3 In terms of cardiovascular disease, while there are many studies of benefits of reducing total and/or saturated fat, Dr. Dean Ornish’s study demonstrating a low-fat diet actually reverses coronary artery atherosclerosis is perhaps the most profound—as few non-drug interventions have been shown to have this strong an effect.4 More re Continue reading >>

The Root Cause – Insulin Resistance

The Root Cause – Insulin Resistance

THE Root Cause – Insulin Resistance Drying Up the Root LCHF and the Fasting Cure If the major chronic illnesses of today were pictured as a tree, Insulin Resistance could be pictured as the root of that tree. From this root, the trunk of poor blood sugar control grows and the many branches of that tree represent almost every modern illness that have destroyed the lives of people we all know and love. The driving force, of why I made “Butter Makes Your Pants Fall Off” was my desire to explain the complicated problem of “insulin resistance”. Last year, while I was losing weight, I was also reading everything I could get my hands on about insulin resistance, because as I studied, I came to understand that this disorder was literally at the root of most the illnesses that plague people we all have known and loved. The Root of the Problem Why do I say insulin resistance is the root of the problem? Because, insulin resistance has been associated with most of the worst diseases we all know about including: Obesity, mental illness like Schizophrenia, Depression and anxiety, Alzheimer’s, Dementia, heart disease, Type 2 Diabetes, irregular menstrual cycles, ovarian cysts, high triglycerides (fat in blood), intestinal problems like IBS, joint pain and skin problems are all related to or in some way caused by or made worse by insulin resistance. What causes insulin resistance? Insulin resistance begins as the levels of insulin in the body remain high over a prolonged period of time. Insulin resistance is also closely related to fat around the middle, or belly fat. Becoming fat around the middle is thought to cause system wide inflammation in the body, which causes the immune system to release chemicals that interfere with the effectiveness of insulin. What Causes Insuli Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Improves Insulin Sensitivity And Numerous Aging Markers

Ketogenic Diet Improves Insulin Sensitivity And Numerous Aging Markers

A physician conducted a decade-long experiment on the health effects of a ketogenic diet, using himself as the laboratory rat; he experienced improvement in insulin sensitivity, body fat, lipids, blood sugar, and other markers A ketogenic diet requires carbohydrate and protein restriction, with 50 to 80 percent of calories coming from fats; this forces your body to shift toward using ketones as its primary fuel source, instead of glucose Although your brain is more dependent on glucose than your heart, your liver can produce a ketone-like compound that your brain can efficiently use for energy Scientists extended the lifespan of mice by 20 percent by suppressing the activity of just one gene that helps control metabolism and energy balance; this is further evidence that longevity is tied to insulin signaling The best way to jumpstart your fat-burning/ketone-producing engine is by drastically reducing your consumption of sugar and grains, fasting intermittently, and maintaining a consistent exercise routine By Dr. Mercola We are just beginning to understand the biological intricacies of aging. A growing body of research is challenging the belief that aging is beyond your control, prompting scientists to begin thinking about ways we can slow our aging clocks to a slow crawl. Although this is a relatively new branch of science, there are some factors that appear to be key in controlling how quickly you age. One major factor seems to be insulin signaling and the metabolic "engines" you have running day to day, which are largely controlled by the foods you eat. In the first featured video, Dr. Peter Attia discusses how a ketogenic diet can optimize your metabolism. But before I discuss the specifics of this, I want to tell you about a remarkable mouse study, presented in the Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Diet Guide For Beginners + Advanced Weight Loss Tips

Insulin Resistance Diet Guide For Beginners + Advanced Weight Loss Tips

Is insulin resistance, diabetes or pre diabetes making it difficult or impossible for you to lose weight? If you fall into this category you probably understand that for the most part insulin resistance is a DIETARY disease. Meaning you most likely have this condition because of the food you've eaten (or are currently eating). Understanding this concept is very important because if you understand that insulin resistance can be caused (and worsened) by diet it is also true that diet can actually help to lower insulin levels and reverse insulin resistance. But hold on. I have some good news for you and some bad news... First the bad news: Most Doctors and patients approach insulin resistance all wrong which leads to higher insulin levels and more weight gain over time. But, here's the good news: I'm going to walk you through how to approach insulin resistance through diet, medications and supplements. Because the best way to treat and reverse insulin resistance is with a comprehensive approach: Let's talk about what foods to eat, what foods to avoid, how much food you should be eating, what type of macromolecules you should consume on a daily basis and much more...​ Understanding Insulin Resistance Before we talk about diet and interventions for insulin resistance you really need to have a basic understand of what insulin resistance is and WHY you would even want to treat it. This is the beginners guide to understanding insulin resistance, diabetes and pre diabetes: Insulin is a hormone that is secreted from your pancreas in response to two macromolecules: glucose (sugar) and protein. It's primary job is to move that sugar inside your cells so your body can burn them for energy. It can put this glucose (energy) into all cells including your fat cells. Why? Because your Continue reading >>

Why The Ketogenic Diet Works

Why The Ketogenic Diet Works

The Most Popular Diet Likely Has Other Mechanisms Behind It What Is The Ketogenic Diet? The ketogenic diet is among the more popular diets right now. The ketogenic diet focuses on the balance of macronutrients, i.e., fats, protein, carbohydrates, and fiber. Rather than restricting calories, necessarily, the ketogenic diet focuses on eliminating carbohydrates from the diet almost entirely, in some cases limiting daily consumption of carbohydrates to as low as 5% of calorie intake. Ketogenic dieters are to eat as many as 70% of daily calories in the form of fat. By limiting carbohydrates, which quickly turn into glucose (sugar) in the body, eating a diet consisting primarily of fat causes the the body to burn fat as fuel. Proponents of the ketogenic diet claim that it offers benefits for: – Weight Loss – Blood Sugar Control – Mental Focus – Lowering Cholesterol – Controlling Blood Pressure – Clearing Up Acne This is quite a set of claims, but there is a lot of science to back up what the proponents of the diet say that it does. Particularly, since research has uncovered the dangers of sugar and the legion of problems associated with high-carbohydrate diets, it would make sense that removing carbs and sugar from the diet might have some benefit for health. Interestingly, the foods permitted and encouraged on the ketogenic diet look very much like what the Kaufmann Diet has looked like for years. The Kaufmann Diet, of course, is an anti-fungal diet, designed to eliminate fungi in the body and limit exposure to foods contaminated with mold poisons, known as mycotoxins. The foods that are commonly contaminated with mycotoxins and the foods would feed a fungal infection are many of the same foods that the ketogenic diet eliminates, including grains, sugar and potat Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Mastery: Your Comprehensive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

Keto Diet Mastery: Your Comprehensive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

What if you could train your body to burn fat more efficiently and speed up your metabolism without restricting calories? If you’re struggling to lose those last 5 pounds or wondering why the muffin top just won’t budge (despite eating clean and exercising), you may find the answers you’re looking for in this keto diet master guide. What Is the Keto Diet? The ketogenic (aka: “keto”) diet is a high-fat, low-carb diet that puts your body in a natural fat-burning metabolic state called ketosis (1). This is done by heavily restricting carbs and focusing on high fat, moderate protein meals (in some cases protein may be also be heavily restricted). According to PubMed, the classical ketogenic diet contains a 4:1 ratio of fat to proteins and carbs. In other words, the principle of the keto diet is to “eat fat to burn fat”. Now, the keto diet is often grouped with other high-fat, low-carb diets such as the Paleo or Atkins diets. But the reason these diets boast fat burning benefits in the first place is because they promote ketosis. Therefore, the ketogenic diet isn’t so much a “diet”, but more so the basis of these diets, and the biochemical reaction that occurs when you train your body to burn fat for fuel instead of carbs. While the ketogenic diet has become popular for weight loss, studies have also shown numerous other health benefits of following a keto diet. For example, studies have shown it may help reverse type 2 diabetes and reduce symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, depression, and autism (2)(3). In fact, the keto diet was first used in the 1920s not as a weight loss diet, but a natural treatment to prevent seizures in epilepsy patients (4). With that said, let’s look closer at how the ketogenic diet can work for dramatic weight loss, and other Continue reading >>

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

Lchf For Type 1 Diabetes

I spend a great deal of time in my clinic dealing with the problems of type 2 diabetes. But occasionally, people ask about type 1 diabetes (T1D) as well. The reason why it is so rare for me is that I treat adult patients where T2D outnumbers T1D by at least 9:1. I was looking at a fascinating study that my friend, Ivor Cummins (The Fat Emperor) had alerted me to a few months ago. Dr. Richard Bernstein is a fascinating character. He had developed T1D as a child of twelve and began to have complications by his 30s. He eventually went to medical school in order to learn better how to treat his own disease. Eventually he decided that the proper treatment was a low carb diet. This was in direct contradiction to the prevailing wisdom of the time (1990s), which included treating patients with insulin and a diet high in carbs. Dr. Bernstein opened up a controversial clinic to treat T1D with a low carb diet and also wrote several best selling books discussing the same topic. Over the years, it has proven to be a safe treatment for T1D. While there are few long-term studies, Dr. Bernstein himself is living proof of the low carb T1D paradigm. In many ways, T1D and T2D are exact opposites of each other. T1D typically affects children who are usually quite skinny. T2D typically affects adults who are usually quite obese. This is not absolute, and we are seeing much more T2D in children as their weights have increased. There are also cases of normal or even underweight patients with T2D. But in general, that is the case. T1D is the severe deficiency of insulin where as T2D is the severe excess of insulin. Nevertheless, people often treat both types of diabetes in the same manner. Both are treated with medications or insulin to keep blood glucose in acceptable levels. Wait, you might Continue reading >>

Are You Insulin Resistant?

Are You Insulin Resistant?

Finding out you are insulin resistant doesn't mean much unless you understand what that implies, and how it effects your health. Insulin resistance is an condition in which the body is not responding properly to the hormone insulin. If faulty insulin signaling is not treated, it can develop into worsening conditions of metabolic syndrome, pre diabetes, and finally type 2 diabetes. What Causes the Insulin Resistant Condition? The insulin resistant condition is rooted in the metabolic effects of a high carb diet in combination with a lack of exercise. Weight gain is a symptom of insulin resistance, rather than a cause. Carbohydrates are foods which contain either some form of sugar or starch, or both. For instance, orange juice is full of fructose, a type of sugar, and white potatoes contain large amounts of starch. Both types of carbohydrate are broken down in the body into glucose, a simple sugar, which your cells can use for energy to do all the things that cells do. Since too much glucose in your body can be toxic, your pancreas releases a powerful hormone called insulin. Insulin works to control the amount of glucose in your bloodstream. It acts to quickly move glucose from your bloodstream and push it into your cells where it can be burned or stored. But there's a catch. To get the glucose into the cells, the cell's glucose "storage tanks" have to be empty. This is logical when you think about it. Imagine what would happen if you tried to fill up your car's gas tank if it were already full. And just like running a car burns up gasoline, when a person exercises, the glucose which is already in the glucose tanks get used. Now there is room for insulin to push the glucose made from the last meal into the muscle cell for fuel. If a person exercises frequently, lots of c Continue reading >>

Hyperinsulinemia: The World’s Biggest Killer?

Hyperinsulinemia: The World’s Biggest Killer?

When we think about the world’s biggest killer, different things come to mind. Guns? Or possibly heart disease, cancer, or maybe even dementia? Well, those three chronic diseases are all good bets. But what if they are just the result of something else, and they all have a common cause? In that case, that common cause could be the world’s biggest killer – and it goes by the name of hyperinsulinemia. This article takes a look at the rapidly growing problem of hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. What is Insulin Resistance? Insulin resistance is a term to describe when our body develops a resistance to the effects of the hormone insulin (1). As a result, we experience increasing blood sugar levels and higher levels of circulating insulin (2, 3). What is Hyperinsulinemia? Hyperinsulinemia refers to the situation where we have a constant elevation of insulin levels (4). The literal definition is simply an excess amount of insulin in the blood. Insulin resistance is the usual cause of hyperinsulinemia, and the resulting high insulin levels can be very damaging to our body (5). Is Hyperinsulinemia Type 2 Diabetes? There is a strong connection between hyperinsulinemia and type 2 diabetes, but they are not the same thing. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin to maintain normal blood sugar levels (6). However, hyperinsulinemia refers to when the body is producing too much insulin to keep high blood sugar levels in check (7). Without adequate intervention, chronic hyperinsulinemia can lead to type 2 diabetes (8). But it must be remembered: hyperinsulinemia is associated with metabolic syndrome, and it’s harmful independently of diabetes. Key Point: Insulin resistance leads to hyperinsulinemia – excess amounts of circulating insuli Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Insulin, Sugar And Inflammation

Ketogenic Diet: Insulin, Sugar And Inflammation

You can view the first part of this series here: The Ketogenic Diet Part 1: What is Keto? Have you ever wondered about the link between sugar and inflammation? Do you know what you can do to reduce inflammation in the body? Let’s explore the relationship between insulin, sugar and inflammation, and weight gain, beginning with what we put in our mouth. How does sugar cause inflammation? After you eat excess carbohydrates (sugar) and/or too much protein, your blood glucose stays at a higher level longer because the glucose can’t make it into the cells of the muscles. This toxic glucose is like tar in the bloodstream, clogging arteries, binding with proteins to form damaging AGEs (advanced glycation end-products), and causing inflammation in the body. What happens when you have high levels of inflammation in the body? High inflammation is triggered by glucose, which sets off a chain reaction in your body. High levels of glucose causes triglycerides to go up, increasing your risk for coronary artery disease. Then, sugars (and starches) get stored as fat. Because the cells of the musculature basically have a crust over top of them (called glycation), the cells aren’t taking glycogen in from the bloodstream, and are therefore considered “resistant.” Additionally, you can’t even metabolize stored fat since insulin stops the production of the fat-burning enzyme lipase! You can exercise all you want, but if you continue to eat oatmeal before your workouts, you will never be a fat-burner: you will remain a sugar-burner and you will continue to become insulin resistant. If the above information isn’t bad enough, I have more bad news: when you’re insulin resistant, the pancreas begins to mistakenly believe, “if a little insulin isn’t working, I’ll just produce Continue reading >>

The Great Medical Disconnect

The Great Medical Disconnect

There is probably no greater disconnect in medicine than the root cause of obesity. Even if you think you already know the answer to this “obvious” question, it’s still worth reading on. The reason this question matters, of course, is clear to everyone. Obesity (and more broadly the syndrome we define as metabolic syndrome) predisposes us to virtually every disease afflicting us in the modern age. Above is a simple graphic from the journal Nature showing the linkage between obesity and all of its sequela. When you are obese, your risk of disease goes up. This is not disputed. Here is where the controversy starts…what actually makes us obese? Obesity is a disorder of fat accumulation – fat cells accumulate too much fat, relative to how much fat the body breaks down. Conventional wisdom, however, says obesity is a disorder of eating too much and/or exercising too little. These are not the same thing. Let’s turn to a well-respected source of medical information, Lehninger’s Principles of Biochemistry (the so-called “bible” of biochemistry). Go to the index and query, what makes fat cells fat? (the technical way of asking this question is, what causes adipose cells to accumulate triglycerides) and you’ll get the following response: “High blood glucose elicits the release of insulin, which speeds the uptake of glucose by tissues and favors the storage of fuels as glycogen and triacyglycerols, while inhibiting fatty acid mobilization in adipose tissue.” Let me translate this: Eating glucose (carbohydrates) increases insulin levels in our body. Insulin drives glucose into liver and muscle cells as glycogen (in small, finite amounts) and into fat cells as triglycerides (in unlimited amounts). Insulin also inhibits the breakdown and utilization of fat. Pa Continue reading >>

More in diabetic diet